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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

A freight train moves along tracks next to Port Road in Jeffersonville. Photo by Christopher Fryer

Greasing the wheels When it comes to infrastructure, Southern Indiana means business By Matt Koesters matt.koesters@newsandtribune.com

W

hether by air, by the Interstate 265 loop. The road, by rail or by downtown crossing is meant to river, Louisville provide more northbound lanes and Southern In- to ease traffic congestion along diana enjoy a distinct competi- Interstate 65. Both new bridges, tive advantage over other cities along with a renovated Kennedy Bridge for southbound I-65 trafwhen it comes to logistics. “Typically, when a company fic, will be funded by the collecis looking at either expanding tion of tolls from motorists. “Both bridges will be signifiand relocating or adding a new cant economic drivers in facility somewhere, inithe long run,” said Uric tially, the main driver is Dufrene, professor of the logistics issue,” said economics and finance at Jerry Acy, River Ridge Indiana University Southexecutive director. Acy east. “While tolls will proestimates that a relocatvide a cost to daily coming company’s choices muters, the economic for relocation sites are benefits of both bridges “99 percent” driven by will far exceed the tolls.” logistics. The east-end crossing is And the rich keep MIKE MOORE perhaps the most anticigetting richer. pated component of the Southern Indiana is project among members about to give businesses of the Southern Indiana a few more reasons to business community, as it locate here. The Ohio will provide direct highRiver Bridges Project is way access to the town recognized as one of the of Utica, the Port of Indilargest ongoing transana — Jeffersonville and portation projects in the the River Ridge Comcountry, but some lessermerce Center. known projects near “When it comes to River Ridge Commerce URIC DUFRENE convenience, people Center are going to turn that are shipping their the heads of executives products or receiving looking for new homes their raw materials, confor their companies. venience and efficiency is at the top of their BRIDGES PROJECT lists,” said Rich Cooper, Estimated to be comCEO of Ports of Indiana. pleted at the end of 2016, “This bridge is going to the Ohio River Bridges provide both of those Project consists of three components to people major components — the downtown and east- JACK COFFMAN at River Ridge and the Ports of Indiana, and end crossings and the requite frankly, on the other side of alignment of Spaghetti Junction in downtown Louisville — at a the river as well.” While the east-end crossing is cost of about $2.5 billion. The east-end crossing, for expected to immediately benefit which construction is being Southern Indiana, the downtown managed by the Kentucky Trans- crossing is more about planning portation Cabinet, will complete for the future, said Jeffersonville

Mayor Mike Moore. “It puts us ahead of the competition,” Moore said. “The economic growth is what has driven the two bridges projects. You wouldn’t have had governors from Indiana and Kentucky both willing to commit the dollars and investment into our community and Louisville’s community if there wasn’t a huge benefit for us financially.”

HEAVY HAUL CORRIDOR When it comes to economic growth in Southern Indiana, it’s easy to identify the epicenter of where that growth is happening: The north end of Jeffersonville, where River Ridge and the Port of Indiana — Jeffersonville are located. According to the latest annual report from the River Ridge Development Authority, the business and industrial park has grown from $129.3 million in direct investment in 2006 to $530.5 million in 2013. With new tenants like America Place, Catamaran and American Fuji Seal, that number’s sure to grow this year. One thing holding River Ridge back is a lack of rail connectivity to the port, but that’s about to change. Ground was broken in April on the construction of a new heavy haul corridor that will connect the two entities, which will include right-of-way acquisition for the construction of new rail lines from the port to the former ammunition plant. The heavy haul corridor’s $22.5 million price tag is being paid for through a partnership between the state, River Ridge, the port, Jeffersonville and Clark County. Jeffersonville’s willingness to contribute to the project

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore and Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer cut the ribbon to officially open the Jeffersonville ramp to the Big Four Bridge on Tuesday afternoon. Photo by Christopher Fryer

THE BIG FOUR BRIDGE BOOM Though the recently completed Big Four Bridge, a pedestrian and bicycle crossing, doesn’t help local commercial entities with their logistics needs, it does provide Jeffersonville with something just as important for attracting new business — a steady stream of customers. “I think it changes the entire dynamic for the city of Jeffersonville,” said Mayor Mike Moore. “It makes us a much more attractive city for job growth, for family growth, for education growth, for tourism growth.” The Big Four Bridge could ease the pain caused by tolls for some Jeffersonville businesses, said Uric Dufrene, professor of economics and finance at Indiana University Southeast. “Jeffersonville is positioning itself as a destination for Louisville residents, and the Big Four Bridge will improve accessibility,” Dufrene said. Several businesses located to and opened in downtown Jeffersonville in direct response to the opening of the pedestrian bridge, including Big Four Burgers + Beer, Pearl Street Treats and Red Yeti Brewing Co. Dufrene thinks there’s room for more than just new eateries in Jeffersonville, thanks to the bridge. “The city and entrepreneurs should also think about a mix of retail or hospitality establishments that won’t be adversely impacted by any tolls,” Dufrene said. — Staff Writer Matt Koesters

“Both bridges will be significant economic drivers in the long run.” — Uric Dufrene

continued on page E5

IU Southeast professor of economics and finance

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E2 | PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014

Global fact finding? Map out greater global reach from River Ridge. Land and Location: 6,000 prime acres zoned to meet every need, from global headquarters to heavy industrial. Located at the Crossroads of America, in Jeffersonville, Indiana and the Louisville, KY metro market. I-265 East End Bridge puts downtown Louisville just minutes away.

Global Logistics: A logistical network of four Interstate highways: I-64, I-65, I-71, and I-265. Plus railway connections to the Ports of Indiana on the Ohio River, offering 12-month barge access to international markets. Other assets include the Louisville International Airport and UPS Worldport, the largest automated package facility in the world.

Infrastructure: High-volume water supply (80 to 100 million gallons per day), a new water treatment facility with a two million gallon per day capacity, and 138kv power service provided by Duke Energy with 7,000 linear feet already installed. Three telecom providers keep the data flowing.

Labor & Training: A right-to-work labor force deploying cutting-edge skills supported by two local training providers and the Indiana Skills Enhancement Fund. Worldclass educational and R&D resources include the University of Louisville, Purdue University, and Indiana University.

For further fact-finding, contact us at 812.285.8979

River Ridge Commerce Center 6200 E. Highway 62 • Suite 600 Jefforsonville, IN 47130 P: 812.285.8979 • F: 812.285.8983 E: info@riverridgecc.com www.riverridgecc.com


News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

E3

Growing jobs at River Ridge Companies keep flowing into industrial development

ABOVE & BELOW: The River Ridge Commer Center is located off Ind. 62 and employees nearly 6,000 people at businesses that have moved to the area. Submitted photo

BY TARA SCHMELZ

newsroom@newsandtribune.com JEFFERSONVILLE — What once used to be full of mostly dormant buildings from an old World War II ammunition plant is now a growing area full of businesses, creating unprecedented economic growth in Jeffersonville and Charlestown. The River Ridge Commerce Center, which is located off of Ind. 62, employees about 6,000 people in the 40 businesses that have already moved to the area. And they are just starting. “There’s a terrific potential here at River Ridge. When you look at the assets here at the area, with the interstates and waterways, it gives us a competitive advantage in getting products PAUL WHEATLEY to market. We have sold 500 acres, which is right at 10 percent of our property,” said Paul Wheatley, director of marketing and finance for the River Ridge Development Authority. “When you start to extrapolate that over the next five to 10 years there’s awesome potential for job growth and investment.” PRIME LOCATION River Ridge has 6,000 prime acres zoned to meet every need, from global headquarters to heavy industrial businesses. It is also located in a great location, with easy access to three major interstates, regional and international airports and the UPS Worldport, the largest fully automated package handling facility in the world. Additionally, construction is currently taking place on two new Ohio River bridges, connecting Southern Indiana to Louisville’s east end and downtown, which is scheduled to be completed in 2016. Decisions for the property are made by the River Ridge Development Authority. The authority is responsible for the installation of infrastructure and environmental remediation, for the operation of the water utility and for conducting marketing, attraction and retention efforts. These responsibilities are executed by a full-time staff of 13 and overseen by an appointed Board of Directors. Clark County, the City of Jeffersonville, Town of Utica, City of Charlestown and the Ports of Indiana each have an appointment to the board. TOTAL INVESTMENT The total private investment to date is $317 million. That is in addition to the federal/state funds of $10 million. The economic impact of the project has been amazing for the area. Indianapolis-based Policy Analytics, LLC performed the first Economic Impact Study for RRDA last year. That study showed that direct investment in the development grew from $129.3 million to $530.5 million from 2006 to 2013. The area generated an estimated 9,155 jobs in the region, with 6,000 of those directly connected to RRCC spending or employment.

