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Volume 32 No. 5

May 2016

Budding Northside videographer creates documentary series By Neil Strebig One documentary a week — that’s local videographer Willy James Gandy’s promise to himself and Northsiders. “I like being able to tell the stories that are around me,” Gandy said. “There’s so many interesting ones that I feel like the world’s going to really love seeing them.” The 21-year-old Gandy and son of Bill Gandy, owner of Allegheny City Historical Gallery, is a self-taught filmmaker compiling a weekly documentary series on local Northside businesses and community celebrities. He hopes to not only shine a positive light on his beloved community, but also to inspire. “I’m just covering the story. I’m just showing people what is already there,” Gandy said. Gandy is a self-described, “one-man army,” working solo without an audio or lighting crew. Filming on a Sony camcorder his elder sister gave to him as birthday present, Gandy is bringing Pittsburghers an in-depth look at the culture of the Northside. “Consistency is key in creating anything really great,” Gandy said, “I know the community will really get behind

INSIDE

STORIES, COLUMNS, FEATURES & MORE

a lot of these documentaries.” Gandy recently featured the brand-new Allegheny City Brewery Company highlighting the surging microbrewery scene. Gandy wanted to feature the local brewery located on Foreland Street because “they’re very forward with the community.” Gandy respected their upfront approach towards community outreach which in many ways mirrors his own organic style of filmmaking. An avid film and television fan, Gandy admits to drawing a large amount of inspiration from local filmmaker, Rick Sebak. “He’s the original. He’s the legendary Pittsburgh filmmaker,” Gandy said, “He’s number one in my book.” The influence of Sebak’s positive grassroots style can be seen in Gandy’s “Hidden Gems” documentary. A film showcasing three local business: Subba’s, Laverty Jeweler’s, and the Trevor James Experience salon. All three have been present in the Northside for years, yet each is regarded as an under-the-radar’ business. Gandy’s three-minute film helped change that perspective. His most recent documentary about “Walking Bob,” features a local resi-

-Ignite Northsite, Page 5 -Sandwich Week, Page 9 -Education section, Page 25

The Tuskegee Airmen story By Alyse Horn The Tuskegee Airmen were the military’s first black pilots, created by the US Army Air Corps in 1941 after Civil Rights Movement activists pressured President Franklin Roosevelt to open up more opportunities for blacks in the military. In 1941, fewer than 4,000 African Americans were serving in the

Photo by Neil Strebig

See Tuskegee, Page 14

Willy James Gandy’s most recent documentary is called “Walking Bob,” featuring a well-know Northside resident. dent who Gandy describes as “such an interesting guy.” “I’m interested to see what kind of documentary it is shaping into,” Gandy said on the project before it debuted on Tuesday, April 26. In addition to his Northside-focused documentary series, Gandy has also designed ACHGs website, coordinates its YouTube page, and has collaborated with the likes of KRS-One and Rakim. Gandy was the designated videographer at the legendary hip-hop stars’ show in Homewood this past November. To check out more of Gandy’s work visit his webpage or his YouTube channel, Get Gone TV.

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The Northside Chronicle

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THE NORTHSIDE CHRONICLE 922 Middle St. • Pittsburgh, PA 15212

Managing Editor Alyse Horn E-mail: editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com Advertising Manager Lauren Stauffer E-mail: advertising@thenorthsidechronicle.com www.thenorthsidechronicle.com Phone 412-321-3919 • Fax 412-321-1447 Mail Subscriptions are available at a rate of $35 per year. 2016 Advertising rates: SIZE Black & White Color 1/8 page $56 $68 1/4 page $118 $157 1/2 page $229 $295 Full page $452 $585 Back Page $616 Center Spread $965 Discounts of up to 20% off rate card price for multiple-insertion contracts

DISCLAIMER: The viewpoints and opinions of the writers and contributors that appear in The Northside Chronicle do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints, opinions, beliefs or positions of The Northside Chronicle’s publishers, editors, staff and/or affiliates. The Northside Chronicle is not affiliated with any formal political, social, religious, educational or philosophical organization or party of any kind. The materials comprising The Northside Chronicle are provided by various organizations, community groups, advertisers, entities, writers and contributors and are provided as a service to the readers of The Northside Chronicle on an “as-is” basis for informational purposes only. The Northside Chronicle assumes no responsibility for any copyright infringement, errors or omissions in these materials and expressly disclaims any representations or warranties, express or implied, including, without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose regarding the correctness, accuracy, completeness, timeliness and reliability of the information provided. The Northside Chronicle is not responsible for damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance upon such information. Reference herein to any commercial product, process or service does not constitute or imply endorsement or favoring by The Northside Chronicle. © The Northside Chronicle 2011

May 2016

Community Meetings To have your community meeting included, email editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com After Jail & Prison Ministry Support Group Mondays, 6-7 p.n. Allegheny Center Alliance Church 412.321.4333 ext. 127 801 Union Place, first floor Allegheny West Civic Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Calvary United Methodist Church 412.323.8884 Brighton Heights Citizens Federation 2nd Thursday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Morrow Elementary School 412.734.0233 Brightwood Civic Group 3rd Tuesday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Pressley Ridge, 2611 Stayton St. 412.732.8152 Brightwood Community Emergency Response Shelter 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6 p.m. 3219 Central Ave. California-Kirkbride Blockwatch 3rd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor California-Kirkbride Neighbors 2nd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor 412.758.3898 Central Northside Neighborhood Council 2nd Monday, monthly, 7 p.m. Allegheny Traditional Academy 412.231.7742 Charles Street Area Council 1st Monday, monthly, call for times Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St. 412.321.5567 Community Alliance of Spring Garden/ East Deutschtown 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Fuhrer Building of St. Michael’s Church 412.977.1979 Deutschtown New Hope Council 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Community Center, 623 Suismon St. East Allegheny Community Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Bistro to Go 412.321.1204 Fineview Citizens Council 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. 21 Lanark St. 412.231.0330 Mexican War Streets Society 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. AUU Church, Resaca Pl. and North Ave. 412.323.9030

