Issuu on Google+

SPORTS

to help UNT gain Tier One status NEWS: Building Page 2 Group offers ‘safe place’ for students ARTS & LIFE: Page 4 Student finds life without alcohol interesting VIEWS: Page 6

Volleyball wins first tournament title since 2006. Page 5

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

News 1, 2 Arts & Life 3, 4 Sports 5 Views 6 Classifieds 7 Games 7

Volume 96 | Issue 3

Sunny 95° / 77°

ntdaily.com

The Student Newspaper of the University of North Texas

Gubernatorial candidate’s wife comes to Denton White plans to make education priorty

By T.S. McBride

Contributing Writer Andrea White, wife of Texas gubernatorial candidate Bill W h ite, wa s i n Denton on Friday to campaign on behalf her husband. White appeared at a meetand-greet event at the home of Bill Barnett, the Democratic candidate for justice of the peace. Bill White, who is running on t he Democrat ic t icket, faces an uphill battle w ith Republican incumbent Rick Perry. His wife said she hopes t hat w il l cha nge as W hite strives to increase his name recognition. “It’s a big state and he has to be known to win,” Andrea White said. “A lot of people haven’t seen his ads yet, but they will.” Denton is a Republ ica n city and White trailed Perry in an August 23 Rasmussen poll, with 49 percent of likely voters favoring Perry and 41 percent favoring White. The potential Texas first lady sa id she wasn’t t roubled by pol l numbers a nd t hat W h ite had ra ised $ 3

million more than Perry for his ca mpa ig n, t houg h she st re s s e d t h at t he Fr iday meeting was not a fundraising event. Instead, the purpose was to reach out to “Republicans and moderates of the community.” Dianne Edmondson, county chairwoman of the Denton Cou nt y Republ ica n pa r t y, said that the party won’t be foc u se d on c a mpa ig n i ng for Per r y ’s re-elect ion i n Denton. “The governor will be in Denton Cou nt y I’m su re,” she said. “But the Democrats a re t he m inor it y pa r t y in Texas.” She said she was confident that Perry would win the election. “G ov. Pe r r y h a s b e e n e x t r e m e l y g o o d f or ou r economy,” she said. “We’ve had more jobs created i n t he la st c ouple of ye a r s than the entire country put together.” About 50 people showed up to Barnett’s house on Pearl Street to hear White speak. She addressed the group for about five minutes, stressing her and her husband’s interest in reducing dropout rates in Texas. “When you treat dropping out like an emergency and tell

kids it’s not acceptable, then they rethink the thing and go back to school,” White said. “If [Bill] was elected governor — you know 50 percent of the state budget is education — he’s promised me he would spend every day on trying to get our k ids the education they need to succeed.” Also in attendance was Neil Durra nce, t he Democrat ic ca ndidate for Texas’s 26t h congressional district. “Bill White would be a great gift for the state of Texas,” D u r r a nc e s a id . “I t h i n k that people are tired of the extremism … of the current candidate.” W hile in Denton, Andrea White also spoke at the home of Rudy Rodriguez during the installation of officers for the Leag ue of Lat in A merica n Cit i zens. Mayor Ma rk Burroughs also attended. Bill W hite was mayor of Houston from 2004 to 2010. He was twice re-elected to the position by large majorities. This is the first run for the governor’s office for the San Antonio native. White’s wife said that his ex per ience as a self-made businessman ma kes him a better candidate for the office than Perry. The Texas g ubernatoria l election will be held Nov. 2.

Photo by Berenice Quirino/Staff Photographer

Andrea White, the wife of gubernatorial candidate Bill White, speaks in a Denton home Friday afternoon.

Glee club hosts fall SGA officers plan new year auditions this week By Isaac Wright

leadership position within the association to become active in Kevin Sanders plans to it and, instead, is working to put extend the message that all UNT students in positions where they students are part of the Student can succeed and their individual Government Association, a group skills can best serve the assothat tries to provide them with ciation. a voice. “Just because you don’t have The SGA is an organization ‘I’m such and such. My title is,’ consisting of students that allows that does not mean you can’t get its members a place to in this organization and voice issues that pertain do stuff,” Sanders said. to them at UNT. With Mich ael Wa l ker, the money fueling the a pol it ica l science association coming out f reshma n, has a of student service fees, brother who was in all students are allowed, the SGA. Walker also and encouraged, to intends to get involved participate in it. KEVIN in the organization. Sanders, a political SANDERS “I don’t know too science junior and SGA president, much about it, but I am going has been involved in the orga- to learn more about it and run nization for two years and was for office whenever I can,” elected president of the associa- Walker said. tion in the spring. T he associat ion is a lso “When Dakota [Carter] became working to make itself more president, I saw us move closer inviting to students and help down the path I would like us to them understand it exists for be on,” Sanders said, “If we can their needs, said Mercedes capitalize on some of the things Fulbright, a political science he started and make them bigger junior and SGA v ice presiand better then it’ll be great.” dent. During the Carter admin“I don’t want us to be looked istration, the SGA rules were at as a separate entity from the changed to allow any student university,” Fulbright said. “I in good academic standing know our staff is a group of with the university to run for individuals who are friendly an office in the student govern- and wanting to put ourselves ment. However, Sanders stressed out there for the students.” that people don’t need to be in a As president, Sanders has

also put an emphasis on better using the money budgeted to the SGA under his administration. “We’ve focused on being fiscally responsible, but, in doing so, making the fiscal responsibility that we have count for students,” Sanders said. “It makes no sense to save all this money and cut expenses and then do nothing with it.” The most important thing about the association is that t he SG A, t he st udent-led governmental body of UNT, exists for the students and their needs, the officers and staff said. “If you have questions or concerns we’ll help you out, and not just you but the rest of the student body,” said Joshua Chatman, SGA director of student affairs. The SGA is trying to rebrand itself and to help get people involved and help them understand it exists for the benefit of students, Sanders said. “One of the key points of our administration is making sure that we always keep in mind who we work for and that we work for students,” Sanders said. “The job I do here, while I do get a salary for it, I would do it for free because I feel like it needs to be done.”

t o r emov e b a r r ier s a nd engage students in college life. The Division of Student Development addresses the diverse needs of students and encourages lifelong learning, according to its website vpsd. unt.edu. For ex a mple, i f a n incoming student is homesick and lonely in the dorms, connecting t hem w it h t he services offered by the dDdiv ision can help t hem be a better student and deal with

overa ll problems t hat may arise, McGuinness said. During her time at UNT, With has interacted with many st udents, i nclud i ng t hose in the Student Government Association, the student-led governmental body of UNT. “I’m very excited to work with her,” said Kevin Sanders, the SGA president and a politica l science junior. “Wit h has helped me so much as a student and a lso as SGA president.”

Staff writer

By Jessica Paul

Senior Staff Writer For those looking for a chance in the spotlight, this week could make their dream a reality. With the Glee Club’s second semester soon to arrive at UNT, auditions for prospective new members will continue today and Wednesday from 5-10 p.m. in the Silver Eagle Suites. “We’ve got a Facebook event we put up a month ago and it says right now we’ve got about 140 people confirmed,” said Jose Coira, a radio, television and film senior and founder and president of UNT’s Glee Club. “But with the Mean Green Fling, we had over 150 people sign up, not from Facebook, so I have no idea how many people are coming.” Last week was a huge eyeopener as to what’s going to happen at auditions, he said. Auditions will begin with a registration table outside the Silver Eagle Suites. Once inside, old members from last semester will take 10 people at a time into another room to be measured and fitted for costumes if the st udent makes it into the ensemble.

