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Publication & Copyright This publication is copyright – NSW Reconciliation Council, January 2014. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced without permission with the exception of photocopying for use by teachers with reproduction maintaining original format and text. This Kit makes use of material produced by the NSW Board of Studies (pg 8). The NSW Board of Studies should be consulted separately on the issues of reproduction. ISBN 978 0 646 91504 3 Note to Reader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are warned that this publication may contain references to deceased persons.

Effort has been undertaken to ensure that the information contained in this book is correct, and the NSW Reconciliation Council regrets any offence that errors or omissions may cause. Throughout this publication, the terms Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are used wherever possible. In the interests of readability we use the terms Indigenous and non-Indigenous to refer to the relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and non-Indigenous Australians. The authors intend no disrespect. Acknowledgements and Contributors Recognise (Reconciliation Australia), NSW AECG, Aboriginal Affairs NSW, NSW Board of Studies, Aboriginal Disability Network NSW, UGL, Mick Gooda, Lachlan McDaniel, Emma Franklin, Kirsten Gray, and Lucy Simpson.

Design

alphabetstudio.com.au Enquiries

Telephone: (02) 9562 6355 Email: schools@nswreconciliation.org,au Teaching Kit is available online: nswreconciliation.org.au

entry details interpreting our journey past entries culturally appropriate teaching

10 16 20 22

classroom activities freedom rides poster case studies fact sheets

28 29 30 31

constitutional recognition significant dates reconciliation road map entry forms


getting started

JUMP ON BOARD

ART & RECONCILIATION

Learning Outcomes

What: The Schools Reconciliation Challenge is an annual art competition for young people. It is designed to engage students in Reconciliation and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues through art.

What is Reconciliation? Reconciliation is a multi-layered process. In Australia it means bringing everyone together by addressing divisions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians that have been caused by a lack of respect, knowledge and understanding. Reconciliation seeks to ensure equality of health, education, housing and justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, and advocate for the maintenance of their cultural identity and recognition of our shared history.

This Teaching Kit has been developed with reference to the Aims, Objectives and Outcomes of the Visual Arts components of the K–6 Creative Arts Syllabus (NSW) and the Visual Arts Years 7–10 Syllabus (NSW). However, its content is relevant to a range of subject areas, ages and ability levels.

Who: All young people in years 5–10 (or of equivalent age), Indigenous and nonIndigenous, of all abilities. Young people may enter the competition through their school or independently. When: The competition runs from 3 February – April 2014. It is free to enter and selected artists will be sponsored to travel to Sydney for a showcase event during National Reconciliation Week How: FIRST, register for the competition by emailing schools@nswreconciliation.org.au with your name, school and position at the school. Then use the activity ideas, fact sheets, case studies and other resources in this Teaching Kit to inspire and inform lessons about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues. Within these lessons, assist students to develop artworks, or one collaborative artwork, which reflects their ideas about Reconciliation and the theme ‘Our Journey’. Submit the artwork/s to the NSWRC by 4 April 2014. Artworks should be 2D and a maximum size of A1. All entries must include a complete artists statement and entry form (found at the back of this Kit).

Competition closes 4 April! 2

Why use art to explore Reconciliation? Art is a great medium through which to explore Reconciliation. It has long been used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to explore and express ideas, tell stories, and pass information. Using art as a vehicle for learning assists students to investigate social realities, explore complex themes and issues, express their ideas creatively, and develop positive attitudes. Reconciliation is about improving relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the broader Australian community. The Schools Reconciliation Challenge is one way for students to learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia and contribute positively to Australian society, whilst expressing themselves artistically, and meeting the objectives of the NSW K-6 and 7-10 syllabuses.

CREATIVE ARTS STAGE 3 (Years 5/6) Making • Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likenesses of things in the world (VAS3.1) • Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways (VAS3.2)

The NSW Reconciliation Council is a non-government, not-for-profit organisation. It is the peak representative body for Reconciliation in NSW. Our purpose is to advance Reconciliation by promoting the development of equitable and just communities that acknowledge and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, cultures and values.

Appreciating • Acknowledges that audiences respond in different ways to artworks and that there are different opinions about the value of artworks (VAS3.3) • Communicates about the ways in which subject matter is represented in artworks (VAS3.4) STAGE 4 (Years 7/8) & Stage 5 (Years 9/10) • Use a range of strategies to explore different artmaking conventions and procedures to make artworks • Expresses the function of and relationships between artist-artwork-world-audience. • Investigates the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter in the visual arts • Investigates and makes informed choices about ways to develop meaning in their artworks • Demonstrates an ability to select and use different materials and techniques to make artworks

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getting started

How you interpret ‘Our Journey’ is up to you, but the following may help inspire you! To be eligible for the Schools Reconciliation Challenge, students’ artworks must address Reconciliation and the theme Our Journey, and explore how these two ideas relate. There are many different types of journeys. For example, physical journeys, emotional journeys, spiritual journeys, healing journeys, learning journeys, political journeys, and rights journeys. All of these are central to the struggle and understanding that is part of the Reconciliation Journey, which all Australians must travel together to achieve equality and mutual respect.

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The journey to Reconciliation is one that all Australians must travel together

These journeys might be physical, spiritual, emotional, cultural or otherwise

• Local stories about Reconciliation

• Traditional journeys – corroborees, nomadic hunter gatherer lifestyles, or old trade routes

• Heroes and champions of Indigenous rights

All journeys help shape our identity and make us who we are • Explore how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identities have changed over time

• Significant events or moments e.g. the Bridge Walk in 2000 or Gough Whitlam • Language revitalisation projects and other journeys to recover culture pouring dirt through the hands of Vincent Lingiari • The meeting of old and new ways

• Journeys of resistance and pride. How has identity been influenced by struggles and challenges? Think Stolen Generations, mission life, family reunification, NT Intervention, assimilation policies etc

• Our journey as a society. How have our attitudes and views changed over time?

• Changing identities that combine the traditional and the contemporary

• The importance of land, culture and language to an individual or community’s identity and life journey

• The experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people today compared to precontact life

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have faced many struggles in the past 200+ years and have fought hard to maintain their culture and way of life • Social, legal and political inequality and resilience • The journey towards self-determination • Activism, leadership & solidarity • Some key journeys to look at: British Invasion in 1788, Pemulwuy’s resistance, Bennelong, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, Wave Hill Walk Off, 1965 Freedom Rides, 1967 referendum, Mabo & Wik, The Apology, or journeys to Constitutional Recognition.

What is the future of Our Journey as Australians? • Imagine what the future of Reconciliation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians might look like • What does Reconciliation mean to you and what would it involve? • How has Reconciliation worked in other countries, like New Zealand and Canada? Check out the Fact Sheets in this Kit for more information. A comprehensive set of Fact Sheets is also available on the NSWRC website.

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getting started

In schools across NSW, young people are speaking up about Reconciliation, and telling their stories. Here are some of the outstanding and inspiring artworks from the 2013 Schools Reconciliation Challenge.

We're Listening Noah Cohen Stoddart, Reddam House Second prize, years 7 & 8 My artwork is about how communication between nonIndigenous people and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is improving and growing just like the technologies of today. Mobile phones, which are a communication tool used by all different types of people around the world, symbolise this process. Reconciliation means acknowledging the original custodians of this land and going forward together.

