Page 1

North Shore Country Day School

· Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition


Searching for NSCDS Memorabilia By the time you read this, the launch of our Centennial year will be less than 365 days away! We are searching for as many films and videos, as we can, to share with our NSCDS community via a Centennial website that is in the works. We are especially interested in Commencement films and videos, along with posed photos of the Commencement classes. The clock is ticking! If you have films, videos, photos or anything you would like to share or donate, please contact NSCDS Archivist Siera Erazo at serazo@nscds.org or 847.881.8844, or Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 at nwhiteman@nscds.org or 847.881.8848. Thank you!


in this issue

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

features 4 Upper School Commencement 12 Finding Wisdom in Unexpected Places 14 Annual Report

depa r t men t s 3

FA L L 2 0 1 8 The Acorn is published by the Marketing and Communications Department of North Shore Country Day School three times a year for alumni, parents, grandparents and friends. Its goal is to connect our school community, celebrate recent accomplishments and capture the essence of life and learning at North Shore.

North Shore Country Day School 310 Green Bay Road

Winnetka, Illinois 60093 847.446.0674 Tom Flemma

Head of School

HEAD’S LETTER

42

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

44

DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

46

EVENTS

48

BOOK REVIEWS

49

FA C U LT Y

55

LIVE AND SERVE

58

VISUAL ARTS

60

PERFORMING ARTS

62

AT H L E T I C S

64

HOMECOMING

66

P H O T O S F R O M O U R PA S T

68

ALUMNI CONNECTIONS

72

CLASS NOTES

76

ALUMNI REFLECTION

77

R E M E M B E R I N G J E N P FA N N E R S T I L L

Tura Cottingham Director of Marketing & Communications, Co-Editor tcottingham@ nscds.org

Tracie Frederick

Christine Wachter Communications Associate, Co-Editor cwachter@nscds.org

Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 Director of Alumni Relations nwhiteman@ nscds.org

Senior Associate Director of Development tfrederick@ nscds.org

Communications Associate jyoung@nscds.org

Maureen Wilde Development Associate— Annual Giving mwilde@ nscds.org

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80 Director of Development mmcdowell@ nscds.org

Kim Baker Development Assistant kbaker@ nscds.org

Jay Young

Photographers Jay Young Tura Cottingham Christine Wachter

Margaret Ringia Hart Design, www.mermadeart.com Graphic Arts Studio Printing, www.gasink.net

On the front cover Richard Austin ’18 prepares to lead the seniors in singing “Wake the Echoes” for the final time as North Shore students. On the back cover If you have information about this photo, contact Director of Alumni Relations Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 at 847.881.8848, or nwhiteman@nscds.org.


1

3

5 2

2

4

6


h e a d’s l e t t e r

Graduates, then and now, engaging In 1919, a number of Winnetka families asked a fundamental question: What matters most when educating a child? Our School was their answer. Maybe you are like me, and you sometimes turn to the back when you begin reading a periodical. For me, that’s particularly true for magazines (not so much novels, I don’t like to ruin the surprise). Perhaps, I like to know where I’m headed, or just like a quick bite before I have the snack or the full meal. I’m so glad I instinctively employed that approach when I began this issue of the Acorn with the alumni reflection by Susie Restin St. John ’68 (page 76). It allowed me to move backward not only through the magazine, but through time; to consider North Shore today from a distinct vantage point. The through line was unmistakable: members of the North Shore community instinctively engage the world around them and are well-prepared to do so. Is it a coincidence that our graduation speakers invoked the same Gandhi quote that Susie did? I don’t think so, because “Live and Serve” is as alive and well at North Shore today as it was in 1968, or ’48 or ’28 for that matter. It’s a philosophy as much as a motto; an approach that informs our curriculum, our program, and our interactions with each other and those around us. Susie expertly captured the sheer magnitude of the events she lived through, but also the impact of those events on individuals, on a class, on a generation. For her, the tumultuous ’60s became a call to action, her North Shore education the springboard to a life of service and engagement. James Robinson ’15 has wasted little time in applying his talents—high among 1 Buddy Day 2 Lower School Closing 3 Middle School Graduation 4 Middle School Field Day 5 Upper School College Breakfast 6 Lower School Field Day

them, an insatiable curiosity—to the world around him (page 12). A North Shore education has always emphasized the application of knowledge in an effort to make a difference. Is there any doubt that the unique emphasis here on the arts and service has helped shape his academic and personal interests, and the interdisciplinary approach he brings to solving problems? This is a particularly effective type of intellectual engagement: layering multiple disciplines upon each other, finding creative solutions in the interplay of their differing approaches. The rest of the Acorn, summarizing the second semester of the school year, is chock full of the myriad ways that members of the North Shore community engage with each other and with the greater Chicagoland community. Our first ever Scholarship Dinner, O’er the Fields We’ll Go, was a rousing success and a testament to our School’s longstanding commitment to making a North Shore education accessible to all. The funds raised will directly impact the lives of students, who will surely go on to engage their worlds like James and Susie and so many others. The first ever “Live and Serve” Day for North Shore gathered almost 30 Raiders to pack meals at Feed My Starving Children in Libertyville. We hope to begin spreading this event across the country, so North Shore alumni and friends can work together across generations in their own communities. I can certainly vouch for the fact that the Class of 2018 continues the North Shore tradition of engaging inside and outside the School walls. They have offered countless hours of community service, Buddy Day activities, classroom collaboration, athletic achievements and artistic endeavors—and have done so with analytical minds and generous hearts.

Our program demands regular, enthusiastic engagement from our students in the belief that exposure to and immersion in academics, arts, athletics and service creates a uniquely impactful education. We believe in this formula, and our graduating seniors show us why. They are a talented and caring group, a flock, according to senior speakers Clayton Durning ’18 and Grace Scullion ’18, who have already started down the path that Susie St. John sketched for them. They are already fighting for change, giving their time and talents to make this a better world. We must urge them on, for they will make a difference and we will be proud to call them our own. Finally, the fall Acorn always includes our Annual Report, where we have the chance to recognize and thank all of those friends of North Shore who have contributed funds to ensure we can continue to offer a transformative education. Make no mistake, your donations make a difference and allow everything on these pages to happen. This is a special place, and the ongoing, thoughtful engagement of all of our School constituencies help to make it so. We offer a first-rate education that challenges our students to be better thinkers and better humans. It has been that way for nearly 100 years and we are just getting started! We are about to launch the 100th school year at North Shore Country Day School. In 1919, a number of Winnetka families asked a fundamental question: What matters most when educating a child? Our School was their answer; our School and its graduates was the change they wanted to see. May it always be so. —Tom Flemma, Head of School

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

3


4


COMMENCEMENT 2018 a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

5


Brad O’Connor ’18 and Cassandra Hiland

Grace Scullion ’18 and Clayton Durning ’18

“This generation has the power. Today is supposed to mark a transition into the real world, but if this past year has shown us anything, it’s that we have always lived in the real world, and we are already changing it. We cannot forget that the reins are in our hands, because it is up to us to create the world we wish to live in.” G R A C E S C U L L I O N ’ 1 8 A N D C L AY T O N D U R N I N G ’ 1 8

Members of the Class of 2018

6


feature

B

ack in the fall, when the senior class was tasked with choosing a theme for the Homecoming dance, they decided to go with something a little out-of-the-box—“birds.” “Birds are super symbolic creatures,” explained Grace Scullion ’18 in the senior class message she delivered with Clayton Durning ’18 at North Shore Country Day School’s 99th Upper School Commencement on June 8. “Parents, you know. Whether you’ve been dreading—or awaiting with delight—having an empty nest, or telling your child that it’s time to spread their wings, we’re all in a bird-filled moment. But for the Class of 2018, birds are more than just a reminder to not live in your basement forever.” Clayton explained that over the past four years of high school, the 59 students seated on stage about to graduate, had formed a community. “Nay, a flock,” he said. And while it’s difficult to wrap up an entire school career in one speech, Grace and Clayton took turns telling a packed Auditorium 10 things they did know. The list included some light-hearted items (“If there is a dance circle, you can find Quigg Veach ’18 in the middle of it”). But they also talked about the power they had to create change. “Today is supposed to mark a transition into the real world, but if this past year has shown us anything, it’s that we have always lived in the real world, and we are already changing it,” Grace said. “We cannot forget that the reins are in our hands, because it is up to us to create the world we wish to live in.”

And while they admitted that nothing is forever (except nudes posted online), the Class of 2018 will always have each other. “Not because we are all the best of friends, but because North Shore Country Day School made us—the Class of 2018— a flock,” Clayton said. “Throughout the good, the bad and the ugly, we can all look back at our time at North Shore and sense that there is something ambiguous and special about this place that leaves each student with a feeling of gratitude.” After Grace and Clayton’s message, English Department Head and Upper School English Teacher Cassandra Hiland addressed the class. Cassandra, who also has two children in the Class of 2018, contemplated the lyrics of Bob Dylan’s Forever Young: “May you build a ladder to the stars, and climb on every rung, and may you stay forever young.” Cassandra first encountered those words as an inscription in a yearbook she perused as a child. And while the idea of staying forever young may sound appealing to a 10-year-old, she acknowledged that being young is actually quite difficult. “Presumably these challenges of youth were not what Dylan meant to highlight,” Cassandra explained. “Here’s what I’ve chosen to believe, and why I bring this quote up in the first place. The qualities associated with youth that I like to think Bob was talking about were these: first, having an open mind; second, feeling and expressing deep passion; and third, having a capacity for great joy. I’ve been watching you as a class for a long time now, and these are qualities you already possess in ample measure.”

Cassandra reminisced about some of the ways the Class of 2018 had embraced new concepts and all kinds of people over the years, and how they demonstrated enthusiasm and joy both in the classroom and out. “Since you’ve excelled at being young, I hope that you will keep your youthful spirits throughout your lives and excel at getting old,” she said. “I am so fortunate to have been part of your journey and to be leaving North Shore with you today, and I am so grateful to all of the North Shore faculty and community members who have helped to get us here.” After presenting diplomas to the seniors, Head of School Tom Flemma, continuing the tradition he started last year of wearing one of his father’s colorful blazers, addressed the class for the final time. “I am so proud of you and all you’ve accomplished,” he said. “I celebrate you for your individual accomplishments—and they are legion—but also for your collective accomplishments and your collective impact on this place. You’ve helped each other to reach heights you wouldn’t have reached alone, and others have noticed.” Following the recessional, everyone made their way outside where the seniors sang the School song, “Wake the Echoes,” for the final time as students. Then the three lifers, Haniya Ghazi ’18, Thomas McDowell ’18 and Nina Valenti ’18, lowered the flags and one by one rang the bell, marking an end to their 14-year journey as North Shore students.