Photo by Jeanette Laredo/ Photographer

Freshman Alex Labrada; undecided; looks up as she waits for her turn to audition. UNT Glee auditions are taking place August 30 through September 1 See GLEE on page 3 in the Union’s Silver Eagle Suite.

UNT names long-term employee vice president By Brianne Tolj

Contributing writer The Division of Student Development has appointed a new vice president starting this semester. Elizabeth With has been a UNT employee for 14 years and recently served as interim vice president from January to now. Working with college students and having the ability to make an impact and a difference in someone’s direction are some of the advantages in her new position,

With said. With’s colleague for “Overall my goal is 16 years. to make sure students The Div ision stay at the center of the of Student university,” With said. Development She aims to involve i s c om pr i s e d of the students in campus mu lt iple ser v ices life and wants them to ELIZABETH and campus love UNT and all it has WITH programs, including to offer. the Career Center, “With is well respected nation- Student Health and Wellness ally, and doing the right things for C e n t e r, S t u d e n t L e g a l students is her primary focus,” Services, and Student Money said Maureen McGuinness, the Management Center. assistant vice president and These programs are created

“Overall my goal is to make sure students stay at the center of the university.”

—Elizabeth With Vice President of Student Development


SPORTS

to help UNT gain Tier One status NEWS: Building Page 2 Group offers ‘safe place’ for students ARTS & LIFE: Page 4 Student finds life without alcohol interesting VIEWS: Page 6

Volleyball wins first tournament title since 2006. Page 5

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

News 1, 2 Arts & Life 3, 4 Sports 5 Views 6 Classifieds 7 Games 7

Volume 96 | Issue 3

Sunny 95° / 77°

ntdaily.com

The Student Newspaper of the University of North Texas

Gubernatorial candidate’s wife comes to Denton White plans to make education priorty

BY T.S. MCBRIDE

Contributing Writer Andrea White, wife of Texas gubernatorial candidate Bill W h ite, wa s i n Denton on Friday to campaign on behalf her husband. White appeared at a meetand-greet event at the home of Bill Barnett, the Democratic candidate for justice of the peace. Bill White, who is running on t he Democrat ic t icket, faces an uphill battle w ith Republican incumbent Rick Perry. His wife said she hopes t hat w il l cha nge as W hite strives to increase his name recognition. “It’s a big state and he has to be known to win,” Andrea White said. “A lot of people haven’t seen his ads yet, but they will.” Denton is a Republ ica n city and White trailed Perry in an August 23 Rasmussen poll, with 49 percent of likely voters favoring Perry and 41 percent favoring White. The potential Texas first lady sa id she wasn’t t roubled by pol l numbers a nd t hat W h ite had ra ised $ 3

million more than Perry for his ca mpa ig n, t hough she st re s s e d t h at t he Fr iday meeting was not a fundraising event. Instead, the purpose was to reach out to “Republicans and moderates of the community.” Dianne Edmondson, county chairwoman of the Denton Cou nt y Republ ica n pa r t y, said that the party won’t be foc u se d on c a mpa ig n i ng for Per r y ’s re-elect ion i n Denton. “The governor will be in Denton Cou nt y I’m su re,” she said. “But the Democrats a re t he m inor it y pa r t y in Texas.” She said she was confident that Perry would win the election. “G ov. Pe r r y h a s b e e n e x t r e m e l y g o o d f or ou r economy,” she said. “We’ve had more jobs created i n t he la st c ouple of ye a r s than the entire country put together.” About 50 people showed up to Barnett’s house on Pearl Street to hear White speak. She addressed the group for about five minutes, stressing her and her husband’s interest in reducing dropout rates in Texas. “When you treat dropping out like an emergency and tell

kids it’s not acceptable, then they rethink the thing and go back to school,” White said. “If [Bill] was elected governor — you know 50 percent of the state budget is education — he’s promised me he would spend every day on trying to get our k ids the education they need to succeed.” Also in attendance was Neil Durra nce, t he Democrat ic ca ndidate for Texas’s 26t h congressional district. “Bill White would be a great gift for the state of Texas,” D u r r a nc e s a id . “I t h i n k that people are tired of the extremism … of the current candidate.” W hile in Denton, Andrea White also spoke at the home of Rudy Rodriguez during the installation of officers for the Leag ue of Lat in A merica n Cit i zens. Mayor Ma rk Burroughs also attended. Bill W hite was mayor of Houston from 2004 to 2010. He was twice re-elected to the position by large majorities. This is the first run for the governor’s office for the San Antonio native. White’s wife said that his ex per ience as a self-made businessman ma kes him a better candidate for the office than Perry. The Texas g ubernatoria l election will be held Nov. 2.

PHOTO BY BERENICE QUIRINO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Andrea White, the wife of gubernatorial candidate Bill White, speaks in a Denton home Friday afternoon.

Glee club hosts fall SGA officers plan new year auditions this week BY ISAAC WRIGHT

leadership position within the association to become active in Kevin Sanders plans to it and, instead, is working to put extend the message that all UNT students in positions where they students are part of the Student can succeed and their individual Government Association, a group skills can best serve the assothat tries to provide them with ciation. “Just because you don’t have a voice. The SGA is an organization ‘I’m such and such. My title is,’ consisting of students that allows that does not mean you can’t get in this organization and its members a place to do stuff,” Sanders said. voice issues that pertain Mich ael Wa l ker, to them at UNT. With a pol it ica l science the money fueling the f reshma n, has a association coming out brother who was in of student service fees, the SGA. Walker also all students are allowed, intends to get involved and encouraged, to in the organization. participate in it. KEVIN “I don’t know too Sanders, a political SANDERS science junior and SGA president, much about it, but I am going has been involved in the orga- to learn more about it and run nization for two years and was for office whenever I can,” elected president of the associa- Walker said. T he associat ion is a lso tion in the spring. “When Dakota [Carter] became working to make itself more president, I saw us move closer inviting to students and help down the path I would like us to them understand it exists for be on,” Sanders said, “If we can their needs, said Mercedes capitalize on some of the things Fulbright, a political science he started and make them bigger junior and SGA v ice president. and better then it’ll be great.” “I don’t want us to be looked During the Carter administration, the SGA rules were at as a separate entity from the changed to allow any student university,” Fulbright said. “I in good academic standing know our staff is a group of with the university to run for individuals who are friendly an office in the student govern- and wanting to put ourselves ment. However, Sanders stressed out there for the students.” As president, Sanders has that people don’t need to be in a

also put an emphasis on better using the money budgeted to the SGA under his administration. “We’ve focused on being fiscally responsible, but, in doing so, making the fiscal responsibility that we have count for students,” Sanders said. “It makes no sense to save all this money and cut expenses and then do nothing with it.” The most important thing about the association is that t he SG A, t he st udent-led governmental body of UNT, exists for the students and their needs, the officers and staff said. “If you have questions or concerns we’ll help you out, and not just you but the rest of the student body,” said Joshua Chatman, SGA director of student affairs. The SGA is trying to rebrand itself and to help get people involved and help them understand it exists for the benefit of students, Sanders said. “One of the key points of our administration is making sure that we always keep in mind who we work for and that we work for students,” Sanders said. “The job I do here, while I do get a salary for it, I would do it for free because I feel like it needs to be done.”

t o r emov e b a r r ier s a nd engage students in college life. The Division of Student Development addresses the diverse needs of students and encourages lifelong learning, according to its website vpsd. unt.edu. For ex a mple, i f a n incoming student is homesick and lonely in the dorms, connecting t hem w it h t he services offered by the dDdiv ision can help t hem be a better student and deal with

overa ll problems t hat may arise, McGuinness said. During her time at UNT, With has interacted with many st udents, i nclud i ng t hose in the Student Government Association, the student-led governmental body of UNT. “I’m very excited to work with her,” said Kevin Sanders, the SGA president and a politica l science junior. “Wit h has helped me so much as a student and a lso as SGA president.”