Letter to readers

center personnel. “River Ridge Commerce Center provides us with unparalleled access River Ridge Commerce Center to superior logistics and a skilled workforce,” said Joel Saban, execu• SERVICES OFFERED: Industrial tive vice president of pharmacy opcenter and development organization erations with Catamaran. “Locating our newest facility in this region • ADDRESS: 6200 E. Ind. 62, Suite works well for our business model 600, Jeffersonville and we found that River Ridge pro• PHONE: 812-285-8979 vides exactly what we need.” • WEBSITE: riverridgecc.com American Fuji Seal, Inc., a Japa• BUSINESSES: 40 nese company with American op• EMPLOYEES: About 6,000 erations headquarted in Bardstown, Ky., purchased more than 23 acres BRINGING REVENUE at River Ridge. The manufacturer of River Ridge businesses also con- labeling products for the food and tribute heavily to the area with in- beverage industry has already startcome and sales tax, as well as local ed construction of a $20 million, option tax revenue streams. In 2014, 84,000-square-foot facility, which is RRCC is projected to contribute expected to employ 60 $11.6 million in state people. Bruce Atcher, sales tax and $10.3 “Our mantra here is vice president of operamillion in state in- ‘Build it and they will tions with Fuji Seal, said come tax revenue for was River Ridge’s locome.’ Our board itcation Indiana. An additional combined with a $3.8 million in local of directors has put capable workforce that income tax revenue led its decision to locate is generated within specific emphasis on to the area. the six-county area inimproving existing “Our mantra here is cluded in the analysis. ‘Build it and they will and building new “The River Ridge come.’ Our board of diDevelopment Author- infrastructure in order rectors has put specific ity is very excited by to encourage new emphasis on improving the fact that our job existing and building creation and capital companies to locate new infrastructure in investment mission at the River Ridge order to encourage new leads to great paying companies to locate at jobs and tax revenues Commerce Center.” the River Ridge Comfor state and local — Paul Wheatley merce Center,” Wheatley governments,” WheatRiver Ridge Development said. “Those new private ley said. Authority director of marketing investments will join an and finance array of already existNEW ing and successful busiDEVELOPMENTS nesses here at River Ridge, including Several new developments have Amazon, United Technology Corp., come online at River Ridge this year, Standard Register and more.” including America Place at River Ridge, Catamaran and American Fuji GROWING COMMERCIALLY Seal. Development isn’t limited to large America Place has two structures businesses. River Ridge recently anplanned at River Ridge.The company nounced that New Washington State has already completed construction Bank will be the first commercial of one building — a 150,000-square- business to locate at what will be foot facility. The second building-a called the River Ridge Retail Center, 225,000-square-foot facility — is along Patrol Road. The bank will enscheduled to be complete later this compass 3,000-square-feet and ofyear. The Class-A warehouse space is fer full-service banking and an ATM. designed to appeal to an array of in- Construction is scheduled to start at dustrial tenants. the end of this year. Catamaran, a pharmacy benefit “As everybody can see, as you management company, plans to cre- drive up and down the road, we’ve ate 205 jobs at River Ridge by 2015, got a lot of activity going on here adding to its already large workforce right now. There’s lots of dirt being of 4,000 employees across North turned out here,” Wheatley said. “ ... America. Jobs will include pharma- the future is bright.” cists, pharmacy technicians and call

For more info

Dear Friends, River Ridge Commerce Center is on the cusp of several exciting advancements as we continue to welcome additional international and national corporations in 2014. We are honored to be the choice location of 40 businesses — each with a unique set of operational requirements and goals — and we are growing. Making River Ridge unique is our capacity to accommodate a host of companies representing a wide range of industry categories. With an eye toward a bright future, we are pleased to report positive momentum in 2013 related to infrastructure improvements, jobs creation, economic impact, and much more. River Ridge is proof that American business is “full steam ahead” and we are ready to help companies take root for the next phase of our national economy. Whether a business needs an expansive land tract or a small parcel of land, River Ridge is up to the challenge of delivering what today’s businesses need. Without question, immediate access to exceptional logistics and transportation options makes River Ridge especially attractive to nearly any business seeking the site of its new headquarters or manufacturing facility. Our reputation for exceptional logistical resources is without peer. Major corporations specializing in fulfillment or those relying on close access to suppliers will benefit from nearby access to Louisville International Airport, UPS Worldport and Clark Regional Airport, as well as the Port of IndianaJeffersonville. Construction began in early 2013 on two new Ohio River bridges connecting Southern Indiana to Louisville Metro’s east end and downtown. A planned transportation route connecting the new I-265 interchange to Highway 62, which runs adjacent to River Ridge, will deliver instant access to multiple interstate highways throughout the region. Beyond logistics and distribution, River Ridge offers businesses an employeefriendly working environment in a campuslike setting. We strive continually to update development amenities and in 2014 will be constructing new TARC bus stops, sidewalks, and landscaping along Patrol Road. As the Midwest’s premier business, industrial, and distribution park, we welcome the chance to provide every client — local, national or global — with the right place to do business. I also would like to publicly express my sincere appreciation and gratitude to the River Ridge Development Authority leadership and staff, with special thanks to our Executive Director, Jerry G. Acy. Together, our team has managed the completion of a multitude of infrastructure improvements, new investor agreements, and much more. This talented, professional staff, together with my fellow board members’ leadership and vision, has helped make these advancements possible. Wishing each of you the best, — J. Mark Robinson, President, River Ridge Development Authority


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PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

News and Tribune 05.30.2014

Voluforms is located at 1419 Fabricon Blv. in Jeffersonville. Submitted photo

Printing out success CEO shares story behind Voluforms’ 30-year growth NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com When Michael Stewart began his career with Voluforms in 1984 along with his father, the Jeffersonville-based company started out as a small printing business for local banks. Now, almost 30 years later,Voluforms has grown exponentially, branching out into a “one-stop shop” for everything from promotional products to fulfillment and warehousing. “We started with three people in a garage, and we have about 63 people overall now,” Stewart, CEO and president of Voluforms, said. The commercial printing company provides several services, including brochures, logo wear and graphic design. “We probably do $2.5 million to $3 million worth of promotional products,” Stewart said. Before opening Voluforms, Stewart and his father worked for a printing company that specialized in bank checks and forms. However, when they found out the company had been bought out and discontinued its forms services, the pair decided to take those clients and start their own business. Around the same time, Stewart said a new law also was passed for bankholding companies to expand beyond county borders, and the companies needed a way of becoming more uniform. “What would happen is they would have three banks with three different forms, and they tried to uniformly put those forms into one,” he said. And thus a name was born. “We allow them to use their buying power and basically their volume pur-

For more info Voluforms

• SERVICES OFFERED: Printing, promotional products, warehousing • 1419 Fabricon Blvd., Jeffersonville • 812-283-0455 • voluforms.com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 30 • EMPLOYEES: 63

chasing, which is where we got Voluforms from,” Stewart said. The printing company services about 465 banks across the country, from the smallest in Texas to the largest in Indiana. “We can turn on a dime because we don’t have a lot of red tape here,” Stewart said. “We’re going to work to make sure we’re giving you the right advice and to get the best bang for your buck.” In 1991, the company was awarded the Inc. 500, which recognizes the fastest growing companies in America. Voluforms has also been nominated several times by Business First as one of the top philanthropy companies in the area and offers volunteer services to multiple organizations, including Clark County Youth Shelter and Floyd County Animal Rescue League. “I think the biggest key to our success has been our level of service,” Stewart said.“Our No. 1 goal here is to make people talk not only about the product but the type of service they got. “The best advertising you can get is good word of mouth.”

Alisha McKnight, daughter of owners Nick and Sherri Jecker. Photo by Christopher Fryer

Greentree Pet Center has been family owned and operated for 38 years. Pictured, from left, are Chris Schickel, Jeremy Burns, Owner Brent Poyner, Connie Poyner and owner Mary Poyner.

Greentree Pets celebrates 40 years Greentree Pet Center in Clarksville brings many years of quality service to area animal lovers. Owner Brent Poyner is proud to have served the community through the years. “We would like to thank our customers for more than 40 years of support. Without our customers, we wouldn’t be here. Thanks for shopping here, and supporting the little guy,” he said. The pet center offers supplies for all types of animals, including birds, dogs, and cats, and carries Frontline and K9 Advantix flea products. “Now is the time to be sure your pet is on a good flea product, before the hot weather begins,” Poyner said. Grooming supplies, including clippers, combs, and brushes, also are in stock. Greentree Pet Center’s specialty, however, is aquariums. Through the years, Poyner has expanded the salt water and fresh water fish selection at his store. “Salt water tanks are really popular, with the brightly colored fish they provide. And freshwater African cichlids, with their bright orange, yellow, and blue coloring are one of the few fish that can rival salt water fish for their color. Poyner offers a wide selection of fish, as well as live rock and coral, and aquariums ranging in size from desktop to 220-gallon. Larger aquariums are also available on request, he said. “A good thing about having fish tanks is that anyone, from the very young to the very old, can enjoy them,” Poyner said.