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

7


“I hope that you will continue to find what matters to you and invest yourselves fully in it. If it’s possible, I hope you will make one of your passions your job; I can say from experience that there is nothing better than spending your days doing work that means something to you and makes you happy.” CASSANDRA HIL AND Thomas McDowell ’18 and Nina Valenti ’18

Eli Kraus ’18 and Flynn Hersh ’18

The Class of 2018: Sarah Niemann, Bridgette Ugarte, Joy Pasin, Abby Gifford and Hillary Swimmer

The Class of 2018: Mickey Hughes, Sana Hadavi, Pressley Smith, Rachel Schapiro, Sofia Baumann; (Front) Ethan Cantor, Carlo Castellanos and Joey Buterbaugh

8

Tom Flemma and Clifton Johnson ’18


The Class of 2018: Tom Pratt, Quigg Veach, Brad O’Connor, Jack Mangel, Will O’Connor, Trevor Yamada, Chip Heller and Owen Hiland

“You are well prepared for what lies ahead. Use what you’ve learned to make the world a better place. Don’t wait for permission from anyone else—put your shoulder to the wheel and help make change. We need you and we are counting on you.” TOM FLEMMA Tom Flemma and the Class of 2018 Leif Steele ’24, Thandi Steele ’18 and Zinzi Steele ’21

Zaina Vohra ’18 and Evelyn Gonzalez ’18

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

9


Upper School Stats

Average Class Size

14 Student-to-College-Counselor Ratio

59:2

Number of Colleges Offering Admission to Class of 2018

101 Colleges in 39 States and the District of Columbia

Student-to-Teacher Ratio

Students Awarded Merit Scholarships in 2018

8:1

64%

Student Clubs on Campus

College and University Matriculation by Region

15

Southwest 5% South 5%

Hours of Service

7,822

Mid-Atlantic 17%

Midwest 35%

Conference, Regional, Sectional and State Titles Past Four Years

26

West 19%

All-Conference Players Past Four Years

221 Students Who Participated in at Least One Sport in 2017-18

213

New England 19%

Academic Interests

Undecided 19%

Social Science 34%

Arts 5%

Students Planning to Play College-Level Athletics in the Class of 2018

7 College Admissions Representatives Who Visited in 2017-18

150 10

Engineering 7%

Communications 7% Natural Science 13%

Business 15%


Class of 2018 College Choices Braden Adamson-Tate Denison University

Abby Gifford Indiana University Bloomington

Eli Kraus Lake Forest College

Liam Sauvage University of Denver

Richard Austin Skidmore College

Evelyn Gonzalez Tufts University

Caroline Later Southern Methodist University

Cara Savin Northwestern University

Sofia Baumann Chapman University

Gabby Greer University of Vermont

Sam Leiter Tulane University

Rachel Schapiro Brown University

Cooper Bluhm University of Pennsylvania

Sana Hadavi Drexel University

Charlotte Leonetti University of California Berkeley

Grace Scullion Stanford University

Anna Brennan Tulane University

Claudia Hayward Texas Christian University

Jack Mangel Denison University

Pressley Smith Northeastern University

Joey Buterbaugh Bradley University

Chip Heller Union College

Thomas McDowell Denison University

Thandi Steele Williams College

Ethan Cantor Dickinson College

Flynn Hersh Knox College

Peter Miles Santa Clara University

Sam Stoll Lewis and Clark College

Carlo Castellanos Bradley University

Owen Hiland Williams College

Sarah Niemann University of Michigan

Hillary Swimmer Colby College

Margaret Chandler Colby College

Sophie Hiland Middlebury College

Brad O’Connor Georgetown University

Bridgette Ugarte University of Wisconsin Madison

Fed Chiara Drexel University

Jessica Hourihane The Ohio State University

Will O’Connor Northwestern University

Nina Valenti Skidmore College

Will Dart University of Denver

Grace Hughes Lewis and Clark College

Isabella Ogbolumani Cornell University ILR TO

Quigg Veach Denison University

Julia Doyle Georgetown University

Alana Jackson Northwestern University

Joy Pasin University of Notre Dame

Zaina Vohra Marquette University

Clayton Durning Pitzer College

Clifton Johnson Boston University

Tom Pratt St. Louis University

Trevor Yamada Colby College

Hannah Gailen Southern Methodist University

Nate Kaplan Lafayette College

Cam Rizai University of Denver

Haniya Ghazi University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Grace Kayser University of Denver

Alliyah Rumbolt-Lemond University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Samara Kohn Vanderbilt University

11


FINDING WISDOM IN UNEXPECTED PLACES JAMES ROBINSON ’15

12


feature

“One thing my documentary work has taught me is that there are people all around you with amazing stories and advice.” James Robinson ’15 grew up, for the most part, without television. His family had a small TV they kept in the closet most of the year, and pulled it out for the Super Bowl. Unlike most children of his generation, he did not spend hours zoned out in front of its flickering light. “It was great because I was outside all the time and it led to an awesome childhood,” he explained. “But it also meant that the first time I saw a documentary, I was blown away by the power of film.” James was in the 4th grade and he was studying the maps of the world when he saw a dotted line through China. He asked his parents what it meant, and they explained that it was Tibet and that it was a complicated situation. So they agreed to let him watch a documentary about it. “Once I saw that, I realized the power of documentary film,” he said. “And I knew I wanted to make my own.” His first attempt at a documentary was little more than a slideshow of pictures he found on the internet, telling the story of the life of the Dalai Lama for a 6th grade project. But as he was putting it together in 2008, there were large-scale protests around Tibetan independence because China had hosted the Summer Olympics that year. The momentum around the issue inspired him to stick with it. “None of my classmates even knew where Tibet was,” James said. “So as I began to talk with people and learn more about the situation, I thought that this really needs to get out there.” James came to North Shore Country Day School as a freshman in 2011 and he brought his passion for storytelling with him. He began collecting stories of Tibetans living in exile in the United States—largely on his own time over the summers and during spring breaks. But then he also completed independent studies with Upper School English Teacher Drea Gallaga and Kate Puccia, who was the art department chair and Upper School art teacher at the time. With their help, and

with guidance from his other English teachers, Kathy McHugh and Cassandra Hiland, who he says taught him critical lessons that he still uses today, he began to build the narrative of what would become his first full-scale solo show, entitled “Imprisoned Perspectives.” The mixed-media exhibit intertwined the voices of refugees, activists and scholars as it examined the role perspectives played in the political situation at the time. It also touched on the environmental destruction on the Tibetan Plateau, which is something James would continue to explore after graduation. “Imprisoned Perspectives” was on display in the John Almquist Gallery from May through July of 2015. The exhibit and its accompanying audio guide included interviews, video, handmade books, photographs and conceptual art. After graduating from North Shore, James took a gap year to continue his work. One part of “Imprisoned Perspectives” looked at seven major rivers that begin in Tibet, bringing water to 1.2 billion people. He wanted to follow one of those rivers and talk to people along the way. So he set out for the Mekong River, which is sourced on the Tibetan Plateau and winds through China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Originally, James was focused on hydropower dams in China and the impact they have on individuals living downstream. But while he was visiting, there was a massive drought and the story expanded to include climate change and its effects on communities. “That’s the case with a lot of climate change stories. You can’t isolate it,” he explained. “Climate change always appears with other issues. So you have to understand how the issues play off each other and compound each other.” James spent three months in the fall of 2015 traveling down the Mekong River, interviewing rice farmers whose yield had decreased by 50 percent because of drought and mothers who couldn’t feed

their children because the water level had dropped significantly and interrupted fish spawning. “As I went down the river, there weren’t very many scientists who wanted to speak to me so I relied on the people who were experiencing this change firsthand,” said James in the trailer for “We See the Change,” his second solo exhibit. “Originally I was looking for historical truths and statistical facts, but once you speak with people you begin to find human truths and human facts, and sometimes those can be more important to actually understanding how the issues facing our world impact people.” After his gap year, James enrolled at Duke University, where he is studying environmental science and policy and will complete a certificate in documentary film studies. He expects to graduate in 2020. While in school, he put the finishing touches on “We See the Change,” which combined photography, video and installation art with an audio guide and a 200page photo book. This project earned him Durham’s Power Plant Gallery Professional Development Award, as well as the first student arts residency at Duke’s Rubenstein Art Center. The exhibit opened in April at the Power Plant Gallery. This summer, James received a John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award to explore climate change in the United States. He spent four days in Louisiana, talking with Native American communities whose land is sinking, and he traveled to New Mexico for a project on wildfires. “One thing my documentary work has taught me is that there are people all around you with amazing stories and advice,” James explained. “Oftentimes, you learn the most when you least expect it. So, if you’re willing to ask questions, and open yourself up to other people’s stories, you may be rewarded with a wealth of unexpected wisdom.”

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

13


Head of School Tom Flemma with Katie Sheehan ’28, Margot Ake ’28 and Elly Culleton ’28

14


ANNUAL REPORT


a nnua l r eport

THANK YOU What a year! Thank you for your continual giving and deep dedication to North Shore. Our community has demonstrated, once again, how deeply we care about our School’s excellence and long-term viability through multiple gestures. The good works and engagement of many lead us to record-breaking fundraising, raising $1,393,490 in Annual Giving. In addition, our inaugural Scholarship Dinner raised more than $400,000 in donations that will directly impact our students. Every year, North Shore receives gifts from Jeff Foreman ’80, Lifers Nina Valenti ’18, Thomas McDowell ’18 all of our constituents—current parents, and Haniya Ghazi ’18, and Molly Shotwell Oelerich ’87 alumni, parents of alumni, current and former grandparents, current and former faculty and staff, and friends. You all matter. Through Annual Giving and gifts toward scholarship and/or specific endowment programs, you set NSCDS on a course to succeed in our work. Teachers and students are positioned to excel in their classrooms and focus on the array of opportunities before them. We extend our heartfelt thanks to each of you who support the arts, academics, athletics and service—the full North Shore experience. As trustees, we wholeheartedly believe this is the place where students become who they are. Thank you donors and volunteers for your goodwill and friendship. Your impact is seen every day on campus! Most Sincerely, JEFF FOREMAN ’80

K AT I E F R E I B U R G E R

M O L LY S H O T W E L L O E L E R I C H ’ 8 7

Alumni Board President

Development Chair, parent of Betsey ’19 and Alex ’21

Board Chair, parent of Buckley ’23 and Dixie ’26


Operating Revenue and Expenses for the year ended June 30, 2018 SOURCES

USES Endowment & Release from Restriction 7.4%

Financial Aid 10.9% Administration 4.5%

Investment Income 0.3% Other Income 0.6% Summer Programs 4.1%

Tuition & Fees 77.7%

Auxiliary Services 3.1%

Salaries & Benefits 57.7%

Plant & Maintenance 14.1%

Contributions 6.8%

Summer Programs 2.8% Auxiliary 3.4% Instruction & Instructional Support 6.5%

Annual Giving

The Benefit

Endowment

$1,393,490 + $435,760 + $422,650 =

$2,251,900 TOTAL RAISED

Annual Giving The first priority of the School, Annual Giving provides flexible resources to support the annual operating budget.

Endowment Major gifts and bequests are directed to our endowment, which creates the overall financial stability and an ongoing source of income for the School.

The Benefit This year’s Benefit was an inaugural Scholarship Dinner, raising funds that make a North Shore Country Day School education accessible to all deserving students, no matter their economic means. The Benefit annually supports strategic initiatives and projects.

