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Thursday, September 15, 2011

News 1, 2 Arts & Life 5,6 Sports 3,4 Views 7 Classifieds 8 Games 8

Volume 98 | Issue 13

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ntdaily.com

The Student Newspaper of the University of North Texas

UNT plans alternate routes

PHOTO BY ANDREW WILLIAMS/ INTERN

University Union assistant director for programs Mark Packer introduces the Fine Arts Series at the student senate meeting. For a full list of the school year’s events, visit www.unt.edu/fas.

Student senate adds 12 members, reaches quorum A NN SMAJSTRLA Staff Writer

The Student Government Association appointed 12 new senators, increasing the number of senators from 20 to 32 and meeting its required quorum of 30. Until Wednesday’s meeting, the senate was only able to vote on issues affecting SGA, like amendments to the bylaws or constitution. Abigail Glavy, SGA director of public relations, said students could expect more bills to be passed in the coming meetings. “We now have absolute twothirds,” Glavy said. “That means that we can vote on issues that affect the entire student body, such as the Union master plan and same-sex homecoming couples.”

Glavy said she believes the SGA can now be a better voice for the students because it can vote on issues that affect the students more directly. The SGA had a hard time this semester filling its 45 available senate seats. At last week’s senate meeting, the group passed a bill loosening the requirements transfer students must meet to apply to be a senator in hopes that it would encourage participation. The transfer bill allowed newly appointed senators Julie Walter, a communication studies junior, and Denis Sansoucie, an interdisciplinary studies sophomore, to apply. SG A P resident Bla ke Windham said Sansoucie influenced his decision to draft the transfer bill.

Sansoucie said he wanted to become a senator before the bill was passed but could not do so because the bylaws required him to have taken 12 credit hours at UNT before applying. “I wanted to be able to help with policy changes,” Sansoucie said. “I had 37 hours before I came to UNT.” Sansoucie said he believed the credit hours were sufficient experience, even though the hours were not taken at UNT. The senate is still working to fill the 13 seats available in the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Education, the College of Visual Arts and Design, the College of Music, the School of Merchandising and Hospitality Management and the Toulouse Graduate School. Students must apply by this Friday to be considered.

Light rain provides little relief JARRED RUGGLES & ISAAC WRIGHT

Intern & Assigning Editor Recent showers may have provided some temporary relief from the triple-digit temperatures, but they did put a stop to drought conditions that have been plaguing North Texas all summer. Early Wednesday morning Denton County received a small amount of rain, providing a day of cooler temperatures for residents of North Texas. However, neither the rain nor the comfortable temperatures are expected to last. The county received less than an inch of rain and is not expected to see any more precipitation in the coming weeks, leading to continued drought conditions, said Nick Hampshire, a meteorologist for the National

“It will take inches and inches [to make a difference]. Something like this wouldn’t even put a dent in it.”

-Nick Hampshire National Weather Service meteorologist

Weather Service in Fort Worth. “It will take inches and inches [to make a difference],” Hampshire said. “Something like this wouldn’t even put a dent in it.” He added that the scattered showers around North Texas will not reach down to the wildfirestricken areas near both Austin and Houston. North Texas will have to receive 15 inches of rain within a three-month period to coun-

teract the prolonged dry spell the state has experienced, Hampshire said. County officials said the North Texas region and its agricultural industry will feel the effects of this summer for years in the future. With temperatures in the triple digits for 70 days, Denton County broke records for the scorching temperature and has made this summer one of the hottest on record.

PHOTO BY BRIAN MASCHINO / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Melissa “Mel” Finefrock, an English junior, crosses Maple Street outside of Maple Hall. Because of construction, Finefrock’s route from Maple Hall to her class in the General Academic Building includes a walk around the outskirts of campus, causing her to backtrack by the Language Building. M ARLENE GONZALEZ STAFF WRITER

UN T st udent s w it h disabilities have been forced to find detours and re-plan routes as t he number of fenced-off sidewalks and blocked ent ra nces f rom campus construction projects expand. But a monthly newsletter created by university officials has helped decrease t he frustration, students said. Mel issa Fi nef rock, a n English junior who is blind, said she guides herself to classes using a white cane that allows her to feel when a building or object is near. But when new construction takes place, Finefrock said, the regular routes she uses are no longer accessible, forcing her to find alternatives – sometimes even the streets. “I have good orientation skills, but I still wouldn’t

¡Carnaval! to celebrate Hispanic heritage CAITLYN JONES & AGNES QUINN

Contributing Writer &Intern Hundreds of students are expected to turn out as UNT kicks off its monthlong celebration of Hispanic heritage today with free food and live music at the university’s ninth annual ¡Carnaval! celebration. Catered by Denton’s La Milpa Mexican Restaurant, the event will take place on the Library Mall from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will feature booths set up by various student organizations to represent 24 Spanish-speaking countries.

T he fest iva l, a pa r t of Hispa nic Heritage Mont h, is a celebration of various Hispa nic cu ltures a nd a n opportunity for students to meet new people and learn about a culture beyond their own, said Cara Walker, student services coordinator at the UNT Multicultural Center. The center teamed up with the University Program Council to host the festival, which Walker said is quickly becoming a UNT tradition.

vent u re out on my ow n without a second opinion,” Finefrock said. “Venturing out in an unknown place w it hout a lot of pla nning ahead of time can be dangerous.” Fi nef rock a nd De v i n Axtman, a political science senior who uses a wheelchair to get around campus, said they made a request last semester to the UNT’s Americans with Disabilities Act Adv isor y Committee t hat somet hing be done to infor m students w it h disabilities about ongoing const r uct ion project s around campus. The committee responded by publishing a newsletter to inform students about where construction is going to take place and for how long. T he C on s t r uc t ion of Obstruction report is sent out once a month to students registered under the Office of

Forest Service plan underfunded

ARTS & LIFE: VIEWS: SPORTS: PHOTO COURTESY OF CARA WALKER

See ODA on Page 2

What’s Inside NEWS:

Three girls show off their traditional Mexican dresses during a Mexican Independence Day celebration at the Library Mall. Sept. 16 is Mexican IndeSee ¡CARNAVAL! on Page 2 pendence Day and a day for locals to celebrate Hispanic heritage.

Disability Accommodations, but anyone who is interested can find it on the UNT website. “I didn’t use to have much time to read it,” Finefrock said. “But because of all the crazy stuff that is going on this year – and I can’t do but one of my three or four routes that I can get to class – I’ve been reading it religiously.” Ron Venable, director of the ODA, said 720 students directly receive the newsletter and UNT is one of the few universities working to get this information out. “Even though we can’t catch ever y emergenc y, it’s rare that a campus has anything like this,” Venable said. Although the newsletter is sent out once a month, it includes the major projects, Venable said.

Page 2

Students win prizes, get Page 3 advice in Cash Cab

Fall enrollment indicates big future for UNT Second year coach brings strong work ethic

Page 7 Page 4


Page 2 Amber Arnold and Isaac Wright, News Editors

ODA “It’s impossible to have them all recorded, but we do our best to get the word out, especially in a university the size of UNT,” Venable said. He said the city of Denton sends information out about where the construction is going to take place. During the six months that the report has been sent out, Axtman said, students have given positive feedback. He said the report has been convenient and has helped him

Continued from Page 1

get to classes. “If there’s construction on a sidewalk, I have to find a different route,” Axtman said. “It’s more annoying than anything.” He said the ODA facilities have been helpful and open to suggestions the students have. “You know where you go every day, so if you see where construction is going to take place you go another way,” he said. “It’s not just for students with disabilities, it’s for visitors and people who work here.”

