Page 1

EXTENSION TO THE SARA HILDÉN MUSEUM Nathan Siter

Diploma Thesis 18.3.2009 Tampere University of Technology Department of Architecture Professor Hannu Tikka


EXTENSION TO THE SARA HILDÉN ART MUSEUM ABSTRACT This thesis presents a design for an extension to the Sara Hildén Art Museum in Tampere, Finland. The museum has a severe lack of space to display and store the Sara Hildén Foundation’s extensive, world class collection of 4500 modern and contemporary works of art. In addition to the lack of space for the collection, the museum is in need of more space for the staff and administration. Lastly, the building’s approach is ambiguous and in need of development in relation to its surroundings. Without these changes, the current museum cannot adequately serve the public due to the fact that the masterpiece quality works of the collection are rarely displayed for extended periods of time. Therefore, on the level of the individual, there is little chance of aesthetic or educational experiences. In addition, there is little chance for a greater regional cultural prosperity. The overall organization of the plan is based off iterative repetition of groups of clusters. The system of ratios for the dimension of the complex is based off of Phi in relation to the human scale. Its form is biomorphic in response to the boxy, brutal nature of the existing building. The extension itself is a separate structure from the existing building linked together with a series of underground galleries. The new extension serves as a new entrance point to the complex with its approach being more obvious in relation to its surroundings. The extension fuses with the natural park like setting of the site, with its roof top garden being engineered to intensive green roof standards. This collection is a great asset to the people of Pirkanmaa. However, a building needs to be designed that can house the works without distracting from the art. The building needs also to be sensitive to its surroundings yet have its own unique identity. It should be designed with future expansion in mind as well. Tampere and the Pirkanmaa region could benefit greatly from a building such as this in combination with this collection.


SARA HILDÉNIN TAIDEMUSEON LAAJENNUS TIIVISTELMÄ Diplomityön aiheena on laajennus Sara Hildénin taidemuseoon Tampereelle. Museolla on tilan puutteen vuoksi ongelmia asettaa näytteille ja varastoida laajaa maailmanluokan kokoelmaansa, joka käsittää 4500 modernin ja nykytaiteen teosta. Museolta puuttuu myös henkilökunnan ja hallinnon tiloja. Lisäksi kulku museoalueelle on epäselvä ja tarvitsee uudelleen suunnittelua suhteessa ympäristöönsä. Nykyisellään museo ei voi tehokkaasti palvella yleisöä ja pitää mestariluokan teoksiaan esillä pitkiä aikoja. Mahdollisuudet alueelliseen kulttuurin kehittämiseen ovat rajoittuneet. Alueen jäsennys perustuu toistuviin klustereihin. Rakennuksen suhdejärjestelmä muodostuu kultaisen leikkauksen suhteesta ihmisen mittakaavaan. Uuden rakennuksen muoto on biomorfinen vastakohtana olemassa olevan rakennuksen kulmikkuudelle ja karkeudelle. Laajennus on erillinen rakennus, joka liittyy entiseen rakennukseen sarjalla maanalaisia galleriatiloja. Laajennus palvelee uutena sisäänkäyntinä museoon. Lähestymissuunta on selkeämpi suhteessa ympäristöön. Laajennuksen kattopuutarha sulautuu ympäröivään puistomaiseen luontoon ja täyttää viherkattorakentamisen korkeat vaatimukset. Museon kokoelma on arvokas kulttuurinen pääoma pirkanmaalaisille. Museorakennus on suunniteltava toimimaan näyttelytilana, joka päästää esiteltävät teokset oikeuksiinsa eikä vie huomiota niiltä. Rakennuksen on kunnioitettava ympäristöään, mutta samalla sillä on oltava oma identiteettinsä. Suunnittelussa on otettava huomioon myös tulevaisuuden laajennustarpeet. Tampere ja Pirkanmaa voivat hyötyä suuresti tällaisesta rakennuksesta kokoelmineen.


OPENING REMARKS My first exposure to the Sara Hildén Art Museum was during my first visit to Finland in January of 1999 while I was studying urban planning and landscape architecture as an exchange student in Copenhagen. I attended the outstanding exhibit of British artist, Tony Cragg (whose sculptural work “Trilobites” is included in several of my renderings through out the following pages). My first thoughts of the museum were of the simple, yet elegant layout and of the high level of art contained within. However, approaching the museum was indeed a bit round about and ambiguous. After permanently moving to Finland in 2000, I became employed with Arkkitehtikonttori Petri Pussinen Oy in 2004. Due to the firm’s involvement in the planning of Särkänniemi Amusement Park, I found myself working a small project for the design of the concrete sign at the entrance to the parking lot for the museum as well as it surroundings in 2006. During this project, my original thoughts on the museum and its surroundings were solidified and added to as I was now viewing the site from an analytical angle instead of as a tourist. I submitted plans for the area surrounding the sign and did the visualizations. The plans were not accepted, but the sign was built. I was slightly disappointed but this is how these things go sometimes. Well, I would have never guessed that two years later I would be almost literally handed an opportunity to design an extension to the museum for my graduate work. In early winter of 2008, I was looking for a topic for my graduate work. It was suggested to me that I might contact the museum, as they are in desperate need for more exhibition space. After making contact, it was agreed that this would be a fine opportunity for both myself and the museum. I would make plans for an extension to be used as a preliminary study for their future plans. My work started with several interviews with the Museum Director, Riitta Valorinta and the Curator of the Collection, Päivi Loimaala. Once my program was set, I designed about twelve versions leading up to the final version presented in the following pages. I attended the Louisiana Museum, National Gallery and Ordrupgård in Denmark, the De Cordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln Massachusetts, and Kiasma in Helsinki in order to view practical and impractical design matters. During these visits, I was unable to obtain permission to view the storage facilities at any of the museums. I also reviewed my materials from visits to the Guggenheim and Chelsea Art Museums in New York in 2007 and the Frankfurt Modern in 2005 and 1998. Now that the work is finished, I hope that it is of use to the Museum, the Foundation and the citizens of the Pirkanmaa region. It would be great, if with in the next five to ten years, we will be able to see this or another project realized that truly fulfills the needs of the Collection and the public. Tampere 3.3.2009 Nathan Siter


TABLE OF CONTENTS Opening remarks 1. Introduction 2. Sara Hildén 3. Current Sara Hildén Art Museum 3.1 Existing building 3.2 Existing surroundings 3.3 Analysis of the existing museum 3.3.1 Access 3.3.2 Space Issues 3.3.2.1 Storage 3.3.2.2 Exhibition and related 3.3.2.3 Staff 3.3.3 Aesthetic 4. EXTENSION DESIGN 4.1 Access to the museum complex 4.2 Former parking lot 4.3 Building entrance 4.4 Non-paying public spaces 4.4.1 Ticket lobby 4.4.2 Café 4.4.3 Bookstore 4.5 Paying public spaces 4.5.1 Staircase 4.5.2 Main Hall 4.5.3 Gallery spaces 4.5.4 Auditorium 4.5.5 Remaining spaces 4.6 Logistical spaces 5. EXISTING BUILDING 5.1 Gallery spaces and access 5.2 Office wing 5.3 Existing entrance 6. SCULPTURE PARK 6.1 Green Roof 6.2 Lawns 6.3 Other spaces