GIVE ANNUALLY, IMPACT DAILY. You made an impact campuswide, enhancing our students’ North Shore experience and allowing us to live out our mission to prepare students with a challenging education that requires them to think critically, communicate effectively and engage fully in their intellectual growth and personal development, helping them become selfconfident, ethical citizens of the world who embody our motto, “Live and Serve.” For ways to give and more information, please contact: Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Director of Development 847.441.3316 or mmcdowell@nscds.org. For online giving, please visit www.nscds.org/give

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

17


our donor s H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y

Currently, there are 67 alumni, parents, former faculty, parents of alumni and friends of the School who have either openly or anonymously made their planned-gift intentions known to the School. We sincerely thank the members of the Heritage Society for investing in the future of North Shore Country Day School. We acknowledge those new members to the Heritage Society recognized in bold type. If you are interested in more information on planned-giving opportunities, please contact Molly Ingram McDowell ’80 at 847.441.3316 or email her at mmcdowell@nscds.org.

Marion R. Foote ’63

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

Stuart W. Rogers ’74

Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80

Linda Kiracibasi

Douglas M. Schmidt

Nancy Emrich Freeman

Patricia Blunt Koldyke ’54

Julie A. Schmidt

Audrey Gallery ’50

Barbara Flint Krier ’72

Susie Brew Schreiber ’58

Virginia Caspari Gerst ’60 Richard D. Golden ’44

Jordan Rutledge Lockwood ’97

Cynthia Scott and Daniel Kegan

Walter A. Goldstein ’71

Courtney Kling Luddecke ’67 F. Todd Searle ’05

Blanche Hoyt Gordon ’40

Chesly J. Manly ’89

G.P. Searle ’03

George Gordon ’43

Susan Bottum Matejka

Margot Sheesley ’60

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Hall

Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69 Stephen L. Smith ’74

Tonja Rizai Hall

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80

William B. Hinchliff ’64

Dr. Hamilton Moses III ’68

Catherine Askow Thompson ’69

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Nancy M. and Robert M. Parker

Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Washburn

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew H. Paull

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick F. Webster, Jr.

Carlene C. Blunt ’57

Joya Bovingdon Cox ’42

Liz Washburn Borozan ’57

William B. Davis ’65

*Mrs. Lyman W. Jeffreys

Miller Bransfield ’80

Lewis Davis

Michael F. Brookins ’57

Margi Morse Delafield ’65

Betsy Bruemmer ’76

Sharon S. Fitzmorris ’64

Gwen Jessen ’76 Mr. Lewis D. Petry *Mrs. Joan Palm Johnson ’57 Spencer M. Punnett II ’71 Robert A. Jones ’55 Dr. Matthew M. Rizai

Elizabeth R. Ingram ’82

Robert Y. Jordan ’71

Donald ’70 and Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 Marcia Durling Williams ’68 John N. Wilson ’43

DECADE SOCIETY

The Decade Society recognizes these steadfast individuals who have supported North Shore with a gift to Annual Giving for 10 consecutive years or more. These loyal donors embody the spirit of our School motto, “Live and Serve,” and have generously ensured the strength of the School’s future with their support year after year. We welcome those new members to The Decade Society recognized in bold type. Thank you for your consistent support.

Carlene C. Blunt ’57

Mr. and Mrs. Jules G. Cogan

John T. Blunt ’54

Jeff and Lucy Colman

Gary and Deborah Vainder Edidin ’67

Scott and Susan Bondurant

Pam Rahmann Conant ’75

Gabrielle Edidin ’97

Liz Washburn Borozan ’57

Richard F. Corrington ’49

Jennifer Edidin ’94

Frederick M. Bowes II ’62

John and Tura Cottingham

Peter H. Eklund ’79

Barbara R. Bradford ’66

Earl and Karen Cunningham

Mark J. Bransfield ’86

Mr. Tim Curren

Ms. Elizabeth Ester and Mr. Michael T. Brody

Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83)

Anne-Marie Dall’Agata

Miller Bransfield ’80 Andrew W. Brown ’76

Bruce A. Everett ’60

James D. Darrow ’67

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Ewen

John S. Darrow ’65

Richard C. Fall ’62

William B. Davis ’65

Mrs. June Farrell

Margi Morse Delafield ’65 and Lawrence Howe Delafield

Norman B. Ferris ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Ainsley

Christine and John Bakalar

Courtney S. Bryant ’58

Luke H. Bakalar ’97

Rachel Abarbanell ’98

Greg and Elizabeth Barr

Leigh Schweppe Buettner ’66

Emily and Michael Denesha

Peter W. Flanzer ’76

Mr. and Mrs. Lorenz W. Aggens

Kristen Gardiner-Barry ’91

Mr. Edward J. Burnell III

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Christina Fleps ’69

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Ake

Catharine Bell Bartholomay ’79 and William Bartholomay

Ruth Burnell ’70

Daniel D. Deuble ’77

Louise and Tom Flickinger

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Ake ’88

Mrs. Jane Deuble

Marion R. Foote ’63

Betty De Lescaille Curtis Bates ’42

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Buterbaugh

Paul J. DeWoskin ’86

Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80

Carol Marshall Allen ’74

Katherine Bearman ’02

Katherine Galt Allen ’68

Rob and Marcie Bearman

V. Blake Allison ’68

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Dhaens (Lucia Farwell ’55)

Stephanie and Tom Formolo

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Butz

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Beerheide

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Amboian, Jr.

Jill Witte Dillon ’69

Thomas A. Belshe ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Butz ’48

Hollis Potter Fromm ’64

John F. Benjamin ’49

Byron C. Campbell ’51

Charlie Doar ’03

Mr. and Ms. William Gallaga

Laura Thomas Bergman

Elizabeth Guenzel Carlin ’58

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Doar III

Thomas H. Garver ’52

Judy Drake Berkowitz ’64

Barbara Castilla

Sharon Dole

Matthew Berman ’79

Merle C. Chambers ’64

Eileen F. Donoghue

John P. Ayer, Jr. ’71

William W. Berry ’69

Fay Donohue ’68

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Gaud, Jr.

Kristopher R. Baade ’94

Mr. Bruce B. Blair ’69 and Dr. Judith L. Nerad

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher J. Charnas ’83

Daniel C. Dose ’59

Cynthia Turley Gentles

Harry ’61 and Barbara Bulger Drake ’66

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Geraghty ’65 (Elisabeth Olson ’65)

Elizabeth D. Ames ’61 Cristy Athas Mr. Cameron S. Avery and Ms. Lynn Donaldson

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Bach ’87

Robert B. Butler ’66

Alice Graff Childs ’37

Benjy Blenner ’02

Nancy Geyer Christopher

Jay and Patti Bach

Dayle Block

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Clark

Juliette Fentress Bacon ’49

Lee and Therese Block

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Cody ’70

Oscar C. Blomgren, Jr. ’47

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Durbin (Cece Ewen ’67) Eliza Howe Earle ’67 Stephen B. Edge ’71

18

Mrs. Harold M. Flanzer

Susan Pettibone Fraser ’69 Tracie and Brian Frederick

Clifford G. Gately ’75 Joan Hauser Gately ’49

C. Gary and Virginia Caspari Gerst ’60


“I decided to include NSCDS in my will because I believe so strongly in what we do and how I have seen so many children grow and flourish in the North Shore environment.” L I N D A K I R A C I B A S I , current faculty, Heritage Society member

317

Members of the Decade Society

(GIFTS OF 10 CONSECUTIVE YEARS OR MORE)

Mr. and Mrs. Bert A. Getz, Jr. Mr. Howard E. Jessen Mr. and Mrs. George H. Gilmore, Jr.

Ned Jessen ’73 and Lynn Lillard Jessen ’74

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Glasser ’51

*Joan Palm Johnson ’57

Academics: Josephine O’Brien ’27, Kami Day ’27, Nikash Bawa ’27 and Colin Wiercinski ’27

Mr. Grant G. and Dr. Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69 Judith Brew McDonough ’62

Ms. Erica Regunberg and Dr. Robert Dann

Susan Stetson ’72 and Alan Vertrees

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew J. Renaud (Lisa Paul ’85)

Robert D. Stibolt ’72

Howard I. Goldblatt ’80

Christopher W. Johnson ’66

James E. Golden ’70

Mr. and Mrs. William T. McDowell (Molly Ingram ’80)

Robert Y. Jordan ’71

Joanne Golden ’74

Judith Dayton McGrath ’54

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

Mr. Michael A. Sachs

Richard D. Golden ’44

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent K. Kelly

Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. McHugh

Mr. Sheldon Rosenbaum

Dr. Jacques N. Gordon and Ms. Elizabeth H. Wiltshire

Kathleen Johnson ’70

John H. Roberts ’49 George S. Rogers ’78

Elizabeth Ruwitch Ryan ’76

Jennifer L. Stone ’82 Lauren G. Stone ’77 Andrew J. Sullivan ’79 Boetius H. Sullivan III ’71 Lauren L. Suter ’51 Mina Takahashi ’96

Bradley L. Savage ’88

Catherine Askow Thompson ’69

Linda Salisbury ’74

Anne Coulter Tobey ’63

Ceil Scanlan

Mr. and Mrs. Byron D. Trott

Tracy Louis Merrill ’78

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Scheman ’72

Helen Turley

Richard A. Meyer ’76

Julie Schmidt

Tom Kowalczyk

Mr. James W. Molzahn

Susie Brew Schreiber ’58

Jo and Bill Guenzel ’64

Nicholas B. Kronwall ’53

Kerry Lynn Moore ’89

Ms. Di Li and Mr. John Schultz

Purnendu and Terri Gupta

David Kubacki

George H.D. Schulz ’63

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Hall

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Viellieu

Eugene A. Kuznetsov ’94

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moore

Alice Suter Hardesty ’55

Mark and Kim Morgan

Mr. William G. Schur and Ms. Donna Fletcher

Alice Marshall Vogler ’69

Mr. and Mrs. Peter T. Lawler

Suzu and David Neithercut

Charles H. Schweppe ’67

Dr. Valerie and Mr. James T. Leesch

Peter and Natalie Nelson

Tara Steinschneider Vossough ’74

Karen and Chris Segal

David A. Nimick

Molly Whiteman Vreede ’03

Courtney Williams Shelton ’88

Laurie S. Lipman, M.D. ’70

Louise Konsberg Noll ’40

Margaretha Walk ’59

Carolyn Miller Short ’64

Kenneth M. Henderson, Jr. ’47

Mr. Ed Loeb

Leonie M. O’Donohoe

Susan Palm Waltrip ’59

Helen Loennig ’86 Mr. and Mrs. J. Jeffry Louis III ’81

Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87)

Theodore B. Washburne ’46

John T. Hickey ’65

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Shotwell III ’61 (Lynne Wavering ’60) John A. Silander, Jr. ’63

William B. Hinchliff ’64

Daniel H. Lowinger ’08

Christine Olatunji

Prabhakant and Anita Sinha

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick F. Webster, Jr.