¡Carnaval! Walker said that by hosting events like ¡Carnaval!, the Multicultural Center aims to expose students to other cultures and to represent all minorities on campus. “I was an undergrad student at UNT and I always remember doing ¡Carnaval!,” Walker said. “This is how we highlight our Hispanic culture at UNT.” National Hispanic Heritage Month takes place from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 and is set aside to recognize the accomplishments and influence of Hispanics in the history of the U.S., according to the organization’s website. At UNT, ¡Carnaval! is a way for students and faculty from different backgrounds to come together to celebrate each other’s differences, Walker said. Business junior and El Salvador native Aldo Alfaro said when he came to ¡Carnaval! last year he enjoyed seeing his home country represented at one of the two dozen booths. “It filled me up with a lot of emotion to see students that were not from El Salvador representing El Salvador,” said Alfaro, who also

Continued from Page 1

works at the Multicultural Center. “To have the opportunity this year to have an impact and convey to them the same feeling that it did to me would be an honor.”

Other events Also tonight, the UPC is hosting Salsa Night at 7 p.m. in the Silver Eagle Suite. It’s part of UNT’s Fine Arts Series. UNT Fuego will teach the basic steps of salsa and Havana NRG will be playing. “Participation in past years has been good, turning out 100 to 200 participants,” said vice president of marketing Jose Robles. The UPC is also hosting a screening of “Panic Nation,” a documentary about immigration in the U.S., on Sept. 21 in the Lyceum. The director of the film will be in attendance and a debate will follow. The La Vida Denton festival will take place Oct. 5. The event is sponsored by UNT, TWU, NCTC and the Center for Visual Arts. The goal of the event is to help students meet members of the Hispanic community and build a network in Denton, organizers said.

News

Thursday, September 15, 2011 ntdnewseditors@gmail.com

State Forest Service seeks funds SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Long before this month’s historic wildfires in Texas, the state’s forest service ca me up w it h a $ 20.4 million plan to stop the f lames from starting or ta mp t hem out before small blazes grew deadly and destructive. Three years later, the plan is still only half-funded — a result of the weak economy, a strained state budget and what one former lawmaker calls a “dereliction of duty” by legislators who almost a lways prefer to spend money only after a crisis has unfolded. In 2008, the Texas Forest Service made an insistent sales pitch for an ambitious wildfire protection plan that called for adding more than 200 firefighters, creating rapid-response teams to qua sh sma l l f la re-ups, building advanced automated weather stations and establishing two training academ ies for w i ld f i re crews. “We cannot over-emphasize the protection aspects of this plan,” officials wrote in their request for money. W hen f ully f unded and implemented, the program was “guaranteed to protect lives and properties.” The idea for the plan dated to 1999. But over nearly a decade of steadily worsening fires, the budget request acquired a sense of urgency. By 2008, it declared: “This is the final straw! Bigger fires call for bigger state resources!” T h e For e s t S e r v i c e concedes t hat even t he full fire-protection system

Graphic Courtesy of MCT would not have completely spared Texas from last week’s catastrophic fires, which incinerated more than 1,700 homes, blackened tens of thousands of acres and killed four people. “There’s no way we’ll ever be staffed to handle the worstcase, catastrophic events like you’ve seen recently,” said Robbie DeWitt, chief financial officer of the Forest Service. But the plan was designed to limit exactly those types of widespread losses — and at a fraction of the price of fighting full-blown fires. Forest Service officials say they harbor no ill will toward lawmakers. It was the agency’s own idea to increase funding on ly i ncrementa l ly g iven economic realities. Still, at least one critic says the decision to leave the plan only partially funded reflects

lawmakers’ reluctance to make big investments to prevent emergencies. Former Republican state Rep. Dav id Sw inford used to represent the Panhandle, which in 2006 endured the deadliest wildfire on record in Texas, a blaze that killed 12 people and scorched more than a million acres. After the flames were out, Swinford worked to increase funding for the wildfire plan and for volunteer fire departments through a tax on insura nce compa nies. He sa id the state relies on a “crisis management” attitude that leans too heavily on paying for firefighting efforts after the fact. “The dereliction of duty is the state not putting money in that program,” he said. “I got tired of watching it.”

Once a fire takes hold, the f la mes a nd t he costs ca n quickly spread out of control. The federal government pays some of the expenses, but this past summer the Forest Service needed an infusion of $121 million from the state. With an additiona l $ 8.5 million the state put toward the fire-protection plan in 2010, about 60 firefighters were hired. The Forest Service also bought heavy equipment such as bulldozers, opened nine new offices in high-risk fire areas and paid for some firefighter training. Still, the annual funding for the program is about $12 million less than what the Forest Service considers necessary, according to the budget request and other documents reviewed by The Associated Press.

American poverty levels rise WASHINGTON — High joblessness and the weak economic recovery pushed the ranks of the poor in the United States to 46.2 million in 2010 – the fourth consecutive increase and the largest number of people living in poverty since record-keeping began 52 years ago, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday. The share of all people in the U.S. who fell below the poverty

line rose to 15.1 percent last year from 14.3 percent in 2009. That matched the poverty rate reached in 1993 before falling steadily to 11.3 percent in 2000. Since then the poverty rate has risen, accelerating after the recession began in late 2007, and is now approaching levels not seen since Lyndon B. Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1965. Last year the share of chil-

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dren under 18 living in poverty jumped to 22 percent, from 20.7 percent the previous year. The Census Bureau’s report also showed that the number of people without health care coverage rose to 49.9 million last year from 49 million in 2009, though the percentage of uninsured was statistically unchanged. And there was a further erosion of incomes at the middle of the middle class. Inflation-adjusted median household income in the U.S. fell 2.3 percent in 2010 from a year ago, to $49,445. Taken together, the data all point to the severe and widespread financial strains of a nation in the throes of an economic crisis. And the report, coming shortly after President Barack Obama’s proposed package of $447 billion in tax cuts and spending to revive job growth and the recovery, is almost certain to intensify the debate over the government’s role in helping the poor and unemployed at a time of budget deficits and painful cutbacks in public services. Extended federal unemployment benefits, for example, helped some people rise above the poverty line. Analysts had widely expected the poverty rate for last year to edge higher, given that the nation’s unemployment rate averaged 9.6 percent in 2010 compared with 9.3 percent the previous year. The latest jobless figure for August was 9.1 percent. By the Census Bureau’s latest measure, the poverty threshold last year was an income of $11,139 for one person and $22,314 for a family of four.


Sports

Thursday, September 15, 2011 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Page 3 seangorman@my.unt.edu

Mean Green Newcomers Seven games into the season, the UNT soccer team tied its longest all time season opening unbeaten streak and leads the Sun Belt in goals and assists. Part of its early success can be tied to the arrival of eight new players – six freshmen and two transfers.

Whether it is because of playing time, the transition to college on and off the field or the players’ role on the team, each of the newcomer’s path is unique. Here is a look at how each player has adjusted to joining a new team in Denton.

Freshmen take different paths after joining UNT soccer BOBBY LEWIS

Senior Staff Writer Before practice begins on a much cooler day than what the women’s soccer team is used to, the team’s six freshmen bring equipment out before t he tea m’s vetera ns ma ke arrive on the field. Ca rr y ing equipment for more experienced players is just a small part in the life of a freshman student athlete, which can make for a difficult adjustment.

The next years With UNT having one of its most experienced teams i n recent memor y, some freshmen must wait for their time to come. “There are some [freshmen] that are coming off the bench, but they’re not getting minutes right now because this is a pretty veteran team,” head coach John Hedlund sa id. “But they’ll probably get a lot more time next year.” Midfielders Angela Melendez and Alyson Stallcup find themselves in that boat

“I understand how everything works. My time will eventually come.”

-Alyson Stallcup Freshman midfielder

t h is sea son, play i ng i n a combined four games. The t wo have to compete for playing time behind veteran m id f ielder s ju n ior E l len Scarfone and seniors Carly McD ow el l, Ju l ie L ac k e y, Hannah Crawford and Kara Brooks. Both players are used to indiv idua l success on t he field, as Melendez was named to an All-District team after her senior year in high school and Stallcup had the same honor after her sophomore and senior years. “It’s frustrating not playing,

but I understand how everything works,” Stallcup said. “My t i me w i l l event ua l ly come.” For now, t he f resh men will settle for the success the team is enjoying with its 4-0-1 record.