4 8 9 10 10 11 13 13 14 14 15 16 17 18 20 20 21 22 22 23 24 24 24 24 26 27 27 28 29 29 29 30 31 31 32 32

5


7. STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS 7.1 Structure 7.2 Exterior materials 7.3 Interior materials 8. CONNECTIONS TO TAMPERE 9. FUTURE EXPANSION 10. CONCLUSION

33 33 35 36 37 38 39

SOURCES PHOTO CREDITS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

40 41 42

APPENDIX A. PLANS AND SECTIONS

43

APPENDIX B. ADDITIONAL VISUALIZATIONS

56

6


7


1. INTRODUCTION The Sara Hildén Art Museum in Tampere, Finland is a small museum consisting of a world-renowned collection of contemporary and modern art. Over the past thirty years, the museum has consistently shown exhibitions from influential contemporary artists as well as from their own collection. Contemporary Finnish art has had at least one or two exhibitions a year, making the museum very important to the promotion of current trends in Finnish art works as well. This has contributed to the museum becoming one of the most valuable assets to Tampere and the Pirkanmaa region from a cultural and educational standpoint. Currently, the existing museum is in need of more exhibition and storage space to better fit the needs of both the public and the museum. In addition, its place in the Tampere cityscape needs better definition as to how it can be tied in to its surroundings.

2

8

1 Aerial photograph of Sara Hildén Art Museum

2 Juan Gris, Guitar and Set-Square, 1926

3 Sara Hildén in Venice, 1964


2. SARA HILDÉN

3

Sara Hildén (1905-1993) was a successful businesswoman in the fashion industry in Tampere. Her initial interested in art can be linked to her involvement with the fashion industry. Her marriage in 1949 to Finnish modernist painter, Erik Enroth, further developed her ideas surrounding contemporary and modern works. In 1961, she began purchasing twentieth century works with the idea to start her own collection of contemporary art. She then established the Sara Hildén Foundation in 1962 and turned all the works over to them in order to ensure the collection would continue to grow. The foundation’s major aim under the charter of foundation is to create, maintain and preserve a collection of high quality modern and contemporary international art. Both Finnish and foreign artists are collected, representing a range of works from the early twentieth century through today. The current collection is considered worldclass. It consists of over 4500 drawings, paintings and sculptures highlighted by works from artists such as Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris, Joan Miró, Paul Klee, Francis Bacon, Josef Albers, Pierre Soulages, Christo, Helene Schjerfbeck, Kain Tapper and many others. 9


3. SARA HILDÉN ART MUSEUM

4 Aerial photograph of Särkänniemi Peninsula

5 Tampere city map

3.1 EXISTING BUILDING In order to display the collection better, it was decided to build a museum to house the works. In February 1979 the museum was opened to the public in Tampere, Finland. The museum is located adjacent to Näsinneula observation tower in the northwestern corner of Särkänniemi amusement park on the Särkänniemi peninsula. The site is a gently sloping bowl shaped landscape formed by north-facing hillside that slopes down to the shores of Lake Näsijärvi and a hillside with gentle south and west-facing slopes to the east. This bowl opens out towards the northwest and is bordered by Lake Näsijärvi to the north. The building’s architect, Pekka Ilveskoski, tucked the building slightly into the north-facing hillside. The building opens out to views of the lake and its shores, which are exemplary of a typically Finnish lakeside landscape. The museum building consists of 2500 square meters, of which 1500 meters have been allocated for exhibition space. The

6 Existing museum plans, Current situation, No scale 1 Entrance 2 Ticket/bookstore 3 Elevator 4 Central Gallery 5 Gallery 6 Café Sara 7 Office wing 8 Library 9 Storage (former gallery) 10 Storage 11 Auxillary Space

4

exhibition spaces are centered around a sky lit central gallery which has stairs down to the lower level. The galleries have elegant proportion and are essentially closed inward, with windows near the ceiling to let in natural light if needed. A small nook with a view to the lake and connection back to the central gallery separates each gallery. The circulation through the galleries is circular, starting and ending in the central gallery. From here it is possible to go downstairs to the lower level galleries and café. Also located on the upper level are offices, library, break room and some storage for the works. The lower galleries are roughly the same size and layout as the upper galleries. However, the floor plan is fairly open, each

SARA HILDÉN ART MUSEUM

CENTER SQUARE

RAIL STATION

5

10

7 Museum central gallery


5. 5. 4. 5.

1. 2.

9.

7.

8.

3.

10.

Upper Floor

5.

of the galleries being separated by a meter high wall and/or an elevation change of about 500 to 1000 millimeters. There are several taller walls here on which very large works can be hung. Large windows in each of the galleries open out to the lake creating juxtaposition between the man made and the natural environments. Located on this level is also a multimedia gallery, exit to the outdoor sculpture park, auxiliary spaces and the museum cafĂŠ, which again, capitalizes on the stunning views to the lake.

6.

5.

9.

5.

11. 10.

6

7

3.2 EXISTING SURROUNDINGS

3.

Lower Floor

The outdoor sculpture park consists of two main and several smaller areas. The first main area is a hillside that is seen upon

11


entrance to the site. This hillside is fairly well wooded. It has gentle southern and western slopes, a rather steep northern slope down to the shoreline and is bordered by the “Korkkiruuvi” roller coaster attraction at Särkänniemi to the east. Located at the top of the hill is the foundation of a former birthing clinic. Sculptures from Harri Kivijärvi and Hannu Siren are located around this foundation. The second main area is the lower yard. It consists of a stone patio directly outside of the museum café and a lawn located between the museum and shoreline. The lawn is punctuated by a few trees and sculptures mainly from Harri Kivijärvi. This lawn

8

continues around the corner of the museum towards the west. The several smaller areas are focal points spread out through the site itself. The first is the existing entrance to the site. A concrete sign for the museum and a sculpture consisting of a glass boxed in streetcar frame the entrance, making a gateway into the parking lot and site. At the end of the parking lot, in front of the museum entrance is a sculpture from Harri Kivijärvi. And lastly, there are several sculptures lining the path to the lower lawnfrom the museum entrance. 9

12

10


8 Sculpture lawn at museum

9 Steep hillside overlooking lake on museum property

10 Museum from eastern hillside

11 Map of Särkänniemi amusement park, route to museum in red

12 Korkkiruuvi attraction picture taken from museum property

3.3 ANALYSIS OF EXISTING BUILDING

3.3.1 Access

The current museum has many shortcomings and issues that should be resolved in order for the general public and foundation to get the most out of the outstanding collection of works of art that has been amassed. The major problems with the current museum and layout of the site are difficult access to the museum from the city and lack of space involving the storage and the display of the permanent collection, as well as room for the staff. In addition, there are a few slight aesthetic issues that should be addressed, such as material changes and the organization of

Access to the museum can prove to be a slight problem. While the location of the museum is quite ideal with its beautiful scenery and that it is part of one of Finland’s largest summer time leisure destinations, the museum is not entirely easy for a tourist to reach. The fact that it is located in the back corner of an amusement park is both a positive and a negative. Positively speaking, being part of an amusement park, a new dimension is opened up creating a center for both amusement and culture. This gives the

the sculpture park.

possibility for a gentle interlude to a fun-filled, but hectic day at Särkänniemi amusement park. In addition, it offers an opportunity for park attendees to view a world-class collection of art that they might not have considered to see