Manchester Citizens Corporation Quarterly meetings, call for times MCC Center, 1319 Allegheny Ave. 412.323.1743 Manchester Public Safety Meeting Quarterly meetings, call for times Northside Leadership Conference 412.323.1743 Northside Rotary Club Every Friday, noon Cardello Building, 2nd Floor Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Board 2nd Monday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5527 Northside Coalition for Fair Housing Membership Monthly, call for times 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5521 Northside Leadership Conference Call for times 4 Allegheny Center, Suite 601 412.330.2559 North Side Lions Club 2nd and 4th Tuesday, monthly, noon Max’s Allegheny Tavern North Side Public Safety Council 1st Thursday, monthly, 5:30 p.m. Northside Leadership Conference 412.330.2559 Observatory Hill, Inc. 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Byzantine Seminary, 3605 Perrysville Ave. 412.231.2887 Perry Hilltop Citizens’ Council 4th Monday, monthly, 6 p.m. Triangle Tech,1940 Perrysville Ave. perryhilltop@gmail.com 412.223.7144 The Promise Group Every other Tuesday, 6 p.m. Western Pa. Humane Society 412.321.1019 Troy Hill Citizens Council Second Tuesday of the month , 7 p.m. 1619 Lowrie St. 412.321.2852 Spring Hill Civic League March 2nd, May 4th, Sept. 14th, Oct. 5th, Nov. 2nd. 7 p.m., Spring Hill Elementary School contact@shcl.org Summer Hill Citizens Committee 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. WPXI Television Station community room


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The Northside Chronicle

Pear and the Pickle opens in Troy Hill

By Alyse Horn Pear and the Pickle, the new café and market at 1800 Rialto St. in Troy Hill, opened Wednesday, April 13 to the public. Current hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday through Saturday. Bobby Stockard and his wife Alexis Tragos are the owners, and are currently offering NY style deli sandwiches that are made to order, a full espresso bar and coffee by Stumptown. The market also has limited grocery items and produce, but in the coming months will be stocking the shelves with local produce, canned and dry goods, sun-

dries, dairy products, and bakery items. Stockard said a rooftop garden is also in the near future. Troy Hill resident Nicole Moga said the cafe is a welcome addition to the neighborhood, as the “community desperately needed a gathering place and good coffee.” “Alexis and Bobby have hosted the neighbors on several occasions before they opened, and their space and presentation are impeccable,” Moga said. “The take out food and general store are icing on the cake.” To keep up with Pear and the Pickle and for updates, check back to their website and Facebook page.

Photos by Alyse Horn

The name of the cafe and market, Pear and the Pickle, is a nod to Troy Hill’s history. In the early 19th century, the neighborhood was mostly farmland that onced house Banjamin Herr’s Orchard. It was said his pears were especially delicous. By 1850, Troy Hill was quickly evolving from farm land into an indistrialized community that was home to many factory workers, including pickle packers from the Heinz plant.

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YINZ! Comics by Nils Balls

May 2016

May 9 ACCA elections At the February 8 General Membership Meeting, the Elections Committee of Allegheny City Central Association opened the floor to nominations for the 2016-18 ACCA Board of Directors. The committee accepted nominations until April 11. Voting will take place on Monday, May 9 during the ACCA General Membership Meeting. Each voter must be a resi-

dent of Allegheny City Central and be a member in good standing, meaning: You must have attended at least one ACCA regular, or special, membership meeting within the last 12 months (not counting the May 2016 election meeting) Your ACCA dues must be current Contact elections@accapgh.org with any questions.

Mobile farmers market visits NS Green Grocer is a mobile farmers market that is designed to travel into food desert communities to provide the fresh food options that are currently missing from the landscape. By selling fresh, healthy foods at an affordable price Green Grocer will help to alleviate

food inequity by creating access. Everyone is welcome to shop at the market. On Tuesday’s Green Grocer will stop at Northside Common Ministries from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Forms of Payment Accepted: SNAP/EBT, VISA, MasterCard, AMEX and Cash.


May 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Call for up and coming leaders, entrepreneurs Courtesy of Allegheny City Central: Ignite Northside is designed to engage emerging leaders and entrepreneurs in Northside neighborhoods, and aims to help launch and grow innovative community projects and local businesses, and develop action plans and a supportive network to succeed. If you are thinking of launching or expanding a business or community project, Ignite Northside is there to help. Several workshops will be offered to help you develop action skills, and build the confidence, plans, and network of resources necessary to succeed. The workshops offer impactful, action-focused experiences targeting effective partnerships, getting organized, “pitch� development and more. Ignite Northside is invested in the long-term success of

its entrepreneurs and community leaders, providing ongoing support for workshop participants through regular open office hours. Ignite Northside meets you where you are; tailoring support to your stage of concept, personal definition of success, and bringing the experience to a neighborhood near you. Ignite Northside has scheduled the next workshops on the Northside: Saturday, May 7 The Pittsburgh Project 2801 North Charles Street For more information on participating, mentoring, or supporting, visit the Ignite Northside webpage, or email Ebony McQueen-Harris, Ignite Northside Program Manager. Ignite Northside is a collaborative program of New Sun Rising and the Riverside Center for Innovation.