The nows On the other side of the coin, freshmen midfielders Haley Dockray and Leah Cox, forward Kelsey Petty and goalkeeper Jackie Kerestine have already made an immediate impact for the Mean Green. Of t he fou r, on ly Pet t y has yet to start any games, a lt houg h fa m i l ia r it y ha s made things a bit easier for the forward. “[Hedlund] reminds me of my club coach, David Pfeil, a nd I t h i n k t hey played together, so things have been going pretty well so far,” Petty said. Dockray and Cox, the team’s ot her t wo f reshmen, have started a combined six games. Dockray, who has started six games this season, has played

PHOTO BY REBEKAH GOMEZ/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Midfielder Angela Melendez, midfielder Leah Cox, midfielder Haley Dockray, goal keeper Jackie Kerestine, midfielder Alyson Stallcup and forward Kelsey Petty, at the Mean Green Soccer Complex on Tuesday. the third-most minutes on the team. “It ’s a big adju st ment, academic-wise,” Dockray said. “The soccer’s a lot tougher, but I think I’ve adjusted well.” Anchoring the Mean Green defense is Kerestine, who’s enjoyed the majority of the goa l keepi ng responsibi l i-

Transfers make quick transition Adame and Ross seeing significant playing time

BOBBY LEWIS

Senior Staff Writer For two UNT women’s soccer players, new beginnings have yielded great individual results to complement the team’s success this season. Sophomore defender Tori Adame and junior forward Katelyn Ross, each a transfer in her first season with the Mean Green, have made their impact felt on the field while trying to adjust to their new surroundings off of it. “We always seem to bring in a couple of transfers each year, and some make it, some don’t,” head coach John Hedlund said. “We’ve got a great group of girls here that welcome all newcomers in, but it’s just really measured on if they can play at this level and [Adame and Ross] have been able to do that.”

Fitting right in In her first year with the Mean Green, Adame has started five games and appeared in all seven of UNT’s games. The Midlothian native transferred to UNT after spending one season in Houston with HBU, where she played in all 24 of the Huskies’ games, scoring one goal and earning one assist. “I wanted to be closer to home,” Adame said. “And I just felt like the level of competition at [Houston Baptist] wasn’t high enough.” Almost a month through this season, she hasn’t scored yet, which she said has taken some time to adjust to. “At high school, I played on a really good club team, so I was used to a high level of play,” she said. “Going over to Houston, I got used to playing at a lower level, so I had to pick up my game when I got here.” For Adame, transferring to UNT and being in Denton is

PHOTO BY JAMES COREAS/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

(Left) Junior forward Katelyn Ross and sophomore defender Tori Adame warm up with running drills during Tuesday’s practice. They are the new transfer additions to the women’s soccer team. a l s o mor e comfortable away f rom t he soccer field. “Houston’s obv iously a huge city, and I’m not used to that. I’m from like the country, a small town,” she sa id. “Denton is more, l i ke, friendly, so I like that.”

KATELYN ROSS

“At Texas A&M-Commerce, we played a ver y kickball, direct style of play, and we play more of a possession type of game here, which I’m a lot more comfortable with,” Ross said. T he ps ycholog y major

played two seasons with Texas A&M-Commerce and played in three games each season. “I just really loved [Hedlund] and the players when I came to visit,” Ross said. “I liked the program and it was close to home in Justin.”

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Ross hasn’t gotten a chance to start yet, but her versatile skill set has helped UNT all over the field. “[Ross] comes off the bench, and she can play pretty much anywhere we need her to play,” Hedlund said. “Both she and [Adame] really have brought energy and passion to the team because they both love to play the game.” Ross is listed on the roster as a for ward, but she has played almost every position this season. As a result, the junior has scored two goals and notched one assist in six games.

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ties this season. Kerestine split time in the first three ga mes w it h ju n ior Ha ley Newsom, but has logged a full 90 minutes in every game since. Despite her quick success in one of the most important spots on the field, Kerestine said she still feels the same

w ay most f re sh men fe el when they start their college careers. “That’s been one of my biggest issues is just being so nervous,” Kerestine said. “As a senior in high school, it’s different. Here, I always feel like I’m always on my toes and I’m very nervous.”


Sports

Page 4 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Thursday, September 15, 2011 seangorman@my.unt.edu

Mean Green History September 15, 1987: UNT defeats conference rival in front of 14,480 fans

Coach travels across country before leading UNT AUSTIN SCHUBERT

Intern Twelve players with conference titles, 28 All-Americans and five teams qualifying for the NCA A Championships. Entering his second season as the head coach of the men’s and women’s UNT cross-country teams, Sam Burroughs has a coaching resume that speaks for itself. Before earning all of his accolades, Burroughs started his cross-country career by joining his high school team with intentions that were far from athletic. “I originally joined crosscountr y for all the wrong reasons, mainly to get near a girl on the team,” Burroughs said. “It wasn’t until my junior and senior year of high school that I became more serious about it.” After high school, Burroughs f i rst d iscovered h is love for coaching while running cross-country and track at the University of Buffalo. “I entered college as a computer science major but hated my first introductory class,” Burroughs said. “After that first semester, I figured

“I would like to be the coach of the first ever women’s SBC Championship team here.”

-Sam Burroughs Cross country head coach

out that I wanted to go into coaching. My coaches helped direct me on what route to take.” Graduating with a degree in exercise physiology in 2000, Burroughs got his first taste of coaching as a graduate assistant on the Buffalo’s crosscountry and track coaching staff. In 2002, he left for Boston University, where he spent one year as an assistant coach. Next came five years as an assistant coach in New York, two at Manhattan University and three at Iona University. It was at Iona where Burroughs achieved unprecedented success. “In my three years at Iona, we finished in the top four in the NCAA D-I Championships each year,” Burroughs said. “Our program was at a level where

we were drawing recruits from all over the country and even outside of it.” In 2008, a head coaching job at Abilene Christian University brought Burroughs down to Texas. Not long after arriving, the native New Yorker said he experienced culture shock. “I remember my first weeks in Abilene when people that I didn’t even know said hi to me when I was walking down the sidewalk,” Burroughs said. “If somebody does that in New York, you turn around and walk the other direction.” At ACU, Burroughs led the team to two Lone Star Conference titles and won backto-back Conference Coach of the Year awards. In 2010, UNT took notice and Burroughs was hired as the men’s and women’s

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head cross-country coach. Immediately, UNT runners saw a n i mprovement i n coaching style. “Coach Burroughs is more hands-on than our previous coach was,” senior Ingrid Mollenkopf said. “He actually follows us and makes sure we’re on target during our runs. This helps make us more competitive.” Mollenkopf wasn’t the only one who noticed a difference when Bur roug hs a r r ived. Junior Michael Sandoval said Burroughs’ tireless work ethic and love for cross-country is hard to ignore. “He gets me excited about cross-country,” Sandoval said. “If you want to be good in this sport, you have to love it, and coach Burroughs definitely makes it fun for us. You can tell he enjoys his job.” Burroughs said he hopes to accomplish various goals at UNT and take the program to a level it has never been before. “I would like to be the coach of the first ever women’s SBC Championship team here,” Burroughs said. “The next step would be winning both the men’s and women’s conference titles in the same year.” Off the course, Burroughs’ roots have led him to follow another sport. “Growing up in New York,

PHOTO BY ALEX HALL / INTERN

UNT cross-country head coach stands on a course watching his players run. Burroughs is in his second year of coaching the Mean Green. I became a big basketball fan,” Burroughs said. “I was shocked when I came down here how big high school football is compared to high school basketball. It’s unheard of up north to have any high

school football games on TV. Basketball is king.” Burroughs and the UNT men’s and women’s crosscount r y return to act ion S at u rd ay at t he Bay lor Invitational in Waco.

Being Sam Burroughs -Don’t expect to catch the Mean Green cross-country head coach in jeans: Burroughs said he doesn’t own a single pair, preferring shorts and slacks. -While acting as Buffalo’s assistant cross-country coach, Burroughs earned his master’s degree in human performance in 2002. -Borroughs has coached three athletes who qualified for the World CC Championships.