When children come in to visit the pet center, Poyner noted that they see some familiar friends among the tanks. “Fish make great pets, and though it may sound odd, fish have personalities and interact with their owners. They know when someone’s watching, and they know who feeds them.” He added that fish provide great relaxation. “That’s why you see a lot of tanks in doctors’ and dentists’ offices. It’s scientifically proven that fish lower blood pressure, and it’s an interesting hobby.” For people who want a unique animal, Greentree Pet Center also offers a selection of lizards, iguanas, chameleons, water dragons, geckos and some varieties of snakes. “The ball python is a good starter snake. They are tame and will curl up in your hand. They also are a smaller snake, not over five feet long when fully grown,” he said. Greentree Pet Center continues to work with the Humane Association of Clark County. Usually, one or two cats that are awaiting adoption make the pet center their home, and applications are offered in the store.

For more info 1604 Greentree Blvd., Clarksville, behind the Greentree Mall 812-282-2594

Callistus Smith Agency is located at 3415 Paoli Pike in Floyds Knobs.

Highlander Collision Southern Indiana’s gets you back on the insurance is Callistus road in style Smith’s business Family still finds satisfaction in serving community Highlander Collision is a full service auto body repair and paint business conveniently located three miles from Interstate 64 on U.S. 150 in Floyds Knobs. Nick Jecker is the owner of this 18bay facility. This family owned business has been around for 13 years. Jecker said he still finds satisfaction in returning damaged vehicles back into pre-accident condition. All paint jobs are done with DuPont Paint. There is a paint booth that will provide a factory baked on finish each time. Highlander Collision guarantees a color match to each vehicle by using a computerized paint mixing system. All vehicles are washed before being returned as a courtesy to customers. There is a waiting area for customers to relax in while their vehicle is being repaired. A tow service and rental cars are available. Highlander Collision works with all insurance companies. There are six technicians and four office employees having a combined total of over 160 years of auto body re-

pair experience. Jecker has 24 years of experience. He has been working in body repair full time since he was 17. Most recently, Alisha (Jecker) McKnight joined the office at Highlander Collision as its new office manager. Alisha is the daughter of Nick and Sherri Jecker, owners of Highlander Collision and was raised in the auto body business. If you need help in scheduling your car for repairs, please call Alisha at 812-923-6000.

For more info Highlander Collision

• SERVICES OFFERED: full-service auto body repair and paint • 5907 U.S. 150, Floyds Knobs • 812-923-6000 • highlandercollision.com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 13 • HOURS: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. MondayFriday, or by appointment

NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com Callistus Smith Agency is a thirdgeneration insurance agency that was founded in 1947. The company is now run by Glenn Smith, Nancy Smith and Mike Heiligenberg. Additionally, on its team of professionals is Adam Smith, an Affordable Care Act adviser certified by the National Association of Health Underwriters and Brian Smith who specializes in business insurance. There are 14 employees. On average the employees at Callistus have 25 years of experience. “People specialize in specific areas,” Glenn Smith said.“As an agency, we can handle any type of risk.” Callistus Smith Agency specializes in auto, home, motorcycle, boat, life, business, health and other types of insurances. It is highly qualified to handle any situation. In addition, it works with its clients and other local businesses so they can understand the new health reform law. There are many issues to contend with in the new law and Adam is eager to help the com-

For more info Callistus Smith Agency

• SERVICES OFFERED: Insurance sales • 3415 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs • 812-944-7711 • callistussmith.com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 67 • EMPLOYEES: 14 • HOURS: M-F 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

munity in any way they can. Callistus Smith Agency is involved with the community. With 67 years in business, it is a stable agency. In the future, Callistus Smith Agency hopes to have continued growth and enhance its education and expertise. The team also engages in seminars and regular webinars. “We are going to grow with the times,” Smith said. It has been located at its current location at 3415 Paoli Pike in Floyds Knobs since 1997.


News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

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TOP AND BELOW: A freight train moves along tracks next to Port Road in Jeffersonville. Photo by Christopher Fryer

Business continued from E1

was a no-brainer, Moore said. “I never heard a conversation from any of the parties involved questioning the necessity or the value,” Moore said. “If we’re going to continue to be a growing community, this is another step in the process that gets us ahead of the competition.” Rail connectivity means that River Ridge tenants will enjoy direct access to 12,500 inland river miles via the port, Cooper said. “When this link, when this corridor comes together, that new corridor will ensure River Ridge companies, like port companies, will have multimodal connectivity, including connections to multiple Class 1 railroads, great interstates and the Ohio River,” Cooper said. “I think that’s where the business attraction piece comes in; we’ve been very successful at the Ports of Indiana because we can demonstrate to companies that we can drive transportation costs out of their business. That’s a significant part of doing business today.” One of the Port of Indiana — Jeffersonville’s key advantages in attracting industrial tenants is its direct access to rail, and rail is still going strong, Cooper said. Acy agreed, adding that the heavy haul corridor will be River Ridge’s route to the east-end crossing. “Having two access points to the interstate is very important as we add more and more companies here,” Acy said. “As employee traffic gets to be greater and truck traffic increases over time, it’s going to be vitally important to have alternate access to I-265.”

AIRPORT ROAD Though still far from a definite plan, Clark County has already funded preliminary environmental and engineering work for a new road that would connect the Clark County Regional Airport to River Ridge. Dubbed Airport Road by its propo-

nents, the proposed transportation corridor would also open up thousands of acres of agricultural land for commercial and residential development, said Commissioners President Jack Coffman. But the primary reason for the road, Coffman said, is to attract more businesses to Clark County in general and River Ridge in particular. “Sure, you can get over from the Clark County airport to River Ridge without too much trouble, but having a direct route will even make River Ridge more desirable for those type of businesses that are looking to locate offices and corporate headquarters,” Coffman said. “Even some small manufacturing, they’ll have a direct route to the air-

port.” Dufrene applauded Clark County’s plan. “Making the airport more accessible and increasing the connection between the airport and River Ridge will be tremendous,” Dufrene said. “To the extent that this can be fast-tracked, policy makers might want to move as fast as possible on this road.The airport increases the marketability of the entire region due to the significant intermodal benefits.” But the Airport Road plan has its detractors. Though an exact route has yet to be determined for the project, Moore is critical of the county’s proposal. “To me, it doesn’t make sense to

build a $12 million road if only a few select people get to utilize it,” Moore said. “But if you can take that same amount of money and transfer it to where tens of thousands of people are going to be using it on a monthly basis — to me, the plan that I presented is much more efficient, much more effective and much more user-friendly than what the county has proposed.” Moore’s plan is to widen Charlestown Pike to four lanes, which he said would improve the flow of traffic near River Ridge. Acy said that the proposed Airport Road would alleviate some congestion issues by providing an alternate route for commuters from I-65 to River Ridge.


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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

America Place Business Park expands 30-year-old venture growing into River Ridge NEWS AND TRIBUNE newsroom@newsandtribune.com

Currently, America Place Business Park, in Jeffersonville, sits at one million square feet. But Keith Starling, leasing and marketing manager for the company, said the business is going to be growing even larger, adding another one million square feet. American Place Business Park has been open in the same location since 1984. The company offers industrial warehousing space and office space for small to mid-size companies. Starling said that what sets the company apart from others is their willingness to work with clientele from all different backgrounds, from start-up companies to major manufactures. Starling said he is willing to work with the company and help them as they grow. “We try to be really flexible here,” Starling said. “We have got a lot of space and we don’t want to lock someone into a five-year lease on something thinking ‘in a year I’ll have to double the space,’ so we allow them to move around the park, or to expand where they are currently at. If it is good for them, it is good for us.” The America Place Drive location is at 80 percent occupancy, Starling said, with more than 30 tenants. In order to accommodate the demand of industrial warehouse space, the company will be expanding to River Ridge Commerce Center. They will be purchasing 86 acres, or another 1 million square feet of capacity. “What we’re doing is changing pretty dramatically,” Starling said. “We’ve had this kind of small to mid-size company range and what we’re finding is Keith Starling, leasing and marketing manager, displays the model for the new park for America Place Business that people would go from basically their garages Park. The new park will be located at River Ridge Commerce Center. One building is already built, and the next to a small space here.Then as they grew, they could is scheduled to be done by the end of October. Submitted photo take more and more space. Then they would get to kind of accommodations do they need and handle a certain spot and we couldn’t accommodate them that whole thing until actually signing the lease.” anymore, so they had to go to a bigger facility.” Starling said that he also works to plan events for Starling said that the first building is already in America Place Business Park the tenants and the community. place in the new park, and the second building will “We’re actually opening a park July 3 that we’re be set to go up near October. This will be a great • SERVICES OFFERED: Industrial park and going to dedicate to the city and all the tenants will move for his company and his tenants, Starling said, storage be able to use it,” Starling said. because the location of the River Ridge park is so • 266 America Place Jeffersonville Overall, Starling said that he is very excited that centralized and close to multiple modes of trans• 812-288-4251 his company will be growing and for what he has portation, allowing him to accommodate more ten• americanplace.com achieved, and will be achieving with the River ants. • YEARS IN OPERATION: 30 Ridge location. “We’re seeing a lot of demand for warehousing • COMPANIES IN THE PARK: 33 “This is an exciting time for us in general because space industrial space a lot of jobs moving to the we love Jeffersonville, we love this town, this area,” sector,” Starling said. “It’s not just local companies Starling said. “We’re happy to see it grow and see around here, it’s companies from all over the coun- best place for them. “I go out into the community and meet new ten- this demand being met, see our tenants doing well try realizing that this is such a great area logistically and that this is such a low cost of living. You can ants, or people, that might be interested in indus- now, and that they’re growing. I’m also excited to live in Jeffersonville, kind of that small town feel, trial space, interested in growing or getting a larger have new tenants come in and new facilities that facility,” Starling said. “I will take them and show we can offer. but still have all the resources of Louisville.” “It’s just really a great time and we’re really proud Starling said that he primarily works with new cli- them around here and kind of find out what is a ents and helps them to figure out what will be the good fit, what kind of build out do they need, what of the community and how it’s grown.”