1000 Men – Blind Leading the Blind Blake Parrott, Lawrence Public School Second prize, years 5 & 6 My artwork is about blind people leading the blind. Some people have eyesight but are blind to the world around them. Reconciliation relies on seeing people beyond their skin, communicating with one another, and showing respect. I have a vision problem but I can see through colour. Sometimes I want to say “look and help others, they are people too and they have something to say”.

Why?

Dream Spirit Journey

Molly Ruttley, Northern Beaches Secondary College – Mackellar Girls Campus Year 7/8

Danny Gordos, Reddam House

this artwork is about how we see and treat the land around us.

My artwork explores the connection all Australians have with the land and how different cultures interpret this connection differently. For many of us land is merely something we possess, or cross over to get somewhere. However, many Aboriginal people have a stronger, deeper connection to land. This artwork looks at the combination of two different interpretations of the land and coming together.

AMAROO (Beautiful Place) The Process of Evolution Hannah Rubinstein & Rachel Bowen-James, Reddam House This artwork explores how the pursuit of technological advancement in Australia has been undertaken at the expense of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and rights In today’s world, people are preoccupied with having the newest iPod, the latest computer, and the ability

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to be connected to everyone and everything at the click of a button. However, they do not take the time to learn about the First Peoples of this land, on whose home our society has been built. Our artwork demonstrates the merging of two different cultures, both of which have an important place in Australian society. Rather than letting progress and material things dominate our lives and displace culture, we should utilise technology to bring culture into our lives in new and interesting ways.

Decoda Knowles & Abbey Bain, Barrenjoey High First prize, years 9 & 10 Amaroo means ‘a beautiful place’ in one of the Aboriginal languages local to Canberra. In our artwork, this word is set over a traditional Torres Strait Islander headpiece. Our artwork encourages the audience to appreciate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and recognise their beauty and significance. Reconciliation means re-examining our history, challenging our viewpoints, and discussing and encouraging new and honest interpretations of culture.

Look to the Future Group Work, St Bedes' Primary School First prize, Years 5 & 6 This artwork is about our local region, Yuin country, and the important place of Aboriginal people as the original custodians of the land and the keepers of knowledge and tradition. The artwork is looking towards a positive future for all people and animals; one in which we can move forward and learn together.

Actions Speak Louder than Words Group Work, Fairvale High School First prize, years 7 & 8 Our artwork is about showing respect and bringing everyone together. It reflects on the importance of open communication, and the necessity to act on the things we say in order to genuinely promote and maintain Reconciliation. Within the artwork, we have used our hands as tools to communicate our ideas about Reconciliation.

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Culturally Appropriate Teaching The following section is reproduced in its entirety with permission from the Board of Studies NSW, and provides a guide for teachers to develop inclusive and culturally appropriate activities.

• Recognise how contemporary Aboriginal art can adapt Western art forms and new technologies and media, and still communicate cultural knowledge and express Aboriginality.

• Discourage students from copying or using Aboriginal signs or symbols in their own artmaking. This not only causes great offence to Aboriginal people, but also infringes copyright. Students should be encouraged to develop their own symbolic visual language when learning about the systems of symbolic meaning in Aboriginal artworks.

• Keep informed of significant developments and innovations in the ways Aboriginal art practice, forms and media change over time. There are numerous magazines, catalogues and newspapers that have current information.

• Ensure that all resources used are culturally sensitive and appropriate. If in doubt, consult with Aboriginal people or the NSW Reconciliation Council. • Integrate other aspects of Aboriginal art and culture, such as the oral tradition, the performing arts, song, and dance wherever possible. • Avoid aspects of Aboriginal art containing sacred or secret or ‘inside’ information. It is inappropriate to address this area in classroom situations; most Aboriginal people would find it offensive. However, it is important that students are informed about this issue and learn to respect it. Aboriginal artists or advisors may provide some background to this issue. • Encourage an understanding of Aboriginal culture as a dynamic living culture, which, like all cultures, adjusts to change and has a history. • Avoid reference to traditional Aboriginal culture as ‘primitive’, ‘Stone Age’, or ‘simple’, as these terms are highly offensive. • Follow correct protocols when using works by an Aboriginal artist who has died. Students should be aware that in some communities the mentioning of names and display of photographs of people who have died are signs of disrespect to them and their families. Permission must be sought from families to show images of the deceased. • Discourage generalised or stereotypical characterisations of Aboriginal art, artists, culture or communities. Make specific reference to place, time, people and events, and draw attention to the rich diversity that exists within Aboriginal societies and the art produced.

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Strategies for Teaching Aboriginal Students • Wherever possible employ an Aboriginal artist, dancer or storyteller to work with the students in the classroom. • Acknowledge that Aboriginal students will not necessarily be well informed about all aspects of their cultural heritage. Some will know a great deal while others might know little. • Enrich the classroom environment by displaying positive affirmations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and art. • Provide Aboriginal students with opportunities to enrich and affirm their cultural identity if they choose to do so. Do not assume that all students will have the desire to do this. Teachers need to recognise that Aboriginal students, like other students, learn in a variety of ways, have special needs and come from cultures with very rich and diverse creative arts traditions. Teachers need to be flexible in their delivery of programs and in the way they respond to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students’ learning styles. • Avoid stereotyping Aboriginal students by their physical attributes or the way they learn, as this will have negative effects on them. It is best teaching and learning practice to meet the needs of all students as learners from a variety of cultural backgrounds. • Acknowledge and recognise Aboriginal English as the home language of many Aboriginal students; use it as a building block within the classroom. • Develop an awareness of otitis media and other health problems affecting learning outcomes for Aboriginal students.

• Acknowledge that some Aboriginal students will need time for family commitments, cultural traditions and events that affect their daily lives. • Encourage the Aboriginal Education Assistant to participate in classroom activities; they are able to offer support for the students and teachers. Terminology • Terminology changes over time within Aboriginal culture and communities. The following is a selection of terms to help teachers with the sensitive implementation of the units of work. • ‘Aboriginal people’ is the preferred term. Aborigine is an outdated term and can often offend some Aboriginal people. • In any writing activity, the word Aboriginal should always be written using a capital ‘A’. • It is unacceptable to use the terms half-caste or full blood when referring to Aboriginal people. This is highly offensive. • Use terms such as group, nation, language group or cultural group rather than the word tribe, as it is now outdated terminology. Some Aboriginal people refer to themselves as traditional, not tribal. • Avoid using words such as legends and myths when referring to the Dreaming or Dreaming stories. Dreaming is preferred to Dreamtime as the latter refers to the past, and is not inclusive of the present and the future.

Classroom Activities 10–15 to stimulate thinking about Reconciliation and the theme Our Journey

• Torres Strait Islanders do not consider themselves Aboriginal people. There are similarities and differences between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

Freedom Rides Pull Out Poster 16–17 showcasing a significant Aboriginal journey

• Torres Strait Islanders refer to their traditional stories as legends rather than Dreaming stories. • Aboriginal people will often refer to themselves as Koori, Murri, Noonga etc. These names refer to a particular group or area to which they belong. They are not general terms and should not be used as such.