Senior dance students will which the public is invited to see, display their original works on and in this process they have to Friday for the first time at the solve all of the problems they are New Choreographers Concert. given in order to create this work The concert will start at 8 p.m. of art,” she said. In the class, students learn in the University Theatre in the Radio, Television, Film and about dynamics, unity, variety, content, form and theme, Performing Arts Building. General admissionArts is $5& and Jesse Sidlauskas, Life Cushman Editor said. From the 10 choreographed tickets can be purchased at the box office, over the phone, at the works at the concert, two dance pieces were chosen to represent door and in advance. Students enrolled in dance UNT at the American College professor Shelley Cushman’s Dance Festival, including Amelia senior projects class are required Wert’s “The Television is Watching to choreograph or perform in the Me Again” and Cassie Farzan concert. They also can complete a Panah’s “Gravity of Deception.” “I set out with this image of a research study in fieldwork. “Their work is a culmination to motel. I was interested in doing demonstrate the knowledge they something different,” Wert said. have acquired through the course “I thought about the idea of why people would want to stay at a of their study,” Cushman said. Cushman, the artistic director motel and wondered what they of the concert, is known for felt.” Wert’s modern piece includes her background in dance. She

is isolated from the others and dances with minimalistic movement for a strong impact. The themes include love, loss, isolation and insomnia, which are overlaid by the glow of a television. “It’s a good program. We have some amazing faculty that have really pushed us far,” Wert said. All 56 dancers were chosen from the dance department by advanced choreography students. Some choreographers also decided to dance. Cushman allowed students to perform if they were up for the challenge. Rachel Caldwell choreographed “Certain Uncertainty” and is also performing in “Guess Who’s Not Coming to Dinner,” choreog raphed by A n na Womack. In Caldwell’s choreography, dancers explore the experi-

Arts & Life

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Page 5 NTDailyArtsLife@gmail.com

Cash Cab comes to UNT

PHOTO BY TARYN WALKER/INTERN

Dance students perform “The Itch,” choreographed by dance senior Anna Olvera, at a rehearsal for the New ChoreograBRITTNI BARNETT The level of question difficulty As students are given a free phers Concert. Senior Staff Writer

Students hoping to avoid ence of being blind by wearing the heat, rain or long walks blindfolds. In 28 rehearsals, the across campus can take a four dancers adapted to their cab to class this week – the hearing and touching senses to Cash Cab, that is. help them through the modern The first annual Cash piece. Caldwell also worked with Cab event, sponsored by the music student Ryan Pivovar to Student Money Management compose a song of looped cello Center, will run every day this week from noon to 2 p.m. “As part of a rethink money campaign we’ve been interacting with students more,” said Monique Bradley, a jourBY M ARLENE GONZALEZ wife, Leslie Kregel, thought P HOTO BY CHELSEA STRATSO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER nalism junior and mentor for Intern would be great to increase Roller derby teammates “dainty villain” and “shelbitron” skate together during a practice drill Wednesday at the Lone it the center. “Our goal now is awareness of the communiOn Friday, the shops off the Star Indoor Sports Center. to come to students and not ty’s artistic talent and culture, Denton Square will stay open so much as to push informaKregel said. later than usual. tion in their face or anything Drawe contacted sources Denton will have its monthly like that, but to educate them and created the website firstFirst Friday on the Square and in ways that are relative to fridaydenton.com to establish Industrial Street area. them.” the event. Live music, sculptures, stained The idea for the program “First Friday has no boss, no glass, appetizers and art will be comes from the Discovery president. I’m just in charge of available until 9 p.m. instead of Channel program “Cash the website and building it into the regular 6 p.m. Cab,” a game show that takes PHOTO BY TARYN WALKER/INTERN something because I started it,” For First Friday, art galleries JESSE SIDLAUSKAS place in a taxi and allows Derby Revolution, which began week at the Lonestar Indoor Robin Huttash, owner of A Creative Arts STUDIO, will participate in First Friday Drawe said. and businesses stay open longer Arts & Life Editor passengers to answer quesSports Center off Shady Oaks to w ith nine members three Kregel’s business, Cimarrona, to give shoppers an opportunity Denton. The studio will stay open until 9 p.m. on Friday. tions for cash. months ago and now has more practice the aggressive contact The team members of the sells hats, scarves and warm to admire and buy art. However, instead of giving than 100 active members. Muertas Locas, Hickory Street sport known as roller derby. Several communities and month, which is where the idea pher and UNT alumnus, said he clothing recycled from old away money, the Cash Cab The teams form the competiHooligans and the Main Street countries have their own First came from. helped start Denton’s First Friday clothes. aims to teach students to Mafia meet several times per tive groups of the North Texas See DERBY on Page 6 “What we hope is [to gain] a Friday or First Thursday each Shannon Drawe, a photogra- in in February 2010. He and his manage it.

ride to class they will be asked to answer questions related to harmonies. finances and the SMMC. Caldwell said her piece is about But, just like in the show, wrong blindness as an experience, not answers could cause students to a handicap. be left in the dust. “I was in my modern class last “Any time a student gets a semester and we would lie on question wrong, we use that as an the ground and shut our eyes. opportunity to teach them about I wondered if I could capture a the center or money management in general,” Bradley said. Students also have the opportunity to win prizes such as key chains, highlighters and microwavable Ramen noodles.

varies. For example, one question was feeling of dance with touch and about how much debt the average sound rather than with sight,” student graduates with. Caldwell said. “I heard about [the Student The concert will also be held at Money Management Center] 8 p.m. Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. my freshman year,” said Sunday in the University Theatre. Kasey Owens, a hospitality For more information, visit www. management sophomore. “I danceandtheatre.unt.edu. decided to ride in the Cash Cab because I have to walk all the way across campus and I have a bum knee.”

Monthly event promotes art purchases in Denton

Full-contact sport gains momentum in Denton

Highlights • Cuts • BEST WESTERN SHOP IN WaxingNORTH • Keratin TEXAS Complex Soothing Treatments

SERVING DENTON

SINCE 1957

& FELT HATS Student Discount -STRAW 20% off on Haircuts

BUY 1 GET 1 FOR 1¢

415 S. Elm St. #102 Denton, TX 76201

940.380.0955 outbackhair.com

(special group)

Neck pain? HORSEPOWER BOOTS BY: ANDERSON BEAN

$159

99

SHOW US YOUR STUDENT I.D. & GET  5% OFF PURCHASE!

345 E. HICKORY, DOWNTOWN DENTON - weldonswestern.com

Thursday, December 2nd Roger Creager/Zach Walther-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo Till They’re Blue or Destroy-7:00pm @ The Hydrant Café Denton Holiday Lighting Festival-5:45pm @ The Square Friday, December 3rd North American Skull Splitter Tour 2010: Skeletonwitch/Withered/Landmine Marathon/ The Spectacle-8:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Crooked Finger-9:00pm @ Public House Denton Bach Society-7:00pm @ The Hydrant Café MillionYoung/Teen Daze/Old Snack/Goldilocks & The Rock-9:00pm @ Hailey’s The Quebe Sisters/Will Johnson-8:00pm @ Dan’s Silverleaf Fatty Lumpkin-7:00pm @ The Boiler Room Reindeer Romp-7:30pm @ South Lakes Park Saturday, December 4th La Meme Gallery opening: Sally Glass/Oh Lewis!/ Murdocks/Jon Vogt-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Angel Tree Fundraiser-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo The Contingency Clause-9:00pm @ The Hydrant Café A Spune Christmas 2010: Telegraph Canyon/Monahans/Birds & Batteries/Seryn/Dour Burr/Glen Farris-7:30pm @ Hailey’s Disc Golf Winter Open: Amateur Team Tournament10:00am @ North Lakes Disc Golf Course Sunday, December 5th Sundress/Final Club/Land Mammals/ The River Mouth-9:00pm @ Hailey’s Monday, December 6th Trivia Monday with Norm Amorose -7:30pm @ Public House Tuesday, December 7th Pearl Harbor Memorial Day Thursday, December 9th Josh Abbott Band/Rob Baird/ William Clark Green-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo

THE WARRIOR’S WAY [R] 11:40am 2:05pm 4:55pm 7:30pm 10:05pm BURLESQUE [PG13] 1:05pm 4:05pm 7:00pm 9:50pm DUE DATE [R] 11:45am 2:20pm 4:50pm 7:15pm 9:40pm FASTER [R] 11:15am 1:45pm 4:30pm 7:05pm 9:35pm HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 [PG13] 1:40pm 5:10pm 6:30pm 8:30pm 9:45pm HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 - DIGITAL [PG13] 11:55am 3:40pm 7:25pm 10:45pm LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS [R] 11:20am 2:10pm 5:00pm 7:55pm 10:40pm MEGAMIND [PG] 1:10pm 4:00pm MEGAMIND - REAL D 3D [PG] 11:50am 2:35pm 5:15pm 7:50pm 10:15pm MORNING GLORY [PG13] 11:30am 2:25pm 5:05pm 7:45pm 10:30pm TANGLED [PG] 12:45pm 3:20pm 6:05pm 8:45pm TANGLED - REAL D 3D [PG] 11:25am 2:00pm 4:40pm 7:20pm 9:55pm THE NEXT THREE DAYS [PG13] 12:50pm 3:55pm 7:10pm 10:20pm UNSTOPPABLE [PG13] 11:35am 2:15pm 4:45pm 7:35pm 10:10pm

Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star [R] 101 Mins Digital Cinema 2:20pm 4:50pm 7:20pm 9:50pm Contagion [PG-13]105 Mins Digital Cinema 2:15pm 4:55pm 7:35pm 10:15pm

Digital Cinema 2:10pm 4:50pm 7:30pm 10:10pm Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark [R] 100 Mins Digital Cinema 2:15pm 4:45pm 7:25pm 10:05pm

Warrior [PG-13] 139 Mins Digital Cinema 12:50pm 4:00pm 7:10pm 10:20pm

Our Idiot Brother [R] 90 Mins Digital Cinema 1:00pm 3:20pm 5:40pm 8:00pm 10:15pm

Apollo 18 [PG-13] 87 Mins Digital Cinema 12:55pm 3:10pm 5:25pm 7:40pm 9:55pm

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World [PG] 89 Mins RealD 3D 4:30pm 9:30pm Digital Cinema 2:00pm 7:00pm

Seven Days In Utopia [G] 99 Mins Digital Cinema 1:55pm 4:40pm 7:15pm 9:45pm

The Help [PG-13] 137 Mins Digital Cinema 3:00pm 7:05pm 10:25pm

Shark Night [PG-13] 91 Mins RealD 3D 3:25pm 5:45pm 8:15pm 10:40pm Digital Cinema 1:05pm

Rise of the Planet of the Apes [PG-13] 104 Mins Digital Cinema 2:40pm 5:15pm 7:55pm 10:30pm

The Debt [R] 113 Mins Digital Cinema 2:25pm 5:05pm 7:50pm 10:35pm Colombiana [PG-13] 109 Mins

Cowboys & Aliens [PG-13] 112 Mins Digital Cinema 5:00pm 10:35pm Crazy, Stupid, Love [PG-13] 118 Mins Digital Cinema 2:05pm 7:45pm

Friday, December 10th Burial/Wild Tribe/x- unit 21’s first show/Wiccans/ Rotundus/Youth Agression-8:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Dirty City Band -9:00pm @ Public House New Riders of the Purple Sage/ Violent Squid Day vs. Night Achtone-8:00pm @ Dan’s Silverleaf The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-7:30pm @ The Campus Theater Saturday, December 11th Dead Week Print Show: Pan Ector/Gutterth Productions/ La Meme/ Pants-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Jessie Frye, with Sam Robertson-8:30pm @ The Hydrant Café Arts & Crafts Show-8:00am @ Danton Civic Center The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-7:30pm @ The Campus Theater

See CASH on Page 6

little more visibility and have the Creative Art STUDIO, one of public more aware of art culture the businesses that has been in Denton that isn’t always a part of First Friday since it started. recognized,” Kregel said. Huttash said her main goal Merchants join with artists to help promote art and busi- is providing music for the event nesses. For example, an artist each month. On Friday, Alex Riegelman, looking for a place to display his or her work could contact a local guitarist and blues a coffee shop owner willing to singer, will play in A Creative Art STUDIO. host the artist, Kregel said. Keri Zimlich, a journalism Heath Robinson, a pharmacy junior, thinks the event will junior, said she thinks the event bring attention to the creativity is a great opportunity to have the community has to offer. Pfun. HOTO BY AMBER PLUMLEY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER “It’s stops not the justCashcab one shop, but “I think it’s a good way to On Wednesday, accounting senior Stephen Trevino for a minall the shops getting together increase the exposure of the arts ute at the Business Leadership Building to pick up students for a free ride to to rekindle that love of art,” in Denton,” Robinson said. anywhere on campus. The Cashcab is offered from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday as Robin Huttash ow ns A Zimlich said.

well.

Sunday, December 12th The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-2:00pm @ The Campus Theater Monday, December 13th The Gay Blades-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Trivia Night with Norm Amorose -7:30pm @ Public House

THE LOCAL FAVORITE! Voted Denton's Best Bar Daily Specials! by the readers of the DRC two years in a row Late n e p O AM 'Til 2

Awesome specials on UNT game days!

Located in the Lively Historical Downtown Denton Square Area! 940.484.2888 | 115 S. Elm Street, Denton www.wimgo.com and search Sweetwater THE POLAR EXPRESS weekend of 12/2

SHOWTIMES VALID FOR 12-03-2010

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 [PG13] 12:00 | 3:20 | 6:30 | 9:40

TANGLED 3D [PG] 11:15AM | 1:50 | 4:25 | 7:00 | 9:55

MEGAMIND 3D [PG] 11:00AM | 1:25 | 3:50 | 6:15 | 9:00

UNSTOPPABLE [PG13] 11:45AM | 2:20 | 4:55 | 7:30 | 10:15


Senior dance students will which the public is invited to see, display their original works on and in this process they have to Friday for the first time at the solve all of the problems they are New Choreographers Concert. given in order to create this work The concert will start at 8 p.m. of art,” she said. In the class, students learn in the University Theatre in the Radio, Television, Film and about dynamics, unity, variety, content, form and theme, Performing Arts Building. General admissionArts is $5& and Jesse Sidlauskas, Life Cushman Editor said. From the 10 choreographed tickets can be purchased at the box office, over the phone, at the works at the concert, two dance pieces were chosen to represent door and in advance. Students enrolled in dance UNT at the American College professor Shelley Cushman’s Dance Festival, including Amelia senior projects class are required Wert’s “The Television is Watching to choreograph or perform in the Me Again” and Cassie Farzan concert. They also can complete a Panah’s “Gravity of Deception.” “I set out with this image of a research study in fieldwork. “Their work is a culmination to motel. I was interested in doing demonstrate the knowledge they something different,” Wert said. have acquired through the course “I thought about the idea of why people would want to stay at a of their study,” Cushman said. Cushman, the artistic director motel and wondered what they of the concert, is known for felt.” Wert’s modern piece includes her background in dance. She

is isolated from the others and dances with minimalistic movement for a strong impact. The themes include love, loss, isolation and insomnia, which are overlaid by the glow of a television. “It’s a good program. We have some amazing faculty that have really pushed us far,” Wert said. All 56 dancers were chosen from the dance department by advanced choreography students. Some choreographers also decided to dance. Cushman allowed students to perform if they were up for the challenge. Rachel Caldwell choreographed “Certain Uncertainty” and is also performing in “Guess Who’s Not Coming to Dinner,” choreog raphed by A n na Womack. In Caldwell’s choreography, dancers explore the experi-

Arts & Life

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Page 5 NTDailyArtsLife@gmail.com

Cash Cab comes to UNT

PHOTO BY TARYN WALKER/INTERN

Dance students perform “The Itch,” choreographed by dance senior Anna Olvera, at a rehearsal for the New ChoreograBRITTNI BARNETT The level of question difficulty As students are given a free phers Concert. Senior Staff Writer