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Miriam Feinstein Lupien ’80

Kenny Olatunji

William H. Hines ’73

Diane Olson

Winder Holeman

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Mabie

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel K. Skinner

Diane Williams Parker ’58

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Slotkin

Georgia Elmes Welles ’48

Cindy Hooper

John R. MacArthur ’74

George D. Smith III ’81

Berkley and Bob Wellstein

Ruth Allen Hopfenbeck ’49

Timothy H. Macdonald ’67

Gayley Atkinson Patterson ’70

S. Scott Smith ’80

Chesly J. Manly ’89 Irl H. Marshall III ’71

Mr. Michael Peccia

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Smith ’74

Donald ’70 and Nancy Green Whiteman ’71

Ellen Howe ’65 and Russ Hoyle III ’65

Marnie Paul ’64

Lewis Hunt ’76

Mr. Edward E. Matthews

Mary Hobart Petke ’65

Thomas P. Smith ’89

Brad and Mary Ann Whitmore

Liz Price Hunt ’42

Mr. and *Mrs. James G. Maynard ’44

Andrew I. Philipsborn ’69

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Souder

Marcia Durling Williams ’68

Mary and Frank Phillips

Dana Specht

John N. Wilson ’43

Mrs. Caroline Howard McCarty

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Pick ’48

Leslie M. Spitz ’61

Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49

John P. Stallings

W. Rockwell Wirtz ’71

Dr. John and Dr. Mary Sperling McAuliffe ’61

Jane Drake Piechota ’66

Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Wiznitzer

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Potempa

Kimberly Louis Stewart ’75

Ms. Lynsey Wollin-Casey and Mr. Shawn Casey

Kathy and Patrick McHugh

Sally Simmons Kiper ’56

Mrs. Barbara Gorham

Beatrice McKenna

Linda Kiracibasi

Sherry Gormanous

Jacqueline B. Melissas

Patricia Ostrom Kohnen ’60

Elizabeth Peruchini Graham ’88

Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Koldyke (Patricia Blunt ’54)

Mr. David Green and Ms. Jamie Querciagrossa

Lauri Reagan Harris ’87 Thomas B. Harris ’63 Marianne Neuses Hartnett ’49

Cassandra and Chris Hiland

Teresa and Harley Hutchins ’60 Charles H. Ingram ’75 Elizabeth R. Ingram ’82 Martin L. Jack ’67 Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Jaffe Rufus R. Jeffris, Jr. ’53

Anne Darrow McCausland ’62

Tappan G. Merrick ’66

Dr. and Mrs. David H. Potter

Laura Wirtz Jenkins ’84

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas F. McClanahan

Kristen Moffat Powell ’86

Arthur ’70 and Diane Flint Jessen ’70

Mr. and Mrs. James A. McClung

Allan and Carla Price

Gwen Jessen ’76

Robert A. McClung ’91

Midge Chace Powell ’49 Daniel W. Randle ’64

Audrey Kuh Straight ’65 William F. Steel ’60 Frances Blunt Steinwedell ’51

Rich and Julie Ugarte

Jim and Tricia Valenti Sallie Welsh VanArsdale ’40

David F. Webster ’73

Estelle Miller Weedon ’60 Dr. Elliot S. Weisenberg ’76

George E. Whiteman ’06

Judith Atwood Wright ’54 Anne Hines Young ’77

William E. Steinwedell II ’49 Molly Brown Stephan ’67

Peter Shedd Reed ’73 *Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

19


Musical Tea: Hunter Wessel ’31, Corie Dorsey ’30, Annie Aiston ’31 and Sebbie Brindley ’31

549 139

Leadership Donors ($300+)

DONORS MADE A FIRST GIFT TO NSCDS

Athletics: Buckley Oelerich ’23

GIVING

LIVE AND SERVE

PERRY DUNLAP

SOCIETIES

SOCIETY

SMITH SOCIETY

+Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hough (Elizabeth Schroeder ’85)

Recognizing the School’s motto “Live and Serve,” the following leadership donors are acknowledged for contributions of $25,000 and above.

Established in memory of the School’s founding Headmaster, this society welcomes those leaders who contribute $10,000 to $24,999.

+Michael and Melissa Howard

Anonymous

Juliette Fentress Bacon ’49

North Shore offers its most sincere gratitude to the following individuals whose gifts add richness to the life of the School. Their generosity significantly impacts all areas of school life. These contributions provide the foundation from which the School continues to grow and affords the very best to our students. Thank you to those who support North Shore with these leadership gifts.

Katie Hazelwood and Todd Kaplan +Mr. José Isasi and Ms. Charlene Kittredge +Mr. and Mrs. Strib Koster +Michael and Jennifer Larsen

HEADMASTER’S SOCIETY

Named in honor of the nine Heads that have led the School, this society recognizes individuals who give $5,000 to $9,999.

+Mr. Ed Loeb +Mr. Douglas Anderson and Ms. Colette Kelsey +Amy and Andy Bluhm +Louise and Tom Flickinger Mary Pick Hines ’49 +Mr. Howard E. Jessen Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Schroeder

Christine and John Bakalar +Heather and Robert Bartell

+Dr. Amanda and Mr. Thomas T. Macejko, Jr. Suzu and David Neithercut

+Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Canmann

+Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Niemann

+Brian and Heidi Capozzi

+Ryan Paulson and Darla Hovden

+Mr. and Mrs. John R. Chandler +Erica and Jeff Conlon

+Duff and Chase Stevenson

Mrs. Jane H. Deuble

+Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stoll

Lucia Farwell Dhaens ’55

+Katherine and Jim Umpleby

+Mr. and Mrs. Jay Dietz

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rankin Maria and Mohan Rao +Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rosen (Sarah Geist ’86) Mr. and Mrs. E. Scott Santi

Anonymous +Mr. and Mrs. William T. Bartholomay (Catharine Kleiman ’79) Lois R. and Maurice J. Beznos +Dr. Judith L. Nerad and Mr. Bruce B. Blair ’69 +Mr. and Dr. John Bradshaw +Amy and Clay Brock Alice Graff Childs ’37 +Sean and Diana Connolly James D. Darrow ’67

+Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Doar III

+The Scheyer Family

+Dombalagian Family

+Karen and Chris Segal

+Art and Lili Duquette

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Durbin (Cece Ewen ’67)

+Dennis and Christina Self

Eliza H. Earle ’67

+David and Cathy Durning

Mrs. Susanna Souder

+Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Flannery

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Souder

+Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Freiburger

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Stone

+Rich and Susan Gallun +Alan and Ginny George +Amy and Jim Gray +Julie and Matthew Halbower

20

Dr. and Mrs. Mark Haupt

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Haupt

+Jeff and April Diehl

Gary and Deborah Vainder Edidin ’67 Torrey Everett ’56 +Alison and Bill Fitzgerald

+Mr. and Mrs. John A. Terlato +Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80 Brad and Mary Ann Whitmore Stephanie and Tom Formolo Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wilson Mr. and Mrs. W. Rockwell Wirtz ’71 +Mr. and Mrs. Sun Yoo


Academics: McKena Shelly ’29

“ D U R I N G H A N N A H A N D S A M ’ S T I M E AT N O R T H S H O R E , T H E Y D E V E L O P E D L I F E L O N G F R I E N D S H I P S W I T H C L A S S M AT E S A N D FA C U LT Y. I W I L L A LW AY S R E M A I N G R AT E F U L F O R O U R Y E A R S A S PA R T O F T H E N O R T H S H O R E FA M I LY.”

Susan Matejka, parent of Hannah Bottum ’13 and Sam Bottum ’16, Heritage Society member Buddy Day: Braden Adamson-Tate ’18 and Liam Smith ’30

+Susan and Steven Fortier Mr. and Mrs. Bert A. Getz, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James J. Glasser ’51 Mr. Richard Gonzalez +Todd and Lana Gray +Ms. Lisa Altenbernd and Mr. Stephen Hagerty +Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hallinan +Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hayward Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Jaffe The Jaharis Family Foundation

+Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87) Christopher Osgood ’61 +Mary and Frank Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Pick ’48 Mr. David Pickering and Ms. Malessia Howland +Laura and Robert Probst Dr. Matthew M. Rizai and Ms. Lana Skopcenko John H. Roberts ’49 +Nat Roberts and Laura Zung

Patricia Missner Johnson ’67 +Jane and James Saccaro +Dr. and Mrs. +Mr. and Mrs. Morton O. Schapiro Peter M. Karmin ’83 +Mr. and Mrs. Vincent K. Kelly Mr. and Mrs. Fareed A. Khan +Mr. David Klaskin Robert C. Kopple ’61 +Olivier and Anne Leonetti Victoria H. Leslie ’73 James W. Leslie ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Lumpkin +Mr. and Mrs. Mark W. Madigan Mr. Edward E. Matthews The Joseph Nolan Family

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Sherman

ACORN SOCIETY

Representing the acorn on the School seal which symbolizes a student’s growth, this society honors those who make gifts between $2,500 and $4,999.

+Mr. and Mrs. James J. O’Connor, Jr.

The Graboys Family

+James and Stephanie Olson

+Jill and David Greer Jo and Bill Guenzel ’64 Steve Haislet and Karen Strehle William B. Hinchliff ’64 David F. Hines ’81 Dr. William H. Hines ’73

Anonymous (3) Amboian Family Suzanne and Douglas Bade +Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berghammer Mr. Daniel W. Boone Andrew W. Brown ’76

S. Shultz and T. Pierson

+Jennifer and Jon Bunge

+Melissa and Chuck Smith

Dr. Sungjoon Cho and Dr. Mehyun Song

Molly Brown Stephan ’67

Chuck and Linda Glew

Tim and Lorri Gerdeman

+Mr. and Mrs. Matthew J. Renaud (Lisa Paul ’85) Mr. and Mrs. Marquis Sauvage Sarah M. Schmidt +Mary Kelly and Michael Schneider

+Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hoffman

+Mr. and Mrs. Sean T. Scott (Hilary Bishop ’96)

+Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hourihane

+Brian and Katie Scullion

+Elizabeth R. Ingram ’82 +Ashish and Ritu Jain +Patrick and Tessa Kalotis Constantine Kanellos and Hariklia Karis Beth Kaplan Karmin ’80 and Kenneth M. Karmin ’79

+Mr. Richard W. Smirl and Ms. Holly K. Halsted-Smirl Lauren G. Stone ’77 +Jennifer L. Stone ’82 Howard R. Strong ’67 Mr. Robert Szymanski and Ms. Van N. Ven Catherine Askow Thompson ’69

+Mr. and Mrs. Alan Swimmer

+Michael and Kenzie Doornweerd

Leeanne Mitchell King ’61

Mr. and Mrs. Byron D. Trott

Patricia Ostrom Kohnen ’60

+Rich and Julie Ugarte

Jennifer Edidin ’94

Mr. and Mrs. F. David Leiter

+Jim and Tricia Valenti

Gabrielle Edidin ’97

Candice and Peter Luglio

Cynthia Walk ’63

Mr. and Mrs. John Mangel II

Margaretha Walk ’59

+Susanna and Renaat Ver Eecke Robert A. Waller ’47 The Watrous Family +Alison and Robin Winslow Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49 +Mr. and Mrs. Keith Yamada

+Michael and Amy Ellis Bruce A. Everett ’60 +Drs. Hamad and Dolores Farhat Mrs. Bruni Fletcher-Koch John and JP Forrest +Randy and Natascha Freeman

+Sean and Heather Martin Scott and Leslie McLamore +Heather and Greg Metz Eileen and Mike Murdock

Georgia Elmes Welles ’48 Mr. and Mrs. Conrad J. Winkler Anne Hines Young ’77

Edward U. Notz ’53

*Deceased +Total contributions for Annual Giving 2017-18 and Scholarship Dinner

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

21


HOUR SOCIETY

When established, this society was named to approximate the cost of operating the School for one hour, and recognizes individuals who contribute between $750 and $2,499.