Staff writer

BY JESSICA PAUL

Senior Staff Writer For those looking for a chance in the spotlight, this week could make their dream a reality. With the Glee Club’s second semester soon to arrive at UNT, auditions for prospective new members will continue today and Wednesday from 5-10 p.m. in the Silver Eagle Suites. “We’ve got a Facebook event we put up a month ago and it says right now we’ve got about 140 people confirmed,” said Jose Coira, a radio, television and film senior and founder and president of UNT’s Glee Club. “But with the Mean Green Fling, we had over 150 people sign up, not from Facebook, so I have no idea how many people are coming.” Last week was a huge eyeopener as to what’s going to happen at auditions, he said. Auditions will begin with a registration table outside the Silver Eagle Suites. Once inside, old members from last semester will take 10 people at a time into another room to be measured and fitted for costumes if the st udent makes it into the ensemble.

PHOTO BY JEANETTE LAREDO/ PHOTOGRAPHER

Freshman Alex Labrada; undecided; looks up as she waits for her turn to audition. UNT Glee auditions are taking place August 30 through September 1 See GLEE on page 3 in the Union’s Silver Eagle Suite.

UNT names long-term employee vice president BY BRIANNE TOLJ

Contributing writer The Division of Student Development has appointed a new vice president starting this semester. Elizabeth With has been a UNT employee for 14 years and recently served as interim vice president from January to now. Working with college students and having the ability to make an impact and a difference in someone’s direction are some of the advantages in her new position,

With’s colleague for With said. 16 years. “Overall my goal is The Div ision to make sure students of Student stay at the center of the Development university,” With said. i s c om p r i s e d of She aims to involve mu lt iple ser v ices the students in campus and campus life and wants them to ELIZABETH programs, including love UNT and all it has WITH the Career Center, to offer. “With is well respected nation- Student Health and Wellness ally, and doing the right things for C e n t e r, S t u d e n t L e g a l students is her primary focus,” Services, and Student Money said Maureen McGuinness, the Management Center. These programs are created assistant vice president and

“Overall my goal is to make sure students stay at the center of the university.”

—Elizabeth With Vice President of Student Development


News

Page 2 Abigail Allen & Josh Pherigo News Editors

Tuesday, August 31, 2010 ntdailynews@gmail.com

Faculty, students gain space for research BY TIM MONZINGO Senior Staff Writer

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

designed to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Standards. The new stadium and business building will also strive for LEED certification. Aspects of the building are designed to reduce the amount of energy it consumes, as well as use recycled construction mater ia l s a nd less w ater, according to the website. Killam said the administrators hope the building will receive a Gold LEED rating, but the verification process is long and the word is still out. Paul Gallagher, a biolog y junior, watched the building go up and was impressed. “I remember last semester w hen t hey were bu i ld i ng it,” he said. “It was loud and annoying, but I think it looks nice.” Gallagher said that although t he faci l it y shou ld at t ract h ig h-level resea rchers, he doesn’t plan to go to graduate school and be a part of the work at UNT. The facility is something PHOTO BY ABIGAIL ALLEN/MANAGING EDITOR the faculty should be proud of, The Life Sciences Complex, opened June 9, provides scientific researchers with Hutson said, and will become new facilities. UNT administrators hope to use the building to draw in faculty. prominent in t he resea rch world. “I think that it’s going to with additional faculty as part be intrigued by our resources of the cluster hires that have become ver y wel l k now n, to say the least,” she said. The university is already been identified as part of the especially as we have more looking to expand its pres- getting to Tier One status,” research results coming out, and I would be very proud to ence in research by adding he said. The new building is the first say that I had the opportunew faculty, Killam said. “We’re in t he process of of three construction proj- nity to work in such a great interviewing and negotiating ects at the university that are facility,” she said.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::

GET YOUR FREE TEMP TATTOO AT THE BOOKSTORE & PLAY TO WIN!

Visit

on

Scientific researchers on campus have a new place to make discoveries. The doors to UNT’s Life Sc iences Complex s w u ng open to admit faculty into the 87,000 square foot research space June 9. The facility is devoted to helping the school achieve Tier One status by providing of f ic e s, la bor ator ie s a nd meeting spaces for researchers

“I think ever yone who is over there and was involved with it and is now moved in is very happy about it …,” said Bob Killam, a biology faculty member who worked closely w it h t he project cont ractors and architects. “At this —Angela Hutson point we have absolutely no Graduate student complaints.” Though there is still some in t he f ields of molecu la r w ork to be done, K i l la m biolog y a nd biochem ist r y, s a id t he w or k i s mo s t l y accord ing to t he faci lit y’s complete. website. “About 20 percent of t he building was not completed on schedule because we didn’t have the money identified to f u nd it when const r uct ion began,” he said. He expects the structure to be completely finished by Januar y or Februar y of next year, he said. The new facilities are a vast improvement over what was available in the old Biolog y Building, said Angela Hutson, a graduate student studying microbiolog y. “I think it’s wonderful,” she said. “I think it promotes a lot of communication and interpersonal working. Everything is so leading edge. It’s a lot easier to get things done.” Hutson said she feels that the facility will help attract top-notch researchers to the university, enhancing its reputation in the research community. “This is a top-of-the-line facility, so anyone interested in doing research is going to

“I think that it’s going to become very well known.”

UNT Bookstore | UNT Dallas Bookstore University Union | 7300 Houston School Road

www.unt.bkstr.com www.untdallas.bkstr.com 413/1012_RATFBTS10


Tuesday, August 31, 2010 Katie Grivna Arts & Life Editor

Arts & Life

Page 3 kgrivna@ntdaily.com

Students boycott new, expensive textbooks BY A MBER JONES Intern

Each year, professors hand out their syllabi and announce the textbooks required for the semester. While most professors state that a book is mandatory for the class, many students are successfully managing through the school year without the use of a textbook. While bookstores are readily available to UNT students, a lot of people have developed their own methods to save money, including purchasing their books online. Websites like Amazon, Ninja books and Half-Price.com have been reliable sources for buying cheap books. “My freshman year I didn’t know where else to buy my text so I spend nearly $600 at the campus

bookstore. Luckily, I never did that again. Now, I always buy books off of Amazon. I bought all five of my schoolbooks for less than a $200,” Courtney Tinch, an education junior, said. Although sites like Amazon are an alternative place to purchase books, many offer only older editions of the text. Some students are willing to buy the dated editions. “I don’t spend money on new books. It’s a waste of money. The only difference between the two editions is that the newer editions may have one or two new chapters added to them. But overall the material is the same,” said Janice Jones, a biology graduate student. Other students are saving cash and not buying books at all. “Personally, I boycotted school textbooks. I got tired of hearing

PHOTO BY BRENICE QUIRINO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

the teacher say that books were mandatory, and then we would use them once. So I stopped buying them. If we end up having a book assignment I just borrow a friend’s copy,” Roze Pegues, a psychology senior, said. Pegues is not the only student who feels this way. Many students have begun using other methods for preparing for test or class assignments. Some students rely strictly on their notes from class lectures to help them complete schoolwork, while others use the campus library as their study tool. “I don’t buy books, but sometimes the teacher will assign something directly from the book. The library almost always has a copy of a textbook I may need, and the best part is that it’s free,” Jalisa McGinnis, a social work junior, said.