Students hoping to avoid ence of being blind by wearing the heat, rain or long walks blindfolds. In 28 rehearsals, the across campus can take a four dancers adapted to their cab to class this week – the hearing and touching senses to Cash Cab, that is. help them through the modern The first annual Cash piece. Caldwell also worked with Cab event, sponsored by the music student Ryan Pivovar to Student Money Management compose a song of looped cello Center, will run every day this week from noon to 2 p.m. “As part of a rethink money campaign we’ve been interacting with students more,” said Monique Bradley, a jourBY M ARLENE GONZALEZ wife, Leslie Kregel, thought P HOTO BY CHELSEA STRATSO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER nalism junior and mentor for Intern would be great to increase Roller derby teammates “dainty villain” and “shelbitron” skate together during a practice drill Wednesday at the Lone it the center. “Our goal now is awareness of the communiOn Friday, the shops off the Star Indoor Sports Center. to come to students and not ty’s artistic talent and culture, Denton Square will stay open so much as to push informaKregel said. later than usual. tion in their face or anything Drawe contacted sources Denton will have its monthly like that, but to educate them and created the website firstFirst Friday on the Square and in ways that are relative to fridaydenton.com to establish Industrial Street area. them.” the event. Live music, sculptures, stained The idea for the program “First Friday has no boss, no glass, appetizers and art will be comes from the Discovery president. I’m just in charge of available until 9 p.m. instead of Channel program “Cash the website and building it into the regular 6 p.m. Cab,” a game show that takes PHOTO BY TARYN WALKER/INTERN something because I started it,” For First Friday, art galleries JESSE SIDLAUSKAS place in a taxi and allows Derby Revolution, which began week at the Lonestar Indoor Robin Huttash, owner of A Creative Arts STUDIO, will participate in First Friday Drawe said. and businesses stay open longer Arts & Life Editor passengers to answer quesSports Center off Shady Oaks to w ith nine members three Kregel’s business, Cimarrona, to give shoppers an opportunity Denton. The studio will stay open until 9 p.m. on Friday. tions for cash. months ago and now has more practice the aggressive contact The team members of the sells hats, scarves and warm to admire and buy art. However, instead of giving than 100 active members. Muertas Locas, Hickory Street sport known as roller derby. Several communities and month, which is where the idea pher and UNT alumnus, said he clothing recycled from old away money, the Cash Cab The teams form the competiHooligans and the Main Street countries have their own First came from. helped start Denton’s First Friday clothes. aims to teach students to Mafia meet several times per tive groups of the North Texas See DERBY on Page 6 “What we hope is [to gain] a Friday or First Thursday each Shannon Drawe, a photogra- in in February 2010. He and his manage it.

ride to class they will be asked to answer questions related to harmonies. finances and the SMMC. Caldwell said her piece is about But, just like in the show, wrong blindness as an experience, not answers could cause students to a handicap. be left in the dust. “I was in my modern class last “Any time a student gets a semester and we would lie on question wrong, we use that as an the ground and shut our eyes. opportunity to teach them about I wondered if I could capture a the center or money management in general,” Bradley said. Students also have the opportunity to win prizes such as key chains, highlighters and microwavable Ramen noodles.

varies. For example, one question was feeling of dance with touch and about how much debt the average sound rather than with sight,” student graduates with. Caldwell said. “I heard about [the Student The concert will also be held at Money Management Center] 8 p.m. Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. my freshman year,” said Sunday in the University Theatre. Kasey Owens, a hospitality For more information, visit www. management sophomore. “I danceandtheatre.unt.edu. decided to ride in the Cash Cab because I have to walk all the way across campus and I have a bum knee.”

Monthly event promotes art purchases in Denton

Full-contact sport gains momentum in Denton

Highlights • Cuts • BEST WESTERN SHOP IN WaxingNORTH • Keratin TEXAS Complex Soothing Treatments

SERVING DENTON

SINCE 1957

& FELT HATS Student Discount -STRAW 20% off on Haircuts

BUY 1 GET 1 FOR 1¢

415 S. Elm St. #102 Denton, TX 76201

940.380.0955 outbackhair.com

(special group)

Neck pain? HORSEPOWER BOOTS BY: ANDERSON BEAN

$159

99

SHOW US YOUR STUDENT I.D. & GET  5% OFF PURCHASE!

345 E. HICKORY, DOWNTOWN DENTON - weldonswestern.com

Thursday, December 2nd Roger Creager/Zach Walther-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo Till They’re Blue or Destroy-7:00pm @ The Hydrant Café Denton Holiday Lighting Festival-5:45pm @ The Square Friday, December 3rd North American Skull Splitter Tour 2010: Skeletonwitch/Withered/Landmine Marathon/ The Spectacle-8:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Crooked Finger-9:00pm @ Public House Denton Bach Society-7:00pm @ The Hydrant Café MillionYoung/Teen Daze/Old Snack/Goldilocks & The Rock-9:00pm @ Hailey’s The Quebe Sisters/Will Johnson-8:00pm @ Dan’s Silverleaf Fatty Lumpkin-7:00pm @ The Boiler Room Reindeer Romp-7:30pm @ South Lakes Park Saturday, December 4th La Meme Gallery opening: Sally Glass/Oh Lewis!/ Murdocks/Jon Vogt-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Angel Tree Fundraiser-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo The Contingency Clause-9:00pm @ The Hydrant Café A Spune Christmas 2010: Telegraph Canyon/Monahans/Birds & Batteries/Seryn/Dour Burr/Glen Farris-7:30pm @ Hailey’s Disc Golf Winter Open: Amateur Team Tournament10:00am @ North Lakes Disc Golf Course Sunday, December 5th Sundress/Final Club/Land Mammals/ The River Mouth-9:00pm @ Hailey’s Monday, December 6th Trivia Monday with Norm Amorose -7:30pm @ Public House Tuesday, December 7th Pearl Harbor Memorial Day Thursday, December 9th Josh Abbott Band/Rob Baird/ William Clark Green-8:00pm @ Rockin’ Rodeo

THE WARRIOR’S WAY [R] 11:40am 2:05pm 4:55pm 7:30pm 10:05pm BURLESQUE [PG13] 1:05pm 4:05pm 7:00pm 9:50pm DUE DATE [R] 11:45am 2:20pm 4:50pm 7:15pm 9:40pm FASTER [R] 11:15am 1:45pm 4:30pm 7:05pm 9:35pm HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 [PG13] 1:40pm 5:10pm 6:30pm 8:30pm 9:45pm HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 - DIGITAL [PG13] 11:55am 3:40pm 7:25pm 10:45pm LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS [R] 11:20am 2:10pm 5:00pm 7:55pm 10:40pm MEGAMIND [PG] 1:10pm 4:00pm MEGAMIND - REAL D 3D [PG] 11:50am 2:35pm 5:15pm 7:50pm 10:15pm MORNING GLORY [PG13] 11:30am 2:25pm 5:05pm 7:45pm 10:30pm TANGLED [PG] 12:45pm 3:20pm 6:05pm 8:45pm TANGLED - REAL D 3D [PG] 11:25am 2:00pm 4:40pm 7:20pm 9:55pm THE NEXT THREE DAYS [PG13] 12:50pm 3:55pm 7:10pm 10:20pm UNSTOPPABLE [PG13] 11:35am 2:15pm 4:45pm 7:35pm 10:10pm

Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star [R] 101 Mins Digital Cinema 2:20pm 4:50pm 7:20pm 9:50pm Contagion [PG-13]105 Mins Digital Cinema 2:15pm 4:55pm 7:35pm 10:15pm

Digital Cinema 2:10pm 4:50pm 7:30pm 10:10pm Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark [R] 100 Mins Digital Cinema 2:15pm 4:45pm 7:25pm 10:05pm

Warrior [PG-13] 139 Mins Digital Cinema 12:50pm 4:00pm 7:10pm 10:20pm

Our Idiot Brother [R] 90 Mins Digital Cinema 1:00pm 3:20pm 5:40pm 8:00pm 10:15pm

Apollo 18 [PG-13] 87 Mins Digital Cinema 12:55pm 3:10pm 5:25pm 7:40pm 9:55pm

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World [PG] 89 Mins RealD 3D 4:30pm 9:30pm Digital Cinema 2:00pm 7:00pm