KORKKIRUUVI

SARA HILDÈN ART MUSEUM

D

B

PLANETARIUM/NÄSINNEULA C

KOSKISEIKKAILU

MAIN GATE

12

E

Kortelahti

11 IVENTIE

PAASIK

otherwise, being that the cost of admission is included in the overall ticket price. Also, the fact that the museum is located a bit out of the way in the park, means it is less susceptible to the noise factor of most of the park, which may interrupt the ideal park-like surrounds of the museum. Although the museum is located a bit out of the way, it is still in close proximity 13


13

to the “Korkkiruuvi” rollercoaster that is just to the east of the site. This attraction runs at regular intervals for eight hours a day during the summer months. This creates a slight disturbance. Also, due to the slightly out of the way position, finding ones way to the museum can be slightly difficult. One must pass through the main Särkänniemi gates and then either pass through the Planetarium/Näsinneula building or go around behind it. From here, the museum is another 100 meters to the west. This may be most pertinent to a foreigner who may only be interested in a visit to the museum and not the rest of the attractions. However, it is worth mentioning that once the visitor has worked his or her way around Näsinneula, the gateway, framed by the concrete sign and streetcar sculpture are a more than adequate marker showing where the museum is. What is needed is a more direct access to the museum that is obvious, yet does 14

not conflict with the plan of Särkänniemi amusement park. In addition, some sort of noise diffusion should be taken into consideration in planning either a new building or renovations to the existing site.

3.3.2 Space Issues 3.3.2.1 Storage Simply put, there is not enough on-site storage space for a collection of this size. This has caused two of the existing galleries to become storage rooms. One of which is upstairs, directly off of the central gallery, while the other is located in the downstairs multimedia gallery. In addition, the remaining storage is located off-site in two different locations. This is a two-fold problem. The first is the inconvenience that is created due to having to travel up to twenty minutes in one direction to access the work(s) in storage. The second is


13 Current entrance to museum property

14 Museum gallery

security. The museum would much rather have all of the works in one place in a more secure environment. At the moment, there is 300 square meters of storage in use on-site with an additional 1200 square meters off-site. There is a total need for 1500-1800 square meters of storage on-site. If there was proper on-site storage, the galleries being used as storage could then be freed up for other use, with a total of up to 140 square meters of additional exhibition space.

3.3.2.2 Exhibition and related The current exhibition galleries are very simply laid out with an elegant circular circulation and proportions. However due to the limited exhibition space, the museum is not able to adequately display the permanent collection but on rare occasions when there is no visiting exhibition. This goes against what the museum was originally intended to be for, meaning for the better part of a year, the collection is only available to be viewed

14

in the catalogs or if one is lucky enough to be at another museum borrowing a work from the collection. According to the Curator and Museum Director, hanging works on the walls is made a bit easier by the exposed columns at regular intervals along some of the walls. However, the museum was designed based off of the Paris school of painting where works are considerably smaller than contemporary works. Therefore, this design was about 50 years too late. This means that the gallery walls are too low, creating inadequate spaces for hanging works larger than 2.5 meters tall. High above these walls are unsightly curtains that are generally closed, covering the upper windows of the galleries. Lastly, during exhibition change over, the access to the galleries from the outside or the storage is sometimes too small for some of the larger works to enter the galleries or museum. One complaint about contemporary museum design is that the layout is not straight forward enough. The visitor is often left with the question of if he or

15


she viewed the entire exhibit or not. A labyrinthian circulation system, even if done well, could feasibly detract from the overall art viewing experience. Dead ends and choices in direction should also be avoided for the same reason. As first and for most, the museum is meant for housing art. Once this is successfully accomplished, the building can then take on its own character. For many museums these days are built for their lobbies alone, creating awkward connections to the works themselves. Entrances into galleries need to be large enough to let through larger contemporary works, but still small enough that they

achieved through new galleries located in the extension, leaving the existing galleries as they were intended. The museum has no discernible bookshop other than a small area next to the existing ticket counter. It is also in need of a workshop for children, as the museum receives many visits from school children. Lastly, there is a lack of a separate space for lectures, films and performance.

do not over power the scale of the space. Placement should be towards the corners of the gallery, but not in the center. It is much better to have long, uninterrupted walls for hanging one large work or several smaller than fragmented walls. In addition, by placing the entrance closer to the corner of the gallery, it is possible to create a void wall where there is no room for any work to be hung. This creates a less busy feel to the gallery. Currently, the museum is in need of an additional 800 to 1000 square meters of exhibition and gallery space. This additional area would be adequate for visiting exhibitions while the permanent collection would be housed in the existing building as originally intended. Wall heights would need to be within a range of three to five meters tall. Doorways from storage should be about three by three meters. However due to construction costs of raising the roof support structure, renovation of the current galleries structure is not recommended especially due to the fact that updating to current contemporary hanging standards can be 16

just is not enough space for the needs of both the administrative staff and the tour guide staff. There are not enough offices.

15 Downstairs gallery

16 Faรงade material

17 Museum parking lot

18 Thick vegetation on museum property

3.3.2.3 Staff The current staff spaces are cramped and crowded. The main problem is that there

15

16


17

The library shares its space with an office, creating a cramped space with not enough storage for materials. The current break room is too small to be shared by both staffs. The current staff needs are roughly double the current situation.

from the museum and lake. Lastly is the issue of the parking lot in front of the museum. It is mainly used by employees of Särkänniemi amusement park, having very little to do with the museum visitor, especially when the Särkänniemi is open for the summer. It is an unsightly expanse of asphalt that detracts from the museum site as a whole.

3.3.3 Aesthetic The existing building was built using a cheap façade material of a concrete element covered in small pebbles. It is not particularly attractive for an art museum. On the inside, the floor material is a speckled off white tile, which in the opinion of the administration should be changed to a darker, more neutral grey. The exterior spaces are in need of a bit of work as well. The sculpture park should be strengthened with a stronger circulation network that would give a greater identity as a whole to the entire site. The vegetation needs to also be thinned out in many places in order to create a more elegant atmosphere and to open up views to and

18

17


20

18


19 Northern end of extension from Lake Näsijärvi

20 Graphical depiction of Phi

21 Cluster Diagram

22 Aerial view of site from south

4. EXTENSION DESIGN

circulation (which becomes circular with a forth cluster when the sculpture park is included in the system). The spaces in the extension would serve as the new entrance to the museum complex housing the non paying customer services such as the Café and Bookstore as well as the ticket counter, cloak room and a 117-seat auditorium. The spaces under the former parking lot would house visiting exhibitions. The existing building would then house the staff offices, library, children’s workshop and permanent collection.