Case Studies 20–21 follow the inspiring Reconciliation journeys of Lachlan and Mick Fact Sheets 22–25 with information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues

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art activities for the classroom

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have travelled many different Journeys. Physical journeys across the land; spiritual journeys connecting with culture and history; emotional journeys related to historical and ongoing injustices; political journeys in the struggle for rights and freedoms, and Reconciliation journeys hand in hand with non-Indigenous people. This is just to name a few!

wonder • How many different kinds of journeys can you think of? Create a mind map brainstorming your ideas. • Sometimes you might experience multiple journeys at once. Can you think of some examples of this? • What are some journeys that are significant to you? It may be a journey travelled by a family member, someone you admire, or a collection of people, like a community or nation.

learn

create

• Look at My Place by Nadia Wheatley and Donna Rawlins. The book showcases the stories of 21 children, over two decades, which together convey the physical, cultural and emotional journeys of a small pocket of Sydney.

• Create a map of a significant journey you have had, illustrating it with symbols that represent people you met, things you discovered, or lessons you learnt along the way.

• Watch the documentary Ringbalin. It invites you on a journey along Australia’s great Murray Darling Rivers, with Aboriginal Elders mapping out their stories. • Research the decade-long journey of the Gurindji people, led by Vincent Lingiari, to achieve fair wages and legal ownership of their own land. • Check out Accessible Arts, the peak arts and disability organisation in NSW, to see how students with a disability are using art to represent their journeys aarts.net.au • Look at the political cartoons in Survival: A History of Aboriginal Life in New South Wales by Nigel Parbury.

• Weave or make a collage that represents your life journey. Use different materials and images to symbolise different aspects of your life. • Work with your class mates to create a mural in your school reflecting a collective journey. You could use graffiti, paste-ups, paint, or mosaic. • Think about how different colours can represent different feelings and emotions. Use watercolours to represent an emotional journey you have had, letting the colours blend together to show how you have moved from one feeling to another.

“If you can imagine the one LEARN family continuously occupying • Read Aboriginal Dreaming stories and the same land for 40,000 years Torres Strait Islander Legends. Consider what these say about the importance of or more, using it not just to Country. Find some at creativespirits.info. sustain life but as a place of • For an in depth understanding of Aboriginal reverence and worship, where connection to place, read ‘Country’, every tree, rock and waterhole Chapter 1 in Nourishing terrains: Australian had significance, you will Aboriginal views of landscape and wilderness (p7-13) by Deborah Bird Rose. get some understanding of • Google Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock the importance of land to Route – a story of contact, conflict and Indigenous people” Tania Major Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have an important connection to their Country – the Land and Sea that holds their culture. Art is often used to reflect this relationship and to tell stories of time and place.

WONDER • Think of a place that is special to you. How does it relate to your personal journey, your history and your identity? • How does the land relate to us as a community and tell stories of our shared experiences as Australians?

“I can look back over 70 years on this part of the land. There was a richness in the relationships between people so you never felt alone. We always said pmerel atnyene…that means country holds you” Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, Alyawarr elder, Utopia homelands

• How do you think environmental degradation, land clearing and pollution impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

*Remember to explain to students, it is not appropriate to copy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art. It should be used as inspiration to develop their own style

CREATE • Express your own connection to land, and your own journey. Art ideas: cross-hatching, aerial style paintings, bark paintings and making use of found objects. • Create different patterns to symbolise different parts of the landscape. Try using repetition. • As a class, visit a locally significant Aboriginal site. Look at the landscape and learn about its history. Use this to inspire an artwork.

survival, of exodus and return, seen through Aboriginal eyes, and interpreted through their voices and art.

• Look at the watercolours of Albert Namatjira. His work represents the land through a fusion of European and Aboriginal artistic techniques. • Check out Bonita Ely’s performance artwork Murray River Punch, commenting on the pollution in the Murray River Basin and its impact on local communities. • Watch the film, Rabbit Proof Fence – learn about the physical and emotional journeys Molly, Daisy and Gracie embarked on to get back to their Country, family and culture. • Look at Kevin Gilbert’s artwork, My Father’s Studio. This work shows Gilbert’s father immersed in his country (his studio) and surrounded by his art (rock carvings).

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art activities for the classroom

As Marcia Langton has noted, most people come to know Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through the media, television and stories, rather than through real relationships. Often these representations are based on negative or oversimplified stereotypes that feed bias and racism. Such misrepresentations of identity are dis-empowering. It is important that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can determine their own identity because this is central to their sense of freedom.

LEARN

CREATE

• Look at the artworks of Adam Hill or Destiny Deacon to see some contemporary representations of Aboriginal culture and history.

• Create a self-portrait using abstract techniques, using what defines you instead of how you look.

WONDER

• Google ABC, The Drum’s satirical article, How to Write about Aboriginal Australia.

• As a class, discuss some of the assumptions you hold about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? Why do you think you hold these assumptions? • Find some examples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-representation (think Koori Mail, Redfern Now, Indigenous films etc.) How do these compare to nonIndigenous representations? • Discuss the concepts of objectivity and subjectivity – the idea that there are (at least) two sides to every story. How can we use art to break down stereotypes and provide multiple perspectives?

• Read Mick Dodson’s article ‘The End in the Beginning: Re(de)finding Aboriginality’ to understand the impact misleading negative representations have on Indigenous identity.

• Look at Bindi Cole’s, Not Really Aboriginal series 2008, exploring how Aboriginal people come in many shapes and colours.

• Check out Ricky Maynard’s, Portrait of a Distant Land, 2005 to see how he uses photography to re-tell the story of Aboriginal people in Tasmania.

• Find a colonial artwork depicting Aboriginal Australia. Discuss it as a class then reconstruct it, creating a new angle on the subject matter.

• Make a poster or paint a mural in your school to help represent Indigenous Australians in a positive way to your peers. • Create a new flag for Australia, trying not to use any of the symbols from the current Aboriginal and Australian flags. • Draw a portrait of someone you admire. Think about the qualities and personality traits you want to represent in them.

“Self-representations of Aboriginality are always also acts of freedom”

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a strong oral history tradition. Stories are integral to the transmission of culture from generation to generation. They are used to explain creation, history, spiritual beliefs and values, and give people a sense of identity and belonging. Every journey, ceremony and artwork has a story.

WONDER

• What are some different ways you can tell a story? • Can you think of a story that is important to your identity? It could be one that it often repeated in your family or culture, or one that has had a significant impact on you. • How is your culture passed down to new generations? How does this compare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practises?

LEARN

• Look at the children’s books of Bronwyn Bancroft & Elaine Russell to see how they tell stories about their family’s journeys using illustration. • For a series of animated Dreaming stories from Central Arnhem Land, see abc.net. au/dustechoes • Check out the colourful, simply told stories in the works of Ian W Abdulla, Roy Kennedy & Jody Broun. • Barani Barrabugu is a booklet about Sydney’s Aboriginal Journey; explore it for ideas of storytelling over time.

CREATE

• Be inspired by the art of Roy Kennedy and Elaine Russell – draw, paint or collage a picture mapping out your home, neighbourhood, or a special place in order to tell its story. • Use generator.acmi.net.au/storyboard to create an online storyboard about a contemporary Reconciliation issue, happening or event you think is important. • Create a class ‘family tree’ that relates to the place the students live. What is shared? Where are the gaps? How many stories are contained in the one tree? • What are the shared stories in students’ hometowns? Collaboratively, the class creates their own Reconciliation story chart.

“Everyone has their own story to tell, and every one’s story is its own history and its own artwork” Djon Mundine

Mick Dodson

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art activity sheet

This activity sheet is designed to help students think about Reconciliation and the theme Our Journey in order to create a meaningful artwork.