Perry High JROTC updates Pittsburgh Perry High School JROTC Cadets are holding a blood drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, May 13 in the Perry High School Drill Hall. The cadets organized the drive to help support the Central Blood Bank.

The cadets will also be placing flags on veterans graves in Highwood Cemetary on Friday, May 27 and participating in the Memorial Day ceremony that will take place on Monday, May 30 at 10 a.m. in Legion Park.

Photo by Justin Criado

For the past 67 years, flags have been placed on veterans graves in the cemetary for Memorial Day.

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Photos by Neil Strebig

On Saturday, April 23 the Providence Connections Family Support Center help an outreach event for family’s to come and celebrate art. “We know it’s hard being a parent sometimes and when you add additional stressors it becomes even more challenging,” Samantha Ellwood, Executive Director at the Providence Family Center, said. “We’re here to offer support and services to family, to make the job of being a parent a little bit easier, and have a rich experience for the whole entire family.” Find the full story on page 19.


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Northside barber turns in his clippers after 51 years By Neil Strebig Dave Kushner never had dreams of becoming a barber, and certainly never planned on cutting men’s hair for a living, but his affinity for the local residents evolved in to a lifelong business after taking his first job behind the chair. After 51 years of service in the Northside, Kushner will be officially closing the doors of his Dave’s Barber Shop in Historic Deutschtown at the end of this month. “Was my first job at [326 Federal Street],” Kushner said of his humble beginnings on the Northside. “I just enjoyed it over here. It was always an exciting place to work.” Kushner, 72, has been at his current 505 Foreland Street location since 1999, but originally started cutting hair in 1965 on Federal Street. “Dave is emblematic of those small neighborhood serving busi-

nesses that make these places good to live in. There are good reliable services that neighborhoods depend on,” Mark Fatla, Executive Director of the Northside Leadership Conference and client of Kushner’s, said. “We sometimes take them for granted until they depart or close. And that’s suddenly when we realize how important they were to both us individually and the neighborhood as a whole.” Kushner, a South Hills-native, originally planned on retiring at the age of 70, but two years later he’s finally decided to hang up the clippers in favor of life at home with his family. Jesting that his sons wondered “what took me so long,” Kushner admits he will miss the many clients he has grown close to over the years. “I’m going to miss the people, sure, that’s the one thing in the back of my mind. Most of these people are like extended family, I’ve know them for so long. Some I’ve

Photo by Neil Strebig

Dave Kushner (right) cuts the hair of longtime client Art Albright, 82, of Bellevue. Albright has been getting his hair cut by Kushner since 1965. [had] over 30 years and [they’re] still coming in here,” he said. John Chmelynski of the North Hills admitted that he’s unsure of where he’s going to go for his afternoon haircuts. “He’s very efficient and personable,” Chmelyshki said. “I like the way he cuts my hair. Nothing fancy, just a plain haircut. Just a regular barber shop, [that’s] hard to come by.”

Kushner, whose cut, styled and shaved over thousands of Pittsburgh patrons over the years, proudly shares that “It felt good to make customers happy.” As a lifelong Northside merchant, Kushner also used to help former customer and Northside Chronicle editor Jim Lyons deliver papers during the early years of the newspaper in the 1980s. “One day [Lyons] just asked if I wanted to do that. He used to bring a couple hundred and I’d take about 25 to different places along Federal Street,” Kushner said. “My pay was, he’d give me a little ad in the paper. A little square.” When asked about what they’ll do once Kushner officially retires, Falta joked, “I’ll try to talk him out of it. Your barber is a long term relationship. When something interrupts it, it kind of upsets your world a little bit.” As for Chelyshki he figures he’ll just, “Grow long hair.”


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May 2016

Northside Sandwich Week V: The Pastrami Strikes Back By Alyse Horn & Justin Criado Starting on Thursday, May 19 and running through May 29, participating Northside restaurants and pubs will serve up signature sandwiches at promotional prices. This year’s Northside Sandwich Sampler will kick off at Pittsburgh’s Grand Hall at the Priory from 6-9 p.m. Restaurants will pit their sandwiches against each other and event attendees get to try them all and vote for their favorite. Celebrity judges will tally the votes and choose the next Northside Sandwich King or Queen! Restaurant and Beer participants include: Atria’s James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy Scratch Food & Beverage Penn Brewery

Young Brothers Bar Huszar’s Max’s Allegheny Tavern Allegheny City Market Chateau Café & Cakery Legends of the North Shore North Shore Deli War Streets Brewery Allegheny City Brewing Penn Brewery Last year the sold out event welcomed over 400 people to sample all of the 11 entries in the contest. Scratch Food and Beverage was crowned king with a Reuben sandwich for the win, which was made up of smoked beef tongue on rye with beet and cabbage kraut. A new addition to the event will be a Beer Garden with beer from local Northside breweries.The NSLC is also bringing back Le Tour de Sandwich,

Photo by Justin Criado

Lasy year’s runner-up, Chef Dan Bartow (left) of Central Northside’s Legends of the North Shore, stands with winner Chris Biondo.

which is a guided bike tour for For more information on those who want to see where Sandwich week or to buy tickthis year’s restaurants are and ets, visit www.sandwichweek. sample the fare of winners past. p i t t s b u r g h n o r t h s i d e . c o m .


