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NORFOLK STATE UNIVERSITY

®

WAVES

A Newsletter for Faculty, Staff, Alumni and Friends of Norfolk State University Achieving Excellence. Success Beyond Measure.

NSU Program Reaches Out to Sophomores

T

he Spartan Success Center is proactively working to retain sophomore students through its Sophomore Year Experience (SYE) program. According to Sheryll Heard, SYE coordinator, second-year students often experience what’s called the “sophomore slump”—a time that students are often confused and overwhelmed. During sophomore year, students are asked to declare their majors, find internships and make decisions about studying abroad. When these new expectations are combined with other stressors, students may fall into the sophomore slump. SYE is designed to provide innovative and intrusive academic advising, connect students to campus resources and develop programs that guide them toward declaring a major. Sophomores are encouraged to meet with their academic advisors and to develop relationships throughout the campus community. All of these efforts are meant to help sophomores stay enrolled, progress and reach graduation.

The Spartan Success Center offers sophomores resources to help them through their second year of college.

Continued on next page

Grant Will Educate NSU Students and Community About High Risk Behaviors Dr. Desi Hacker, of the Department of Psychology, has been awarded a $794,000 grant from the Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. The purpose of this grant is to provide comprehensive HIV and substance abuse prevention and educational services to African-American young adults between the ages of 18–24 Dr. Desi Hacker on the NSU campus and in the Norfolk community. Dr. Hacker will be assisted in the implementation of this grant by Dr. Darlene Colson, Dr. Ernestine Duncan (College of Liberal Arts) and Dr. Cynthia Burwell (School of Education). This initiative will complement the University’s High Risk Behaviors campaign by the implementation of programs designed to reduce substance use and risky sexual behaviors. Undergraduate and graduate students will also participate in carrying out grant activities. The grant will have a three-pronged approach: • Implementation of research-based HIV/AIDS/Substance Abuse prevention groups on campus • Implementation of a media-based campus-wide HIV/Substance Abuse awareness campaign • Dissemination of information on HIV/Substance Abuse and HIV testing on campus and in the Norfolk community


New School of Graduate Studies and Research has new Dean Dr. George E. Miller, the first dean of NSU’s new School of Graduate Studies and Research, began work on Oct. 1. Dr. Miller has 35 years of experience in higher education in the classroom and in administration. He played a significant role in developing NSU’s Center for Materials Research and served as the center director for four years. Most recently, Dr. Miller served as president of Martin University in Indianapolis, Ind. Additional administrative positions include serving as vice president for Academic Affairs at Claflin University in Orangeburg, S.C.; provost and vice president of academic affairs at Bowie State University, Bowie, Md.; vice president for academic affairs at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, N.C.; and associate vice president for academic affairs and associate vice president for research at Norfolk State University. Over his career, Dr. Miller has been awarded $30 million in grants from federal agencies and private

foundations and sources. Most notably, grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA provided initial funding to start NSU’s Center for Materials Research. During his 11 years at NSU (19871998), Dr. Miller played a significant role in developing the Center for Materials Research. Dr. Miller led the three-person team that conceptualized and developed the Materials Research Laboratory and was the principal investigator and writer of the grant for the construction of the approximately 18,000 square-foot Materials Sciences Research Science Building, which at that time, enabled the University to expand its research capability and provided the first significant Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics facility in 30 years. Professionally, Dr. Miller has served on the National Governors Association’s Innovation America Task Force, representing South Carolina; the National Science Foundation’s Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) board of reviewers; NASA-NSU CREAM board of reviewers; board of directors, VQuest Enterprises, Inc.; chair board of trustees, Family Health Center Foundation; and CEO and president of Organic Bio-Energy. Dr. Miller earned the Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Howard University, the master of science in physical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor of science in chemistry from Delaware State College.

Dr. George E. Miller

NSU Program Reaches Out Continued from page 1

So far, the SYE program has held a “Welcome Back Sophomore Celebration,” followed by an academic skills seminar in September; a majors fair in October; and is holding

WAVES

Making Waves is published by the Office of Communications and Marketing. (757) 823-8373 Eddie N. Moore, Jr. Interim President and CEO Deborah C. Fontaine Interim Vice President for University Advancement Cheryl Bates-Lee AVP of University Relations Stevalynn Adams Regina Lightfoot Christopher Setzer

marketing@nsu.edu

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bi-weekly academic skills sessions and a speaker series throughout the semester. Heard said that an SYE focus group made up of students who have diverse backgrounds, classifications, majors, genders and campus involvement, is providing data about the program’s efforts. The group meets monthly and SYE will use its data to plan and implement future sophomore programs. “We are also partnering with many organizations on campus because research shows that it takes the entire campus to respond to the needs of our sophomores,” said Heard. While any sophomore can take advantage of the program, this first year has more than 100 students who are participating in the pilot. One of the factors that will help determine how well the program is working is the term-to-term retention, year-to-year retention, good academic standing and sophomores declaring majors. “Sophomores want to talk about their lives and future goals,” said Heard. “It is important that we provide opportunities for them to hear from former students that have traveled this path,” she said. “Everyone has a story and they are not all the same nor are they perfect. This gives our students an opportunity to perhaps think about other possible choices while building strong relationships that promote success.” Making Waves