The basis for this design was to create separate clusters of spaces in order to have flexible possibilities for exhibitions and related social functions. The dimensions of the extension are proportional to the average Finnish human height of 1.8 meters in multiples of phi (or the golden ratio, which is 1.61803399). The design is centered on a new set of gallery spaces that is placed under the former parking lot. The placement and form is an iteration of the placement of the galleries in the existing building. Access to these galleries is gained via a new extension placed inside the hillside/cliffs next to the “Korkkiruuvi” rollercoaster thrill ride at the neighboring Särkänniemi Park. The placement and form of the spaces inside the extension are a looser echo of the arrangement of the galleries. This creates three separate groups of spaces that are linked together by linear 21

22

19


4.2 FORMER PARKING LOT

23

4.1 ACCESS TO THE MUSEUM COMPLEX In order to integrate the museum better into its surroundings in relation to the entrance to Särkänniemi, an access point from the main entrance square in front of the Planetarium at Särkänniemi would need to be created. This access point would consist of two separately pitching walls creating a tunnel in the hill located between the Planetarium and Koskiseikkailu attraction ending up in the former museum parking lot. From here, due to the curve of the tunnel and the fact that views to the existing museum building are blocked, the visitor is oriented directly towards the new entrance to the complex. The entrance to the existing building’s importance is further played down through use of plantings and other visual aids to emphasize the extension’s entrance over the existing. The existing entrance to the site would remain intact as is. Coming from the eastern parts of Särkänniemi, it frames the entrance nicely and is obvious from a distance. 20

The former parking lot would serve as a central circulation node for the complex. Open in nature, the visitor is faced with a hierarchy of possible places to go. The first is the extension, which is oriented directly in front upon exiting the complex entrance tunnel. Secondly, partially obscured by vegetation, is the existing building. Lastly is the sculpture park, in which the extension is built into. In order to further enhance central circulation node, local environmental artist, Antti Pussinen, has designed a colour labyrinth made from 1.8m tall

23 New entrance tunnel to museum complex from in front of Särkänniemi Planetarium

24 Exit of new entrance tunnel towards main entrance of extension

25 New entrance to extension, colour labyrinth and obscured view to existing building new entrance

26 Sketch of colour labyrinth

27 Plan and sequence of colour labyrinth

28 Section of colour labyrinth

aluminum poles painted with Joseph Itten’s colour harmonies. The poles have holes drilled through them. The visitor looks through the hole and views another pole. Based of his or her knowledge of colour harmony, either the correct or incorrect pole in the sequence is chosen. The labyrinth starts in the entrance tunnel and finishes at the entrance to the new

24


25

26

27

building. The idea to place a labyrinth was to help tie the “circus” like atmosphere of Särkänniemi to the sobering, intellectual ideals of the art world by creating a fun but educational, environmental work. Also located in the central circulation node is access to the storage facilities via a large service elevator. It is placed adjacent the former entrance to the site for easy access from larger service vehicles. The former loading dock to the existing museum will also remain open to service vehicle traffic as well as the entrance located on the lower floor of the existing building. All other vehicle traffic is removed from the area.

4.3 BUILDING ENTRANCE

28

The building is accessed through a hole in a large sloping wall. To the northern side of the entrance is a long, curving, sloping retaining wall planted with trees. The 21


southern side of the entrance is bordered by a wall that is higher than the entrance, which continues into the building. The glass doors open up to a bridge that passes over and through a chasm like space. This bridge serves as the entrance tambour for the building. It is fully glassed in on the ceiling and northern side, while only partially on the southern side, which is slightly obstructed by the same wall that continues into the building mentioned above. At the other end of the bridge is the ticket lobby.

4.4 NON-PAYING PUBLIC SPACES 4.4.1 Ticket Lobby The ticket lobby is meant to be a compact space with mostly artificial lighting. The ticket counter is directly in front of the visitor upon entering the space. It consists of a back lit opaque glass under the counter and concrete wall for the back. A light box is placed on the wall for information

22

SARA HILDÉNIN TAIDEMUSEO

+106,25

29

+101,25

MAIN HALL

TICKET LOBBY

FRAMING STUDIO

purposes. Behind the ticket counter is an opaque glass wall. It divides the lobby from the cloakroom, bathrooms and fire escape route from downstairs. Yet, it lets light through and slightly obscures the views into the spaces. To a gain access to the spaces behind this screen, a grey painted metal and glass sliding door is employed. At the northern end is the main staircase and elevator to the exhibition spaces, the bookstore and a bridge to the café. The ceiling is sloping up and away from the ticket counter towards the lake and connected to the white main halls walls only via its cast concrete support beams in order to let in gentle wash of natural light

29 Section through main hall of extension, 1:1000

30 New ticket lobby

31 Café

32 Complex Layout 1 Complex entrance 2 Extension entrance 3 Existing building entrance 4 Ticket lobby 5 WC 6 Cloak 7 Bookstore 8 Main stairs 9 Café 10 Main hall 11 Auditorium 12 Central gallery 13 Gallery 14 Children’s workshop 15 Office wing 16 Storage and auxillary spaces

30


31

9.

from above. Cutting through the ceiling is a back lit, opaque glass gash that runs the length of the lobby, providing a gentle wash of light. Leading up to both the ticket counter and elevator are floor place spotlights shining up to the ceiling.

16. 8. 7. 4.

6. 5.

2. 13.

4.4.2 CafĂŠ

13. 12.

13.

1.

15.

13. 16.

3.

1.

Upper Floor

11.

10.

13. 13.

32

Lower Floor

14.

13.

13. 12. 13.

12. 13.

16.

The cafĂŠ is located across a bridge from the top of the staircase to the exhibition spaces, directly above the auditorium. The cafĂŠ widens, cantilevering out slightly over the lake and main hall and floor to ceiling windows open out towards the north exploiting a panorama view of the lake. Also located on this northern cantilever is a glassed in terrace intended for fourseason use. The part above the main hall cuts through the eastern sloping wall proving a full view of the entire northsouth axis of the main hall. Located in the northeastern corner is a multipurpose room. This room is intended for smaller lectures, informal meetings, and use by 23


33

guest performers and artists, etc. A large window over looks the lake to the north and a balcony protrudes to the east. It has direct access via a fire escape route to the auditorium below.

4.4.3 Bookstore The bookstore is located as a direct part of the ticket lobby. It is partitioned off by glass from the lobby. It has views opening out to the lake and over looks a sculpture courtyard.

sculpture courtyard. This courtyard is on the same elevation as the main hall, oriented towards the summer solstice sunrise in the east and accessed from the sculpture park via a set of granite steps. It is a fairly shaded, protected space of introspection. The northern view is towards the north end of the main hall. Once in the main hall, the visitor has choice of using the auditorium, taking in the view of the lake at the northern end of the main hall or following the length of the main hall south towards the new gallery spaces at the opposite end.

4.5 PAYING PUBLIC SPACES 4.5.2 Main Hall 4.5.1 Staircase The stairs down to the exhibitions reveals views to the lake both north and to the east. The view to the east is across a sunken 24

The main hall is almost a north-south axis. Its dimensions are 64 meters long by 7 meters wide. Two slightly curving, 14meter tall, sloping, white walls to both the


33 Main stairs, sculpture courtyard and bridge to cafĂŠ

34 Main hall

35 Main hall

36 Section through length of main hall, 1:800

east and west define it. Separating the walls is a glass canopy roof that spans the entire length to the hall. At the north end, the glass roof becomes a glass curtain wall. From here, there is a splendid view of the lake through the curtain wall. At the southern end of the axis, there is the first of a series of new galleries and a similar glass wall as at the northern end, which ends above the entrance to the gallery instead. The foremost purpose of the hall is to be a place to exhibit sculptures and larger installations. Its long, slightly winding nature creates possibilities for groupings of smaller works or point reference views of larger works. It is possible to hang

34

paintings if a special temporary wall is constructed to make a more vertical surface. Secondly, the hall is suitable for special functions and gatherings, such as exhibition openings, performance and fund raising activities. Its long nature means it can be divided into several different sections for different, but related uses or used for one purpose, its capacity being able to comfortably hold approximately 400 people. Lastly is the visual aspect of the hall. The walls and openings to the outdoors are designed to only let direct sunlight in at certain times of the day and year. The ceiling window strip only lets direct 35

36

25


sunlight in around noon everyday. Secondly, the openings at both ends are designed to let in sunlight for a period of plus and minus two weeks either side of both the winter and summer solstice during sunrise and sunset.