For more info

Expectations run high at River Valley Financial Bank Letter to readers River Valley Financial Bank is a progressive financial institution that is dedicated to the principle of customer service. Customer service is not a buzzword or marketing theme at River Valley Financial, but rather a commitment. We believe that customer service is about anticipating and exceeding customers’ expectations. “Expect a Difference!” is River Valley’s service promise. That’s right, service promise. We realized from our board of directors to our newest employee that if the customer doesn’t see and feel a difference when they bank with us, then we are no better than our out-of-town, or out-ofstate competitors. We are the local bank with the hometown advantage ... prompt and local decision making, flexibility in administration of lending and deposit programs, and most importantly, a “They know me!” difference. We take pride in our customer relationships and we want our customers to know how much we value that relationship. If you aren’t already a River Valley customer, we invite you to “Expect a Difference!” We trust you will see it in our faces and recognize it in our attitude. Customer satisfaction is our standard and not a goal. Sincerely, — Matthew P. Forrester, President, CEO

New Jeffersonville office opens on Veterans Parkway NEWS AND TRIBUNE newsroom@newsandtribune.com River Valley Financial Bank was established almost 140 years ago when it opened its main branch in Madison. Since then, with its roots strongly tied to the people and towns along the Ohio River, the bank now operates 15 branches in the Indiana cities of Madison, Hanover, Sellersburg, Charlestown, Floyds Knobs, New Albany, Osgood and now Jeffersonville as well as Carrollton, Ky. Since opening its first office in Clark County in 2003, the leadership team at River Valley Financial Bank has been hard at work living up to their service promise — “Expect a Difference.” That hard work and effort has paid off with successful and steady growth as people continue to look for alternative styles of banking that offer all the bells and whistles of a large bank, but with the friendly atmosphere and courtesy usually found d in a smaller community bank.

While River Valley Finanical Bank has various locations throughout Southern Indiana, the company recently opened a new building at 1475 Veterans Parkway in Clarksville. Submitted photo

J JEFFERSONVILLE OFFICE O OPENS Located at 1475 Veterans Parkway, just across an from the street from fro BoomBozz pzza, the newBo est locations will highlight lig the personal, above and beyond customer an service that River Valley ser customers have come to cus know kno as well a new electronic service called IT — tro or IInteractive Teller. The Interactive Teller T offers offer customers self service banking similar to an ATM, but with much more service capabilities and servi with the human touch. “It creates both a safe and personalized transaction,” perso stated Matt Forrester, president of River Valley Financial B Bank. “So the customer can take advantage of some ta of the latest in technology but with the personal touch service p that we feel is so important to our bank customers.”

For more info River Valley Financial Bank

• SERVICES OFFERED: Banking • Various locations in Southern Indiana • rvfbank.com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 139 • LOCATIONS: 15

River Valley Financial has quickly gained the “Expect a Difference” reputation with service and products, such as the Interactive Teller, that make banking as convenient and easy as possible. You can experience a real difference in the personal service and treatment you receive at River Valley and still have all of the convenience in technology such as Free Online Banking, Free Bill Pay, Remote Deposit for businesses, Mobile Application and now the Interactive Teller and much more. So if you are tired of banking as usual and ready for a change — come to River Valley Financial Bank and Expect a Difference!


News and Tribune 05.30.2014

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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

CELEBRATING

YEARS

Founded in 1984, America Place offers more than one million square feet of warehouse space in the heart of Kentuckiana. America Place is currently home to more than 30 businesses representing a wide variety of industries.

INDUSTRIAL SPACE TAILORED TO FIT YOUR COMPANY’S NEEDS We offer space suited — but not limited to — printing, manufacturing, storage, office and distribution. With spaces ranging in size from 10,000 to 250,000 square feet, we can accommodate any and all of your business needs. We specialize in custom warehousing at competitive market prices.

266 America place Jeffersonville IN 47130 PH: (812)-288-4251 www.americaplace.com


News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

F1

Have you visited WorkOne lately?

WorkOne held its grand opening at 2125 State St., Suite 16, in New Albany. Submitted photo

Organization is place for employers and prospective employees to find each other

For more info WorkOne

• SERVICES OFFERED: Employment procurement services • 2125 State St., Suite 16, New Albany • 812-948-6102 • WEBSITE: workoneregion10.com

NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com The new WorkOne site has several computer labs for group workshop offerings to help job-seekers with resume, job search and interview techniques. WorkOne has a menu of talent development workshops, to include instruction in areas such as social media, workplace communication, Rosetta Stone language skills and Microsoft Office offerings to name a few. Last year over 600 certificates were awarded for completion of jobreadiness workshops, and approximately 550 certificates for completion of Microsoft office training. WorkOne has a developed an on-site Customer Service Training Program to help workers develop skills that are needed in many of today’s service industry jobs. Customers participating in this program learn telephone etiquette, conflict resolution, sales techniques, key communication principals, stress management, keyboarding/ Microsoft office, and how to apply the best practices to become a customer service specialist. A Career Advancement System is offered, which includes curriculum designed to provide job-seekers with skills and information needed for successful job search. The Career Advancement System includes fundamental workshops to ensure the job-seekers is proficient in resume, job search, and interviewing techniques, but also technology skill-upgrades, workplace communication, and social media. Career Advancement participants must successfully complete the National Career Readiness Certification from ACT. Upon completion of the Career Advancement System, job-seekers gain endorsement as a “Preferred JobSeeker” and are promoted to area employers for placement by WorkOne Business Consultants. WorkOne partners with area colleges and training institutions to assist eligible jobseekers with financial aid for training to a certification or degree to increase employment opportunities. Customers are currently enrolled in training for occupations such as accounting, registered and practical nursing, dental assisting, education, information technology, respiratory therapy, industrial maintenance, certified production technician, truck driver-CDL, and welding to name a few. Business Services: Business partnerships are imperative to a quality workforce system. WorkOne offers free jobpostings on the Indiana’s largest job board Indianacareerconnect.com, featuring job skill-matching and priority of service for military veterans.Thousands of jobs are posted on this site (statewide and regionally), as a primary resource to recruit new employees. The Indiana Career Connect site provides users with a wide array of employment-related services. Job seekers are able to search for all available jobs in the state using a search engine that “spiders” jobs from company and government websites, newspaper postings, and corporate job boards. Job searches can be conducted within a radius of a zip code, by city or county, by metropolitan or workforce area, or statewide. Employers can search for talent and rank the results using the automated system. The site provides labor market wage information and skill requirements for the jobs listed. Job seekers are able to develop resumes and submit them to employers online. Indiana Career Connect is a portal for connecting employers and job seekers and expanding economic opportunity in Indiana. The WorkOne Career Advancement System provides employers with well-qualified candidates, with proven work-ethic and skills in administrative, advanced manufacturing, business management, customer service and other industries. Employers can take advantage of customized recruiting services available through specialized events, information sessions, and on-site job fairs. WorkOne Southern Indiana conducts several recruiting events on-site each month to assist with area companies with recruiting needs. In addition, the organization hosts the largest regional job-fair event in Southern Indiana annually.The recent job fair held May, 2014 included 60 regional companies and over 1400 jobs available in a variety of industries to include manufacturing, service, financial, medical, professional, and transportation/logistics. Approximately 460 job seekers attended the 2014 event.