+Mr. Michael Edwards and Ms. Melissa Mizel Peter H. Eklund ’79 +James and Kelly Epstein

Marion R. Foote ’63

Anne Huebner Abercrombie ’61

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Fortier

Mr. and Mrs. John Ake Mr. and Mrs. John Anton, Jr. ’89 Richard J. Appel ’81 Mr. Cameron S. Avery and Ms. Lynn B. Donaldson Nicholas C. Babson ’64 William C. Bartholomay ’46 +Mayur and Maribel Bawa Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Bay Mr. Kevin Bell Carlene C. Blunt ’57 Liz Washburn Borozan ’57 +Chris Boyle and Cole Moir Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83) Stephanie and Miller Bransfield ’80 Ms. Leslie Shad and Mr. Joseph H. Brennan Mr. and Mrs. Rob Brindley Leigh Schweppe Buettner ’66

Carrie and Bill Bach ’87

Alfred Shotwell ’61 and Lynne Wavering Shotwell ’60

Jay and Patti Bach

James and Jennifer Shreve

Dr. Franklin Baumann and Dr. Tina Mattera

+Mr. and Mrs. J. Jeffry Louis ’81

Anonymous (7)

+Gretchen and William Ake ’88

Carolyn Miller Short ’64

Mr. Reed Fellars and Ms. Reven Uihlein-Fellars Katie and Andrew Florig

James A. Gassel ’85 Cynthia Turley Gentles +Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Geraghty III ’62 C. Gary and Virginia Caspari Gerst ’60 +Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85 Carey and Colby Gifford James E. Golden ’70 +Jennifer Gonzalez-Gent ’98 and Mark Gent

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel K. Skinner

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Mabie

Kenneth and Heidi Small

+Peter and Deborah Smith

Dayna Block

+Deidre and Michael McClurg Mr. Grant G. and Dr. Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69 +Mr. and Mrs. William T. McDowell (Molly Ingram ’80) Sheila and Harvey Medvin Richard Meyer ’76 +Joshua Miller and Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04 +Jason and Susan Millner James M. Mindling ’62 John P. Molner ’81

Ms. Anne M. Bloedorn

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Smith ’74

Oscar C. Blomgren, Jr. ’47

Katherine and John Sprenger Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63 +Zachary and Laura Steinhandler Kimberly Louis Stewart ’75 +Jayanth Surakanti and Chethra Muthiah Anne Coulter Tobey ’63 +Dr. Christine Tremper Robert Turpin ’59 Scot and Anita Tyson Mr. Steven L. van der Zanden and Ms. Kimberly Orput Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Viellieu

Ms. Heather Mooney

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald A. Hansell

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moore

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick F. Webster, Jr.

L. Hall Healy, Jr. ’59

Mark and Kim Morgan Dean and Maureen Nelson +Ashley Hemphill Netzky ’91 and Pam Netzky +Brett and Jessica O’Brien +Mr. and Mrs. Terrance J. O’Bryan Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Pasin

+Mr. and Mrs. Colin Hudson

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Butz

Nichole and Scott Humphrey +Richard and Kijsa Phillips +Mr. and Mrs. David Pierre +Mrs. Stacy Hunt Teresa and Harley Hutchins ’60

Elizabeth Guenzel Carlin ’58 +Mr. and Mrs. Eric Jacobson +Julie and Rich Carrigan +Arthur ’70 and

+Lara and Benjamin Port +Mr. and Mrs. Michael Potempa Kristen Moffat Powell ’86

Suzan Baskin Bernhard ’52

Thomas P. Smith ’89

Purnendu and Terri Gupta

Sam Howe ’73

Laura Thomas Bergman

Mr. and Mrs. Steven MacGeachy

Tara Steinschneider Vossough ’74

Ruth Allen Hopfenbeck ’49

John F. Benjamin ’49 Matthew Berman ’79

Mr. James W. Molzahn

Dr. Will Hester and Dr. Titus Daniels

+Phyllis Beattie ’72

John R. MacArthur ’74

Michael J. Graham ’70

+Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Heller, Sr.

Steven L. Barber ’67

+Bethany Schwartz and Benjamin Smith

Mr. and Mrs. George Bury

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Butz ’48

Prabhakant and Anita Sinha

Mrs. John J. Louis, Jr.

+Jeffrey and Mr. and Mrs. John C. Fortson Marianne Markowitz Mr. and Mrs. Peter McCabe Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher J. Fraleigh James A. McClung Jane Franke ’80 Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Gardner ’67

Mr. and Mrs. Steven J. Arenson

Laurie S. Lipman ’70 +Dr. and Mrs. Demetrius K. Lopes

+Diana and Tom Flemma

Brad and Kristin Sheftel +Mr. and Mrs. Bong Shinn

Carole and Steven Levin

Mr. Bruce Ettelson and Ms. Missy J. Bundy

Mr. Bernard Ford and Mrs. Heather O’Shea

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Ainsley

+Dr. Aneta and Mr. Kris Leschynski

+Loren and Diane Weil

Ross Blumenfeld ’03 +Susan and Scott Bondurant The Parents of Hannah Bottum ’13 and Sam Bottum ’16 Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. Bransfield ’86 Tim and Deneen Brennan Michael F. Brookins ’57 Mr. and Mrs. Chris Buckner Edward J. Burnell III Robert B. Butler ’66 Stacey and Lowell Cantor +Mr. Jac Cerney and Ms. Mary L. Doi Mr. and Mrs. Barry Clark Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Cody ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Jules G. Cogan Jeff and Lucy Colman Sharon Cooper ’83 Sharon and Dick Cooper

Laurie Weisberg

+John and Tura Cottingham

Berkley and Bob Wellstein

+Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Dart II

+Melissa and Matthew Wessel Paul C. Westhead ’85 +Donald ’70 and Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 +Rudy and Nichole Wilson

Lew Davis Joel de la Fuente ’87 Daniel D. Deuble ’77 +Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Deveny

Hillary Wirtz ’97

Charlie Doar ’03

+Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wood ’90

+Mullery Doar ’06

Mr. and Mrs. Qiao Xing +Debbie and Ethan Youderian

+Elizabeth Doi ’09 Daniel C. Dose ’59 +Mr. and Mrs. Dale Downing

Paula Castillo ’90

Diane Flint Jessen ’70

Alison Leeds Puth ’81

Merle C. Chambers ’64

Gwen Jessen ’76

Rebecca Reategui ’12

Pam Rahmann Conant ’75

Ned Jessen ’73 and Lynn Lillard Jessen ’74

Samuel G. Reategui ’15 Nancy Kimball Robinson ’58

PURPLE AND

Kathleen Johnson ’70

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Ebershoff

Matthew and Katherine Roszak

WHITE SOCIETY

Stephen W. Edwards ’52

Scott and Ranell Conine Bruce Culleton and Katherine Gooch +Earl and Karen Cunningham Andrew S. DaMiano ’72 William B. Davis ’65

+Dr. and Mrs. David Kalainov Mr. and Mrs. K. Kalil +Shelley and Ed Keller Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

+Michal and Jana Rozsival Elizabeth Ruwitch Ryan ’76 +Brooke and James Sabia

+Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux

+Keswani Family

Mr. Michael A. Sachs

+Deb and Bryan Keyt

Linda Salisbury ’74

+Mr. and Mrs. William C. Doyle

+Mr. and Mrs. Rock Khanna

Charles F. Sample ’81

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Drake ’61 (Barbara Bulger ’66) Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey D. Echt

Dr. and Mrs. Eun-Kyu Koh +Liz and Mike Kohler Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Koldyke (Patricia Blunt ’54) Mr. and Mrs. Peter T. Lawler

22

Mr. Weifang Zhou and Ms. May Xue

In honor of the North Shore colors, this society recognizes individuals who make gifts between $300 and $749.

+Nenad and Rebecca Dragojlovich

Arlene H. Elisha Mr. and Mrs. W. Robert Elisha ’77 (Joanne Turley ’77) Libby Ester and Michael Brody William Carter Everett ’53 Richard C. Fall ’62

Mark and Rebecca Sansoterra

Anonymous (5)

Mrs. June Farrell

Bradley L. Savage ’88

Katharine Galt Allen ’68

Anne and Mike Fiascone

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon I. Segal

Carol Marshall Allen ’74

Rory and Mary Ann Finlay

V. Blake Allison III ’68

Courtney Nigro Fitzgerald ’82

+Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sheehan

Nathan C. Appleton ’94


Middle School Service Week: Niabelle Comeau ’23 and Sophie Green ’23

“I consider the 15 years (1966-81) I spent in the Middle and Lower Schools of North Shore to have been instrumental in the development of my teaching philosophy and in my growth as an educator and as a person. In the hope of giving back to North Shore for what I received and to enable it to continue its mission in the future, I am pleased to include North Shore in the plans for my estate.” L E W D AV I S , former faculty, Heritage Society member

Academics: Allie Charnas ’20 and Julia Fortier ’20

Mrs. Mary Ann Flemma Chuck and Julie Floyd

Marcia McMillan Hines ’56 +Cindy Hooper

Chesly J. Manly ’89

Christine Olatunji

Mr. and Mrs. Brian P. Smith

Manzari Family

Kenny Olatunji

William F. Steel ’60

Mr. John and Dr. Jane Forester

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Horevitz

Thomas Marrinson ’82

Marcia and Jerry Osher

Mr. and Ms. Kwesi E. Steele

Curtis E. House ’71

Irl H. Marshal III ’71

Lucy Trumbull Owens ’31

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Frazier

Ellen Howe ’65 and Royce Hoyle ’65

Mr. and Mrs. David E. Mason (Margaret Krasberg ’57)

Andrew and Georgia Pappas

Frances Blunt Steinwedell ’51

Apur Patel ’86

William E. Steinwedell II ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Hudson

Mr. and *Mrs. James G. Maynard ’44

Jane Drake Piechota ’66

Herbert L. Stern ’66

Ellen Rockwell Galland ’63

Liz Price Hunt ’42

Arturo Garcia

Charles H. Ingram ’75

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas F. McClanahan

Laura Wirtz Jenkins ’84

Robert A. McClung ’91

Peter S. Reed ’73

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Gascoigne

Kathy and Patrick McHugh

Tina G. Rice

+Tracie and Brian Frederick Hollis Potter Fromm ’64 +Barrington Fulton, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Gaud, Jr. +Miriam Geraghty ’69 and Douglas Severson ’69 Howard I. Goldblatt ’80 Richard D. Golden ’44

+Dr. Kristen Kaczynski and Dr. Christopher Shaw

Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. McHugh

Mr. Andy Richardson

Joseph and Laura McKeown

Ms. Anne Richardson

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kendall

Mr. and Mrs. Breece R. McKinney

Ms. Barbara Richardson

Mrs. Linda Kenny David E. Kidd ’48 +Linda Kiracibasi Ms. Susan Klingenstein

Dr. Carmen Gomez-Fiegl and Dr. Patrik Fiegl

Edward and Amy Kraus

Nell Kneibler ’62

Dr. Jacques N. Gordon and Ms. Elizabeth H. Wiltshire

Mr. John Lillig and Ms. Anna Lee

David S. Gorelick ’97

Dr. Valerie and Mr. James T. Leesch

Mr. Edward Harney and Ms. Kathryn A. Mikells Thomas B. Harris ’63 Martha Bacon Hartfiel ’47 +Josh Hilton and Brook Wharton