Students name/s ………………………………………………………….………………………………………………………….... Use the spaces below to list some words that you associate with the term RECONCILIATION …………………………………………………………………………

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The theme for the Schools Reconciliation Challenge this year is Our Journey. Create a mind map in the space below to brainstorm some of the ideas you would like to represent in your artwork. You might also find it helpful to discuss these ideas with your friends, family, teachers, or class.

Not everything we say is written or spoken. There are many ways to get a message across or communicate an idea. Use the space below to list different ways you might be able to express your ideas: …………………………………………………………………………

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case studies


“The Freedom Ride was probably the greatest and most exciting event that I have ever been involved in with Aboriginal affairs. It was a new idea and a new way of promoting a rapid change in racial attitudes ”

Pull out this poster & put it on the wall!

Charlie Perkins

Warwick (QLD)

Goondiwindi (QLD)

18 February

Stanthorpe (QLD)

Boggabilla

18 February

Lismore

22 – 23 February

Moree

Collarenebri

16 – 17, 20 February

16 February

Tenterfield

Ballina

19 February

Walgett

14 –16 February

Inverell

Glen Innes

19 – 20 February

19 February

Coonamble

Bowraville

Grafton 21 February

Coffs Harbour 23 February

24 February

Gulargambone

14 February

Kempsey

Gilgandra

It set off on 12 February 1965. A group of students got on a bus and travelled around rural NSW to protest inequality between Indigenous and nonIndigenous Australians.

Arrernte man Charles Perkins led the Freedom Rides. He believed his people deserved better and decided to stand up for their rights!

The Freedom Rides was a journey to campaign against racial discrimination and the dispossession, exploitation and unequal treatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

14 –16 February

Through the media, Australians began to become more aware of the injustices experienced by Aboriginal people. More and more people joined the movement, encouraging and supporting Aboriginal people to fight discrimination.

Port Macquarie

Dubbo

Taree

13 February

25 February

Wellington

13 February

Orange

13 February

Newcastle 26 February

Sydney

depart 12 February return 26 February

Aboriginal people were forced to live on reserves and missions in sub-standard housing, with no plumbing or electricity. Children were forcibly removed from their families and people often experienced racism, segregation and abuse.

This journey laid the path for future social action, including the current campaign for Constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.


art activity sheet

This activity sheet was written by Lucy Simpson of Gaawaa Miyay for NSWRC

Visual communication is a great way to represent Our Journey. Often we use images to relay a story, message or instruction. Can you think of three examples where we use images to communicate something? Use the boxes below to record these examples using photography, cut and paste images from magazines & newspapers, or to draw your own illustrations. Write a short description below each box explaining what these symbols represent.

a simple art idea to get you on your way!

my grandfather’s house

Classroom Kit

GO!

• Scratch foam printing boards – scratch foam or a styro foam food tray

1. Preparation Collecting inspiration/concept and story development

5. Position foam on paper Place foam face down on paper & apply pressure with your hand to stick it down

2. Sketching ideas Map out and draw some ideas to apply to your foam.

6. Print it Flip paper and foam holding both together so the paper is on top and apply pressure evenly across paper to achieve a clear print. You can just use your hands to do this, or something flat like a ruler. Be sure not to let the foam slide around on the paper as you’re rubbing.

• Rubber Rollers • Non toxic water based block ink • Baby wipes (to clean printing boards) • Paper (coloured and white) for printing • Firm perspex sheets for inking stations • Paddle pop sticks • Old newspapers to keep desks clean • Blunt pencils or ballpoint pens for etching into scratch foam

For inspiration Collect objects of different colours, shapes and textures i.e. leaves, seed pods, twigs, feathers, coral, bark etc.

In class Activities • Complete visual story telling worksheet • Discuss Aboriginal culture, Reconciliation, and the theme ‘Our Journey’ • Discuss and develop individual concepts for artwork • Develop ideas for symbols, design and artistic representations of your message or story

3. Carving scratch foam If you want your image to print clearly you need to make your lines quite deep. You can press fairly hard without poking through the back of the foam. 4. Inking up & rolling on Spread ink over a flat Perspex board, then run your roller through the ink. If the roller makes a sticky sound and rolls through the ink (rather than sliding across the inking plate) you’ve got the right consistency. Roll your roller over your foam to ink it up. You are aiming for a smooth, thin, velvetylooking coat of ink.

the river at the back of

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Think about ways you can use drawings to represent places, things, people, or stories that are important to you. In the space below, create & record your own symbols, and what they mean to you.

7. Reveal your masterpiece! Starting at one corner, peel paper or foam (whichever is on top) back slowly 8. Hang out your print to dry Pin up, place, or hang out your print to dry and admire your beautiful creation! Take the time to wash your plate while the ink is still wet so you can use it to print time and time again.

Sometimes artists use ‘found objects’ in their artworks as part of their creative process. Found objects are existing forms that are incorporated and re-worked in some way to create something new. Spend some time at home, school or outside collecting your own ‘found objects’ to use in your artwork that may help to tell your story. In the table below list some of these items, the way you are thinking of incorporating them into your work, and what they represents to you. Object / Item

How I might use it

To me this represents

Cockatoo feather

As inspiration for a drawing or glued to a collage

The place I grew up, on the land of the Gadigal people

Now it’s time to make your Our Journey artwork!

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Create something that tells the story of the Journey/s you would like to convey. Use any technique you like – illustration, rubbings from a textured surface, photography, cut outs from newspapers and magazines, stamps, stickers, stencils, prints, or anything you think will help tell your story.

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case studies

People are often shocked to hear that Australia is the only nation in the world to have a federal Constitution that permits racial discrimination. The Constitution also fails to recognise the First Peoples of this land – the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, despite being our founding political and legal document. The only way to amend the Constitution is through a referendum where all Australians who are eligible to vote can say ‘Yes’ to proposed change. Below, Lachlan tells us about the journey thousands of Australians are currently undertaking to help build support for such change. For a more detailed explanation of racial discrimination in the Constitution, see the Constitutional Recognition section of this Kit.

Family Journey I am a Wiradjuri man, descended from the Thorpes of Euabalong. My family lived on a small mission on the Lachlan River. In Wiradjuri, we call that river Kilari, which is where my name comes from. They moved to Forbes around 1900 and my GreatGrandmother remains there today, along with much of my family. My Dad moved to Sydney later on, and I became the first of my Wiradjuri family to be born and raised here.

Journey to Recognition

Reconciliation Journey

Currently, I am a Project Officer for Recognise, which is the People’s Movement to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Australian Constitution. We also seek to rid the Constitution of racial discrimination that may be used to harm people. In order to raise awareness about these issues, the Recognise team, along with thousands of supporters, have embarked on a huge relay across Australia to speak to people about Constitutional Recognition, hear their ideas, and garner support for change. We are travelling around the country by foot, car, bicycle, and even canoe, through big cities like Melbourne, Adelaide and Darwin, and the many small communities in between. In each place we’ve been, we have had wonderful engaging conversations with local people, sharing stories and building momentum for positive change.

People have many different ideas around what Reconciliation is. Some people think it is largely about making amends for past injustices. While this is very important, for me Reconciliation is also about the future. About establishing better working relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Constitutional recognition is an important step in this process because it is about offering respect.

I joined the Journey from the border of Victoria and South Australia, travelling across the bottom of the country almost to Adelaide. I also took part in the 1200km bicycle ride from Alice Springs, up through the centre to Katherine. Recently I just returned from a four wheel driving leg, starting from Darwin, heading through Kakadu, and then out to Wave Hill and on to Kununurra. It has been amazing.