Graduates from WorkOne’s Pilot CPT Program. Submitted photo

CERTIFIED PRODUCTION TECHNICIAN TRAINING WorkOne Business Consultants meet with regional businesses to assess business needs related to recruitment, hiring and training qualified employees. Employers in the southern Indiana region continue to note a skill-gap deficit for employees being hired in the manufacturing sector. Technical skills and work ethic skills remain as key issues. In November, 2013 WorkOne Southern Indiana partnered with Ivy Tech Community College and Kentuckiana Works to provide a pilot Certified Production Technician (CPT) Training Program through grant funding from the National Fund for Workforce Solutions. The pilot class included fourteen representatives representing both regional manufacturing firms and WorkOne job-seekers. All participants successfully completed the CPT certification. In January, WorkOne partnered with Ivy Tech Community College and One Southern Indiana to host a Skill-Gap Forum for the manufacturing industry. Approximately 50 regional representatives from the manufacturing sector attended the event to discuss skill issues impacting their industry. The event included Craig Lamb, a representative from the Lafayette-area Advanced Manufacturing Movement. Lamb presented information on initiatives taken to develop and sustain an advanced manufacturing training program for his area, and provided insight on how the program could be replicated for the Southern Indiana workforce area. Employers participating in the WorkOne Pilot CPT program participated in a panel discussion. Employers at the forum validated the need to for Certified Production Technician Training, and indicated a desire to recruit and hire candidates completing the program. WorkOne continues to partner with Ivy Tech Community College and area manufacturers to offer training for the Certified Production Technician (CPT) Certification. Additional skills are required for job-seekers and employees to advance in today’s manufacturing environment. Individuals interested in completing the Certified Production Technician training should contact a WorkOne Career Coach to register for upcoming classes. On-the-Job Training grants can help offset an employer’s cost of training new employees for a variety of occupations. WorkOne on-the-job training can help save time and money in the recruitment and hiring process, train employees for specific company skill needs, and increase retention rates. Employers make all hiring determinations for any applicants referred by WorkOne. WorkOne will assist with developing a customized training plan (based on skills gaps of the applicant), and provide 50% reimbursement of the new employees wage to employers for the training period. Youth Services: Career Launch, a career-readiness program targeted to individuals age 18-25, provides skills such as financial management, team building, workplace communication, problem solving, basic computer software, and how to prepare and get a job for today’s workplace. Career Launch allows young adults to earn a Career Readiness Certificate, issued by ACT, which proves that they are prepared for the world of work. Upon successful completion, participants receive an incentive and work with a Career Coach to gain employment. A Youth Career Coach can help youth explore options and develop an achievable career plan. A Career Coach can help youth to earn a high school diploma or equivalency, find on-the-job training that pays while learning, and offer financial aid to allow attending training for certifications and degrees that employers need now. Individualized youth services available include: • Comprehensive counseling and guidance • Summer employment linked to learning • Paid and unpaid work experience • Occupational skill training • Tutoring to complete secondary school

• Alternative secondary school services • Leadership development opportunities • Supportive services • Follow-up services Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG), is a national model drop-out-prevention program designed to help young adults earn their high school diploma or equivalency and work toward attending college and/or getting a job. WorkOne has partnered with Jeffersonville and New Albany High Schools to pilot this program in Southern Indiana for 2013-14. WorkOne hires a JAG Specialist to work with students in the classroom setting to achieve their academic and career goals. Jag Specialists are responsible for helping students achieve attainment of 37 required competencies, coaching, mentoring, developing a career association, placement, and follow-up with students upon completion of the program. The JAG goal for high-school graduation is 90%+. Currently 70 students are enrolled in WorkOne JAG programs at these two schools. In February, the first JAG Community Development Conference was held in Clarksville.The conference included a regional competition of JAG participants for public speaking, financial literacy, employability skills, writing skills, career presentation, creative solutions and critical thinking, and outstanding senior. In addition to student competitions, two school competitions were held for best JAG Program commercial, and banner. Finalists from the regional competition, advanced to participate in the state JAG competition.A WorkOne Southern Indiana JAG participant from Jeffersonville High School, Kansas James, was recognized statewide as second place finalist for the Outstanding Senior Award.

Youth exploring virtual welding. Submitted photo

WORKONE YOUTH CAREER EXPO 2014

WorkOne partners with schools in the six-county region to provide a Youth Career Expo each Spring. The WorkOne Youth Career Expo provides an opportunity for youth to talk with approximately 40 regional employers and educational institutions and explore careers for their future. Area employers also recruit for permanent and seasonal employment at this event. Over 300 young adults representing eight area schools were in attendance at the 2014 WorkOne Youth Career Expo. The purpose of the Youth Expo is to provide youth career exploration opportunities with individuals in their fields of interest.Youth participating in the event are provided a list of interview questions for potential employers and training institutions to assist with their career exploration experience. In addition, information is provided on professional dress for interview and employment, hot 50 jobs, job hunting handbook, and work ethic.


F2 | PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014

BODY SHOP & AUTO SERVICE Our Family Serving Your Family for 60 Years Family Owned & Operated Since 1954 • Professional Trained Technicians • Mechanical Repairs • Insurance Work

• Rental Cars Available • 24 Hour Towing - 944-1921 • Domestic & Foreign Cars • Uni-Body & Frames Repaired

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www.kahlsbodyshop.com 2801 Mt Tabor Rd • New Albany, IN

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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

F3

Kahl’s celebrates 60 years New Albany body shop is a Southern Indiana favorite NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com Since 1954, Kahl’s Body Shop and Auto Service has been a family owned and operated business. Over the past 60 years, Kahl’s has provided all types of auto repair and vehicle body repair services for family cars, local law enforcement agencies, fleet management companies, dealerships and more. Mickey Kahl is the owner and Kahl’s shop has been voted No. 1 in collision repair in Floyd County by News and Tribune readers. Their goal is to make sure customers are satisfied with every step of the job. With 10 employees Kahl’s is able to offer all levels of repair. Their staff is highly trained and certified in repair and renovations. Their goal is to make your vehicle look brand new again. Kahl’s works on both mechanical and collision repair. Not only will Kahl’s work on domestic cars, they will also work on foreign automobiles. Unibody and frames are also able to be repaired at Kahl’s. Rental cars and 24 hour towing is available. Kahl’s also offers insurance work. Not only are computer estimates available, Kahl’s has added a drive-thru estimate bay in with their new expansion. With this drive-thru bay, customers can learn their estimated cost faster and more reliably. With 60 years of success and building on the future, Mickey said he is hoping for steady growth in the company. “We are committed to earn your business by making you the customer our priority,” he said.“We pride ourselves as having the quick response times, courteous staff and reasonable rates.” Referrals play an important part in our success due to our satisfied and loyal customers. Here are a few examples of what our customers have to say about us: • “Outstanding Service Guys! I can not believe you were able to fix my car. It drives like new again. I wouldn’t trust my vehicle to anyone else. Thanks for a job well done!” — Steve Jones • “I looked around at a lot of other repair shops and I have to say that I am extremely happy that I decided to bring my car to you. I was really amazed at how fast you were able to get my car running so fast!” — Sally Thomson Here is a look at services:

ESTIMATING At Kahl’s Body Shop we make every effort to use our expertise in writing a thorough, comprehensive report of the damage. This “Damage Report,” or estimate as it is more commonly called, is a visual inspection list containing the needs of your vehicle to return it to pre-accident condition.

From left, David Kahl, Jason Kahl, Mitch Kahl, Mickey Kahl. Photo by Christopher Fryer

QUALITY WORKMANSHIP Your vehicle will be repaired by the best craftsmen in the collision industry, using the most modern equipment available.

COLLISION DAMAGE REPAIR Most of today’s modern automobiles are of unibody construction. Unibody repairs need special equipment, operated by journeyman technicians.

PAINTING

For more info Kahl’s Body Shop

• SERVICES OFFERED: Mechanical and collision repair on domestic and foreign automobiles • ADDRESS: 2801 Mt. Tabor Road, New Albany • PHONE: 812-944-1921 for 24-hour emergency towing service • WEBSITE: kahlsbodyshop.com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 60 • EMPLOYEES: 10

We take special pride in our ability to match factory finishes as the final step in our restoration. Only factory matched finishes from the Dupont paint system are used. Special attention is paid to paint texture, gloss and hue.

WARRANTY

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

We warranty our workmanship as long as you own the vehicle.

At Kahl’s Body Shop customer satisfaction is based on years of experience. As our customer, you will receive the finest quality repairs available.

INSURANCE We will work with ALL insurance companies.

Your Community Bank at home in Southern Indiana Bank continues to grow, provide great banking, customer service AWARD-WINNING TEAM

NEWS AND TRIBUNE

Awards and recognitions for 2013: Community Bank Shares: • Partners in Philanthropy — Ranked No. 1 medium company category by Business First Louisville • Finalist for Business of the Year Award — Medium company category — Business First Louisville • Best Places to Work in Indiana — Indiana Chamber of Commerce

newsroom@newsandtribune.com Your Community Bank is a fixture in Southern Indiana. Now, the bank is looking to provide the same great level of banking and customer service to new customers. The parent company of Your Community Bank has agreed to purchase an Elizabethtown, Ky., bank, Community Bank Shares of Indiana announced Tuesday. The stock-exchange deal is valued at about $18 million, according to a press release. Upon closing, First Federal Savings Bank of Elizabethtown, which is owned by First Financial Service Corporation, will be merged with Your Community Bank. At that time, First Federal offices will become branches of Your Community Bank. Community Bank Shares estimates it will have approximately $1.6 billion in assets and 41 branch offices throughout southeastern Indiana and Kentucky after the transaction closes. “We are excited to add to our presence in the Louisville and Bardstown markets, while expanding into Elizabethtown and neighboring communities,” James D. Rickard, president and CEO of Community Bank Shares of Indiana, said in the release. “We believe this transaction creates a dynamic community banking franchise across the entire Louisville MSA. The acquisition of FFKY is the second transaction we have undertaken in the last 12 months. These activities are part of an integrated strategy to drive shareholder returns through both organic and acquisition related growth.” The transaction is expected to close in the late third or fourth quarter of 2014. Executive Vice President Todd Frossard said these moves are always made while thinking about the customer. “When we discuss strategy; we are always very mindful of our customers and potential new customers within our markets,” he said. “How can we serve our current customers better? How can we expand our relationship banking model within existing markets but also look forward into new markets that would complement our existing footprint?” The move follows an expansion just more than a year ago into the Lexington, Ky., market. Community Bank Shares also owns Scott County State Bank in Indiana. Frossard said the company is excited about the growth. “The company is excited to span the entire Louisville area through the acquisition of First Federal,” he said.“The integration of the two companies will be a major project and will be a substantial focus for the next 18 to 24 months.We are also excited about building shareholder value for our current shareholders and the new shareholders that we will pick up when the acquisition closes. Frossard also said the company is excited about technological advances, and contin-