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Read

Peter and Stephanie Keehn

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Goldman

Ann Howard Hanna ’71

+The Preston Family

James R. Loewenberg ’52 Mr. and Mrs. James W. Lumberg +Malena and Eduardo Luz Timothy H. Macdonald ’67 +Mr. and Mrs. John Mangel III

+Dr. Clark McKown and Ms. Elizabeth Hollenberg Scott and Karen McKown Gary Meltz ’93

Tonja Rizai Hall George S. Rogers ’78 Steve Rosenberg +Rebecca Andreou Sabri ’86

John C. Stern ’71 Susan Stetson ’72 and Alan Vertrees Robert D. Stibolt ’72 +Tim and Maggie Storino +Bridget and Jeffrey Stump Lauren L. Suter ’51 David C. Thomas +Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Thomas Mrs. Kathryn Todd ’96 and Mrs. Kelly Todd

Mr. and Mrs. Bernhard J. Sander

Alice Marshall Vogler ’69

Tracy Louis Merrill ’78 Wendel W. Meyer ’67

The Savin Family

S. Lindsay Webbe ’61

Dirk and Inge Hondmann

Andrew J. Scheman ’72

Estelle Miller Weedon ’60

W. Craig Misner ’65

Charles H. Schweppe ’67

Mrs. Weston K. Whiteman

F. Todd Searle ’05

John N. Wilson ’43

Mrs. Sally Burnett Searle ’47

Frances Winston ’67

+Brian and Jessica Montgomery Dr. Sheryl L. Murray Jay T. Nichols, Jr. ’64 Louise Konsberg Noll ’40

Courtney Williams Shelton ’88

Richard and Christine Norton ’87

Nancy Dayton Sidhu ’59

Pauline Goodrich O’Brien ’41

John A. Silander, Jr. ’63

Lucy Sievers ’80

L. Tim Wallace ’45

Arthur M. Wirtz III ’86 +Tina and Joe Wolf Mr. and Mrs. Graham R. Wood Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Zavala Yang Yang and Heyi Zhang

*Deceased +Total contributions for Annual Giving 2017-18 and Scholarship Dinner

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

23


benefit board

Scholarship Dinner: Sarah Geist Rosen ’86, Nina Yoo, Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04, Susan Canmann and Tom Flemma

Scholarship Dinner: Andrew and Grace Wood, and Jack and Cori Chandler

Scholarship Dinner O’er the Fields We’ll Go! This year, the Benefit Board hosted an inaugural Scholarship Dinner, and the support for the event was overwhelmingly generous! Raising more than $400,000 for our scholarship program, the host committee led the way, bringing in over 300 guests who enjoyed a dinner, live auction and paddle raise. The highlight of the evening was the keynote speech from Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04. With a mix of humor and heartfelt gratitude, Qui spoke about her experience as a scholarship recipient at NSCDS. Her opening words said so much: “Several years ago, I stood in the theater at North Shore (which I must say has had some pretty awesome upgrades since my days as a student) and I said when I looked at my School, I felt as if I were looking into a mirror. All that North Shore represented (represents)— community, love, service—I saw and still see in myself. Tonight though, I stand on the shore—both literally and figuratively—and when I look across the sea of this journey, I still see my family, teachers, the North Shore community. But I also see the benefactors that carried me here. It was your benevolent gifts, direction, encouragement and investment which sustained and propelled me to this place. Like my mom and dad, it was your foresight that saw the blossom and glory of the land when I couldn’t see it—when all I could see was the turbulent tide.” Qui summed it up perfectly on the impact this makes for so many who have come before and after her. We thank the volunteers, the host committee and so many contributors who helped lead the ripple and create waves for our scholarship program. Thank you! Since 1981, the Benefit Board, formerly the Women’s Board, has raised more than $6 million through their annual events to support areas of the School not covered by the annual operating budget. The North Shore community greatly appreciates the Benefit donors. PRESIDENT

Kelly Hudson

Diane Flint Jessen ’70

Sarah Geist Rosen ’86

Kate Jackson

Claudia Lane

Ritu Jain

Jo Louis

David Klaskin

Lynne Wavering Shotwell ’61

CO-CHAIRS: Susan Canmann

Jennifer Larsen

Melanie Taylor

Nina Yoo

Kathryn Mangel

Marilyn Webster

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

Heather Martin Craig Niemann

A S S O C I AT E MEMBERS

Heather Bartell

Lisa Paul Renaud ’85

Wendi Biemer

Irene Bradshaw

Jessica Shinn

Mouse Doar

Amy Brock

Diana Terlato

Sharon Dole

Karen Buckner

Christine Tremper

Susan Downing

Amy Carlino

Alesia Wall

Erica Conlon

SCHOOL LIAISONS

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Hough (Elizabeth Schroeder ’85)

Tura Cottingham, Director of Marketing and Communications

Ashish & Ritu Jain

Karen Cunningham, Senior Accountant

Mr. José Isasi & Ms. Charlene Kittredge David Klaskin

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Director of Development

Mr. & Mrs. R. Stribling Koster

HOST COMMITTEE

The Loeb Family

Mr. Douglas Anderson & Ms. Colette Kelsey

Michael & Jennifer Larsen Mr. & Mrs. Sean & Heather Martin Eileen & Mike Murdock

Bette Anne Duffy

Lisa Altenbernd & Steve Hagerty

Mr. & Mrs. James J. O’Connor, Jr.

Janelle Wood

Nancy Emrich Freeman

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Bartell

Katie Devereux

HONORARY MEMBERS

Susan Gaud

Catharine Bell Bartholomay ’79 & William Bartholomay

Mr. & Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87)

Kimberly Dietz

Traci Lumberg

Amy & Clay Brock

Matt & Lisa Renaud ’85

Cynthia Alexander

Amy Ellis

Patti Bach

Annie Mabie

Jennifer & Jon Bunge

Dolores Farhat

Laura Bergman

Susan Bottum Matejka

Natascha Freeman

Mr. & Mrs. Michael S. Canmann

Todd Ricketts and Sylvie Légère

Anne M. Bloedorn

Honey Jacobs Skinner

Katie Freiburger

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Chandler

Angeline Galbraith Brown ’65

Nancy Green Whiteman ’71

Diane Gavin

Erica & Jeff Conlon

Jane Deuble

Amy Viellieu

Lorri Gerdeman

Michael & Amy Ellis

Mary Ann Finlay

Karen York

Amy Gray

Dolores & Hamad Farhat

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Kathleen Deveny

Inge Hondmann

Diana & Tom Flemma Louise & Tom Flickinger Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Freiburger

24

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rosen (Sarah Geist ’86) Michal & Jana Rozsival Mr. & Mrs. Eric J. Scheyer Duff & Chase Stevenson Mr. & Mrs. John A. Terlato Mr. & Mrs. Sun & Nina Yoo


benefi t boa r d donor s Malena and Eduardo Luz

Dennis and Christina Self

Dr. Amanda and Mr. Thomas T. Macejko, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sheehan

Mr. and Mrs. Mark W. Madigan

Mr. Richard W. Smirl and Ms. Holly K. Halsted-Smirl

Mr. and Mrs. John Mangel III Jeff and Marianne Markowitz

Bethany Schwartz and Benjamin Smith

Sean and Heather Martin

Melissa and Chuck Smith

Ellen Maslennikov

Peter and Deborah Smith

Deidre and Michael McClurg

Zachary and Laura Steinhandler

Mr. and Mrs. William T. McDowell (Molly Ingram ’80)

Scholarship Dinner: Sophie Hiland ’18, Joy Pasin ’18 and Sarah Niemann ’18

Anonymous (2) Gretchen and William Ake ’88

Dr. Clark McKown and Ms. Elizabeth Hollenberg Heather and Greg Metz Joshua Miller and Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04

Michael and Kenzie Doornweerd

Josh Hilton and Brook Wharton

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Downing

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hoffman

Brian and Jessica Montgomery

Ms. Cynthia Hooper

Eileen and Mike Murdock

Jason and Susan Millner

Mr. and Mrs. Bong Shinn

Duff and Chase Stevenson Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stoll Jennifer L. Stone ’82 Tim and Maggie Storino Bridget and Jeffrey Stump Jayanth Surakanti and Chethra Muthiah Mr. and Mrs. Alan Swimmer Mr. and Mrs. John A. Terlato

Mr. Douglas Anderson and Ms. Colette Kelsey

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Doyle

Heather and Robert Bartell

Nenad and Rebecca Dragojlovich

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hough (Elizabeth Schroeder ’85)

Ashley Hemphill Netzky ’91 and Pam Netzky

Art and Lili Duquette

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hourihane

Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Niemann

Rich and Julie Ugarte

Mr. Michael Edwards and Ms. Melissa Mizel

Michael and Melissa Howard

Brett and Jessica O’Brien

Jim and Tricia Valenti

Mr. and Mrs. Colin Hudson

Kelcy and David Vallas

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berghammer

Michael and Amy Ellis

Mrs. Stacy Hunt

Mr. and Mrs. Terrance J. O’Bryan

James and Kelly Epstein

Elizabeth R. Ingram ’82

Dr. Judith L. Nerad and Mr. Bruce B. Blair ’69

Drs. Hamad and Dolores Farhat

Kathy Irvin

Amy and Andy Bluhm

Alison and Bill Fitzgerald

Susan and Scott Bondurant Chris Boyle and Cole Moir

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Flannery

Mr. and Dr. John Bradshaw

Diana and Tom Flemma

Amy and Clay Brock

Louise and Tom Flickinger

Arthur ’70 and Diane Flint Jessen ’70

Jennifer and Jon Bunge

Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Canmann

Susan and Steven Fortier

Brian and Heidi Capozzi

Catharine Bell Bartholomay ’79 and William T. Bartholomay Mayur and Maribel Bawa Phyllis Beattie ’72

Julie and Rich Carrigan María Elena Centomo Mr. Jac Cerney and Ms. Mary L. Doi

David and Catherine Durning

Susanna and Renaat Ver Eecke Ronnie and Christine Wachter Loren and Diane Weil

Thomas and Angel Jackson

Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87)

Eric and Jennifer Jacobson

James and Stephanie Olson

Ashish and Ritu Jain

Ryan Paulson and Darla Hovden

Donald ’70 and Nancy Green Whiteman ’71

Jackson Family

Melissa and Matthew Wessel

Maureen and Art Wilde

Mr. Howard E. Jessen

Richard and Kijsa Phillips

Alison and Robin Winslow

Dr. Kristen Kaczynski and Dr. Christopher Shaw

Mr. and Mrs. David Pierre

Tina and Joe Wolf

Lara and Benjamin Port

Randy and Natascha Freeman

Dr. and Mrs. David Kalainov

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Potempa

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wood ’90

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Freiburger

Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. Karmin ’83

Barrington Fulton, Jr.