PHOTO BY BRENICE QUIRINO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Eduardo Valdes, an accounting junior, is renting his books at Voertman’s Bookstore, located at 1314 West Hickory Street. Students wait their turn at the UNT bookstore to get the textbooks they bought online.

Orchestra operated entirely by volunteers Students give two hours every Saturday BY A SHLEY-CRYSTAL FIRSTLEY Intern

Since the UNT repertoire orche st r a d i sba nde d i n 2009, Ascolti has emerged as the new orchestra, only leav i ng t he percussions, bra ss a nd woodw i nds behind. “We c a n get d i f ferent sounds because we’re a ll st rings a nd t he sound is totally unique and it’s more subtle,” Cara Stroud, president of Ascolti, said. Aa ron A lbi n, a per forma nce doctora l st udent, a long w ith UNT a lumnus

members. “This is a rare outlet for student musicians to have an opportunit y to experience t he st ring cha mber

Hyunseok Chang, co-founded Ascolti, an allvolunteer string orchestra t hat bec a me a n of f ic ia l club at UNT in 2009. “I wanted to share high qua lit y music ma k ing in collaboration with communit y members of Denton,” A lbin said. Ascolti, which means “to listen” in Ita lia n, st rives to prov ide qua lit y string music i n t he Denton c om mu n i t y w h i l e a l s o bring ing t he communit y together w ith the College of Music at UNT. It includes 20 of UNT’s undergraduate and graduate students and a lumni w ho spend at lea st t wo hou rs ever y Sat u rday to pract ice a nd create a musica l collaboration.

“The lowest we’ve had [performing] at a concert was 15 but it usually hovers a rou nd 20,” A lbi n s a id. “We have a lways had t wo

“I really didn’t think it was going to become successful at all but last semester we had about 100 people audition and then it just blew up, especially when Glee’s finale aired last semester,” Coira said. “We had tons of press that week. We had Fox come and interview us, we were in USA Today. So it’s definitely taken off publicity-wise.” Breana Peden, a math senior and fan of the show, said she saw the club perform at her sorority’s variety show last year. “They were good, I didn’t know we had a glee club on campus,” Peden said. As for the club’s plans for the future, Elliott Allums, a chemistry and psychology senior and a current member of the Glee Club, said it hopes to continue to provide entertainment and an outlet for people to perform, sing, and dance. “With the club last semester, we weren’t really sure the direction that we wanted to take it or how the members were going

to view it, but it has evolved into a very successful organization that is very recognizable,” Allums said. “The talent has grown incredibly. It has just rapidly evolved.” Coira said the organization has brought another option to UNT and its students. “There’s a lot of music majors and dance majors that there isn’t a dance team that they can just join,” Coira said. “I think it just gives another opportunity for students for the creative outlet.” Peden said the club is different from other organizations on campus and gives people an opportunity to do more than just sing or dance. The Glee Club rehearsal schedule can be found at www. unt.edu. “For me, it’s been a way to further develop my skills as a dancer and also a great way to meet new faces around campus,” Allums said. “It exposes you to a lot.”

“We have always had two concerts every semester. We are planning a concert late October, early November.”

—Aaron Albin Performance doctoral student

concer ts ever y semester. We are planning a concert f or l a t e O c t ob e r, e a r l y November.” A lbi n s a id t hat bei ng i nvolved w it h A scolt i present s ma ny oppor t un it ies for t he volu nte er

Students dance, sing for Glee Club auditions Continued from page 1

A f t er t he f itt ing, Glee members will escort students individually to the audition room. The Glee Club was split into two groups after Coira was concerned about the groupís size. “We were going to split into an A team and a B team and just have two choirs, but I didnít want one team to be better than the other,” Coira said. “I didn’t want a competition kind of thing.” The two groups consist of the show choir, which sings and dances, and the dance ensemble, Coira said. UNT has been beneficial for the Glee Club because of the university’s reputation for its music and related programs, he said. The club, which has earned acclaim throughout the nation, was recently featured in The New York Times.

repertoire and get a chance to per for m t hese pieces beside t heir col leag ues,” A lbin said. The creation of Ascolti may have beg u n w it h ju st t he m i nd s of A lbi n and Chang, but since last

spring they decided to add an administration, giv ing the members an opportunit y for leadership. “A f t e r o n e y e a r, w e decided we needed help,” A lbin said. St roud, a 13-yea r cello vetera n, emphasi zes t he d i f ference of a st r i ng orchest ra at a universit y c ompa r e d to t he u s u a l sy mphony orchestra. She believes that community involvement is vital in the arts and wants to get some ex per ience i n a r t s leadership. “My role a s president i s to help br i ng pe ople together and help us figure out what we’re going to do and how we’re going to do it,” Stroud said. V iol i n i st a nd re c r u it-

ment leader Ma r ia Jose Romero Ra mos sees a br ig ht f ut u re for A scolt i and is look ing for ward to new members. “I think it’s ver y importa nt t hat people support this group because it’s the only group that I k now of t hat’s completely volu nteer,” Ramos said. “We are going to continue to be a volunteer group and more well-known in the Denton and Da llas area.” A n y one c a n aud it ion for the orchestra from 10 a.m. to 12 : 30 p.m. ever y S a t u r d a y i n t he Mu s ic Building. For more i n for mat ion, s e a rch for A s c olt i on Facebook or v isit it s website at ascoltistrings. com.


Page 4 Katie Grivna Arts & Life Editor

Arts & Life

Tuesday, August 31, 2010 kgrivna@ntdaily.com

Group reaches out through multimedia campaign BY CHRISTINA MLYNSKI Senior Staff Writer

When Lauren Haynie was a freshman, she remembers struggling to find a place she fit into at college. After w inter break 2010, Haynie, a general studies junior and co-vice president of I Am Second UNT, found her calling during a College Ministry road trip. Later, she was introduced to Chris Plekenpol, one of the first speakers for I Am Second. “We all have struggles and we are designed to be able to help each other through them,” Haynie said. I Am Second, a worldwide multimedia movement founded in 2008, was started by Planobased e3 Partners Ministry, said Jim Williamson, a mechanical engineering sophomore and president of the group. The stories on iamsecond. com provide insight into dealing w ith daily struggles while relating to others, according to the website. I Am Second UNT is directed toward the college generation, open to anyone and free to join, Williamson said. “I Am Second is all about teaching people to live a life where we are always putting ourselves second, never first,” said Leah Olsen, a communications and political science junior and co-vice president. The group has a core team of

seven people who do the decision making and more than 35 members, Williamson said. Throughout the week, small g roup sessions meet a nd every Sunday, a large group meeting is held at 8:30 p.m. at the Clubhouse, which is located at 1026 Hillcrest St. All members gather to worship, pray, receive updates and meet new members, Olsen said. The sessions follow a process of watching a video from the website, reading a passage that goes along with the video, answering analytical questions and applying what they learned at the session to something and someone before they meet up the following week, Olsen said. “It’s a sa fe place where you can come and ask questions, where it’s not heav y on doctoring beliefs,” said Steven Bieberly, a communications senior and member. “They don’t force things on people.” The group is supported by fundraisers such as carwashes, as well as by the national I A m Second orga n i z at ion and Denton Bible Church, Williamson said. The movement differs from a church because it’s geared towa rd non-believers a nd people of other faiths, using an outreach process instead of the in-reach process which is typically used, Bieberly said.