For more info

YOUR COMMUNITY PARENT COMPANY RINGS NASDAQ BELL

• SERVICES OFFERED: Banking • ADDRESS: Various locations, headquartered in New Albany • PHONE: 812-981-7750 [customers service] • WEBSITE: Yourcommunitybank. com • BRANCHES: 25 • FINANCIALS: Nasdaq: CBIN, has gained from $9.40 at the end of 2011 to $26; Net income has grown from about $7 million in 2010 to $8.7 million in 2013.

Representatives from Community Bank Shares of Indiana Inc. were in New York City on Friday, April 25, to ring the closing bell of the Nasdaq Stock Market (see photo above.) James Rickard, the company’s chief executive officer, the company’s subsidiaries, rang the bell in honor of the occasion. Community Bank Shares of Indiana Inc. [Nasdaq: CBIN] made its initial public offering April 10, 1995. Your Community Bank and The Scott County State Bank, each have been in business for 80 years and 123 years respectively. “We were thrilled to have this opportunity to celebrate the growth the company has experienced in the last 19 years,” said Rickard in a news release. “It is especially important that we recognize our shareholders, business and retail customers, and our employees and the critical role they have played in our success. “The company’s success is not possible without their support of our approach to community banking.” Your Community Bank and The Scott County State Bank, owned by Community Bank Shares, serve customers across Indiana and Kentucky at 25 branch locations.

Community Bank Shares/Your Community Bank/Scott County State Bank

ues to improve its mobile app, and soon customers will be able to deposit checks through their smart phones. The banking company also gives back. “The creation of our Community Foundation in 2005 expanded our involvement as well as monies we give in the local community,” Frossard said. “We continue to grow the foundation in order to enable us to broaden our giving. In 2013, our Charitable Foundation and subsidiary banks awarded $195,269 to support local programs and non-profit organizations and our employees served on over 50 nonprofit boards and contributed over 4,700 service hours supporting great local causes. “Perhaps one of the largest and most rewarding community contributions that Your Community Bank employees participate in is the processing of The Salvation Army Christmas Kettles and the delivering of Meals on Wheels for LifeSpan Resources,” he added. In short, the future looks bright for the company.

“There certainly are plenty of positive things happening within our bank right now,” Frossard said. “And we believe the success of our bank really comes down to our people and culture.We invest in both.”

Your Community Bank: • Voted Best Bank, Best Mortgage Company, Best Places to Work in Clark County — Readers’ Choice of News and Tribune • Voted Best Bank, Best Mortgage Company, Best Places to Work in Floyd County — Readers’ Choice of News and Tribune • Five Star Banking Award — Indiana Bankers Association • Marketing Maxi Award — Indiana Bankers Association • Best Full Service Bank — Readers’ Choice — KY Standard Readers of Nelson County • Capital Access Corporation — Kentucky Outstanding Public Service Award Scott County State Bank: • Five Star Banking Award — Indiana Bankers Association • Marketing Maxi Award — Indiana Bankers Association Awards and recognitions to date for 2014: Community Bank Shares: • Best Places to Work in Kentucky Award Winner - KY Chamber of Commerce • Best Places to Work in Indiana Recognition (Ranking No. 4) - IN Chamber of Commerce Your Community Bank: • Business of the Year Award Winner — One Southern Indiana • Five Star Banking Award — Indiana Bankers Association • Outstanding Community Service Award — Southern Indiana Salvation Army Scott County State Bank: • Five Star Banking Award — Indiana Bankers Association


F4

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

News and Tribune 05.30.2014

Wyler Toyota celebrates award-winning streak Dealerships sold more than 30,000 vehicles last year

TOP AND BELOW: Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville is located at 808 E. Lewis and Clark Parkway in Clarksville. Jeff Wyler has made several contributions to Bottoms Up Bash, a colon canceer prevention project, as well as provide free breast cancer screenings on site three times last year. Submitted photos

NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com

The folks at Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville didn’t invent the formula for excellence in the automotive sales industry, but recent trends suggest they’re close to perfecting it. The formula’s a lot simpler than you’d guess: Provide a quality car at a reasonable price and stand behind it with excellent customer service. It’s that simple formula that has propelled Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville to its fourth consecutive Toyota Motor Sales (TMS) President’s Award in 2013. The President’s Award recognizes Toyota dealerships throughout the United Sates that achieve high standards of performance in all facets of the automotive dealer profession, including vehicle and parts sales, service and customer satisfaction. TMS has recognized excellent dealers with the President’s Award since 1986. Once again, it was excellence in the areas of sales and customer service that put Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville over the top. Customer Relations Manager Brittany Beverly was recognized for outstanding performance and achieving overall excellence for the fourth year in a row. Also receiving recognition for the fourth consecutive year were the sales team of General Sales Manager Brent Mattingly and Sales Managers Brandon Beverly and Gene Stewart, who were the recipients of the TMS Sales Excellence Award. And for the third consecutive year, Comptroller Shelley Roewer was recognized with the Comptroller’s Award for Excellence. Overall, Jeff Wyler dealerships sold more than 30,000 new and preowned vehicles in 2013, and its goal is to sell more than 33,000 this year.

While Jeff Wyler Toyota of Clarksville employees care about selling quality cars and trucks, they also care about the people who will be driving them. A customer named Kelli bought a Toyota Tacoma from Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville in March 2013, and found that out first-hand. Kelli still receives calls from the Wyler team to make sure she’s satisfied with her purchase, and she describes the Wyler service department as “friendly, knowledgeable people who go out of their way to make you comfortable and keep you informed.” “Our most recent purchase was a Scion to replace our daughter’s Camry that was totaled,” Kelli said. “The Camry saved our daughter and granddaughter’s lives. The team at Jeff Wyler was genuinely concerned about the safety of our family after the accident. We will continue to buy and service all of our vehicles through Jeff Wyler Toyota.” Ensuring that customers like Kelli and her family have great experiences is what motivates Jeff Wyler ToyotaScion associates like Fixed Operations Manager Christy McDonough. “We could not ask for a better company to work for than Jeff Wyler, or a better product to work with than Toyota,” said McDonough. “But it is through our relationship with our customers that we are able to achieve this prestigious award. “Our parts and service departments are committed to continuously enhancing the relationship with our customers. From maintenance to repair, our customers receive warm, friendly service provided by knowledgeable, trained associates that will ensure every experience is truly exceptional.” Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion cares about its customers, and that caring spirit also extends to the Clarksville and Southern Indiana communities. Jeff Wyler Toyota-

For more info Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville

• SERVICES OFFERED: Auto dealer and service center • ADDRESS: 808 E. Lewis and Clark Parkway, Clarksville • PHONE: 812-284-2277 • WEBSITE: jeffwylerclarksvilletoyota.com

Scion has helped lead the charge in breast cancer and colon cancer prevention efforts. The dealership donated to the Bottoms Up Bash, a colon cancer prevention project, and also provided free breast cancer screenings on-site

three times last year in partnership with former University of Louisville football coach Charlie Strong and the James Graham Brown Cancer Center. “The driving force behind our success in 2013 was from focusing on building long lasting relationships in the Southern Indiana community,” said General Sales Manager Brent Mattingly. Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion also invested in the children of the Clarksville and Southern Indiana communities, sponsoring numerous youth sports teams. The team at Jeff Wyler Toyota-Scion of Clarksville knows how difficult it is to keep the trend of earning the TMS President’s Award each of the last four years going, but with great sales, customer service and maintenance teams giving its customers excellent car buying experiences, it looks ready to turn that trend into a tradition.


PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014 | F5

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re closer than you think.

Jeff Wyler Toyota of Clarksville 808 E Lewis and Clark Parkway Clarksville, INÂ 47129 812-284-2277 jeffwylerclarksvilletoyota.com

Jeff Wyler Dixie Honda 5340 Dixie Highway Louisville, KY 40216 502-448-2802 jeffwylerdixiehonda.com

Jeff Wyler Shelbyville Chevrolet, Buick & GMC 700 Taylorsville Rd. Louisville, KY 40065 502-633-4840 jeffwylershelbyville.com

Jeff Wyler Honda of Frankfort 1440 Versailles Rd. Frankfort, KY 40601 502-695-6100 jeffwylerfrankforthonda.com

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award winner four years in a row.