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Allegheny City Historic Gallery: a walk down memory lane By Neil Strebig Century old photos decorate the halls of 433 E. Ohio St. — a time machine located in the heart of Duetschtown’s business district — place where residents can step off the sidewalk, escaping the present and transplant themselves into a world of Northside’s history. “It means everything to me, to promote our history. To promote my family’s history and to promote other people’s families’ histories on the Northside,” Bill Gandy, owner of Allegheny City Historic Gallery said, “We all have fond memories of the Northside. We all went to the same schools, same halls, same streets.” It’s a “collection of collectors” as Gandy calls it. The museum boasts a plethora of old artifacts, photographs, and memorabilia from all neighboring corners of the Northside many of which have been dona-

tions from community residents. Ohio St 19th Century Photo A 19th Century photo of East Ohio Street. Photo by Neil Strebig. The ACHG, which officially opened a little over a year ago, harvested most of its success from social media. As Gandy recalls, he received an enormous amount of support sharing old photographs on Facebook. One of the biggest supporters was Councilwoman Darlene Harris, a Spring Hill native. She and the Urban Redevelopment Authority helped Gandy get the museum started. “[The museum is] Extremely important,” Willy James, Gandy’s son, said. “The history is the heart of the city.” Since ACHGs inception, the gallery has hosted a number of reunions and exhibitions including last week’s expo on North Shore’s Ward, which drew over 100 visitors including Dan Rooney. In Gandy’s words, it was a “magnificent time.”

Gandy, who runs the gallery primarily with his wife Kim and two children, Willy and Sydnie, along with a few volunteers, expressed an interest in relocating the gallery due to its rapidly expanding archive. Described as an “ambitious” project, Gandy is looking toPhoto by Neil Strebig wards moving to the former WaA 19th Century photo of East verly Mansion on North Avenue and Sandusky Street. While no Ohio Street. official plans have been made, The ACHG will also be host- Gandy would not only welcome ing the Federal Street Walking the extra exhibit space, but also Tour on Saturday, April 30. The the chance to incorporate a comtour starts at the intersection of puter into their current archives. Federal Street and Henderson “We wanted to do a physiStreet, continues to the old Carne- cal gallery because lot of older gie Library, and finishes at the mu- citizens don’t know how to use seum’s East Ohio Street location. technology,” Kim Gandy said. “Along the way we’re go- The inclusion of technology for ing to show photos of what the historical and ancestry research areas used to look like over dif- would be a “whole new world” ferent periods of time,” Gandy for older residents she added. said, “We wanted to ramp up See ACHG, Page 11 the walking tour experience.”


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“Collection of collectors”

From ACHG, Page 10

This addition would be welcomed not only for older residents, but also new businesses in the community. “We’re the center of the hub. Everybody comes to us for research,” Gandy said. He has worked with local upstarts like Allegheny City Brewery, Alphabet City, Allegheny Center Alliance Church, TREK, and Wigle Whiskey helping them familiarize themselves with their buildings and the surrounding community. “They all come to us for information,” Gandy said. “For old artifacts on their building, old photos of what it used to look like.” The presence of these new business is just another sign of the positive transformation taking place on the Northside. A transfor-

mation that is aided by the education Gandy and his family offer businesses and residents alike. “I have confidence in the Northside at this point. There’s so much room. It was destroyed so much that it gave so much room for rebuilding, expansion, growth,” Gandy said. “And I think a lot of people see that. The location of the Northside to town – and we have the stadiums and the casino – it makes it a hot spot. You’d be foolish not to open a business in the Northside.” The Gandy family’s commitment to preserving the history of the Northside is an integral part for its revival and the city of Pittsburgh. “Our goal is to keep reuniting Northsiders. We feel like everybody on the Northside should be promoted,” Gandy said. The ACHG is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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May 2016

The famed airmen from Pittsburgh’s Northside From Tuskegee, Page 1

military, according to the National WWII Museum. By 1945, more than 1.2 million had been inducted. During the beginning of WWII, African Americans were viewed as lacking patriotism and intelligence, and were deemed unfit to fight in combat or be a fighter pilot in the military. Social segregation leaked into the military practices as false information from past decades was treated as fact. “The Tuskegee Airmen were the first to fight the stereotypes, and were simultaneously fighting Jim Crow laws in the US while battling the Nazi’s overseas.” The Commemorative Air Force Red Tail Squadron sited an Army War College report from 1925 that stated, “Black people weren’t smart enough to be pilots” and “even went so far to suggest that African American’s were too

cowardly to be trusted to fly a plane.” The report also included a statement from a senior commander in the Army saying, “The Negro type has not the proper reflexes to make a first-class fighter pilot.” The Tuskegee Airmen were the first to fight the stereotypes, and were simultaneously fighting Jim Crow laws in the US while battling the Nazi’s overseas. The pilots not only made great strides for the Civil Rights movement, they also helped secure our victory during World War II. Even after WWII, it still took congress almost 70 years to award the Tuskegee Airmen with the Congressional Gold Medal, said Regis Bobonis Sr, founder and chair of Tuskegee Airmen of Western Pennsylvania. The creation of the Tuskegee Airmen marked a transition in the Civil Rights Movement, and eventually led to the desegregation of