Photo Illustration by GREG McCLENDON/Staff Photographer

The national organization of I Am Second, a group which provides insight into dealing with daily struggles, helps people with addiction, including cigarettes, alcohol and drug abuse. “I Am Second is primarily foc u sed on relat i ng a nd befriending those who would never darken the door of a church,” Haynie said. T he g roup pa r t icipates in Homeless Ministry every Wednesday night in Dallas and is involved with Denton Bible Church and the Village

Church Denton Ca mpus , Olsen said. The next event is at 7:30 p.m. on Monday at the Clubhouse, and is for students to learn more about I Am Second UNT and be placed in a small group session, Haynie said. “I really want people to see how Christians really live in

a community as opposed to the stereotypes,” Williamson said. I Am Second UNT will celebrate its one-year birthday at the start of the new year, and hopes by then that the numbers are larger because students are willing to give the movement a try.

“I was the girl who came to college and got caught up in the scene of boys, parties and bars,” Olsen said. “I think every person should be aware that they don’t have to go through college alone.” For more i n for mat ion, search “I Am Second UNT” on Facebook.

Bike Towards the Cure co-founder returns to Denton BY NICOLE L ANDRY Staff Writer

In the spring semester of 2010, Jonathan Triantafyllou, a pre-med senior, decided to create a cause when his best friend, Phil Bayliss, was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Together, the two friends created Bike Towards the Cure, a fundraising organization that would go on a bike tour across the country over the summer and raise money for cancer research. The tour began in San Diego, Calif. on June 12 and ended August 21 in Sea Isle City, N.J. About 100 cyclists participated in the 71-day tour. Now bac k i n Denton, Triantafyllou is satisfied with the success of the tour and ready to get back on the bike. “It was a lot of fun,” he said. “I’m ready to ride a lot more.” Tr ia nta f yl lou sa id t hat getting to see the scenery of the United States from coast to coast was wonderful, though the changes were very subtle. The most prominent transition, he said, was biking over the Rocky Mountains and ending up in the desert within 15 minutes. The abrupt temperature change caused some problems. “We ended up changing the riding schedule because you

Photo Illustration by GREG McCLENDON/Staff Photographer

Jonathan Triantafyllou, a pre-med senior, created Bike Towards the Cure, an organization that biked across the country over the summer to raise money for cancer research. can’t ride during the heat of the day,” Triantafyllou said. Because the tour route was a combination of two well-ridden routes, Triantafyllou said most residents of the cities the tour passed through were accustomed to seeing large groups of bikers pass by. However, they still received a lot of questions

about why they were biking and where they were headed. Every week, and sometimes every few days, Triantafyllou and Bayliss would update the blog on Bike Towards the Cure’s website with information about how long they biked each day and how they were feeling. “What a day!” Triantafyllou

begins in his blog recount of the first day. “Plenty of complications today … but what’s an adventure if everything goes as planned?” Tr ia nta f yl lou sa id t hat Bayliss coped well throughout the tour, even when they rode through the desert. “Phil’s doing great,” he said. “Nothing went wrong with [his] medication during the trip.” Overall, the bikers managed to raise more than $16,000, though Triantafyllou said they were still counting checks

that they were receiving from various sponsors. Accord i ng to t he Bi ke Towards the Cure website, the money will be donated to three different organizations: the American Cancer Society, the Lance Armstrong Foundation and the V Foundation for Cancer Research. While Triantafyllou enjoyed the trip and its magnitude in both length and importance, he doesn’t plan on making another trip of this size any time soon.

“I’d like to do some smaller tours or maybe do a tour of Europe,” he said. Bayliss said the trip exceeded his expectations. “We didn’t run into any issue on our bikes,” he said. “We joked that we carried around all this extra stuff we didn’t need, but if we hadn’t brought it, we would have ended up needing it.” Bayliss’ favorite part was the last day, when they rode up to the reception celebration in New Jersey. For him, it was like returning home. “My parents and friends told everyone on the beach what was going on, so when we rode up on the boardwalk ... it was a couple blocks’ worth of people standing and applauding,” he said. “I don’t think Jon and I stopped smiling all night.” Like Triantaf yllou, Bayliss would like to get into some smaller scale tours in the future, but for now, he’s resting up in Philadelphia, Pa. “I thought I deser ved a week of laziness,” he said. Bayliss is proud of what Bike Towards the Cure accomplished, and he said there was no way he could have done it without Triantafyllou. “He helped so much,” Bayliss said. “We just helped each other and pushed each other.”


Tuesday, August 31, 2010 Laura Zamora Sports Editor

Sports

Page 5 laurazamora26@gmail.com

Mean Green dominates competition on road By Sean Gorman Senior Staff Writer

Play ing in its f irst road games of the year, the UNT women’s soccer team avenged a n upset f rom last season and stayed unbeaten while winning both its games in the Hotel Encanto Aggie Classic over the weekend. The Mea n Green (4-0-0) continued to dominate on offense, over whelming the P r a i r ie V ie w A & M L a d y Panthers (0-3-0) in a 6-0 win on Friday and defeating the Jacksonville State Gamecocks (0-4-0) 2-0 on Sunday. “The players we have on this team have been fun to watch and can do so much i n open space,” a ssist a nt coach Ca ssidy Acu f f sa id. “This weekend they showed just how dangerous they can be against any team.” Friday Led by freshman midfielder Kelsey Hodges’ second hat trick this season, the Mean Green had no trouble picking apart the Lady Panthers en route to the win. Hodges got started early, scoring her first goal in the 13th minute to give UNT the lead. “When we were recruiting her w e k ne w s he w a s a strong player, but her play has been not hing shor t of

out sta nd i ng,” head coach Joh n Hed lu nd sa id. “She’s been a big part of why our of fen se ha s i mprove d so much.” E i g h t m i n u t e s l a t e r, junior defender Julie Lackey provided insurance with her fourth goal of the season to make it 2-0. The Denton native couldn’t st ay aw ay f rom t he goa l, using an assist from sophomore M ichel le You ng to score in the 49th minute and complet i ng a hat t r ick by scoring on a header in the 62nd minute. Late goals from freshman midfielder Jordan Howell and junior forward Nikki Crocco a dde d to t he on s l au g ht , w it h UNT outshooting t he Panthers 30-3. A fter fa lling to the Lady Panthers at home last season, the win had more meaning for the Mean Green players. “ We r e me m b e r w h a t h a pp e ne d l a s t y e a r a nd how it felt losing to them,” Lackey said. “They’re a team we shou ld have beat la st season.” Sunday Strong goalkeeping from J a c k s o n v i l l e S t a t e ’s A l i Koenig kept things close, but two second-half Mean Green goals were the difference in the team’s fourth victor y.

UNT stayed aggressive by outshooting the Gamecocks 7-2 i n t he f i r st ha l f, but Koenig held UNT scoreless and the teams entered halftime tied 0-0. “Somet h i ng we need to work on is coming out strong to start games,” Acuff said. “We’ll be a much better team if we’re more aggressive early on.” Bot h of fenses st r ug g led early in the second half as the game remained scoreless for the half’s first 20 minutes. Sophomore m id f ielder Ellen Scarfone took a pass from sophomore midfielder Carly McDowell and scored from the left side of the box in the 69th minute to finally break the tie. I n s u r a nc e c a me t h r e e minutes later when sophomore for ward A licia Reyes scored the first goal of her career off a rebound. Senior goalkeeper Mandy Ha l l increased her school record shutout total to 19 and has only allowed a single goal this season. “Mandy brings great leadership and talent to the position, so it’s no surprise that she has achieved that feat,” Acuff said. T he Me a n Gr e en now faces Sa m Houston State University at 7 p.m. Friday in Huntsville.