4.5.3 Gallery Spaces All of the new galleries are in similar dimensions and ratios to the existing building’s galleries. They are also designed around a central space. The circulation is circular in nature and the separate galleries can be skipped if needed by simply continuing on to the existing museum through the central gallery. There is, therefore, no question of missing any portion of the exhibition. The ceiling consists of a hanging ceiling, which houses the air circulation and lighting. It is set back from the wall, allowing for the airflow and the light to spill down into the gallery. Centered on the hanging ceiling are large panels of opaque glass allowing for a gentle wash of light to add to the overall ambient light levels. Wall hung works have separate spotlights located on track system for flexibility of placement of the work. The first gallery is located at the southern end of the main hall axis. The entrance consists of a large opening

37

38

39

SARA HILDÉNIN TAIDE

GALLERY

CENTRAL GALLERY

GALLERY

STORAGE

STORAGE

26

40


37 New central gallery

38 Gallery

39 Gallery, note door position

40 Section through new galleries, 1:500

41 Two story fire escape space

partially obstructed by glass. This offers the possibility of a view directly down the entire length of the main hall axis to a larger work of art, further solidifying the axis, drawing the visitor down the length of the axis. The central gallery is intended to be used as a place to hang information about the exhibition, additional works in a large exhibition and as central circulation node. All of the new galleries can be accessed or bypassed from here. There is a direct route through the space connecting the extension with the existing building. The ceiling is an opaque glass skylight that is in similar to the one in the existing building’s central gallery. The layout of the frame is based off the idea of the Sierpinski gasket. The smallest gallery is meant to for smaller works, darkened multimedia installations or low-level lighting hangings, such as sketches and paper works. Both of

41

the remaining galleries can either be left as one large space or spill into two with a temporary wall.

4.5.4 Auditorium The small, 117-seat auditorium is intended for performance, education and multimedia presentation/installation. It has a sound and light booth and a separate stage entrance. Located behind the stage is a large window offering a view to the lake. This window can be curtained off depending on the needs of the situation.

4.5.5 Remaining Spaces The remaining spaces linking the galleries with other parts of the building are largely meant simply as circulation. However, they can be used for overflow space for very large exhibitions or as a place to hang information about the museum or exhibition. In addition, there is a two story tall space to the east of the auditorium. It is fully glassed from floor to ceiling and punctuated by protruding boxes. The glass is further covered by a wood cladding that both limits the amount of light entering the space and creates continuity across the entire facade in this part of the building. The space has several purposes. The first is that it serves as a fire exit for the spaces related to the café and the auditorium. Secondly, it links the café’s multipurpose room to the stage of the auditorium. The multipurpose room’s balcony also protrudes through it. Thirdly, there is a ramp connecting the lower floor to the stage for equipment loading purposes. 27


Fourth, due to it glassed in nature, at night it is fully lit, creating a box of light. Lastly, in a separate, open-air fire department, thatprotrudes through the space, there is a fire escape route from the roof.

One of the main needs of the museum is more on-site space for the storage and the conservation of the works. The spaces need to be easily to accessed from both the galleries and when works are being loaded and unloaded from the exterior. This requires large doors and a large freight

large tables so that works can be packed and unpacked easily and safely. In addition, there is a need for areas where framing, conservation and photographing can take place. A total of 1800 square meters of logistical spaces are located under the former parking lot and extension’s lobby. They are accessed by a large freight elevator, which opens directly to the outdoors next to the entrance tunnel from the Planetarium. A separate room for photographing, framing and conservation work has also been placed between access to the galleries and the storage area. In addition several storage rooms for

elevator with enough clearance for large works. Immediately next to the elevator, there needs to be enough room for several

non-art related items, several cleaning closets and technical spaces have been allocated as well.

4.6 LOGISTICAL SPACES

42 Entrance to complex from east

43 Corridor to existing galleries

44 Section through width of office wing showing new entrance, 1:500

39

28

42


5. EXISTING BUILDING

workshop was formerly the CafĂŠ Sara. It has direct access to the outdoors and large north-facing windows viewing the lake. Bathrooms, storage and sinks are accounted for. In the upstairs galleries, one storage space that was originally meant to be a gallery is to be changed back to a gallery. This completes a full circulation plan around the central gallery as originally intended.

5.1 GALLERY SPACES AND ACCESS The existing museum is accessed on the lower level by a new corridor that is under the existing entrance to the building, connecting from the new galleries. Just before the existing building is entered, a view to the lake opens up to the north through a tall, glazed curtain wall. The corridor enters the lower galleries through the space formerly occupied by the multimedia gallery, later turned storage room. To the north of this passage is a children’s workshop. The space for the

5.2 OFFICE WING The existing office wing also requires intensive renovations due to the huge

43

OFFICE

LIBRARY

NEW ENTRANCE

NEW CORRIDOR STORAGE

44

volume of space needed in comparison to the existing. In order to effectively double the amount of offices and create additional spaces for staff use, a second floor would need to be added to the existing single floor structure. In order to do this, most of the existing wing would need to be demolished. Located on the first floor would be offices for interns and less essential museum staff as well as a break room for tour guides, complete with an open-air courtyard in the center of the wing. This courtyard provides two purposes. The first is direct access to fresh air for the staff during a break. In addition, staff members who smoke would be isolated here away from building entrances that unfortunately, have become a common meeting place for smokers. The second purpose is to provide natural light into the center of the wing, on both the first and second floors. In order to let the light into the offices as well, the same opaque glass screen wall would be used to divide the offices from the hallway. Also located on the first floor would be anexpanded library. Half of the library 29


would have a double high ceiling and the entire east-facing wall would be glass facing out to a small courtyard. The second floor contains the administrative staffs’ offices as well as a conference room that is located above the other half of the library, sharing the eastfacing window. There is also a break room for the administrative staff, also with an outdoor roof top terrace. The second floor is accessed via either the renovated existing elevator or a new set of stairs.

5.3 EXISTING ENTRANCE

45

Due to the changes in the office wing as well as the connection corridor from the galleries, the existing entrance to the existing building needs to be renovated. The entire space would be glassed in. The lower floor would be open to the upper floor, providing both with a view of the lake to the north. On the upper floor, access to the existing galleries to the west, the outdoor entrance space to the east and library and office wing to the south is accounted for.

46

30


45 New entrance to existing building

46 New entrance interior

47 Roof garden

6. SCULPTURE PARK The sculpture park is an integral part of the entire design. It ties the two separate structures of the existing building and the extension together through a network of paths and similar plantings in order to create a complex that is more integrated into the landscape than the existing. In addition, the exterior circulation in combination with the interior circulation completes a circular circulation system.