Shelley and Ed Keller

Brian and Tracie Frederick

Alberto Colzi and Gianna Risaliti

Miriam Geraghty ’69 and Douglas Severson ’69

Erica and Jeff Conlon

Thomas F. Geraghty III ’62

Sean and Diana Connolly John and Tura Cottingham

Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85

Earl and Karen Cunningham

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Giffen

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Dart II

Jennifer Gonzalez-Gent ’98 and Mark Gent

Alan and Ginny George

Patrick and Tessa Kalotis

Deb and Bryan Keyt Mr. and Mrs. Rock Khanna Linda Kiracibasi Mr. José Isasi and Ms. Charlene Kittredge Mr. David Klaskin Liz and Mike Kohler

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Deveny

Amy and Jim Gray Todd and Lana Gray

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux

Jill and David Greer

Mr. and Mrs. Michael M. Larsen

Jeff and April Diehl

Ms. Lisa Altenbernd and Mr. Stephen Hagerty

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Dietz

Julie and Matthew Halbower

Mullery Doar ’06

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hallinan Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hayward Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Heller, Sr.

Olivier and Anne Leonetti Dr. Aneta and Mr. Kris Leschynski Mr. Ed Loeb Dr. and Mrs. Demetrius K. Lopes Mr. and Mrs. J. Jeffry Louis III ’81

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Yamada

The Preston Family

Mr. and Mrs. Sun Yoo

Laura and Robert Probst

Debbie and Ethan Youderian

Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Vincent K. Kelly Matthew J. Renaud (Lisa Paul ’85) Keswani Family

Mr. and Mrs. Strib Koster

Dombalagian Family

Katherine and Jim Umpleby

Rudy and Nichole Wilson

Rich and Susan Gallun

Elizabeth Doi ’09

Dr. Christine Tremper

Mary and Frank Phillips

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Chandler

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Doar III

Mr. and Mrs. James J. O’Connor, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Thomas

C O R P O R AT E A N D F O U N D AT I O N SPONSORS

Todd Ricketts and Sylvie Légère Edward E. & Marie L. Nat Roberts and Laura Zung Matthews Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rosen (Sarah Geist ’86) Michal and Jana Rozsival Brooke and James Sabia Rebecca Andreou Sabri ’86 Jane and James Saccaro Dr. and Mrs. Morton O. Schapiro

Forward Space Bee Line Support Inc. Byrne, Byrne and Company Graphic Arts Studio Hill Mechanical Corp. Kirkland and Ellis Foundation Judy’s Mailing Service Kate Oelerich Photography

The Scheyer Family

Kirkland & Ellis Foundation

Mary Kelly and Michael Schneider

Northern Trust

Mr. and Mrs. Sean T. Scott (Hilary Bishop ’96)

Pentwater Capital Management LP

Brian and Katie Scullion

Supplyworks

Karen and Chris Segal

Vineyard Vines

Pasquesi Sheppard LLC

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

25


a nnua l gi v ing volun t eer s

“ I E N J OY V O L U N T E E R I N G B E C A U S E I T M A K E S A N I M PA C T O N A L L S T U D E N T S ! I B E L I E V E W I T H G R E AT T E A C H E R S A N D S TA F F, S T U D E N T S W I L L G R O W A N D P R O S P E R .”

Connectathon: Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69 and Phyllis Beattie ’72

Georgia Pappas, Annual Giving parent representative, parent of Johnathon ’23 and Billy ’20

Connectathon: Janie Koster and Katie Todd ’96

Our heartfelt appreciation to Bob Gailen (1946-2018), whom we miss dearly, for his dedication as a 12th grade Annual Giving parent representative and for all he did for the School. Connectathon: Dolores Farhat

TRUSTEES

David C. Thomas

ALUMNI BOARD

EX-OFFICIO

Michael S. Canmann

Susanna Ver Eecke

Annie Aggens ’88

Tom Flemma

FA C U LT Y / S TA F F R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S

Cori Chandler

John Watrous

Kelsey Andersen ’06

Jay Bach

Lee Block

Lisa Doi ’09

Hillary Wirtz ’97

Patrick McHugh

Erik Cooper

Vahe Dombalagian

LIFE TRUSTEES

Catharine Kleiman Bartholomay ’79

Timothy J. Flannery Tom Flemma Thomas R. Flickinger Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80 Katie Freiburger Ginny George Rashid M. Ghazi ’85 Amy Gray Mary Pick Hines ’49 Anne Kelly

John R. Ake Cameron S. Avery John S. Bakalar Edward J. Burnell III John S. Darrow ’65 *Walter Y. Elisha Richard J. Franke *Julie Hall Mary Pick Hines ’49 *Hubert E. Howard, Jr. ’36

Phyllis Beattie ’72 Benjy Blenner ’02 Karen Block ’09 Cece Ewen Durbin ’67 Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80 Sarah Cody Gallas ’04 Thomas F. Geraghty III ’62 Naomi Hattori ’02 Betsy Perkins Hill ’70 Chesly J. Manly ’89

YO U N G A L U M N I COMMITTEE Kelsey Andersen ’06 Benjy Blenner ’02 Karen Block ’09 Mullery Doar ’06

Becky Corrigan Jody Elliott-Schrimmer Marcy Giesler David Grossman Dana Specht Debbie Youderian

Sarah Cody Gallas ’04

PA R E N T G R A D E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S

Melissa Jesser ’09

Bill Ake ’88

Jake Kann ’12

Gretchen Ake

Wesley Keyser ’07

Lisa Altenbernd

Leigh Kukanza ’11

Karen Arenson

Lisa Doi ’09

Charlene Kittredge

*Lawrence Howe, Jr. ’38

David Klaskin

Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69

*Donald S. Perkins

Ciara McDonagh ’90

Madelaine Kukanza ’08

Steven Arenson

James W. Lumberg

*John A. Wing

Edward U. Notz ’53

Genevieve Nielsen ’10

Cathy Bell Bartholomay ’79

DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Jeannie Lea Scully ’63

Jonah Levi-Paesky ’13

Karen Buckner

Todd Searle ’05

Nora Philbin ’11

Ranell Conine

Katie Freiburger, Chair

Alexandra Silets ’87

Julia Price ’10

Jackie Cotter

Lisa Doi ’09

Andrew J. Wood ’90

Meredith Price ’07

Tom Macejko Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04 Michael H. Murdock Molly Shotwell Oelerich ’87 Kenny Olatunji Noreen Potempa Sarah Geist Rosen ’86 Maggie Scheyer Kwesi E. Steele Duff Stevenson

Tim Flannery Tom Flickinger Jeff Foreman ’80 Sarah Geist Rosen ’86

HONORARY Alice Graff Childs ’37 *Onnie Straub Darrow ’38

Ashleigh Cross St. Peters ’05

Carol Smeja-Gailen

Madeline Tank ’11

Steve Haislet

Ginny George

Dick Golden ’44

Mervat Kalil

Liz Price Hunt ’42

Janie Koster

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43 Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49

26

Morgan Peters ’11

Dolores Farhat *Bob Gailen


Connectathon: Larry Williams ’87

$171,330

raised during the fall and spring Connectathons combined Connectathon: Eileen Murdock

ALUMNI CLASS R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S

Bob Kopple ’61

Volunteer Needed ’85

Ashleigh Cross St. Peters ’05

Tom Macejko

Fred Bowes II ’62

Sarah Geist Rosen ’86

Kelsey Andersen ’06

Melissa Mizel

Alice Graff Childs ’37

Jeannie Lea Scully ’63

Lauri Reagan Harris ’87

Sophie Smith Finnerty ’06

Eileen Murdock

Volunteer Needed ’38

Buff Winston ’63

Courtney Williams Shelton ’88

Idalia Gabrielow ’07

Craig Niemann

Volunteer Needed ’39

Marnie Paul ’64

Ches Manly ’89

Bill Reitz ’07

Georgia Pappas

John Wilson ’40

Bob Geraghty ’65

Dina Healy Richter ’89

Danny Lowinger ’08

Sarah Geist Rosen ’86

Polly Goodrich O’Brien ’41

Barbara Bulger Drake ’66

Ciara McDonagh ’90

Jordy Blenner ’09

Hilary Bishop Scott ’96

Liz Price Hunt ’42

Volunteer Needed ’67

Andrew Wood ’90

Karen Block ’09

Jennifer Shreve

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

Frank Soule ’68

Volunteer Needed ’91

Jack Viellieu ’09

Katie Todd ’96

Dick Golden ’44

Bruce Blair ’69

Dan Cogan ’92

Will Finlay ’10

Andrew Wood ’90

Volunteer Needed ’45

Craig Johnson ’70

Michaela Murphy ’92

Sammy Gray ’10

Janelle Wood

Bill Bartholomay ’46

Lee Barker Savinar ’71

Erik Sosa-Kibby ’93

Lilly Milla ’10

Nina Yoo

Jean Cullin Mertz ’47

Bob Stibolt ’72

Laura Fifield Bogdan ’94

Michael Creatura ’11

Ted Butz ’48

Bill Hines ’73

Gaby Levi ’95

Morgan Peters ’11

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Joanne Golden ’74

Mina Takahashi ’96

Grace Flickinger ’12

John Roberts ’49

Volunteer Needed ’75

Jeff Meyer ’97

Jake Kann ’12

Tony Blumberg ’76

Hillary Wirtz ’97

Jeannie Peters ’12

Bob Elisha ’77

Volunteer Needed ’98

Riley Hall ’13

Volunteer Needed ’78

Erika Kondo ’99

Alissa Nolan ’13

Catharine Kleiman Bartholomay ’79

Alexis Contreas Vondran ’00

Jack Colley ’14

Volunteer Needed ’01

Josie Santi ’14

Scott Olson ’79

Benjy Blenner ’02

Claire McCarthy ’15

Jeff Foreman ’80

Henry Gaud ’03

Xander Mitchell ’15

2000s, Sarah Cody Gallas ’04

Frank Lunding ’56

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80

Abby Smith De Jager ’03

Debbie Newmark ’15

Volunteer Needed ’57

George Smith ’81

Alex Kerr ’04

Rachel Cantor ’16

2010s, Jeannie Peters ’12

Elizabeth Guenzel Carlin ’58

Elizabeth Ingram ’82

Dillon Forester ’16

Volunteer Needed ’59

Budge Cooper ’83

Rebecca Lockhart CurryEdwards ’04

Volunteer Needed ’60

David Brown ’84

Kendall Wirtz ’04

Firouz Niazi ’17

Amanda Macejko

DECADE R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S Chair, Chris Charnas ’83

1930s, Alice Graff Childs ’37 Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49 1940s, Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49 Marjorie Sinek Gaile ’50 Volunteer Needed ’51 1950s, Hall Healy ’59 1960s, Bruce Jarchow ’66

Steve Edwards ’52

1970s, Scott Olson ’79

Ted Notz ’53

1980s, Elizabeth Ingram ’82 Volunteer Needed ’54 Volunteer Needed ’55 1990s, Volunteer Needed