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F6 | PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014

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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

G1

There’s no business like show business Derby Dinner Playhouse is a staple of the region’s tourism economy BY SHEA VAN HOY

shea.vanhoy@newsandtribune.com Bekki Jo Schneider sits in the cramped office she shares with business partner Cynthia Knopp. She’s above the laughter and applause of the crowd, which regularly fills the 500-seat auditorium at Derby Dinner Playhouse, which celebrates 40 years this year. Looking at the upstairs offices shared by several staffers and the first-floor performance area, it’s obvious where the funds are spent at Derby Dinner. “This is where we ran out of money for the office,” Schneider said, pointing to the wall behind her desk, which is only half-wallpapered. “You can see we’re cramped.The money goes back into the theater.”

BRISK BUSINESS The money generated from the more than 200,000 annual patrons of one of the largest dinner theaters in the country is substantial — $5.7 million in revenue in 2013, one of the top five years on record for Derby Dinner, Schneider said. More than 134,000 tickets were sold for the main-stage productions last year, and the strategies co-owners Schneider and Knopp employ to draw in customers is a science. “I read two scripts a week trying to find productions,” Schneider said. “I know my audience and narrow it down, then we survey season subscribers, then I take final selections to my staff for them to decide.” She said plays are chosen by season: January brings the most risqué production since Schneider figures the older crowd is less likely to venture out in the cold and snow. Conversely,“In spring, we do our musical, because the older folks are dying to get out of the house,” she said. It’s the variety that Annie Myers, Derby Dinner marketing director, says helps make her job fun. “The [promotional] strategy changes every six to seven weeks because we have a new product,” she said. “It’s not like other businesses. We’re marketing a completely different show, and then we have the Children’s Theatre and concerts.We have to figure out what to market to who.” “We do a lot of social marketing — Facebook, email, mobile rewards.We also really rely on print and radio. It really works for us.” Schneider knows who her audience is and where they come from. About 85 percent of tickets are purchased by women, and no more than 9 percent of subscribers come from any one zip code. They also have a market niche not found anywhere within 100 miles. “The closest two similar theaters are in Indianapolis and Cincinnati.There are none in Kentucky,” she said. “We have subscribers as far away as Indy and Cincy. “We’ve turned into an entertainment center — we belong to the economic engine of the community.”

TOP TOURIST STOP People do come from far away to Derby Dinner, as a good amount of its business comes from motorcoach tours — about 21,000 visits last year came from group customers. Jim Epperson, executive director of the Clark-Floyd Counties Convention and Tourism Bureau, said “a lot of destinations would love to have that kind of nighttime entertainment available, especially if you’re going after the motorcoach tour market.” “That’s always a missing piece for so

Paul Kerr, center, performs as R.F. Simpson in the recently wrapped production of “Singin’ in the Rain.” Photo by Tyler Stewart

For more info Derby Dinner Playhouse

• WHERE: 525 Marriott Drive, Clarksville • PHONE: 812-288-8281 • WEBSITE: derbydinner.com

many destinations,” he said. “Nobody wants to go back to the hotel at 7 p.m. It’s been an anchor in our area for all these years.” Derby Dinner’s success also helps out other businesses in the area. For example, Myers said that Koetter Construction has handled all the business’ many renovations over the years. Becky Fulkerson, director of sales at Clarion Hotel and Conference Center — which sits next door to Derby Dinner — said their neighbor has been a valued business partner. “It’s just been great,” she said.“We take care of all the entertainers who come through.The Elvis impersonator has fans that follow him and stay in the hotel, too. We do some wonderful packages with [Derby Dinner]. It’s an asset for us.” Fulkerson, who has been at the hotel for 14 years, added that Knopp has been a great business mentor in terms of helping her make sales contacts.

MORE THAN JUST THE STAGE Knopp is key when it comes to the aspects of Derby Dinner that go beyond the performances. Schneider — who is the creative engine — listed several businesses-withina-business beyond the theater which are housed at the Marriott Drive location: a restaurant, a gift shop, a marketing company and a set-production team. “Everything but the theater is what I handle,” said Knopp, who started at Derby Dinner as a teenager and worked there “off and on” before buying out her mother’s partnership with Schneider in 2003. The food served is another area where Schneider says the duo know its audience. “I can’t let my tastes drive it,” she said of the food. “For our crowd, the vegetables have to be well done, and so does the meat. And we simply have to have

Derby Dinner Playhouse is celebrating 40 years of business this year. Submitted photo

fried fish and chicken.” She also said people are surprised when they find out it’s not other theaters or movies that serve as Derby Dinner’s biggest threat to pull away customers. “It’s the sporting events — U of L, UK, IU the [Louisville] Bats,” she said.“It’s not Actors Theatre [of Louisville] or the touring Broadway plays.”

WHAT MAKES IT WORK Although Knopp, 54, said her and Schneider are “very different,” they share an essential vision in making Derby Dinner a success. “It’s a concern for the happiness of our customers,” Knopp said. “The end result is to make them very happy.That’s what we do.” It’s that care for the customer which has made Derby Dinner a consistent success, said David DiSavino, past president of the National Dinner Theatre Association, who said he’s visited Derby Dinner several times. “Hitting 40 years in business is incredible,” said DiSavino, executive producer at Rainbow Dinner Theatre in Paradise, Pa. “It couldn’t have happened to nicer people — but it didn’t just happen.They are some of the best business people I know. They call it ‘show business’ for a reason. They understand the business side, and that’s lovely to see.” Knopp said that feeling of community extends to the 30 or so full-time and 70 part-time employees at Derby Dinner,

most of whom have been there for a long time. “It’s a female-run business, and I think because of that, they’re always focused on family,” Myers said. “People can feel that and it makes them want to be a part of it.” Although Schneider, 67, jokes she is retiring,“when I run out of business cards to give out,” she has a definite vision for the future, one that has plans for a 200seat “little theater” on the block she owns the majority of. “It would allow us to take more risks with programming,” she said. Future business is in safe hands, as Assistant Producer Lee Buckholz plans to step in for Schneider — who directs about four shows a year — when she decides to leave the spotlight. “He will be wonderful. We work well together,” Knopp said. “We’ve had a lot of years together, and he’s my right-hand man.” Until then, the co-owners say they’ll celebrate 40 years and keep looking for what customers most want in their regional dinner theater. “I am very proud of what we’ve built here,” Knopp said.“I am very, very lucky to do something I love. And I feel like I have a personal relationship with the employees and customers. “That’s what keeps us here and focused ... and when you are that close to it, it becomes a part of you. I think that’s why we’re successful.”


G2 | PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014

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News and Tribune 05.30.2014

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

G3

Schmitt Furniture puts customers first Furniture store celebrating 78 years in downtown New Albany NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com It’s all about selling quality products, at a fair price, and always putting the customers first. That is the business model C.H. Schmitt had when he started the business, and it’s the one today that Louis Schmitt and his family continue to use as they enter their 78th year at the furniture corner of State and Main streets in downtown New Albany. While times have changed, what has made Schmitt Furniture successful has not. “We’re a 78-year-old business that still believes in what we have believed in for years. The core doesn’t change,” said Schmitt, president of the business. “It’s a challenge for independents, but not impossible. Independents know their customers ... they are neighbors and friends.” Schmitt said the business has always been about being a good community partner — focusing on buying quality American-made furniture in Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois and North Carolina. He said Schmitt also buys some furniture overseas to keep up with the latest trends. Schmitt’s free delivery policy within a 50-mile radius, its focus on customer service before, during and after the sale, offering affordable financing, and selling quality furniture are what keeps bringing people back, he said. While Schmitt Furniture, like most, had to make some adjustments following the 2008 recession, Schmitt said business has been good in recent years. “I am pleased with the business despite these tough times,” he said.“The last three years business has been on a rise for us. My father instilled in me a long time ago to be patient. Business will come back as quickly as it left if you still use your core beliefs.” The revitalization of downtown New Albany in recent years has also driven more customers Schmitt’s way. “I am so excited with what has been going on downtown,” Schmitt said. “There is so much renewed interest in downtown New Albany that all started with the construction of the YMCA. I see more and more people walking around downtown, trying out the different restaurants and going in the shops. There is definitely more foot traffic down here.”