6.1 GREEN ROOF Since the extension is built into the hillside, the roof of the building becomes part of the park. It is designed to be a garden reminiscent of a Finnish dry forest landscape. It slopes up and away from the outdoor central circulation node. The

47

garden is split up the middle by a raised metal walkway, allowing for the ground cover to grow uninterrupted. The walkway climaxes with a terrace that overlooks the lake. Various ground covers of grass, blueberry, lingonberry, heather and moss interplay with the pine and birch trees creating various pockets of light and shade. Interspersed with these pockets would be sculptures from the collection. Use of naturalized Finnish plants is important in this aspect for both aesthetic and practical reasons. Once the initial watering-in period after planting has elapsed, the drainage system of the intensive green roof will keep the plants irrigated. The plants are left to grow on their own with only spring and fall upkeep needed. There is also an open-air staircase that descends to the ground level for safety and convenience reasons.

31


48 Roof garden

49 Eastern sculpture lawn

48

6.2 LAWNS

suitable for sitting to the east and large windows to the library to the west. The outdoor amphitheatre holds about 100 people and is placed on the shoreline of

There are two sculpture display lawns through out the site as well. The first is the existing lawn outside of the lower story of the existing building. It has been split to divide the north lawn from the west lawn. A winding path constructed of gravel wraps around the north lawn along the lakeside. The path ends at a constructed platform for sculpture display that splits the two lawns. The second lawn is located a top of the granite steps leading up from the sculpture courtyard. It is overlooking the lake and oriented to catch early morning sun during the summer.

the lake just to the west of the extension. It would be constructed of reinforced concrete with wooden planks for benches. A hedge would screen the amphitheatre from the walking path. Just next to the hedge is a small gathering space planted with shade trees and surrounded by a seating wall.

6.3 OTHER SPACES In addition to the sunken sculpture courtyard just outside the staircase to the exhibitions from the ticket lobby, there is a small courtyard just outside the library and an outdoor amphitheatre. The small courtyard just outside the library is a smaller more intimate outdoor gathering space. It is bordered by a planting in similar nature to the roof garden surrounded by a cast concrete retaining wall at a height 32

49

50 Detail of structure of main hall’s western wall 1 Reinforced concrete 2 Steel rebar 3 Compacted gravel backfill 4 Crushed rock 5 Drainage pipe 6 Additional wall thickness for added support 7 Footing for lateral support 8 Key 9 Floor slab 10 Top soil 11 Compacted subgrade

51 Curtain wall detail, plan and section 1 Triple glazed glass 2 Steel cable 3 4 Leg casting 4 Glass fin 5 Steel connection between casting, fin and cables


7. STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS

1. 2.

The building’s structure is mostly steel column and I-beam construction. The structure needs to support 500kg/m2 through out almost the entire building due to the use of a green roof and service vehicle traffic, except the floor in the lobby and café. A ten to one ratio for beam length to height is used in these places. However, the supporting structure for the lobby roof is cast in place reinforced concrete beams using a similar wood frame pattern as used in the existing building. This pattern is used through out the rest of the building as well. The beams are concrete versus steel for aesthetic reasons, as these beams are visible on the exterior of the building. This lends to a simpler façade due to a more homogenous choice of materials. The main hall’s walls are constructed with reinforced concrete. The west wall is essentially a cantilever retaining wall. It is part of the reinforced concrete floor slab of the main hall. The floor slab would then extend several meters to the west under the earth to offer further lateral support. Under the wall, is an element constructed of reinforced concrete referred to as a key, which also adds stability from tipping. The east wall is part of the beam structure of the rest of the building. It therefore needs far less additional supporting structure. Due to the fact that the west wall will probably move with the freezing and thawing of the seasons, weight of the earth behind it and perhaps even with wind, the glass roof system needs to take in to account for this. The glass roof would therefore be anchored firmly to the east

3. 4.

11.

5.

14.000

7.1 STRUCTURE

10.

6. 7. 8. 9.

4.000

50

1.000

3.

2. 4. 1.

5.

51

wall, while elastic joints would connect the roof to the west wall to allow for this movement. The glass roofs and curtain walls are constructed using a tension support system. Vertical steel cable trusses in combination with glass fin stabilizing supports running horizontal to the cables are used in the main hall. In the entrance to the new building and fire escape space of the extension, round steel columns and beams are used as a frame in addition to 33


the steel cables. There are no glass fins in these places due to the presence of the steel frame. The glass is connected to the supporting structure via four or two leg steel castings, depending on how many panels of glass are being connected together. The casting is then connected to the cables and glass fins via a steel tube. The tube has the cables passing through it while the fins are bolted to wings protruding off the tube. The glass paneling used is a combination of a 10 mm thick outside panel followed by two 6 mm thick, tinted triple glazing. This allows for a certain level of insulation as well as light diffusion from direct sunlight. Using intensive green roof standards, it is possible to create a roof that is more effective and impacts the environment less than traditional roof construction. In addition, the roof is more visually attractive, having a more stunning impact on the landscape as a whole. A well engineered and built roof can easily double the service life of a roof. Less waste is then created as repairs and replacement come at longer intervals. The insulation, in combination with the plantings and soil fill, is very effect. Heat loss is minimized, which means money will be saved and less natural resources spent in the heating and air conditioning of the building. In addition, because the roof is vegetation instead of hardscape, there is virtually no heat reflection, meaning the environment is impacted less. The vegetation also works as a noise diffuser to a certain point. (note: for reference, adequate noise diffusion of a highway with heavy traffic requires about 30 meters of vegetation. This solution, due to space limitations will impact the noise of the “Korkkiruuvi� but not 100 percent). Lastly, grey water run-off from the roof is 34

also put to good use by giving irrigation to the vegetation, meaning less pollution to the adjacent lake. Due to the overall weight of an intensive green roof, the supporting structure of the roof needs to support 500 kilograms per square meter, which is the same as a parking house. The actual structure of the green roof, apart from the supporting columns and beams, consists of a 400mm roof slab, a protection layer of a waterproof material and a root barrier, inverted roof board insulation, a drainage element, geotextile filtering membranes, soil and then the plantings. For a roof of this type, it is advisable to use an inorganic, liquid roofing membrane in order to provide protection against intrusion from the root system through the waterproofing. By combining the membrane with a closedcell, cellular-glass insulation, root intrusion is eliminated. The roots will naturally penetrate the geotextile and concentrate along the drainage element where it is cool and moist. The planting soil needs to be an engineered substrate due to it needing to be lighter in weight, yet having excellent water retention qualities, therefore eliminating the need for irrigation.

53

52 Detail of intensive greenroof 1 Vegetation 2 Engineered soil substrate 3 Geotextile filtering membrane 4 Drainage element 5 Cellular glass insulation 6 Liquid roofing membrane 7 Roof slab

53 North elevation 54 East elevation 1 Cast in place concrete 2 Glass 3 White painted concrete 4 Wood cladding over glass 5 Grey granite

1.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 52


1. 3.

2.

5. 4.

54

7.2 EXTERIOR MATERIALS The exterior is a white painted concrete for the main walls and cast in place concrete for the secondary walls. The glass for the windows is slightly tinted to cut down on the direct sunlight. The auditorium end of the building is covered in rough-cut dark grey granite. A steel frame supporting wood cladding is then placed on top of this in order to create continuity over the whole facade in this part of the building due to windows, large sections of glazed curtain wall and open-air recessions. The main portion of the outdoor central circulation node is paved with alternating grey and dark grey granite pavers laid in stripes. This pattern is then interrupted by light grey bricks laid in a grid pattern.