I was really moved during the latest leg of the Journey. We stopped in Wave Hill, where Vincent Lingiari led the famous walk off in 1966 to demand equal wages and better working conditions for Aboriginal people. The old people at Wave Hill talked about the need for respect and understanding in the journey towards Reconciliation, and expressed the feeling that without proper recognition in our highest legal document, they were like strangers in their own land. Non-Indigenous people have also been overwhelmingly supportive. When they find out we are the only nation in the world that has a federal Constitution that allows racial discrimination, the response has often been shock and embarrassment. For me, travelling across the country for this campaign is a demonstration of our commitment as a nation to make positive change for a better future.

‘The Journey to Recognition is a journey to greater understanding and respect for all Australians, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.’

A Cultural Journey In 2011 Lachlan spent 3 months hand stitching a Willay Badhang (possum skin cloak), an important traditional Wiradjuri garment. Lachlan wore the cloak at the graduation ceremony for his Arts/Law degree at Macquarie University. Lachlan learnt the art from his father, who sought permission from the Wiradjuri Council of Elders to begin a cloak-making project a few years ago. For Lachlan, wearing the Willay Badhang at this important event symbolised a revitalisation of Wiradjuri culture. The revival of this tradition of cloak-making reminds us that cultural practises people may assume have been lost are alive and well and can be instilled with contemporary meaning.

Mick Gooda is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner. A descendant of the Gangulu people, he comes from his grandmother’s country – the Dawson Valley in Central Queensland. Mick has spent much of his life advocating for Indigenous rights and promoting respect and understanding among all Australians. Below he tells us a bit about his life growing up, his thoughts about Reconciliation and education, and how he came to work in social justice.

Personal Journey My journey’s not so different from anyone else’s… When you’re black you grow up knowing something’s not quite right. You’re treated differently to other kids in your class, and your family’s treated differently. But my mum and dad always told us, ‘no one is better than you’. So we grew up with that sense of strength. My dad was a union rep, and he made sure we were engaged in social justice issues early on. Unions were at the centre of it you know; wages, workers’ rights, and they were big supporters of the Aboriginal movement. I think this was reinforced by my Catholic education, which instilled a strong sense of social justice in me. As I grew up I started looking around, started to see things more. I began thinking, geez, this isn’t right. In Rockhampton Aboriginal people were being denied housing, mistreated by police, and barred from hotels. The injustices made me feel compelled to step up and do something. I started getting a little bit active here and there. I joined the legal service and the housing co-op. At that stage they were pretty broke, so it involved really hands on stuff like fixing houses, collecting rents, and doing the books.

Back in those days we didn’t have very high expectations, but I learnt to work hard from my mum and dad. You don’t raise 10 kids without working hard. My first paid job was in the meatworks in Rocky, and I remember my dad saying ‘now you’ve got it made’. See, just having employment, any employment, was considered a success. Thinking about Sydney, or going to university, we might as well have been thinking about Mars. I lived in Brisbane with my sister for a while when I was in my 20s. Around then, Aboriginal people were having a hard time as a result of government policies and there was a lot of social action happening. I started going to protests and street marches, and I had friends and relatives doing the same. Brisbane was just something else you know. It was a political awakening. I guess a bit of a turning point was when I started working for this company that looked after the telephone towers in Queensland. I worked with about 30 men, and I was the only blackfella. I saw how these white blokes reacted as they became aware of Aboriginal issues. They really embraced it. We worked in some of the most redneck areas in Australia and they’d be telling people off at the pub for being racist. They were open and fair, and it taught me a lot. It gave me faith that there are a lot of good people out there. These days, I feel inspired by ordinary people doing amazing things. The best part of my work is having the opportunity to talk to so many good, humble people and find out what they’re doing. They often say things like ’we don’t do anything big like you do in your job’. But they do. It’s the people on the ground, the health workers and community workers, battling away for 20, 30 years, without a whole lot of recognition, who make a real difference. I also feel inspired by our kids.

“We have such a strong cohort of young emerging leaders and it’s going to be a great ride to sit back and watch them rise.”

What does Reconciliation mean to you? Reconciliation needs to start amongst ourselves. The thing is, we can’t go back to 200 years ago. White people are here to stay. So we need to ask ourselves, how are we going to move forward from here? We need to accept and acknowledge each other and approach this Reconciliation business with open hearts and minds. How can young people contribute to Reconciliation? Get educated. It can be hard to get to school sometimes, but our mob has to get educated. Education gives you the ability to look at things critically, to ask what’s right and what’s wrong, and to form your own ideas rather than just accept what you’re told by others. These are the tools that can empower our youth to reshape things the way they want them to be.


FACT SHEETS

Download the 2013 Teaching Kit from Issuu to access eight additional Fact Sheets on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and cultural heritage: issuu.com/nswReconciliationcouncil/docs/nswrec_ecopy_texture

Throughout history art has been an important feature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. It has been used in a huge variety of ways and represents different aspects of social and cultural life. Archaeological evidence has revealed Aboriginal artwork that is many thousands of years old.

Western Desert Art: The Papunya Tula Movement

Pre-contact Aboriginal Art

• In 1971 the men worked with nonIndigenous teacher Geoffrey Bardon to paint the famous Honey Ant mural. They transcribed body markings and sand drawings onto more conventional painting supports and the so-called ‘dot and circle’ style was born.

• Traditional Aboriginal art is very different to Western notions of art. Rather than creating art to buy and sell, art is used to practise and express culture, tell stories, mark territory, record how people live, and educate younger generations. • Before colonisation, Aboriginal art largely consisted of paintings, etchings, carvings and drawing, which displayed elements of daily life. It often included images of hunting tools, animals, hunting expeditions and the landscape. Examples of Aboriginal rock art in NSW can be seen in the Blue Mountains National Park and the Wollemi National Park.

• Many people believe dot paintings are a traditional form of Aboriginal art. This is not the case. Dot painting emerged from a group of Indigenous men from Papunya in Central Australia in the early 1970s.

• Some also argue that dot painting was introduced as a way of hiding secret and sacred symbols within the artwork, so they could not be detected by outsiders. • Today the Papunya Tula movement is considered one of the greatest art movements of the twentieth century, with some paintings worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

• Much Aboriginal art was spiritual in nature, depicting elements of Dreaming stories and belief systems. It was a way of renewing contact with and expressing the Dreaming visually.

“When we paint, whether it is on our bodies for ceremony or on bark or canvas for the market, we’re not just painting for fun or profit, we’re painting as we always have done to demonstrate our continuing link with our country and the rights and responsibilities we have to it.” Galarrwuy Yunupingu

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Contemporary Aboriginal Art

Relationship to Country

• Aboriginal art forms have grown and changed considerably over the years, as traditional ways have been influenced by new cultures and contemporary ideas. There are now Aboriginal artists working in every medium imaginable, including painting, print, sculpture, photography, digital media, jewellery, papermaking, and installations.