Seven Days In Utopia [G] 99 Mins Digital Cinema 1:55pm 4:40pm 7:15pm 9:45pm

The Help [PG-13] 137 Mins Digital Cinema 3:00pm 7:05pm 10:25pm

Shark Night [PG-13] 91 Mins RealD 3D 3:25pm 5:45pm 8:15pm 10:40pm Digital Cinema 1:05pm

Rise of the Planet of the Apes [PG-13] 104 Mins Digital Cinema 2:40pm 5:15pm 7:55pm 10:30pm

The Debt [R] 113 Mins Digital Cinema 2:25pm 5:05pm 7:50pm 10:35pm Colombiana [PG-13] 109 Mins

Cowboys & Aliens [PG-13] 112 Mins Digital Cinema 5:00pm 10:35pm Crazy, Stupid, Love [PG-13] 118 Mins Digital Cinema 2:05pm 7:45pm

Friday, December 10th Burial/Wild Tribe/x- unit 21’s first show/Wiccans/ Rotundus/Youth Agression-8:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Dirty City Band -9:00pm @ Public House New Riders of the Purple Sage/ Violent Squid Day vs. Night Achtone-8:00pm @ Dan’s Silverleaf The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-7:30pm @ The Campus Theater Saturday, December 11th Dead Week Print Show: Pan Ector/Gutterth Productions/ La Meme/ Pants-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Jessie Frye, with Sam Robertson-8:30pm @ The Hydrant Café Arts & Crafts Show-8:00am @ Danton Civic Center The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-7:30pm @ The Campus Theater

See CASH on Page 6

little more visibility and have the Creative Art STUDIO, one of public more aware of art culture the businesses that has been in Denton that isn’t always a part of First Friday since it started. recognized,” Kregel said. Huttash said her main goal Merchants join with artists to help promote art and busi- is providing music for the event nesses. For example, an artist each month. On Friday, Alex Riegelman, looking for a place to display his or her work could contact a local guitarist and blues a coffee shop owner willing to singer, will play in A Creative Art STUDIO. host the artist, Kregel said. Keri Zimlich, a journalism Heath Robinson, a pharmacy junior, thinks the event will junior, said she thinks the event bring attention to the creativity is a great opportunity to have the community has to offer. Pfun. HOTO BY AMBER PLUMLEY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER “It’s stops not the justCashcab one shop, but “I think it’s a good way to On Wednesday, accounting senior Stephen Trevino for a minall the shops getting together increase the exposure of the arts ute at the Business Leadership Building to pick up students for a free ride to to rekindle that love of art,” in Denton,” Robinson said. anywhere on campus. The Cashcab is offered from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday as Robin Huttash ow ns A Zimlich said.

well.

Sunday, December 12th The Second Shepherds’ Play/ Christmas Pie...A Madrigal Farce & Feaste-2:00pm @ The Campus Theater Monday, December 13th The Gay Blades-9:00pm @ Rubber Gloves Trivia Night with Norm Amorose -7:30pm @ Public House

THE LOCAL FAVORITE! Voted Denton's Best Bar Daily Specials! by the readers of the DRC two years in a row Late n e p O AM 'Til 2

Awesome specials on UNT game days!

Located in the Lively Historical Downtown Denton Square Area! 940.484.2888 | 115 S. Elm Street, Denton www.wimgo.com and search Sweetwater THE POLAR EXPRESS weekend of 12/2

SHOWTIMES VALID FOR 12-03-2010

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 [PG13] 12:00 | 3:20 | 6:30 | 9:40

TANGLED 3D [PG] 11:15AM | 1:50 | 4:25 | 7:00 | 9:55

MEGAMIND 3D [PG] 11:00AM | 1:25 | 3:50 | 6:15 | 9:00

UNSTOPPABLE [PG13] 11:45AM | 2:20 | 4:55 | 7:30 | 10:15


Page 6 Jesse Sidlauskas, Arts & Life Editor

Arts & Life Derby

PHOTO BY AMBER PLUMLEY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

As Cash Cab driver Stephen Trevino, an accounting senior, parks and waits for students needing a ride to class, Tahirah Dean, an English and political science sophomore, comes up and asks for a ride from the Business Leadership Building to the Language Building Wednesday.

Cash

Continued from Page 5

In addition to programs like the Cash Cab, the SMMC offers one-on-one consultations with students who are looking for financial guidance, Bradley said. “The great thing about our center is that we are available from now until forever,” she said. “So no matter how old students are, they can still use our services, whether they’ve gone on to another college, graduated, or whatever.”

The center also provides short-term loans for students. “The unique thing about those loans is that they are for unexpected emergencies, things that come up that would perhaps prevent you from attending classes,” said Nichole Porrata, a higher education graduate student and graduate assistant for the center. “So let’s say that something happens in your apartment and they are charging you an excessive

amount of money that you don’t have; you can come here and we can give you a loan for that.” “W hether you have a million dollars or a hundred dollars it’s the same principles,” Bradley said. “Bill Gates has a lot more things that he is managing, obviously, but he is still using the same principles [of money management].” For more information about the Student Money Management Center visit: http://moneymanagement. unt.edu/.

Thursday, September 15, 2011 NTDailyArtsLife@gmail.com

Continued from Page 5

“This is an alter ego. This is who we are now. They can come out here and be their alter ego,” member Anna Campbell said, referring to the unspoken rule that each member takes on a new name upon joining the team. Campbell’s is Kungpow. Not all of the members compete. Each member is ranked by her skill set, which varies from those who are beginner skaters to the competitive players. Currently, the three Denton teams only play against one another and hold practices, but they are hoping to find outside teams to compete against, Campbell said, adding that the group will go as far as teaching a new player to skate. The game begins with five members from two teams grouped on the track. The pivot position at the front of the pack controls the pace of the pack around the track. A group of three blockers from each team makes up the bulk of the competitors following the pivots. In the rear of the group are the point scorers, known as “jammers.” After an opening pass through the group, the jammers lap the group. Upon flanking the group

the second time, a team will receive a point for each opposing player a jammer passes. As jammers attempt to score points, they run a gauntlet of blockers who throw shoulders and swing hip-checks. While contact is encouraged, it must be within the rules. Players are penalized for pushing with their hands, tripping and even falling on purpose to disrupt the flow of the game.

“Keeping up with school and doing derby takes a lot of work, but it is a lot of fun,” said Lauren “Rosie the Inhibitor” Powers, an education sophomore. “I come here to de-stress.” Teams compete for t wo 30-minute halves that are made up of two-minute bouts. “There’s a lot of rules and things like that, but the basic thing is that the minimum number of [a jammer] can get is four … because once you pass the box, you get their points,” Amy “Dirty” Huckabee said.

PHOTO BY CHELSEA STRATSO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Roller derby teammates “dainty villain” and “shelbitron” skate together during a practice drill Wednesday at the Lone Star Indoor Sports Center.

PHOTO BY AMBER PLUMLEY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Travis Hernandez, 22, of Mariachi Quetzal, plays the violin Friday evening at La Milpa. The mariachi band has been together for more than five years and has played for La Milpa every Friday since it opened.