Tournament title sets the

foundation for UNT volleyball Mean Green earns first 3-0 record since 2003

Photo by Ryan bibb/SenioR Staff PhotogRaPheR

Sophomore midfielder Carly McDowell works on her ball handling skills during practice. The women continued their winning streak with two more wins from last weekend’s Hotel Encanto Aggie Classic in Las Cruces, N.M.

By Felicia a lBa Staff Writer

The UNT vol leyba l l team started off the new season with a statement, winning the Jackson State Invitational on Saturday in a 3-0 sweep. The Mea n Green hasn’t started out a season 3-0 since 2003 and had not won a tournament championship since 2006. “We are a lot more confident this season and the new coaching staff has brought a whole new mindset,” junior designated setter Sarah Willey said. UNT started off the tournament against Southeastern Louisiana with a 3-0 (25-15, 25-19, 25-16) w in, ma k ing head coach Ken Murczek the first coach in school history to start his tenure in a threeset sweep. “I was very proud of the way they [the team] represented North Texas,” Murczek said. The three-set win against the Lions was both a powerful offensive and defensive effort for the Mean Green. The team ended the three sets with a .298 attack percentage and an explosive performance by Melanie Boykins, a junior middle blocker and newcomer to the squad, who contributed 10 kills and had a .667 attack percentage. The defense also did its part by keeping the Lions to only a .096 hitting percentage and a single ace. Willey led the back row for the Mean Green with 14 digs. UNT played clean games all day with just 14 errors, which on ly happened t w ice last season. The Mean Green continued its stellar performance on the second day of the tournament, defeating host Jackson State with a 3-1 (27-25, 20-25, 25-23, 25-13) win. The team put up another powerful effort against JSU with a total of 50

Photo by Ryan bibb/SenioR Staff PhotogRaPheR

Junior Shelley Morton returns the ball at last Tuesday’s scrimmage. The women finished this weekend’s tournament with wins against Southeastern Louisiana, Jackson State, and New Orleans. team kills. Senior outside hitter Amy Huddleston contributed 14 kills while sophomore middle blocker Rachelle Wilson had 13. Senior outside hitter Roxana Casvean posted 12. Senior libero Kristin Petrasic racked up a total of 18 digs after Willey scored 16 in the second game. Her 16 digs brought her to a total of 739 career digs, the 10th highest in school history. UNT earned the tournament title after defeating the University of New Orleans, a former Sun Belt team, in another 3-0 (25-21, 25-15, 25-13) sweep. “I t hought at t imes we executed at a high level this

weekend,” Murczek said. “We had an awesome time and played with a lot of passion.” Leading the Mean Green offense was junior setter Kayla Saey with 91 assists and an average of 9.1 a set. Backing Saey was a resilient defense led by Boykins, who had 25 total blocks. Wilson also provided 23. The dynamic duo of Willey and Petrasic had 35 and 31 digs in the three matches against UNO, respectively. UNT kept every opponent under .100 in hitting percentage, leaving Huddleston satisfied. “We rea lly did what we expected to do,” she said. “We set a foundation this weekend.”

1 Free fresh brewed iced tea or 1 small tart frozen yogurt! Offer good with the purchase of a regular bowl or entrée salad - valid until 9/30/10, must present coupon.

Buy 1 Bowl and get the 2nd Free! The free bowl must be the same or of lesser value, 1 offer per order with coupon. Valid until 9/30/10.


Views

Page 6 Eric Johnson, Editor in Chief

Tuesday, August 31, 2010 ntdailyviews@gmail.com

Clock winds down BABY TALK: Put your mouth on hold on Fouts Field Editorial As the calendar turns to September the electricity of college football fills the air on campuses across the country. Tailgating and football on Saturdays is as much a part of the college experience as keg parties or three-hour lectures. That tradition is lost on the majority of the 36,000 students who inhabit this campus. Now granted, the product put on the football field the last five years has been mediocre at best but with a new stadium on the near horizon, there are just six more opportunities to take in the history of Fouts Field. Originally opened in 1952 as Eagles Stadium, Fouts Field was renamed after Theron J. Fouts in the wake of his passing in 1954. Fouts coached UNT’s football team from 1920 to 1924, amassing a 23-14-2 record, making him one of five football coaches in UNT’s history to have a winning record. He also founded UNT’s track and field program and was instrumental in getting Eagles Stadium built. With the final home game less than three months away, the Editorial Board feels that students should soak up the last remaining moments in a stadium that has been home to one of college’s greatest traditions for the last 58 years. Although recent memory does not exactly get anyone excited about the upcoming season, Fouts Field has seen many great moments through the years. • 14 conference championships, the last in 2004 • 155 wins • A .620 winning percentage • 22 All-Americans, including an honorable mention by Sports Illustrated last season for running back Lance Dunbar • Six All-Pro NFL players, the most recent being current Kansas City Chiefs guard Brian Waters • The largest crowd in Fouts Field history, 29, 347, watched as UNT crushed Baylor 52-13 in 2003 • Receiver Casey Fitzgerald’s 231 receiving yards against Louisiana-Lafayette in 2008 • A 136-point shootout that set an NCAA Division record for points scored and a school record for touchdowns when quarterback Giovanni Vizza accounted for nine in a 74-62 loss to Navy in 2007 • Running back Jamario Thomas breaking his own rushing record with a near 300-yard performance against Idaho in 2004 • Dunbar’s breakout performance against Middle Tennessee last season when he had five rushes for 101 yards and two touchdowns, including a 66-yard romp that ignited the crowd Dunbar’s All-American season does give hope that UNT is on the verge of turning things around, and with the new $78-million stadium set to open in September 2011 against the University of Houston, it couldn’t come soon enough. There are 360 minutes left in the life of Fouts Field as a football venue before the Mean Green and Kansas State shut the door on a UNT landmark Nov. 27.

NT Daily Editorial Board

The Editorial Board includes: Eric Johnson, Josh Pherigo, Katie Grivna, Graciela Razo, Abigail Allen, Sydnie Summers, Brianne Tolj, Augusta Liddic, Katia Villalba, Carolyn Brown and David Williams

Walking around the UNT campus on any given day, you may see a plethora of things going. Students and faculty may observe squirrels chasing other squirrels, construction for new buildings and international students speaking languages you only wish you knew. Unfortunately, a growing amount of individuals who enjoy ca rr y ing on conversations as they walk around campus can be spotted, somet hing t hat w i l l be sure to anger anger many people. I have no idea when these loud mout hs decided t hat talking on their cell phones in public would be acceptable. These are the people who are more likely to run into trees, get run over by bikes or wander into an oncoming Ford Focus.

If somebody is in a small space w ith a lot of people, they need to put their conversations on hold. These places i nclude elev ator s, bu ses, busy bat hrooms, etc. It is hard enough to be stuck in an elevator with a bunch of people, much less somebody who has unlimited daytime minutes. If you a re one of t hese people, I would just like to inform you that while you are enjoying your chat, nobody else within a 10-foot radius of you is enjoying it. Nobody cares about what you do or do not remember about last night, what you have going on this week or what your boyfriend said to you five minutes ago. What gets even funnier is when these people feel like they are entitled to a sense of

privacy. They look at everybody as they continue to talk, wondering why people stare at them as they debate why Sammi is still going out with Ronnie. I wonder why they would do such a thing. Last time I checked, if you a re hav ing a conversat ion in public, your privacy gets chucked out the window. I ca n’t even reca l l how ma ny t i mes I have seen someone drive like an idiot on the road, only to find out that they were talking away on their cell phone. (Hey, I can’t drive well either—I just say my prayers.) Some people just aren’t able to make a right turn a nd ta lk at t he sa me time. Staying off the phone in public can help avoid dirty glares, stumbling, or an “I

almost ran into a pole” experience. But if the pole is somehow not avoided and your face meets metal, just remember that next time, maybe you should just say, “I’ll call you back.”