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are closely connected to the natural • Since the First Fleet landed in 1788, environment. They care for, and are sustained Aboriginal people have been dispossessed by, the land and sea. In fact, Indigenous of their traditional lands by successive people are defined internationally as people Australian governments. belonging to the land or soil of a particular • Colonial governments forced Aboriginal region. Many Aboriginal people refer to their people into particular areas of land, known traditional lands as their ‘Country’. as reserves, stations, or missions. They • Connection to Country is grounded in more were forbidden to practise their culture or to than the physical elements of a landscape. visit their traditional lands. It is often directly linked to the community • Between the 1880s and 1969, as many of people that occupy that landscape, the as 100 000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait stories they tell and the culture that is passed Islander people were stolen from their down in that place for generations. families and placed under the control of the • Deborah Bird Rose has described Country state. The people that were taken are now as a ‘nourishing terrain’. A place that gives known as the Stolen Generation. and receives life. Country is home; it is • The homelands movement, begun in the nourishment for the mind, spirit and heart, 1970s, involved Aboriginal people moving and it holds the stories and culture of back to their traditional lands. They sought Indigenous people. to escape the social dysfunction and political instability in larger communities and Caring for Country old missions, and to protect sacred sites • Traditionally Aboriginal and Torres Strait and maintain customary ways of life. Islander peoples moved often, leaving • Unfortunately, due to a lack of Government enough food sources to regenerate for the spending in Aboriginal Homelands, life on next season. Waste was avoided by using Country can be difficult. Food prices are all parts of plants and animals for a variety extremely high in remote areas and there is of nourishment, tools, and clothing. This often a lack of services, including adequate nomadic lifestyle looked after the limited health care, housing, and education. resources of the environment, and was led by the changing seasons.

• Contemporary Aboriginal art is often political, dealing with themes such as the collective struggle of Aboriginal people, discrimination and inequality, resistance and pride. Art is a strong platform through which Aboriginal voices can be heard. • One technique commonly used in contemporary Aboriginal art is the merging of traditional techniques with more contemporary settings in order to comment on social, historical and political issues. • For examples see: Brook Andrew, Sexy and Dangerous (1996); Jason Wing, Australia Was Stolen by Armed Robbery (2012); and Michael Riley, Cloud (2000). • Since the 1960s, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices have also been increasingly heard and represented in film, television, radio, theatre, music, poetry, and literature.

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples lived as hunter-gatherers. Men and women usually had different jobs. Men used clubs, boomerangs, and spears to hunt large animals such as kangaroos and emus, while women and children collected fruits, berries, and other plants, and hunted smaller animals. • Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples used fire to increase available food and care for their country for thousands of years. Low-level fires were used to remove undergrowth, encourage the regrowth of plants, and enable the spearing of game animals.

Dispossession from Country

Reclaiming Country • There is a strong history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander struggles for land rights. Beginning in the 1920s, and growing in strength throughout the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s, the struggle continues with vigour today. • In 1966, Vincent Lingiari led the Gurindji people in a walk off from Wave Hill station and demanded the return of their traditional lands, beginning an eight-year fight, which was ultimately successful! The Gurindji people were granted freehold title over 3250 square km of land, paving the way for the Northern Territory Aboriginal Land Rights Act of 1976. • On Australia Day 1972, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy was pitched outside Old Parliament House by Indigenous activists demanding land rights and compensation. The embassy remains today and is a powerful symbol of Indigenous protest. • In 1992, the High Court rejected the concept of terra nullius (land belonging to no one) in the famous Mabo case, legally recognising Indigenous ownership of land, called Native Title. Since this time, many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have made successful Native Title Claims.

“The land is my backbone…I only stand straight, happy, proud and not ashamed about my colour because I still have land…I think of land as the history of my nation” Galarrwuy Yunipingu

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FACT SHEETS

Indigenous Leadership • There is a strong history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership, from early warriors and leaders like Pemulwuy, Windradyne, and Bennelong to more recent leaders such as Charles Perkins and Lowitja O’Donoghue. • Organisations such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC), Federal Council for the Advancement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI) and now the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples have also played an important leadership role. • Australia has had a number of Indigenous representatives in both Federal and State parliament, giving a formal voice to issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These people include Neville Bonner (the first to sit in Federal parliament), Aden Ridgeway (Australian Democrats Senator), Ken Wyatt (first to sit in House of Representatives) and Nova Peris (first woman elected to Federal parliament).

Timeline of National Indigenous Representative Structures & Advocacy Bodies: • Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI), 1957 • National Aboriginal Consultative Committee (NACC), 1972-1977 • National Aboriginal Conference (NAC), 1977-1985 • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Committee (ATSIC) 1989-2005

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National Indigenous Representative Bodies

“For the first time in the history of this country there was an Aboriginal voice in • National Indigenous representative bodies the parliament and that gave are designed to represent the interests of me an enormous feeling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples overwhelming responsibility. by giving them a say in the decisions that affect their lives and that of their children. I made people aware, the lawmakers in this country; • They are essentially a “voice” for Indigenous people to engage with government, the I made them aware of media, business and other industries. Indigenous people. I think • Historically, there have been a number of that was an achievement.” Indigenous representative structures and advocacy bodies (see below left). 


Neville Bonner

Universal Human rights • Human rights are rights that we are all entitled to simply by virtue of being human. These are things such as the right to live, the right to have food and shelter and the right to health and education. • Human rights can also be distinguished from other rights because they are something we are all born with, which means they cannot be taken away from us (unless we break the law) and cannot be violated by government or exchanged for other rights. • There are three main categories of human rights:

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples

Indigenous Representation around the World

• The National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples (Congress) is the current national representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

• There are many different types of Indigenous representative bodies in other countries: • In New Zealand there are guaranteed seats for Maori people in parliament.

Indigenous Peoples

• Launched in 2010, Congress aims to be a national voice for Indigenous peoples, providing leadership, expertise and advocacy on issues such as Constitutional recognition, and closing the gap on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander life expectancy.

• In Sweden the Sami people have their own parliament.

• Congress is the first major representative structure since the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC), which was abolished in 2005. Unlike ATSIC, Congress does not have responsibility for delivering services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

• In Canada the Assembly of First Nations is the national Aboriginal advocacy organisation. 


Historically, human rights have been denied to Indigenous peoples by the processes of colonisation and assimilation. Throughout history in many countries, Indigenous peoples have been forced off their traditional lands, separated from their families and banned from speaking their own languages.

• Check out nationalcongress.com.au

• In America, Indigenous people are represented by the National Congress of American Indians.

1st Generation Civil and political rights 2nd Generation Economic & social rights 3rd Generation Environmental, cultural and developmental rights

Reconciliation is an important process in moving forward from these events and ensuring they never happen again.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2007 (The Declaration) The Declaration is an instrument that outlines basic standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of Indigenous peoples internationally. It was designed over a number of decades by Indigenous peoples from all around the world. Some key principles in the Declaration include the rights to self-determination, culture, nondiscrimination and equality, and the right to participate in decision-making. Initially the Australian Government voted against adopting the Declaration. However, in 2009 it gave the document its formal support.