Elsewhere in periphery areas of the outdoor central circulation node, cobbles are laid in gathering spaces, while grass pavers are laid in bordering areas. The skylight for the exhibition space’s central gallery that is located under the middle of the outdoor central circulation node is a reinforced concrete slab punctuated by a matrix of holes filled with thick glass to let natural light though and unnatural light out during the night. Walkways are constructed of light coloured gravel while the raised walkways are steel frame covered in a perforated steel sheet. Railings are plain steel frame, strung with steel cables and topped with a mat black painted handrail. The façades of the existing building are constructed with inexpensive concrete 35


elements coated with small stones. This material is not attractive nor of the caliber of a material for a façade in an art museum. Completely replacing the material would be a large and expensive undertaking. Instead, a steel frame would be bolted to the façade. This frame would support steel cladding or various shades of grey that would then partially obscure the former façade. In addition, the cladding would serve a second purpose of providing shade to the upper windows in the galleries, meaning that the curtains that are hung there could be taken away. It would be possible to make the cladding mechanizedin order to completely shade

as in the ticket lobby or café. The ticket lobby and office wing utilize an opaque glass wall. The wall is framed by mat black painted metal and creates a semitransparent screen that lets light through but slightly blurs the view. It divides the lobby from the cloakroom, bathrooms and fire escape route from downstairs. In the office wing, it divides the offices from the hallway. The floors are concrete reinforced slab, painted with a semi-gloss grey paint. The ceilings are white plaster punctuated by opaque glass that is backlit, creating a gentle wash of light through out the space. Two thick reinforced concrete beams running parallel to each other support

the upper windows if need be.

the stairs. The stair slabs themselves are concrete painted the same grey used through out the museum on the floor. The railings are glass, topped with black mat painted handrails. The walls and ceilings consist of black acoustic panels and the floor is painted dark, mat grey. The seating is a similar dark grey colour.

7.3 Interior Materials Through out the building, walls are either white painted plaster or cast concrete. The concrete is used for walls that are either recessed or not part of the galleries, such

5.

7.

2.

1.

6. 4.

3.

36

55

55 Lobby and sculpture courtyard 1 White painted plaster 2 Cast in place concrete 3 Semi-gloss grey paint 4 Glass 5 Opaque glass 6 Mat black painted metal 7 Stainless steel

56 Connections to Tampere © Tampereen Kaupunkimittausyksikkö

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Sara Hildén Art Museum Luova Creative Center Tampere center square Tampere railstaion Santalahti New bridges New shoreline park/path

57 Connection from Sara Hildén Art Museum to Louva Creative Center


8. CONNECTIONS TO TAMPERE

KORKKIRUUVI

SARA HILDÈN ART MUSEUM

D

5.

7. 1. 2.

6. 6.

3.

56

4.

KOSKISEIKKAILU

MAIN GATE

E

HARLAN TEHDAS

ATU [NK ANTER

well lit, interspersed with environmental installations, sculptures and benches, which would face the lake to the north. In addition, the shoreline of Särkänniemi peninsula is a valuable asset to the city of Tampere. Being that Tampere is located between two lakes, the city really has yet to fully exploit this fact for the citizens. Part of the problem, at least on the southern shore of Näsijärvi, is Kekkosentie/Paasikiventie and the railway tracks separating the city from the shoreline. The second problem is the park of Särkänniemi itself. Särkänniemi, being a pay attraction, is closed to the non-paying

PLANETARIUM/NÄSINNEULA

SAH

In order to connect the site to the surrounding area, there are several possibilities. The first is the soon to be realized Luova Creative Center located just to the west of Särkänniemi at the former Haarlan factory. It is possible to connect the museum complex to the Louva complex via a pathway along the steep north-facing slope without much elevation change. This would open up possibilities of collaboration between the center and museum, especially in educational themes. The pathway should be broad and

57

y

TIE

ONKINIEMENKATU

PAASIKIVEN

Paasikiventie

public during opening hours and all public during closing and off-season hours. Even if the gates to the park were to somehow be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week to the public, it takes a good ten minutes to walk around Kortelahti in order to access the peninsula. Therefore some sort of bridge would need to be constructed linking the northern end of the Tammerkoski to the eastern tip of the peninsula. If this connection was opened up, it could create the possibility of a continual green space, running from the shores of Lake Pyhäjärvi in the south, through Koskipuisto in the center of Tampere, across to Särkänniemi peninsula, though the sculpture park and further down the shore line to Santalahti (where there is a marina and beach) to the west. It would also be possible to create a shoreline park/path along Lake Näsijärvi. This would offer new possibilities to the city and its citizens as well as to the museum and Särkänniemi amusement park.

37


9. FUTURE EXPANSION

under the lawn. In order to provide direct access to the storage, the freight elevator would need to be extended down another floor. A passageway under the galleries would then need to be created to link to it.

As more often than not, more space is almost always needed at some point in the future of continually expanding organizations. There are several possibilities for further expansion based off the plans for the extension. The possibilities could feasibly be used on their own or in combination with another. The first possibility (fig. 58a) would be to place a series of galleries under the lawn between the extension and the existing building. The main staircase in the extension could feasibly be changed to continue down another level. From here, circulation would pass under the main hall and continue through a series of galleries. A staircase would then connect to the lower galleries in the existing building next to the exit that is facing the lake. This would link the complex into a loop based circulation pattern. Approximately, fifty percent could be added to the total exhibition area in this case. In addition, it is possible to place more storage space in the left over areas. A less expensive and complicated solution (fig. 58b) would be to add several serially linked galleries parallel to the western wall of the main hall, connecting to the corridor linking to the existing building. This solution could feasibly add about twenty-five percent to the total exhibition area. The circulation would be noose shaped in this instance. Adding additional storage in this case would be more difficult than in the above case. The last possibility (fig. 58c) would be to convert some of the storage space to gallery space just to the east of the main hall. More storage space could then be constructed between the two buildings 38

59 Summer solstice sunrise over Lake Näsijärvi from roof garden

5.

7. 3. 1. 3. 3.

6. 3.

3.

4.

2.

2.

3. 58a

2.

8.

3.

6.

3.

Lower Floor

5.

9. 1.

3.

3.

2.

2.

3. 58b

4.

3.

3.

9.

3.

6.

3.

Lower Floor

5.

1.

3. 3. 58c

Lower Floor

4. 2.

58a Solution 1 58b Solution 2 58c Solution 3 1 Main hall 2 Central gallery 3 Gallery 4 Children’s workshop 5 Auditorium 6 Storage 7 New stairs down 8 Stairs up to exising building 9 New connection to new galleries

3. 3.

3. 2. 3.

3.

6.