Local restaurant caters to university students, events MELISSA R ATLEY

Staff Writer The family-run La Milpa restaurant has welcomed UNT students both as employees and customers since it opened in 2008. The restaurant will provide the UNT community with a taste of Hispanic culture today when it caters the UNT Multicultural Center’s Carnaval! event. Managers Jorge Landeros and Gabino Guerrero said they believe their restaurant was chosen to provide food for the event because of its authentic Tex-Mex flavors and the popularity it has garnered through word-of-mouth around Denton. “We are at the level of any franchise around,” Guerrero said. “Our menu has variety, and people can tell the differ-

ence between us and other Tex-Mex restaurants.” Landeros emphasized the family atmosphere at the restaurant, noting that his five brothers and two sisters have worked at the restaurant along with a number of students. “We a lso employ many UNT students, and we understand that they are busy and allow them the time they need for school and their lives,” Landeros said. Along with Tex-Mex cuisine, La Milpa also offers different styles of Tejano and traditional Mexican music to set the atmosphere. Quetzal, a live mariachi band composed of former UNT students, performs every Friday evening. According to its website, ma r iachiquet za l.com, t he

band strives to bring new life to the rich tradition of mariachi music. Guerrero has been working in restaurants in Texas for more than 27 years and chose to work at La Milpa because of the authentic way the restaurant prepares its food and the atmosphere. “They didn’t choose me; I chose them because I saw a great opportunity to apply what I know to this great restaurant.” The Spanish translation of La Milpa means a small cornfield, which Guerrero said requires a lot of hard work to maintain, much like a restaurant does. The restaurant, located on Interstate Highway 35E southeast of the Teasley exit, offers UNT students 15 percent off their meal with a student ID.


Views

Thursday, September 15, 2011 Valerie Gonzalez, Views Editor

Fall enrollment numbers indicate big future for UNT Editorial When the Board of Regents appointed V. Lane Rawlins as the president of UNT, Chancellor Lee Jackson described Rawlins as an effective leader who could provide a clear focus in meeting the university’s goals – and they were right. Last Friday, the university released its enrollment numbers for the fall semester. At first glance, the numbers look disappointing: total enrollment is down from last year’s number of 36,118 students to this year’s 35,754 students. The drop in students could be due to the current economic climate or cuts in funding. Yet, not one potential contributing factor stands out more than the fact that the UNT admissions’ office rejected 10 percent more applicants than it did in 2010. While it would have been easy to admit any and every applicant just so the university could tout its growth, doing so would have been counter-productive to its efforts thus far. Not to mention, you cannot expect to be an outstanding university without choosing students who stand out and rejecting those who do not. It was not an ideal time for UNT to raise expectations, either. SAT scores across the state have seen an abrupt drop in reading by two points and in writing by five points. Nationally, SAT math scores have dropped two points. That isn’t the case at UNT. This year’s freshman class, the largest freshman class in UNT history, boasts an average SAT score of 1105 – four points higher than last year. Overall, UNT showed growth in the most important areas of undergraduate success: freshman progression went up from 78 percent to 79 percent, the four-year graduation rate rose from 22 percent to 24.4 percent and the six-year graduation rate grew from 48.2 percent to 49.4 percent. Smarter students are coming to UNT as freshmen and staying here to continue their education. Friday’s numbers indicated an increase in the number of doctoral students attending UNT from 1,658 to 1,744. It is President Rawlins’ number one goal for UNT to attain Tier One status, which graduate students play a big part in due to the research they perform. The new enrollment numbers give UNT a reason to believe it is on the right track. The report shows UNT isn’t only focused on academia. It is also concentrated on becoming more diverse. Hispanic students now make up 5,518 of the university’s population, and African-Americans make up 4,556. It is important for UNT to remain dedicated to maintaining the diverse culture on campus that it is becoming known for. If anything, Friday’s numbers indicate the university has found its stride into academic excellence. For that reason, UNT’s future looks just as bright as this year’s freshman class.

Page 7 ntviewseditor@gmail.com

Student Government has failed The Student Government Association has failed you. This is not an indictment upon the current administration, the members of the senate or anyone who has poured their time and effort into representing you at UNT. Every individual within SGA operates in an essential and effective manner and each member of SGA is interdependent upon each another. This cooperation is instrumental in maintaining our effectiveness. Fortunately, that is not the issue that is impeding out ability to serve you. We a re l i m ited i n ou r numbers, and few students are aware are of our organization. This is how we have failed you.

Our senate has 45 seats that are allocated based on the enrollment of the various colleges and departments that make up UNT. Truthfully, we’re not even half full. Without a rise in senate membership, we cannot introduce or vote on referendums, which are votes that we put out to the student body. Apogee Stadium was passed as a referendum through the student senate. Once the referendum passed, an election for students was held so they could decide for themselves. We cannot bring big change to this campus without a referendum. If you have completed at least 12 hours of class on campus and can obtain 10 signatures from students in your college,

you can help us change this. I implore you to do so. If you wish to see a change on campus or want to feel involved in the developments that take place at UNT, then SGA is the best place for you to focus your energy and efforts into. We are the link between students and administrators. You will have the opportunity to pursue your passions and discover new ones. It is the best way to implement the innovations you wish to make. Our senate sessions are open to the public and are currently held in Terrill Hall 121. The meetings begin at 5:15 p.m. and all students are welcome. SGA has an office on the third floor of the University Union (Union 320S) and is open to any questions or concerns

that students may have. As a senator for the College of Arts and Sciences, I am available whenever you need as well.

B e nj a min N a ll i s a n economics sophomore. He can be reached at d_nall10@yahoo. com.

Medical Marijuana: An Untapped Industry The prohibition of marijuana is quite arguably the most hypocritical, inhumane and unconstitutional law to limit the freedoms of the average American citizen. The war on drugs has failed, alcohol prohibition failed, prescription regulation is a formality at best and by creating this black market we empower the criminals who capitalize on such a high demand for these drugs. Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have industria lized t he former cannabis black market into a legitimate business, creating jobs, capital and more importantly for our government … taxes. The Denmark and Portuguese experiments have shown great progress in their research of implementing a “positive reinforcement” system by treating patients inf licted with drug addictions.

A clinic in Liverpool recently published a study claiming a “90 percent drop in local crime rates, zero cases of AIDs and moving people off welfare and into jobs.” If this research holds true, the American government can make a big PR move by reforming our current “negative reinforcement” system that has proved insufficient financially and morally. This can be done by decriminalizing the possession of marijuana or legalizing and regulating a system, which would generate more state and federal revenue. Unfortunately for us all, many Americans still support the war on drugs and marijuana prohibition, despite the overwhelming proof that our system is f lawed. This has caused a great divide amongst the community, creating an ambiguity between medical marijuana, marijuana and illicit drugs.

The truth of the matter is medical marijuana and marijuana is one and the same (save the added chemicals criminals use, such as lead, to increase the weight of their yield). The only difference being marijuana is more often associated with criminal activities. Surely, you have heard prolegalization and pro-medical marijuana arguments before. As the government argues, however, about methods to create jobs, this is not an option they should turn a blind eye to. If politicians truly wanted to create jobs, they would distance themselves from this inherently prejudiced prohibition, and they would explore the venture of creating a market for medical marijuana. Legalizing a substance with so much potential profit will send echoes through the market, creating jobs in multiple industries. If cannabis were to be fully

legalized, overnight we would see the negation of a criminal black market and the birth of an industry that would need marketing, producing, regulating and educating. But this is America, a place where we live, thrive and die for our beliefs. Let us just hope that we don’t commit suicide for them.

Drew McGinnis is an English senior and can be reached at wolfmanD@ymail.com.

Here’s what our Facebook fans had to say about recent stories in the NT Daily UNT falls to Houston in tale of two halves.

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half. I hope our boys can learn from this game and be amazing in the next. Go Mean Green!

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Summer heat breaks record in 70th day

Bekah Lynn If only the globe wasn’t warming...

NT Daily Editorial Board

The Editorial Board includes: Josh Pherigo, Amber Arnold, Isaac Wright, Sean Gorman, Jesse Sidlauskas, Carolyn Brown, Sydnie Summers, Stacy Powers,Valerie Gonzalez, Drew Gaines, Cristy Angulo and Berenice Quirino.

Want to be heard? The NT Daily is proud to present a variety of ideas and opinions from readers in its Views section. As such, we would like to hear from as many NT readers as possible. We invite readers of all creeds and backgrounds to write about whichever issue excites them, whether concerning politics, local is-

sues, ethical questions, philosophy, sports and, of course, anything exciting or controversial. Take this opportunity to make your voice heard in a widely read publication. To inquire about column ideas, submit columns or letters to the editor, send an e-mail to ntdailyviews@gmail.com

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