“It is using the Declaration that breathes life into it... the Declaration provides a blueprint for Indigenous peoples and governments around the world, based on the principles of self-determination and participation…It is the instrument that contains the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of Indigenous peoples all over the world” Mick Gooda, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner

Getting active in the classroom: 
 • Watch the Story of Human Rights video at: ihrna.info/what-are-human-rights • Discuss this statement some human rights are more important than others • Check out resources relating to the Declaration here: youtube.com/watch?v=oh3BbLk5UIQ

Specific tools and frameworks now exist to protect and promote Indigenous peoples’ human rights. These include the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2007 and the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous people can also engage directly with the UN system through the annual Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

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Websites Accessible Arts NSW aarts.net.au Accessible Arts NSW is the state’s peak arts and disability body. It provides support for teachers and practitioners and develops activities across NSW. The Art Gallery of NSW artgallery.nsw.gov.au/education The Art Gallery of NSW has developed lots of slides, essays and teaching resources about current collections and exhibitions, including the Indigenous collection. The Australian Museum Australianmuseum.net.au/IndigenousAustralia This site gives a comprehensive introduction to the diversity of Indigenous Australia. ANTaR antar.org.au ANTaR is an independent, national network of organisations and individuals working in support of Justice, Rights and Respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This site contains a vast array of resources and links. The Healing Foundation healingfoundation.org.au The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation is an independent Indigenous organisation with a focus on healing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The Human Rights Commission humanrights.gov.au/education/face_ facts/index.html#4 The Human Rights Commission has a vast collection of resources. This link takes you to lesson plans and classroom activities about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Issues. Indigenous Law Centre Featured Artists ilc.unsw.edu.au/artists The Indigenous Law Centre is based at the University of New South Wales. This webpage showcases a wide range of colourful contemporary Aboriginal art, with information about the work and artists.

ReconciliACTION reconciliaction.org.au/nsw/education-Kit.R ReconciliACTION is a network of young people who promote Reconciliation. This link takes you to an education Kit about Reconciliation. Reconciliation Australia Reconciliation.org.au/home/resources/ school-resources This section of Reconciliation Australia is a resource section for schools.

The Little Red Yellow Black Book lryb.aiatsis.gov.au/ provides an entry-point to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and history and is Recognise written from an Indigenous perspective. The website contains mini essays, teaching notes recognise.org.au is the nation wide campaign to recognise and other resources. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples The Macquarie Pen Anthology of in Australia’s Constitution. The site contains Aboriginal Literature fact sheets and background information as macquariepenanthology.com.au/aborwell as education Kits for schools. websites.html is both a book and an online database of SBS The First Australians Series Aboriginal cultural websites. sbs.com.au/firstAustralians National Congress of Australia’s First people nationalcongress.com.au Congress is a national voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It is owned and controlled by its membership and is independent of Government.

“Art has always been integral in terms of creating social change. It is a vehicle through which a conversation can be started” Jason Wing

NSW Reconciliation Council nswReconciliation.org.au NSWRC is the peak body for Reconciliation in NSW. Visit this site to stay up to date with events, projects and campaigns across the state.

is a series, accessible online, which chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia from an Indigenous perspective. Books 2013 Schools Reconciliation Challenge Teaching Kit issuu.com/nswreconciliationcouncil/ docs/nswrec_ecopy_texture Arthur, W. and Morphy, F. (eds) 2005. Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia. Sydney: Pan Macmillan Australia. Parbury, N. 2005. Survival: A History of Aboriginal Life in NSW. Sydney: NSW Department of Aboriginal Affairs.


next steps

Survival Day Get Involved! The need for Constitutional reform Reconciliation means that everyone is treated equally and with dignity and respect. However, this is not possible under the current Australian Constitution, which continues to permit discrimination on the grounds of race and remains silent on the history, rights and contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The Constitution is our highest legal document. It sets out the rules of Parliament and the powers of our legislators and executive government to make and enact laws. Written over 100 years ago, against a backdrop of racism that led to the White Australia policy, our Constitution had no input from Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people. It was drafted by a select group of nonIndigenous Australians, and since its inception has either excluded or discriminated against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“In 1901, the only two Constitutional provisions that made reference to Aboriginal people did so to expressly deny them their rights and their voice. Moreover, Torres Strait Islander people were entirely excluded” Law Council of Australia

Changing our Constitution is difficult. It can only be done through a referendum, and this requires a great amount of people power. To be successful, a referendum must be approved by a double majority. This means:

Join the Campaign! • Talk about it – Australians of all ages and backgrounds can discuss Constitutional Recognition and what it means to them

• A majority of voters across the nation; and • A majority of voters in a majority states (4 out of 6 Australian states)

• Follow Recognise on Facebook & Twitter

There have been 44 attempts to change our Constitution and only 8 have been successful. One of these was the 1967 referendum, when Australians voted overwhelmingly to count Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the census, and allow the federal government to make laws concerning them.

Getting active in the classroom: • Check out recognise.org.au for more information and download the School Learning Guide

Currently there is a nation-wide campaign, led by Recognise, to change the Constitution to better reflect a modern Australia. This would involve removing discriminatory sections and acknowledging the unique place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait peoples and their culture. The Recognise team together with thousands of supporters has been travelling across the country to raise awareness and rally support. This campaign is something that concerns all Australians and is backed by all major parties. By making this change happen we can all reaffirm our support for equality and experience the sense of belonging that comes from recognition.

• Bring the campaign to your school!

• Discuss: Constitutional recognition will create a more equal and united Australia • Why are Referendums important? • Discuss: What is discrimination? Can there be both positive and negative outcomes of discrimination?

“Each of us is unique. We are different. We are all Australians and call this home. Let us rejoice in our diversity and difference because it is they that will enrich us.” Patrick Dodson, Yawuru man and National Indigenous leader

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26 January This is a celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and peoples. Events are held all around Australia showcasing different aspects of culture including dance, literature, music, food, language and history.

National Close the Gap Day 20 March This is the annual event held to raise awareness about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health crisis in Australia, and promote equality in life expectancy and health status between Indigenous and nonIndigenous people.

Mabo Day 3 June This marks the anniversary of the High Court’s historic decision, led by Eddie Koiki Mabo, which overturned the legal fiction of terra nullius and recognised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the original custodians of this land.

National Apology Day 13 February To mark the anniversary of the formal apology by the Parliament of Australia to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly the Stolen Generations, for past injustices.

National Sorry Day 26 May On Sorry Day thousands of Australians from all walks of life participate in memorial services, commemorative meetings, survival celebrations and community gatherings to honour and commemorate the Stolen Generations.

Harmony Day 21 March This is a day of cultural respect for everyone that calls Australia home. The purpose is to promote belonging and cultural diversity, and to reaffirm Australia as an inclusive nation.

National Reconciliation Week 27 May – 3 June This week commemorates two significant milestones in the Reconciliation Journey – the anniversaries of the successful 1967 Referendum and the High Court Mabo Decision. It is a time to celebrate and learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements, and explore how each of us can contribute to the national Reconciliation effort.

Coming of the Light

National NAIDOC Week

1 July The anniversary of the day the London Missionary Society arrived in the Torres Strait for the first time. Torres Strait Islanders people mark this day by holding cultural ceremonies.

6 – 13 July NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. Held from the first Sunday to the second Sunday in July, this week celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

National Aboriginal + Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day

4 August This is a day to reflect on the human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: their right to be educated, cared for, protected, and to have the opportunity to understand and practise their culture.

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

9 August This day affirms the importance of protecting and promoting the rights of Indigenous peoples all around the world. It also celebrates their unique contributions and diverse, rich cultures.