the United States Military in 1948 through an executive order issued by President Harry Truman. Out of the almost 1,000 pilots that had the privilege of calling themselves Tuskegee Airmen and the 15,000 ground personnel that kept them in the air, the largest accumulation hailed from Western Pennsylvania. Bobonis said he began researching the Tuskegee Airmen in 1993 after he joined the Daniel B. Matthews Historical Society in Sewickley, and found that eight airmen had come from the “postage stamp size” town, which triggered his curiosity to keep digging. Since, he has found that over 90 pilots came from the region, which prompted the creation of the Tuskegee Airmen Memorial Project placed in Sewickley Cemetery. It was finished in September 2013 and it is the largest tribute to the Tuskegee Air-

men anywhere in the country. “We had some real achievers that impacted the Civil Rights Movement,” Bobonis said. Out of those men, and one woman, who hailed from the region, four of them came from Pittsburgh’s Northside: Robert Marshall Glass, John Cundieff, James Wiley and Charles Tate. — Tate was from Manchester and graduated from Oliver High School in 1942. After graduation, he enlisted to become a Tuskegee Airmen. He can be found in the Hall of Valor at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland, and he received a Distinguished Flying Cross and four Oak Leaf Clusters. He flew 99 missions and was part of many firsts for African American’s during WWII. Not only was he part of “the first unit of black AmeriSee Tuskegee, Page 15


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Pilots, ground personnel honored through monument From Tuskegee, Page 14

can fighter pilots who trained at Tuskegee,” he also “served under Col. Benjamin O. Davis, the first black graduate from West Point in the 20th Century,” according to a Post-Gazette article publish in 2005. In the Hall of Valor, his plaque reads that he completed 698 flying hours, 310 were in combat, and he was the flight leader for about 20 missions. After service with the Tuskegee Airman, Tate re-entered the Army during the Korean War before returning home and settling for a job in the U.S. Postal Service. Northsider Jesse Finch met Tate over a decade ago when the two were walking into a grocery store. Finch, who was an employee of the Army Corps of Engineers, was wearing his Army jacket when Tate stopped him.

“Even after the war, the Tuskegee Airmen continued to fight against racism. They didn’t do this through violence or anger. Rather, they fought racism with the way they lived their lives. Some of these men became civilian pilots, doctors, engineers, teachers, and entrepreneurs.” Unfortunately, not all airmen were given the same opportunities upon returning home. — This is the first article in a series profiling the famed Tuskegee Photo by Alyse Horn Airmen of Pittsburgh’s Northside The Sewickley Cemetary is home to the largest outdoor monument and first appeared on Storyburgh. org. Storyburgh is a not for profit in the country that is dedicated to the Tuskegee Airmen. community storytelling platform Finch said that Tate told him fice. He worked at USPS, even- that seeks to foster discussion not to take his job for granted. tually becoming the manager and engage the community with When Tate retired from the Army, of a facility in Homewood. under-reported & under-told stohis desire was to become an enTate passed away on ries including topics such as sogineer, but he wasn’t given the November 18, 2005. cial injustice, arts & culture, inopportunity because of his race The Commemorative Air novation, academia & education, and was placed in the Post Of- Force Red Tail Squadron states, and marginalized demographics.


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Spring Hill kicks off series of Northside block parties By Alyse Horn Sunday, May 1 marked the first of many block parties that will be popping up around the Northside in conjunction with the One Northside project and The Buhl Foundation. The Block Party was held in Spring Hill at the new Asylgarten Park, which is owned by the Spring Hill Civic League and currently being transformed into a public space for the community. Live music and food trucks were featured at the rain or shine event, as well as activities hosted by: Mattress Factory, Little

House Big Art, AIR, Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Allegheny City Historic Gallery, and The Saturday Light Brigade. As stated on The Block Party website, these events are “a series of mini arts festivals that will call attention to and celebrate the valuable resources and local identities on the eighteen Northside Neighborhoods of Pittsburgh.” Ben Soltesz, and organizer for the block party, said no solid dates have been set for future block parties, but the neighborhoods that are next on the list include: Northview Heights, Manchester, Central Northside and Observatory Hill.

NSLC to host health initiatives at Farmers Market this summer By Alyse Horn Beginning on Friday, May 13 and running through November, the Northside Leadership Conference will be hosting “A Place To Start,” a health and activity table at the Farmers Market on the East Common at Cedar Avenue. Allana Morrison, Allegheny General Hospital Partnership Coordinator for NSLC, said the activity table will be in operation every Friday during May and June, and every other Friday thereafter from 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The activities will vary from week to week, and Morrison said she

is aiming to cover a broad spectrum of health related topics. “We will be offering a variety of health events ranging from “Walk with a Doc’” to bike riding, line dancing, exercising, and healthy eating demonstrations,” Morrison said. There will also be free health screenings, snacks, and prize give-a-ways. “It’s an initiative to get the Northside healthy, moving, and active,” Morrison said. “We are very excited to assist Northside families with adopting and adapting to a healthy new lifestyle in 2016.”

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for more news about Northside development, real estate, events and more.