Simulation

Education

Puts Nursing Students in Real-Life Situations

N

SU nurse educator Angela K. Hayes is part of a rarified group. Hayes is a certified simulation healthcare educator, who passed the exam in August. Just 255 healthcare simulation professionals from 15 countries have become certified since the examination program launched in June 2012, according to the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. What is even more astonishing is that Hayes accomplished this feat just one month after undergoing surgery to remove a brain tumor, which was found to be benign. That’s just how passionate she is about simulation education.

Commitment and Dedication

“The medical crises in my life increased and intensified my motivation and commitment to assist with educating competent, professional nurses through the use of simulation,” said Hayes, who is lab coordinator of NSU’s Center for Innovative Nursing Education (CINE) and the Hampton Roads regional director of the Virginia State Simulation Alliance. She studied for the exam while in the intensive care unit recuperating from the surgery. Hayes also thanks her nursing students for helping her as well. During the 2013 spring semester, Hayes ran simulatons four to five days a week. “I learned a lot about simulation from these experiences,” she said. Hayes can’t forget how she became acquainted with simulation education and bitten by the simulation bug. She credits Dr. Bennie Marshall, who was

the nursing department chair, at that time. Marshall selected her for the CINE position and sent Hayes to simulation training sessions and several national conferences. “During that time, I fell in love with simulation and I have remained in love. I see the potential it has to transform students’ academic and clinical performances,” she said. Hayes is bringing that passion and commitment to students in the University’s nursing program.

Nursing Judgment

Simulation education puts nursing students in real-life situations that allow them to use their nursing judgment. Hayes said that although the students take part in clinicals in healthcare facilities, they do not often get to use their nursing judgment. More often than not, she added, the facility nurses make the decisions about care. Recently four nursing students took part in a simulation in which they were working with a patient who suddenly went into shock while her daughter was present in the room. The students took on the roles of charge nurse, primary nurse, non-licensed health professional and a recorder, while Department of Nursing and Allied Health staff unfamiliar with the students took on the roles of the patient’s daughter and the attending doctor who they had to contact via telephone. A mannequin, specially equipped for medical scenarios, was the patient. Although it was a simulation, the actions and the judgments of the students were real. Hayes, along with the recording nursing student, evaluated each of their actions. Nursing student Jenna Siegl said the scenario has helped with developing her nursing judgment and dealing with patients. “So far, the patients and their families have been a worst case scenario,” she said. “We look forward to this,” Rachel Jordan said of the simulations, “I always feel accomplished after it. I always take something away from it.”

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Ida Ann Thompson

Student’s Story Touts Value of Higher Education By Keisha N. Reynolds Communications and Marketing Intern

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Norfolk State University transfer student is starring in a commercial about the value of higher education. Ida Thompson, a nontraditional student who transferred from Paul D. Camp Community College, is part of a campaign by Virginia’s Community Colleges (VCCS). A senior political science major, Thompson has big hopes and big dreams of becoming a lawyer. Yet, as a first-generation college student, she has had to overcome many obstacles to get to this point in her life. “My whole life I doubted myself. I lacked the selfconfidence I needed and a mentor to help offer the guidance that my parents were not able to supply,” said Thompson.

and making them aware of scholarships and financial aid that are available for education. “Being a first-generation college student, I was not aware of all the resources available to those enrolling in college undergoing financial limitations,” said Thompson. “I thus proceeded to tell the financial aid officer that I could only afford one class at a time because I was on a very limited budget.”

“Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll land among the stars.” It wasn’t until Thompson met this financial aid officer that she realized the numerous possibilities for funding education. Armed with this knowledge, Thompson plans to offer an annual scholarship after completing her degree. After surviving college as a nontraditional student, Thompson knows she can survive anything and is expecting to graduate fall 2014. “I credit my husband the most for his continued support and my children for being my pillars. I could not do this without the sacrifices that my immediate family makes daily in order to help me succeed,” she said. Thompson wants to encourage her peers to pursue their dreams.“Shoot for the moon,” she said, “even if you miss you'll land among the stars.”

A Vow

That all changed the day she was denied a promotion because she did not have a college degree. That day she vowed never to hear those words again and never to let that hold her back. In March 2007, Thompson packed up her family and moved from California to Virginia to pursue her dreams. After enrolling at a local community college and maintaining a 4.0 GPA for two semesters, Thompson realized that she was smart enough to achieve her dream and pursue law school, so she enrolled in Norfolk State University. She has already begun making strides by engaging her community

See the VCCS video featuring Thompson’s unique story at http://www.vccs.edu/.

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Norfolk State University Making Waves-Nov. 2013