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next steps

Schools Reconciliation Challenge 2014 Entry Form For teacher to complete and attach to artwork. Only one entry form should be submitted per artwork. Artwork Details Artwork Title: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…. Number of contributors: ……… Building Reconciliation in your school shows your respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. You can take the Schools Reconciliation Challenge further by evaluating Reconciliation in your school and developing your own Road Map to Reconciliation. For advice on how to conduct a Welcome to or Acknowledgment of Country, or what to write on your Reconciliation plaque, see p26 of the 2013 Teaching Kit: issuu.com/nswreconciliationcouncil/docs/nswrec_ecopy_texture

Year: ……… How many:

…… Female

…… Male

……*Indigenous

……*Non-Indigenous

*This information is optional.

Artist name/s: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………............................ (FOR CLASS ARTWORKS, PLEASE ATTACH A CLASS LIST TO THIS FORM WITH THE NAMES OF ALL CONTRIBUTORS)

School Name: .............................................................................................................................................................................................. To Do Doing Done

I declare the submitted artwork is original and I have read and agree to the competition conditions of entry on page XX of the Teaching Kit.

Action: We Will…. Develop and implement a Reconciliation Statement

School Details School Name:……………………………………………...........……………………………………………...........…….

Fly the Aboriginal Flag

Town/Suburb:……………………………………………..... Postcode:……………………………………………..........

Fly the Torres Strait Islander Flag

Contact Teacher:………………………………………..….. Teacher Email:*……………………………………………...

Celebrate NAIDOC Week

School Phone Number:…………………………………...... Teacher Mobile:*……………………………………………. *Please provide teacher’s direct details, not the generic school information. Details will only be used to contact you in relation to the Schools Reconciliation Challenge.

Celebrate Reconciliation Week Participate in National Apology Day

Parent/Guardian Details Parent/Guardian Name:…………………………………. Email:…………………………………… Mobile:………………………………….

Participate in National Sorry Day Enter the Schools Reconciliation Challenge Make a mural in our school to represent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a positive way to the school community Invite Aboriginal Artists, story tellers and cultural practitioners to visit our school Develop and display a plaque to recognise the Traditional Custodians at the entrance of our school Connect with Elders in our local community and invite them to talk at our school Organise school excursions to local Aboriginal sites of significance Invite a Traditional Owner to perform a Welcome to Country in our School for important assemblies and events Conduct an acknowledgement to Country at the commencement of our important school events and assemblies Investigate and learn about our local Aboriginal languages with the assistance of our local Aboriginal community, and consider re-naming parts of our school environment

Survey These answers will not affect the result of the competition.

How did you hear about the competition? email

received Kit in the mail

social media

NSWRC Website

other……………………................

How many lessons were spent on this unit? 1

2–5

5+

What parts of the Teaching Kit did you find most useful? Activities Pull out Poster

Fact Sheets

Case Studies

Teaching Protocols

Next Steps

other…………………

What else would you like to see included? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………......

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... Send to: Schools Reconciliation Challenge NSW Reconciliation Council
 11-13 Mansfield Street
 Glebe NSW 2037
 Or by email with digital artwork: schools@nswreconciliation.org.au

CLOSING DATE 4 APRIL 2014

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SUBMITTING ENTRIES

For students to complete and attach to artwork. Only one artist statement should be submitted per artwork. Artist Name/s:........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Year:...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... School:.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Teacher’s Name:.................................................................................................................................................................................................... Artwork Title:..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

Please address the following three points in your Artist Statement: What is your artwork about? How does it relate to Reconciliation? How does it relate to the theme Our Journey?

.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ........................................................................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................................................................ ........................................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................................................

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By completing and submitting the 2014 Schools Reconciliation Challenge entry form, each participant agrees to be bound by the following terms and conditions: Eligibility 1. To participate in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge, students must currently be enrolled in grades 5–10 at a primary or secondary school in NSW, or be the equivalent age of a grade 5–10 student. Students may participate independently or as part of a class project.

8. No corrections can be made after the entry is received by the NSWRC. 9. Entries which are not nominated may be returned at the expense of the artist or school within six months of competition close. Nominated entries may be held for up to 12 months before being returned to the artist. 10. Closing date for receipt of entries is 4 April 2014. 11. Whilst all care will be taken to protect original artworks, NSWRC takes no responsibility for loss or damage.

2. Entries must be entirely the work of the entrant and must never have been published, self-published, featured on any website or public online forum, broadcast, nor have been entered or won a prize in any other competition.

Size and Material of works •

Artworks must be 2D. Students may use any material for their artwork, such as collage, paint, pencil or still digital media such as photography or Photoshop

3. A completed entry form must accompany the document or artwork to indicate agreement to these terms and conditions.

Entries may be a maximum of A1 size (or 60 x 84cm).

Artworks must be submitted on a flat surface such as paper or board, but not canvas

Clearly write, name, class, school and title of work on the reverse. Paper clip or Blue-Tack entry form to artwork. Do not glue entry form to the artwork.

Artwork must not be framed or mounted behind glass

4. Artists who are placed First, Second or Third will receive sponsored travel to attend the awards ceremony and exhibition showcase* in Sydney for themselves and one guardian. Collaborative entries must delegate one representative and their guardian to attend the ceremony. 5. Artists who are placed Highly Commended may have their work exhibited in Sydney but will not receive sponsored travel. 6. The artwork must reflect the 2014 theme Our Journey. 7. Entries must meet the competition requirements and formats, outlined in ‘size and material of works’ below.

Digital Entries •

The file name of digital entries must be the title of the artwork

Email either a digital photograph or scanned version of the artwork. Preferred file types are .jpg, .gif, or .bmp.

The original artwork of entries must be available and submitted to the NSWRC office within seven days of notice (the NSWRC will provide assistance with these arrangements).

Copyright By signing a completed entry form, and accepting the award offer, the nominated authors/artists: 1. Agree to grant royalty-free, worldwide, non-exclusive, licence to reproduce and publish work in all media of expression now known or later developed and in all languages in the nominated artwork to the NSWRC without reservation including, but not limited to, all intellectual property rights to reproduce and publish the nominated entry on the NSWRC website and to change and/or reproduce any part of the nominated artwork in relation to other promotional activities; 2. Agree that the NSWRC may publish, on the NSWRC website and in relation to other promotional activities, any personal information provided by the nominated artist in connection with their entry including, but not limited to, the nominated artist’s name, age, community and state/territory of residence; and warrants that there is no cultural or religious reason or any other impediment that prevents the nominated artwork from being exhibited, published or reproduced. Judging All entries will be viewed and judged by a subcommittee of the NSWRC. The decision of the judges will be final and absolute. No correspondence concerning decisions will be entered into. *Subject to funding.

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11–13 Mansfield Street, Glebe NSW 2037 Phone: (02) 9562 6355 Fax: (02) 8456 5906 schools@nswreconciliation.org.au nswreconciliation.org.au facebook.com/nswreconciliation Download a copy of this Teaching Kit at: nswReconciliation.org.au/schoolsreconciliation-challenge Join us on Facebook: facebook.com/schoolsreconciliationchallenge Š NSW Reconciliation Council Inc. 2014 ABN 583 759 527 94 ISBN 978 0 646 91504 3 The NSW Reconciliation Council acknowledges and pays respect to the Traditional Owners and custodians of Country throughout NSW and Australia.

Profile for Rose  Macdonald

Schools Reconciliation Challenge 2014  

The Schools Reconciliation Challenge is a Reconciliation art project, open for entries during term one (January - April each year). The chal...

Schools Reconciliation Challenge 2014  

The Schools Reconciliation Challenge is a Reconciliation art project, open for entries during term one (January - April each year). The chal...

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