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Providence Center outreach event focuses on art, family By Neil Strebig The smell of freshly grilled hot dogs filled the basement of 3113 Brighton Rd., as kids decorated tree houses, made their own edible arrangements, and played corn hole on boards they hand-painted. Providence Connection, which focuses on a number of child and family support services, hosted an outreach program on Saturday to help bring local families together. “We know it’s hard being a parent sometimes and when you add additional stressors it becomes even more challenging,” Samantha Ellwood, Executive Director at the Providence Family Center said. “We’re here to offer support and services to family, to make the job of being a parent a little bit easier, and have a rich experience for the whole entire family.” The event was heavily coordinated by Russ Stratton, whose wife

Colleen is chair of the parent-advisory committee. The committee is “very valuable” to the Providence Connection according to Site Director Tish Donze. The committee plays a vital role in organizing events, structuring programs, and even hiring staff members. Stratton and his wife saw this past weekend as a great opportunity to use art to help connect families in a constructive and creative manner. “Art is so important,” Russ said, who described the parentadvisory and one of Providence Connection’s main goals is to “make being a parent easier.” Russ helped design a number of props being used at the event including the corn hole boards, which the kids finished painting, and the hand-crafted home plate that was being raffled off at the end of the event. The Stratton’s, along with the

aid of the fellow parent-advisors, helped bring in a number of arts and crafts tables for children and parents to partake in including a sunglasses-making table courtesy of the Mattress Factory and a free book table in association with Reading is Fundamental. “Lot of the kids we serve don’t have home libraries and anytime you can get a book in their hands, it’s a good thing,” said Tess Wilson, Books-for-keeps outreach coordinator at RIF. Wilson described parents as children’s “first teachers,” and said they try to bring at least 50-100 books to events like these. They encourage kids to read at home, expand their home libraries, and for parents to help teach their children the importance of reading. Providence kinship parent and former art teacher, Kendra Foster, even hosted her own table of craft-building.

“I try to come to all the events and volunteer whenever possible,” Foster said. Though this Saturday’s program relied on art and creative craftsmanship to inspire children, it is only a brief glimpse into what the Providence Family Center does. The Center aims to “build relationships and teamwork” according to Donze, who helps oversee many of the site’s programs including parent-children relationship therapy classes, head-start programs for children ages 3 to 5, and in-home visits for families who qualify for the exemplary off-site service. “[Our main goal] is to strengthen families and enrich their lives,” Ellwood said. “Once you help strengthen family, you strengthen the community.” For more information on assistance programs at Providence Center or to volunteer, call (412) 766-3860 or visit online at providencecenter.org.


May 2016

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Riverview Park history, trail guide, future events Map and information courtesy of www.pittsburghparks.org Created in 1894, the park predates the City of Allegheny’s annexation to the City of Pittsburgh in 1907. Formed largely from farmland, todays Riverview Park is known for its dense woodlands and steep topography. Nestled between Perrysville Avenue, Woods Run and Marshall Avenue, the 259-acre park is known for its wooded trails and dramatically steep hillsides. The park’s extensive network of trails invites hikers, joggers, and the occasional horseback rider into the woods. The park is also home to the landmark Allegheny Observatory, a space-themed playground, a visitor’s center, a swimming pool and activities building, the natural beauty of the Mairdale watershed, and the popular two-mile Riverview Loop. Residents enjoy the park’s pool, playground, ball field, shelters and summertime concerts and movies. The Chapel Shelter, a historic picnic shelter that was once a Presbyterian church, was restored by the Parks Conservancy in 2008. Restoration of the building and the surrounding landscape improvements

included new flooring, an updated kitchen, handicap-accessible restrooms, the recreation of the historic steeple and dormers, and a return to the historically-inspired design. The landscape was also restored, with a new trail connection, removal of invasive species, and the creation of new garden beds. The Riverview Park Chapel Shelter is now the most-requested shelter in all of our city parks. Future plans for the park include restoring the historic Watson’s Cabin and continuing restoration of the Snyder’s Point natural area . Upcoming events: Volunteer Sweeps- Join Parks Conservancy staff in Riverview Park for regularly scheduled group volunteer events. At volunteer sweeps, a small group of volunteers better the health of the park by cutting vines, pulling invasive plants, and clearing trash. Projects vary by season. Tools, gloves and training are provided. The first sweep will be on Thursday, May 5 at 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. The second sweep is Saturday, May 21 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.


Page 21

The Northside Chronicle

May 2016


The Northside Chronicle

May 2016

Allegheny West Harry Ebert to N2 Properties L.P. at 856 W. North Ave. for $299,000. Brighton Heights Sandra Grech Jones to Karina Graziani at 3331 Harbison St. for $89,900. Dollar Bank to Brian and Katharine Moser at 3449 McClure Ave. for $41,150. Gary Walsh to Matthew and Todd Howell at 1101 Pemberton St. for $175,000. Estate of Paul Holdcroft to Benjamin T Trodden and Danielle Pugliese at 1149 Termon Ave. for $105,000. Michael Wiley to Bruce Mangone at 1020 Woods Run Ave. for $10,000. Louis Carter LLC to Nestor Renato Munoz at 3255 Bainton St. for $13,000. Batsheva Zacharya to LeBaite LLC at 931 Benton Ave. for $18,000. Lloyd Phillips et al. to Federal National Mortgage Assn. at 3414 California Ave. for $1,955 by sheriff ’s deed. Justin Leapline to Annemarie Bunch and Brad Martin at 418 Chandler