Ben Baby is a senior staff writer. He can be reached at bbaby41@yahoo.com.

Alcohol provides drunken entertainment I’d heard the stories. Cotton mouth. The shakes. Shor t t emp er. B or e dom . Apathy. Don’t stop drinking. Can’t stop drinking. Wait a second. Aren’t those dry-out symptoms for the … heav y drinkers? That’s not me. Those are for the people who are dying in the bars. Me? I don’t live in Tavern, fueled by cheap Jager bombs, dizzied by pastel collars and bad haircuts. I wouldn’t call Lou’s my haunt, either, especially not on their way-tooaffordable margarita nights. Whenever those are. I’m not particularly adept to places on the Square; Texas Tuesdays? What’s that? A bar in a basement with quarter wells one evening a week? Now I’m just talking out of my rear end. Hold on ; w hy a m I so familiar with these evenings? Does my socia l life rea l ly

resemble a pinball table? It’s sta r t ing to sound li ke I’m shooting from one drinking hole to the other, occasionally finding a cheap hole-in-thewall with good pool tables. Bonus points. I guess I forgot about how that game ends: The metallic ball slipping off the shooter, quickly disappearing into the emptiness below. I think I call that “sleep.” Okay; that’s a bit dramatic. But the fact remains: Alcohol is deeply embedded in the culture of this North Texas college town. We know where to park ours car at night so they become hidden and we can make our getaway unabated. We know code-words like “Crusher” and – Dear God, no – “Four Loko.” Going to some locations, it’s quite easy to forget that the contents of a margarita did, at one point, exist sepa rately in glass bott les

t hat weren’t a n of f-wh ite pitcher. Now, my poi nt isn’t to lect u re here. My poi nt is that I didn’t drink for a week. I’m not a binger; I enjoy my cabernet sauvignon at dinner, and I certainly enjoy going out with friends. It just seems the only places to go here are bars and restaurants. I guess that’s just like any college town, though. Drying up didn’t cause me to have cottonmouth. I didn’t get the sha kes. My temper didn’t really change. I’m no more bored than I was two weeks ago, and I suppose the same goes for apathy. Maybe I’m not a heav y enough drinker; whatever. The point is, my week of f was a ref lective eye-opener. I became more observational and understanding of what I surround myself with. It’s not at all a bad thing to go out and play pool and enjoy

Want to be heard?

The NT Daily is proud to present a variety of ideas and opinions from readers in its Views section. As such, we would like to hear from as many NT readers as possible. We invite readers of all creeds and backgrounds to write about whichever issue excites them, whether concerning politics, local issues,

ethical questions, philosophy, sports and, of course, anything exciting or controversial. Take this opportunity to make your voice heard in a widely read publication. To inquire about column ideas, submit columns or letters to the editor, send an e-mail to ntdailyviews@gmail.com

a few beverages w ith good company. It just seems that the buzz can drown out the monotony of a day-to-day social life. Dr y ing up caused me to see these social restraints. Take a week off – it’s really not bad – and watch your eyes open a tad. As for me, I’m ready to dull those senses a tad. Now, where did I stash that Hendricks?

Anonymous contributing writer.

Note to Our Readers

The NT Daily does not necessarily endorse, promote or agree with the viewpoints of the columnists on this page. The content of the columns is strictly the opinion of the writers and in no way reflects the belief of the NT Daily.


CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS

Phone: 940-565-2851 • Fax: 940-565-4659 • Email: dailyads@unt.edu • www.ntdaily.com • GAB Corner of Avenue Phone: 940-565-2851 • Fax: 940-565-4659 • Email: dailyads@unt.edu • www.ntdaily.com • GAB 117, Corner of117, Avenue B and MulberryB and Announcements

Publications Guidelines: Please read your ad the first day of publication. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions of copy. We reserve the right to adjust in full an error by publishing a corrected insertion. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion occupied by the error on the first insertion only. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. The newspaper reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad, and must approve all copy.

Roommate giving you problems? FInd a new one in the ntdaily classifieds.

Announcements Announcements

GuideIfPublications you are a veteran lines: who was denied a Please read your ad waiver of tuition the first day of publiunder Texas cation.theThe publisher Hazlewood Actfinancial at assumes no aresponsibility public technical for erschool, rors orjunior omissions of college, community copy. We reserve the college university right to or adjust in full an inerror Texas you byand publishing a were not ainsertion. Texas Licorrected resident at the ability shall not exceed time you of entered the cost that portion occupied the error the service,byyou on the firstnot insertion may or may be only. The entitled to a advertiser, refund the newspaofand all not or some of per,tuition is responsible for the paid. the truthful content Place ofantheadad. The newspaper reserves the today! right to request changes, reject or Call a sales properly classify an representative at ad, and must approve (940)565-2851. all copy.

Please contact Jason Sharp or Jerri Hardaway at 713752-0017 or toll-free at 877-752-2477. We are with the law firm of Schwartz, Junell, Greenberg & Oathout, LLP, with its principal office located at 909 Fannin, Suite 2700, Houston, Texas 77010-1028.

Announcements Announcements

$5,000$7,000 PAID EGG DONORS

+ Expenses for up to 6 donations. N/smokers, ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ ACT>24/GPA>3.0 reply to info@ eggdonorcenter. com Afraid you For Rent won't find a $299 Student roommate? Move-In Place Special! an ad ... Free water, wi-fi In the in Club Room, sparkling pool, classifieds trash service, and ntdaily.com much more. Come see what we have to offer! 940-565-1375

Afraid you won't find a roommate? Place an ad ...

In the classifieds ntdaily.com

Help Wanted For Rent

Help Wanted Services

STUDENT PAYOUTS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed In Denton. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys.

!BARTENDING! $250/day potential. No experience necessary. Training available. 1-800965-6520 ext 204. Age 18+ OK

t Firssion Ses REE

F

Earn $1000-$3200 a month to drive our brand new cars with ads placed on them. YouDriveAds.com

Help Wanted $$Need Cash$$ Find your partCat lover wanted! Live fully timeinjob today furnished studio the by searching apt/ guest house for ntdaily classifieds. Lake Lewisville estate surrounded by water and trees with hot tub, pool, and outdoor pool table. Utilities, Internet, DirecTV and maid service included. Potential to work off rent by cat sitting (3 cats) and doing projects for owners. E mail us about yourself to bennettlakehouse@ gmail.com.