Several members of the Schmitt family work at Schmitt Furniture including Laura, Anne, Louis and Amy Schmitt. Photo by Chris Morris

Schmitt Furniture’s roots are deep in New Albany, and for many years, not much was happening in the downtown area. However, Schmitt said his business never considered leaving town. Schmitt said like most industries, the furniture business has seen change in the past 20 years. He said a lot of family furniture manufacturers and retailers have sold out or gone out of business. “Our customer base is consistent and reliable. It doesn’t make any sense to sell cheap furniture and have someone angry at you who won’t come back,” he said. “It’s important to sell quality because our name is on it. Trust and confidence play a big part of it.” Schmitt Furniture also has a full line of Restonic mattresses which

are made in New Albany’s Industrial Park. Many family members work at the business. While Louis Schmitt serves as president, his sisters Anne [secretary/treasurer], Laura [service manager] and Amy [sales floor] work at Schmitt Furniture as does his brother John [warehouse] and son Zack [buyer/store manager]. “Everyone has a department to run. We are all spokes in the wheel,” said Schmitt, who has worked in the business for 27 years. “I love seeing and working with my family everyday.” Schmitt Furniture has 75,000 square feet of showroom space. “We are an old fashion, tradition business, based on strong reputation,” Schmitt said. “Our family passed that on to us and that is something we respect and appreciate.”

For more info Schmitt Furniture

• SERVICES OFFERED: Furniture sales • ADDRESS: Located at the corner of State and Main streets, New Albany • PHONE: 812-944-2285 • WEBSITE: schmittfurniture. com • YEARS IN OPERATION: 78 • HOURS: Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

It’s a family atmosphere at Frank Monroe Heating and cooling company has set trends in Southern Indiana NEWS AND TRIBUNE newsroom@newsandtribune.com NEW ALBANY — It’s a family business in the truest sense of the meaning, and New Albany-based Frank H. Monroe Heating & Cooling has been serving customers for more than six decades in Southern Indiana. Boosted by a $500 loan that his mother-in-law co-signed, Frank Monroe launched the business from his Beeler Street home in 1953. Monroe quickly became known for more than just his signature suspenders and humor. His skill in the trade garnered Monroe enough customers to expand his business to Vincennes Street in New Albany. “I found out the more you worked the more luck you had,” Monroe said. And as time would tell, Frank Monroe Heating & Cooling would be in for more growth, both in terms of the marketplace and physical size. Already one of the pioneers of HVAC service locally, Frank Monroe Heating & Cooling was the first business to locate in the New Albany Industrial Park. The company moved to its 595 Industrial Blvd. location in 1974, and Frank Monroe Heating & Cooling continues to offer high quality service and expertise. And as it began, the company remains a family endeavor. For almost 20 years, Monroe’s grandson, Steve LaDuke, has served as president of the company. The business maintains a “Southern Indiana mindset” and doesn’t intend to change, LaDuke said. The company doesn’t seek jobs in Louisville, as the bulk of its work is Steve LaDuke has been president of Frank Monroe Heating-Cooling, Inc., in New Albany, for 18 years. done in Southern Indiana. Skilled workmanship and commit- free estimates on new installations. “We’re certainly blessed with good The company provides service to customers and good jobs,” said LaDuke, ment are traits the company has mainwho began working for Frank Mon- tained, and at a time when many cus- Floyd County, Clark County, Harrison Frank H. Monroe Heating & roe Heating & Cooling when he was a tomers are again acknowledging the County and Crawford County, and has Cooling importance of supporting local busi- close to 200 years of combined service teenager. Frank Monroe Heating & Cooling is nesses, Frank Monroe Heating & Cool- in the heating and cooling business • SERVICES OFFERED: Heating capable of handling repair and replace- ing continues to support the commu- among its employees. and cooling systems LaDuke said it’s his responsibility ment projects for customers, so they nity. • ADDRESS: 595 Industrial The business has garnered several to keep the tradition of Frank Monroe don’t have to cross the Ohio River to Blvd., New Albany find an adequate company to handle awards from area distributors, maga- Heating & Cooling going. • PHONE: 812-945-2566 “I want to make sure we continue to zines and newspapers for its service their HVAC needs. • WEBSITE: frankhmonroe.com provide the best product, at the best “The big city technology — whatev- and sales. • YEARS IN OPERATION: 61 Frank Monroe Heating & Cooling re- price and give the best customer serer that may be — is right here,” LaDuke pairs and services all brands and offers vice,” he said. said.

For more info


G4

PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

News and Tribune 05.30.2014

TOP: A portion of the fabricated steel supplied by Padgett, Inc. for Churchill Downs expansion. BELOW: Hoisting and setting canopies in the blind. Submitted photos

A race to finish at Churchill Downs Padgett in the winners circle

For more info Padgett Inc.

NEWS AND TRIBUNE

newsroom@newsandtribune.com In early October 2013, Encompass Develop, Design & Construct, the designer and construction manager for Churchill Downs’ 2013-14 expansion projects selected Padgett, Incorporated’s bid to fabricate and erect the steel for its new grandstand terrace and rooftop garden. Deadlines for each phase were very tight. Winter was fast approaching and so was the opening of the spring racing season just prior to the 140th running of The Kentucky Derby. Padgett’s team of draftsman designed the shop plans for 660 tons of customized steel using Design Data SDA/2 Version 7. The steel was procured, then transported to the Padgett facility in New Albany where it would be custom-fabricated by a team of the region’s best and most experienced Certified Steel Fabricators. Establishing a timeline for every phase to ensure the project would be complete by the deadline is a job unto itself, and during the planning phase it was unknown what Mother Nature would deliver during the winter of 2014, which included the addition of a new meteorological term for our region. A Polar Vortex descended and the wrath of such a cold condition was unbearable. The seasoned Padgett field

personnel braved the elements to maintain the steel erection schedule because they knew that the on-time completion of each phase was essential to keep the other trades, who were waiting, on schedule to complete their deadlines. “Larry Clark was our General Foreman for the Steel Erection of the entire project, and he did a great job coordinating manpower and equipment to bring this project in safe and on time,” said Laura Bierman, Field Operations Manager and Secretary Treasurer of Padgett, Inc. It takes a fleet of cranes to perform steel erection of this magnitude. Padgett has both the equipment and the personnel to meet the needs. With some of the best pick-up artists in the business, Padgett’s Crane Operators from Local 181 make the toughest jobs look simple. “Don Fell did a great job of working closely with the project management team from Encompass to keep the job moving forward despite constant design changes and unfavorable weather. We knew what Encompass expected of us and Encompass knew what we expected of them, both companies delivered without issue,” said R. James Padgett, Vice-President, Padgett, Inc. “The Link-Belt RTC 8075 a 75 ton rough terrain crane and a Link-Belt RTC 8050 II a 50 ton rough terrain crane performed the majority of the

• SERVICES OFFERED: Crane rental and service, hauling and rigging, press and machinery installation, precision leveling and alignment services, industrial maintenance and repair, structural and miscellaneous steel fabrication, structural and miscellaneous steel erection, custom plate and sheet fabrication, CNC Laser and HD plasma cutting services, CNC press brake forming services and certified welding services. • ADDRESS: 901 E. Fourth St., New Albany • PHONE: 812-945-2391 • WEBSITE: padgett-inc.com

work,” said Don Fell, Project Manager. There were other tasks that required even larger cranes due to the distance in which the crane had to reach. The Link-Belt HTC 3140LB which has a 140 ton capacity and the Link-Belt HTC 8690 a 90 ton capacity were mobilized several times for specific tasks. Padgett’s Link-Belt HTC 8650, which has a capacity of 50 tons, was also utilized for several specific tasks. During the extreme cold, snow and ice the Padgett crew erected the steel, bolted up and impacted the connections, then placed all the steel decking for the concrete floors. The design drawings required over

60 places where a full penetration weld was required. Padgett crews consisting of Certified Welders from Ironworkers Local 70 performed those welds and all welds were tested and approved by a testing agency and then recorded. Once Padgett completed their contracted work, there was more for Padgett to accomplish.The rooftop garden has special amenities such as very large aluminum canopies that provide much-needed shade during hot days at the track. Padgett was asked by Encompass to haul and erect the many canopies that blanket the garden. Encompass put the project in Padgett’s hands to meet a deadline of April 26, 2014. “With the issues with the canopies, Padgett was an integral part of the success. Their willing to help and put forth a great effort into something they would not normally do, speaks volumes. Throughout their scope of the project, dealing with adverse conditions, incomplete drawings, and design issues, they continued to progress. Their original scope of work was the fabrication, and the installation, of all the structural steal, and deck. Would I use them in the future? Yes, I would take them to every project if I could,” Darryl Bright, Construction Manager, Encompass Develop, Design & Construct. Right on time, the rooftop garden was opened for the public. Everyone at Padgett, Inc. took a moment to enjoy the satisfaction that comes from pleasing your customer with a job welldone. Mint Juleps all around!


PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014 | G5

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G6 | PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | News and Tribune | 05.30.2014

YOUR COMPANY WILL WIN LIKE CHURCHILL DOWNS WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR TRUST IN PADGETT. CALL US TODAY & LET US SHOW YOU! • Crane Services • Bare Equipment Rental • Forklift Rental • Structural & Misc. Steel Fabrication • Structural & Misc. Steel Erection

• Sheet and Plate Fabrication • Machinery Moving and Installation • Industrial Repair Services • Precision Level and Alignment • Heavy Rigging and Hauling • Warehousing • Selfdumping Hoppers

(800) 347-3415 www.padgett-inc.com

Progress 2014: Business & Industry  
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