Place for $144,000. Robert Duerring Jr. to Joseph and Sara Schachner at 3515 Fleming Ave. for $20,000. Vincent Graziani et al. to Stefania Young at 201-203 Richbarn Road for $154,500. Hazel Lynch to Hakim Fontaine at 3525 Fleming Ave. for $60,850. Renee Smietanowski to Ross Zikmund at 3448 Harbison Ave. for $109,900. Amber Hollerman to Thornridge Investments L.P. at 1155 Lapish Road for $65,000. Robert Parey Jr. to Lang Lian Thang at 1843 Viruth St. for $129,900. Brightwood Erin Shick to Jessica and Grayson Mitchell at 1520 Hodgkiss St. for $128,200. Northwest Savings Bank to Daniel Wood at 1267 Ingham St. for $70,000. Valenti Capital LLC to Leonard Howell Jr. at 925 Smithton Ave. for $2,000. Landry Jr. & Assoc. LLC to Juanita Collins at 3048 Frederick St. for $10,000.

Veterans Administration to JA Home Investors LLC at 1320 Ingham St. for $47,200. Maurice Rizzuto et al. to Deutsch & Assoc. LLC at 1031 Smithton Ave. for $20,000. Terrence Hamilton to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 1211 Woodland Ave. for $27,500. Metro Realty Development LLC to Charles Coleman and Tina Guyton at 1219 Dickson St. for $20,000. California-Kirkbride ARLP REO 6 LLC to DTH REO Inc. at 1152 Ridgeland Drive for $16,359. Cynthia Butler to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 1504 Woodland Ave. for $25,000. Central Northside Paul Hlivko to Johnna Simitoski at 1204 Resaca Place for $325,773. Mark Anderson to Brian Kirchner at 1232 Wolfrum St. for $5,000. Christopher Lee Waldeck to Frank and Deirdre Menchaca at 1200 Arch St. for $395,000. Richard Krist to Andrew Lacy Jr. at 1227 Sandusky St. for $222,000. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA to

Page 22

Gregory Mucha at 102 Alpine Ave. for $38,000. GO Realty LLC to Daniel Mosser and Sara Thorne Thomsen at 213 Carrington St. for $404,828. Olin Inmon Jr. to Debra Smallwood at 521W. Jefferson St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $10,464). R & B Property & Land Development LLC to Joyce Gutkowski at 1404 Sherman Ave. for $192,000. Jason Peterson to Matthew Hoffman and Renee Gervasi at 1230 Resaca Place for $264,000. East Deutschtown Heather Johnson to Katie and Travis Mogilski at 1214 James St. for $315,000. Cynthia Magargee to Eric Friedl at 839 Peralta St. for $10,000. $147,000. Fineview Casey Hillenburg to Theodore Miller at 2257 Hazelton St. for $47,000. Historic Deutschtown Shelia Sweeney to Nicolas Zioncheck


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Page 23

at 612 Suismon St. for $236,000. Richard Sustakoski to Mark and Christine Bell at 923 James St. for $320,000. Peter Barner to Gregory Swetoha at 604 Middle St. for $171,500. Manchester Stanley Dudukovich to KGMA Development LLC at 1207 Allegheny Ave. for $180,000. Mark Connolly to Typ 2 LLC at 1115 Fulton St. for $135,000. Manchester Citizens Corp. to PattiLand LLC at 1418 Chateau St. for $10,000. Jack Rosenberger to Eric and Jenny Contakos at 1115 Liverpool St. for $123,900. TMNI LLC to K Max Construction at 1319 Liverpool St. for $90,000. Estate of Bernice Goshay to Paul Labrise at 1228 W. North Ave. for $214,000. Observatory Hill Frank Maurice Van Ameringen III to

Alexandra and David Brown at 3066 Marshall Road for $159,000. Derrick Weston to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA at 3227 Orleans St. for $2,096 by sheriff ’s deed. Cindi Schaffer to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. trustee at 100 Perryview Ave. for $7,381 by sheriff ’s deed. Penn Pioneer Enterprises LLC to Julie Peterson at 3361 Delaware St. for $41,000. Estate of Julie Franks to Bayview Loan Servicing LLC at 3794 East St. for $3,113 by sheriff ’s deed. Trevor Clinkscales to Pittsburgh City at 323 Venture St. for $62,762. Perry Hilltop Estate of Denna Ott to Bayview Loan Servicing LLC at 737 Chautauqua Court for $3,353 by sheriff ’s deed. ARN Properties LLC to Ira Lewis at 1965 Federal Street Ext. for $7,219. High Knoll Development Corp. to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 311-313 Burgess St. for $138,000.

May 2016

Darla Tucker to Ronnie Miller and James Casson at Kenwood Ave. for $7,000. Wells Fargo Bank NA to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 2623 Linwood Ave. for $31,100. Leslie McCartney to Chad Cagey at 2727 Perrysville Ave. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $47,633). Frank Hao to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 524 W. Burgess St. for $5,000. Pittsburgh City to Oakglade Realty Capital Partn. L.P. at 2242 Wilson Ave. for $5,900. Estate of Joseph Hezlep to Equity Trust Cust FBO Petra Reisch 20031 at 25 Divinity St. for $24,000. Spring Hill Daniel Friend to Michelle Boles at 180 List St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $34,390). Eric Bushaw to Eric Bushaw et al. and Kyrie Bushaw at 1704 Hunnell St. for $10 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $13,988). Estate of James Paul Utz to Amanda

Rose Kocher at 2140 Rockledge St. for $85,000. Summer Hill Christopher Walton to Jeffrey Labella at 4564 Zane Place for $159,000. Estate of Vincent Roseto to William Thompson at 4435 Highridge St. for $35,200 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $70,196) by sheriff ’s deed. Team Properties LLC to Eric Bimber at 327 Ivory Ave. for $32,000.