Help Wanted Services

For Rent Services

For Rent Services

For Rent Services

creative home COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK Breckenridge Vail Beaver Creek awaits your baby NTDAILY.COM Keystone Arapahoe Basin through adoption. All NYC has to breckenridge offer. Expenses paid. Call or email 20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. Ellen toll free: 888ellen@ Math,868-8778, Acct, Stats Fina, Mktg, Econ, Phys Chem,FOR RELEASE AUGUST 15, 2010 plus t/s eeadoption.com. eeadoption.com. Eng, Biolg,Spanish, GMAT, GRE

ACE PRO TUTORS

NTDAILY.COM

NT Daily Services

All Subjects

FROM ONLY

THE TV CROSSWORD Open 7 Days • 940-383-5850 Roommate by Jacqueline E. Mathews

Help Wanted Take over lease, free Wii AdoptionLoving, 1 bedroom Apartment See more information here http://johnrazmus. com/apt Earn $1000-$3200 a month to drive our brand new cars with ads placed on them. www. AdCarDriver.com

Read the Daily!

giving you Help Wanted problems? JOIN PARTY! FIndOUR a new one Saturday Nite out, a Parks Recreation in the& ntdaily Youth program, is classifieds. looking for parttime counselors for Saturday evenings. No experience necessary. If you are at least 17 years of age and would like a FUN paying job, call Kris today! 972-446-6483.

Get Noticed!

go to ntdaily.com and click on classifieds today and sell your stuff tomorrow.

7

WWW.UBSKI.COM

1-800-SKI-WILD

1-800-754-9453

Place an ad today!

Read the Call a sales representative at Daily! 6 (940)565-2851.3

Brea new

8

2 5 5 3 1 9 9 2 6 3 7 21 6 8 9 1 7 1 9 3 2 47 5 6 8 2 1 4 8 9 4 4 6 2 9 5 7 1 5 3 2 8 9 3 4 2 7 84

$$Need Cash$$ Find your part-time job today by searching the ntdaily classifieds.

ACROSS 1 Morley of “60 Minutes” 6 __ Grissom; William Petersen’s role on “CSI” 9 Entertain V. EASY 10 Fragrance 12 “__-Cop”; Burt Reynolds movie 13 Charlie Brown’s dog 14 Actress Jillian 15 “The A-__”; series for Mr. T 16 “A Passage to __”; Judy Davis/Alec Guinness film 19 Bancroft or Meara V. EASY 23 George of “CSI” 24 Dog’s name in “Peter Pan” 25 Pure 28 “__ Knows Best” 30 “I __ my case!”; closing remark 31 Garr or Hatcher 32 Slangy affirmative 33 “Last __ Standing”; series for Jay Mohr 34 City in Utah 36 Likely 39 Thwart; hinder 42 William Bendix’s TV role

4

7

3

4

5 1 8

2

13 15 17 18 20 21 22 25

6 8 1 9 8 2 5

26 27 28 29 31 33 35 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

(c) 2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

5 V. 3EASY 3 4 2 98

9 3

V. EASY

4

9

7 4 8 6 5 3 2

3 6

DOWN Actress __ Rue Sitcom for Sherman Hemsley “America’s __ Videos” Suffix for cold, old or bold Actor Stephen __ Wet, sticky stuff# 1 Mischief maker Now I __ me down to sleep...” Ortiz of “Ugly Betty” “__ Challenged”; sitcom for Alyssa Milano “Voyage to the Bottom of the __” “...__ the season to be jolly...” __ King Cole Monogram for Eisenhower Slangy denial 180° from SSW “A Flea in Her __”; movie for Rosemary Harris and Rex Harrison “Boys Don’t __”; Hilary Swank film “__ Haw” “Not __ Stranger”; Sinatra movie Opposite of masc. Onassis, to friends __ Hanks Average grade “The Adventures of __ Tin Tin” Orange rind Tim Daly’s sister Title for Bilko or Friday: abbr. Attempt “Say __ to the Dress” Cleaning cloth Tax-deferred retirement acct.

9 3

6 #

5 1

5 6 4 3 2 6 7 9 1 8 2 2 7 4 6 2 9 2 8 87 7 4 5 89 7 5 3 2 64 1 5 5 46146 97 27 62 6 7 21 1 1 392 4 2 348 85 377 4 5 9 1 2 7 4 17 6 7 851 8 2 5 4 6 2 9 1 6 5 Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle

5 4 2 Place an ad today! 8 Call a sales representative at (940)565-2851.

In cla ntd

44 “__ Acres” 45 Senator __ Specter of Pennsylvania 46 Cobb and Burrell 47 Country and pop singer Crystal __ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11

Fe lik d h e sp

5 1 8

9 3# 5 8 6 #3 4 7 5 8 2 3 1

7 4 3 6

7 3 Are your finances just a bunch of jumbled numbers? V. EASY

V. EASY

#1

Stop the frustration and visit the Student Money Management Center today - Chestnut Hall, Suite 313 - 940.369.7761 Personal consultations ~ Workshops ~ Online resources ~ Loan programs http://moneymanagement.unt.edu www.unt.edu/moneymanagement objective an The objective of the game Yesterday’s 7 6The 3is to8fillofallthe game is to fill all 4 9 2 6 6 Yesterday’s 1 answers 9 2 the blank squares in a game with the 6 4 3 2

the blank squares in a game with the # 49are three 2 There 5correct 9 There 8 7 3 7 very correct numbers. arenumbers. three # 1 very 4 3 55 2 6 942 79 86 7 1 2 43 8 5# 21 simple constraints to follow. In a 9 by 9 simple follow. In a 9 by 9 7 69 18 42 95 3 7 81 3 1 9 4 5 constraints 3 1 9tosquare 6 8 42 2 5 7 Sudoku game: square Sudoku game: 5 in3 43 51469 • Every row inof491numbers 9 row of 93numbers 2 must 89 27 78must 32 82 4 86 2 47 • Every clude all digits 1 through 9 in any order 56 35 43 7 1 2 7 4 8 clude all digits 9 in any order 1 1 throughEvery 6 8 2 86 1 9must 26 6 5 34 column • Every column of 9• numbers must 3of 97 numbers 4 6 8 21 97 18 5 9 5 2 6 3 4 include6 3 all2digits 17through 55 1 967in any 9 5 include 9allindigits any 19through requires calculation or arithmetic 4 Sudoku requiresSudoku no calculation or no arithmetic order 3 32 68227 8 4 6 59 11 5 order skills.aItgame is essentially a game of placing8numbers 9 of34the 3subsection 5 5 21 9 3of the 2 skills. It is essentially of placing numbers • Every by 39 • Every 3 by 3 subsection 87 697 86 71 4 5 19 34 43 2 in squares, using very simple rules of logic and by 9 square must include all digits 1 in squares, using very simple rules of logic and by 9 square all 5 must include 7 digits 1 1 2 4 8 9 522 757 13 34116 63 7 1 588 29 through 9 deduction. through 9 deduction. 7 6 3 4 1 8 2 5 9

6

1 # 250

5 6 4 8 1 7 42 99 1 3 7 88 9 8 73 2 4 56 55 876 7 1 34 3 28 7 1 5 3 69 28 664 3 4 1 79 3 7 2 55 4 98 3 397 21 56 9 4 3 1 9 6 2 5 77 44 8 8 2 6 46 37313 Stop the frustration and visit the Student Money Management Center today - Chestnut Hall, 4 3 8 4Suite 9 -1940.369.7761 3 5 2 8 95 6 1 9 9 1resources 5 8 9 36~ Loan 2 84 5 3 4 7 96 67 Personal consultations ~ Workshops ~ Online programs 47 3 97 1 85 8 6 2 9 16 31 6 5 2 www.unt.edu/moneymanagement 6 9 2 3 7 4 1 8 5

72 #

6 25 1 6 3 7 9 8 9 7 2 73 1 14

Are your finances just a bunch of jumbled numbers? 4 2

V. EASY

8

6

# 49 V. EASY

5 13 94 49 29 3 8 5 3 7 6

www.sudoku.com

V. EASY

www.sudoku.com

#3

8 52

# V. 50EASY

Page 1 o



8/31/10 Edition