10. CONCLUSIONS The Sara HildĂŠn Museum and its collection are one of the most valuable assets to Tampere (and Finland for that matter) from a cultural and educational standpoint. A world-class collection of this caliber is a sure draw for tourism from outside the Pirkanmaa region as well. The museum is in desperate need of expansion and modernization to better suit the needs of the public and the collection. This expansion should be site specific and adapt itself to the collection, not the other way around. Connections to the surrounding landscape, attractions and cultural centers also need to be taken into consideration. The building also needs to be forward thinking with room for growth and expansion as trends in the art world change. Lastly, the building needs to have its own identity in the cityscape of Tampere. However, these requirements create a dangerous, perhaps harmful situation for both the Collection and the City of Tampere. As stated previously, new trends

in art museum architecture tend towards focus on the lobby and overall visual appeal of the building to the policy makers before the collection is considered. Expensive technological innovations such as mechanical walls and floating platforms dictate how the art should be viewed, not the other way around. It would be very easy to create a monumental building which fulfills the aspirations of an outside opinion that is then superimposed upon this beautiful landscape instead of being integrated. This is a chance for Tampere to break free from the construction firm dominated, prefabricated element architecture that has made Tampere such a drab city in recent years. Not since the past 15 or 25 years has there been a major architectural contribution to the culture of Tampere. This building could be a contemporary architectural icon, which in combination with a world-class collection of art, could be both a center of culture for the public of the Pirkanmaa region and powerful draw for tourism to the region.

59

39


Sources Dirr, Michael A. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Champaign, Ilinois: Stipes Publishing Group, 1990. Fisher, Adrian and Loxton, Howard. Secrets Of The Maze. New York, New York: Barnes and Noble, Inc, 2007. Klatt, Fred and Landphair, Harlow C. Landscape Architecture Construction. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall PTR, 1988. Ojeda, Oscar Riera, ed. Materials: Architecture In Detail. Glouster, Massachusetts: Rockport Publishing, 2003. Sara Hildénin Säätiö. Nykytaiteen Kokoelma, Ulkomaiset Maalaukset, Veistokset ja Piirustukset. Sara Hildénin Taidemuseon Julkaisuja 66 Sara Hildénin Säätiö. Works On Paper. Sara Hildénin Taidemuseon Julkaisuja 71 Sara Hildénin Säätiö. Ulkomaiset Veistokset. Sara Hildénin Taidemuseon Julkaisuja 77 www.greenroofs.com. Read July 2008. www.pilkington.com. Read May 2008. www.roofmeadow.com. Read July 2008. www.wwglass.com/pilkington/index.aspx. Read May 2008

40


Photo Credits Note: All pictures and drawing contained within this work are © Nathan Siter unless noted below. All works of art used in visualizations are property of the Sara Hildén Foundation and used by permission, with the exception of stills taken from “Appetite For Construction” © Pink Twins (used by permission). p. 7: © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 8: © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 9: © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 10: Fig 4 © Tampereen Kaupunki, Fig 5 © Tampereen Kaupunkimittausyksikkö; p. 11: Fig 7 © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 12: Fig 8 © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 15: © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 16: © Sara Hildén Art Museum; p. 21: Fig 26 to 28 © Antti Pussinen; p. 37: Fig 56 © Tampereen Kaupunkimittausyksikkö.

41


Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the following people for their advice and support during the past long year: Riitta Valorinta, Päivi Loimala, Iris Sarmas, Marjatta Saari and the entire staff of the Sara Hildén Art Museum; The Sara Hildén Foundation; Antti Pussinen; Professor Hannu Tikka; Petri Pussinen; Vesa Helminen; Tommi Kuikka; Jesse Weckroth; and artist Alex Katz. I would finally like to thank my family for their patience, especially my wife, Marjo.

42


AA '

BB ' Balcony 8.8 m

Balcony 33.4 m2

'1

CC

Multipurpose 30,6m2

East Sculpture Lawn CafĂŠ 97.7m2 Kitchen 36.9m2 +104

'

DD

Storage 28 m2

+107

'1

CC

*

EE

Bookstore 62.6 m2 '

FF

+106.25

'

DD

Cloak 25 m2

Ticket Lobby 194.9 m

2

+106.25

*

EE

WC 7m +106.25

WC 4,3m

WC 7m +111.25

'

HH

'

FF

II'

'

GG

Gallery 218 m2

Gallery 145 m2

Central Gallery 238 m2 +105.5

Gallery 194,2 m2

Library 78m2 '

AA

New Gallery 78m2

'

BB

+108

Storage 74 m2

'

GG

'

HH

II'

Path to Luova Creative Center

Upper Floor

1:1000 43


AA '

BB ' +99.50

'1

+97.40

CC

Stage 51.3 m2

East Sculpture Lawn +98.75

Auditorium 123 m2 +101.25

'

DD

+101.25

'1

CC

Ampitheatre *

EE Sculpture Courtyard

Storage 24.1 m2

WC 3.8 m

Main Hall 442.8 m2

'

FF

WC 3.8 m

'

DD

Storage 125 m2

*

EE

Framing Studio 57 m2

North Sculpture Lawn

'

HH

'

FF

II'

'

GG

+101.25

Gallery 131m2 +101

Gallery 157,8 m2

+100.00

Gallery 232.6 m2 Storage 442.6 m2

Children's Workshop 117 m2

WC 3.6 m

Machine 77,6 m2

Central Gallery 123.9 m2

Tool Storage 16m

WC 3.6 m

Gallery 200.6 m2

West Sculpture Lawn

+101.25

Gallery 58m2 +100.625

Storage 140.7 m2

Gallery 136 m2 Gallery 246m2

'

AA

Storage 937.2 m2

' BB

Storage 159m2

'

GG

'

II'

HH

Lower Floor

1:1000 44


AA '

BB ' '1

CC

'

DD

'1

CC

*

EE

'

FF '

DD

*

EE

'

HH

'

FF

II'

'

GG

Office 15m Conference 23 m

'

AA

' BB

'

GG

'

II'

HH

Roof and Floor 2

1:1000 45


+111,00

+107,00

CAFÉ +106,25

+101,25

+99,50

TICKET LOBBY

STORAGE

FRAMING STUDIO

STORAGE

GALLERY

STORAGE

AUDITORIUM +98,75

+97,40

Section AA’

1:400

+111,00

+106,25

+101,25

MAIN HALL

GALLERY

STORAGE

Section BB’

1:400 46


+107,00

+101,25

CAFÉ

+107,00

MAIN HALL

+101,25

MAIN HALL

SCULPTURE COURTYARD

AUDITORIUM

Section CC’

1:200

Section DD’

1:200

Section FF’

1:200

SARA HILDÉNIN TAIDEMUSEO

+106,25

+106,25

+101,25

+101,25

Section EE’

1:200

MAIN HALL

TICKET LOBBY

FRAMING STUDIO

47


Section GG’

1:200

SARA HILDÉNIN TAIDE

+107,25

+101,25

+100,25

GALLERY

CENTRAL GALLERY

GALLERY

STORAGE

STORAGE

Section HH’

1:400 48


+109,60

+105,50

LIBRARY

OFFICE

NEW ENTRANCE

+101,25

+100,25

NEW CORRIDOR

STORAGE

Section II’

1:200 49


South Elevation

1:100 50


West Elevation

1:200 51


North Elevation

1:100 52


East Elevation

1:200 53


Existing North Elevation

1:200 54


Existing East Elevation

1:200 55


56


57


58


59


60


61


62


63


64


65


66

Extension to the Sara Hilden Art Museum  

ABSTRACTThis thesis presents a design for an extension to the Sara Hildén Art Museum in Tampere, Finland. The overall organization of the pl...

Advertisement