Troy Hill Michael Obrycki to Erin Danielle Hegerty at 1816 Niggel St. for $42,000. Bryan Hunt et al. to Rajiv and Barbara Billek Sawhney at 5 Waterside Place for $785,000. Conrad Egerter to WCC Property Development LLC at 2114 Lautner St. for $32,000. LaMarr Woodley to Jennifer Steel at 67 Waterfront Drive for $585,000.


May 2016

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May 2016

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Education on the Northside

Be A Middle School Mentor looking for volunteers By Alyse Horn Be A Middle School Mentor is the largest mentoring program in the region, with a total of 340 mentors across 17 schools in the City of Pittsburgh. Damon Bethea, mentoring project director, said the goals of the program are: “to assist mentees in their transition into middle school and into high school, offer opportunities for mentees to discover and explore future aspirations, assist mentees in understanding the Pittsburgh Promise, and connect mentees to positive caring adult mentors.” Bethea said that statistics show 84 percent of mentees have a 90 percent or higher attendance rate in school, and 70 percent of mentees increased or maintained

their grades in reading during the first half of the 2015-2016 school year. He also said that 66 percent of mentees increased or maintained their grades in Math during the first half of the 2015-2016 school year. Big Brothers Big Sisters, Communities In Schools, Mt. Ararat Community Activity Center and Urban League coordinator programs at 17 schools, while United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania directs and fundraises for BAMSM. Founding partners include Pittsburgh Public Schools & the Mentoring Partnership. For more information, please visit the BAMSM website. Recently, Mancheter Academic Chart School sixth grade students were given a presentation on how to impliment conflict resolution in the work place.

Photo by Alyse Horn

Sixth graders from Manchester Academic Charter School in the BAMSM program hold up the books they received from Reading is Fundamental.

Carnegie Science Center Snowball Day on June 20

mer. In addition, participants can “name their own price” of adIt is never too early to mission before launching their look ahead at warmer weather, preserved snowballs into the just don’t forget to keep a lit- Ohio River. The launch site will tle slice of the winter snowfall be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Last year, hundreds of for the Carnegie Science Center’s “Snowball Day” event. snowballs were salvaged in coffee cans and The annual outing en- coolers, courages participants to save freezer bags to be shared a snowball in their freezers in the event, which helps edand then bring it to the ucate visitors on the biolScience Museum on June 20, ogy of a snowflake and study the official first day of sum- of meteorology and weather. By Neil Strebig

Courtesy of the Carnegie Science Center

Past Snowball Day participants launch their icy orbs into the Ohio River. Did you know: most snowflakes melt before reaching the ground and each snowflake is made up of two to 200 separate crystals, on average.

The Northside Chronicle Education page is sponsored by:


May 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 26

Mattress Factory announce new rooftop exhibit By Neil Strebig The Mattress Factory announced plans for a new rooftop exhibit, to open in June. “Acupuncture,” will make its debut during the 19th annual Urban Garden Party. “The Mattress Factory has long been one of the Pittsburgh’s leading, cutting-edge cultural institutions and this installation will make that even clearer throughout our city,” Mayor Bill Peduto said in a statement. Mayor Peduto went on to “applaud” both the Mattress Factory and German artist Hans Peter Kuḣn, who has worked with the museum on multiple projects since 1986. Most recently Kuḣn worked on the 2001 exhibit, “Scanner,”

of lights will create an optical illusion that makes it seem that the light is actually tearing through the building, utilizing LED lights or as Kuḣn puts it, “light sticks pierce” through the building’s rooftop. The exhibit will be visible from Mt. Washington and Downtown. The public attraction has also been chosen by the Buhl Foundation’s One Northside project as a pillar example of the community’s recent excellence in the art community and the progressive changes taking place on the Northside. “[Acupuncture] is a wonCourtesy of the Mattress Factory derful symbol for progress in A rendering of the new “Acupuncture” exhibit that will be comboth the Northside and Pittspleted and debut this June. burgh,” Buhl Foundation Presia site-specific sound installa- local businesses, Bunting Graph- dent Frederick W. Theiman said. tion, according to the museum. ics and Centimark, to bring the latFor more information Kuḣn worked closely with two est public exhibit to life. An array visit the official website.

Monthly yoga classes By Neil Strebig There will be plenty of live music and yoga some Sunday afternoons in Historic Duestchtown as James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy will be hosting Live Music Yoga Sundays from 12-1 p.m. at least once a month in order to promote healthy living and positive vibes. Lauren Shaffer, a certi-

fied PYS, will be providing enthusiastic participants with her own unique brand of high energy vinyasa flow; a medium paced style that is sure to help strengthen the body’s core and elevate joint stress. CJ Hoffman will supply the music with his ambient and electric sounds. Admission is free, but donations are welcomed.

Barebones Productions Presents “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” opened on April 21 and will run through May 7, at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East. The play is by Dale Wasserman and directed by Melissa Martin. Times for the performances are 8 p.m. from Wed., May 4 through Sat., May 7. Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door.


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