Sarah Lumberg ’17

Kevin Costello ’05

*Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

27


a nnua l gi v ing donor s RAIDERS

Clayton Cottingham ’14

Jake M. Kann ’12

Gus W. Murray ’15

James A. Robinson ’15

SOCIETY

Michael P. Creatura ’11

Katie Karmin ’17

Firouz J. Niazi ’17

Kayla Robinson ’15

Sara Cunningham ’09

Alex Kaplan Keefe ’09

Prescott B. Nicholson ’07

Adeline Rohrbach ’16

Nick David ’15

John M. Kelly ’12

Genevieve Nielsen ’10

Josie Santi ’14

Elizabeth Doi ’09

Bertram K. Kelly-Jarchow ’07

Daniel J. Nolan ’09

Richard E. Santi ’17

John W. Elam ’07

Anita Klaeser ’16

Alissa Nolan ’13

Olivia Scheyer ’13

Will Finlay ’10

Julia Kolbe ’17

Mackenzie Nolan ’15

Camille Scheyer ’16

Grace Flickinger ’12

Anne Kroll ’15

Cooper M. Ochsenhirt ’16

Daniel E. Schur ’12

Dillon J. Forester ’16

Madelaine Kukanza ’08

Emily Paull ’09

Jonathan G. Segal ’15

Hannah Fortier ’17

Leigh Kukanza ’11

Jeannie Peters ’12

Katherine Simmons ’12

Anonymous (2)

Ryan C. Fraleigh ’14

William T. Lawler ’16

Jack H. Pierre ’17

Samuel J. Skinner ’12

Katherine Abrams ’17

Emily Gavin ’09

Emily Leiter ’16

Kelly Powers ’08

Madeline Tank ’11

Elise Adu ’17

Becky Hofstein Grady ’07

Daniel H. Lowinger ’08

Isaac Pratt ’17

Matthew B. Thomas ’09

Carlos A. Angeles ’12

Manuel Hodzic ’15

Stephen M. Lowinger ’08

Meredith Price ’07

Megan Trott ’16

Alexandra Barker ’12

Jacob L. Hoeflich ’14

Hannah Lumberg ’15

Julia Price ’10

Linzy Upton-Spatz ’15

Jordan R. Blenner ’09

Floris H. Hondmann ’13

Sarah Lumberg ’17

Joshua M. Propp ’09

Jack J. Valenti ’14

Karen Block ’09

Vivien Hough ’17

Charlie E. MacVicar ’16

Xieyang Qiao ’14

Lille van der Zanden ’16

Rachel Cantor ’16

Blair Hunt ’09

Caroline McCarthy ’09

Rebecca Reategui ’12

Alexander Vertrees ’07

Jack Colley ’14

Melina Jaharis ’11

John McHugh ’14

Ilhana Redzovic ’13

Emily Finlay Vertrees ’07

Sophie Conant ’09

Michael S. Jaharis ’13

Alexander K. Mitchell ’15

Jack P. Reedy ’07

Jack K. Viellieu ’09

Dylan M. Cotter ’17

Valerie Jaharis ’15

Michael Morette ’15

Mick B. Reedy ’09

Daniel Viellieu ’15

Melissa Jesser ’09

Matthew L. Morette ’16

Jessica Murphy Richard ’07

Katie Winslow ’16

This society is named after our School mascot and acknowledges young alumni within 10 years of graduation who have contributed.

ALUMNI BY CLASS

The alumni tradition of philanthropy plays an important role in maintaining North Shore’s legacy of educational excellence from generation to generation. Our alumni remain connected with and supportive of the School. We are thankful for their loyalty and generosity. Participation reflects Annaul Giving contributions.

CLASS OF ’30 25% Participation Mrs. Bruni Fletcher-Koch

CLASS OF ’40 50% Participation

33% Participation

Louise Konsberg Noll

Francis G. Burlingham

Sallie Welsh VanArsdale

L. Stuart Gordon David N. Scott

CLASS OF ’41 14% Participation Pauline Goodrich O’Brien

CLASS OF ’42 21% Participation Betty De Lescaille Curtis Bates Liz Price Hunt

33% Participation *Anita Straub Darrow

28

John P. Stallings Georgia Elmes Welles

CLASS OF ’52 53% Participation Suzan Baskin Bernhard

CLASS OF ’49 65% Participation

Stephen W. Edwards Thomas H. Garver Virginia Simmons Hardy

Juliette Fentress Bacon

Patricia Collins Horne

Thomas A. Belshe

James R. Loewenberg

John F. Benjamin

Suzanna Martin Reardon

Richard F. Corrington

Jane Doolittle Velde

William C. Bartholomay

Norman B. Ferris

Ruth Geering Hurka Westfall

Margaret Taylor Jenkins

Joan Hauser Gately

Theodore B. Washburne

Marianne Neuses Hartnett

CLASS OF ’46 23% Participation

John S. Hinchman

CLASS OF ’47 59% Participation

Mary Pick Hines

CLASS OF ’53 30% Participation

Ruth Allen Hopfenbeck

William Carter Everett

Mary Chace Powell

Mrs. June Farrell Mrs. Barbara Gorham

Oscar C. Blomgren, Jr.

CLASS OF ’43

Kate Adams Butler

William E. Steinwedell II

Rufus R. Jeffris, Jr.

25% Participation

Martha Bacon Hartfiel

James Stenson

Nicholas B. Kronwall

Kenneth M. Henderson, Jr.

Alice Pirie Wirtz

Edward U. Notz

Katrina Wolcott Kelley Patsy Pettibone McKeown

John R. Lindgren Jean Cullin Mertz *Nancy Waller Nadler *Marion Kimball Purdy

CLASS OF ’44

Sally Burnett Searle

15% Participation

Robert A. Waller

Richard D. Golden

CLASS OF ’38

Thomas F. Pick

John H. Roberts

CLASS OF ’37

Alice Graff Childs

L. Tim Wallace

Cornelia Wallace Caldwell

John N. Wilson

33% Participation

CLASS OF ’45

CLASS OF ’50

CLASS OF ’54

6% Participation

30% Participation

Marjorie Sinek Gaile

Patricia Blunt Koldyke

CLASS OF ’51 CLASS OF ’48

James G. Maynard

33% Participation

John T. Blunt

29% Participation Byron C. Campbell

Theodore R. Butz

James J. Glasser

Frances Clinch Jones

Diane Ritch Starrett

David E. Kidd

Frances Blunt Steinwedell Lauren L. Suter

Judith Dayton McGrath Ellen Reeves Walin Margaret Pirie Warren Judith Atwood Wright


Archive photo from the 1940s

May Day 1967

Thank you for the outstanding support from the Class of ’67, which raised nearly $50,000 for their 50th Reunion! Alumnae versus students field hockey game

CLASS OF ’55 22% Participation

Nancy Kimball Robinson Susie Brew Schreiber

CLASS OF ’59

CLASS OF ’61

CLASS OF ’63

43% Participation

44% Participation

Jay T. Nichols, Jr. Marnie Paul Daniel W. Randle

Anne Huebner Abercrombie

Susan Merrick Bacon

Carolyn Miller Short

Elizabeth D. Ames

David H. Bradford

David S. Strong

Pamela Winston Christensen

Heather Ramsey Campbell

Trink Smith Chambers

Harry L. Drake

Marion R. Foote

Daniel C. Dose

Leeanne Mitchell King

Ellen Rockwell Galland

L. Hall Healy, Jr.

Robert C. Kopple

Thomas B. Harris

Janet Stanley Hoffmann

Mary Sperling McAuliffe

Mary June Newman Howe

John S. Darrow

Sue Barrett Moffatt

Christopher Osgood

William B. Davis

Torrey Everett

Nancy Dayton Sidhu

Elizabeth Allison Owen

Kathryn Culbertson Nothnagel

Marcia McMillan Hines

Robert Turpin

Lucinda Kern Ray

Wolcott E. Pugh

Elisabeth Olson Geraghty

Sally Simmons Kiper

Sara Coulter Veeder

Alfred H. Shotwell III

George H.D. Schulz

Robert C. Geraghty

Franklin J. Lunding, Jr.

Margaretha Walk

Leslie M. Spitz

Buzz Schupmann

John T. Hickey

John A. Rodgers III

Susan Palm Waltrip

S. Lindsay Webbe

Jeannie Lea Scully

Ellen G. Howe

John A. Silander, Jr.

Royce A. Hoyle III

Barbara Schilling Stanton

W. Craig Misner

Anne Coulter Tobey

Mary Hobart Petke

Cynthia Walk

Audrey Kuh Straight

Lucia Farwell Dhaens Alice Suter Hardesty Thomas F. Taylor Lisa McEwen Tingley

CLASS OF ’56 22% Participation

32% Participation

Linda Tanenbaum Weissbluth

CLASS OF ’57 36% Participation Carlene C. Blunt

CLASS OF ’62 CLASS OF ’60 41% Participation

32% Participation

CLASS OF ’65 26% Participation

Margi Morse Delafield

Barbara Berndtson Bamberg

Liz Washburn Borozan

Bruce A. Everett

Frederick M. Bowes II

CLASS OF ’64

CLASS OF ’66

Michael F. Brookins

Virginia Caspari Gerst

Ronald A. Cahan

30% Participation

Elizabeth Patrick Dewey

Colin Graham

Eleanor Wagner Cornog

24% Participation

Margaret Krasberg Mason

Deirdre Healy Henderson

Richard C. Fall

Nicholas C. Babson

Barbara R. Bradford

Harley Hutchins

Thomas F. Geraghty III

Julia Drake Berkowitz

Leigh Schweppe Buettner

Patricia Ostrom Kohnen

James Howe

Joanne D. Brew

Robert B. Butler

Lucinda Kingery Lenhardt

Lane E. Jennings

Bennett W. Carrington III

Barbara Bulger Drake

Margaret Winston Rodgers

Nell Kneibler

Merle C. Chambers

Bruce A. Jarchow

Courtney S. Bryant

Lynne Wavering Shotwell

Anne Darrow McCausland

James D. Davis

Christopher W. Johnson

Elizabeth Guenzel Carlin

William F. Steel

Judith Brew McDonough

Saralyn Kopple Foley

Tappan G. Merrick

Paul D. Hambourger

Robert K. Strong, Jr.

James M. Mindling

Hollis Potter Fromm

Jane Drake Piechota

Jennet Burnell Lingle

Estelle Miller Weedon

Bill Guenzel

Herbert L. Stern

Diane Williams Parker

Margot Fraker Wynkoop

William B. Hinchliff

Gail Barber Sykes

Edward E. Lawson

Barbara Kaufman Welanetz

CLASS OF ’58 23% Participation

*Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

29


CLASS OF ’67

CLASS OF ’70

CLASS OF ’74

CLASS OF ’78

CLASS OF ’83

48% Participation

33% Participation

21% Participation

6% Participation

13% Participation

Anonymous

Ruth Joy Burnell

Carol Marshall Allen

Tracy Louis Merrill

Jane Dettmers Bakey

Steven L. Barber

Robert C. Cody

Joanne Golden

George S. Rogers

Michael W. Bransfield

Wickliffe L. Blasi

James E. Golden

Lynn Lillard Jessen

Ann Gougler Boyd

Michael J. Graham

John R. MacArthur

Frederick T. Croft

Betsy Perkins Hill

Linda Salisbury

James D. Darrow

Arthur C. Jessen

Stephen L. Smith

Frances L. De Peyster

Diane Flint Jessen

Cece Ewen Durbin

Craig H. Johnson

Tara Steinschneider Vossough

Eliza H. Earle

Kathleen Johnson

Deborah Vainder Edidin

Mary Prendergast Kinney

CLASS OF ’75

Paul Fairbank

James W. Leslie

19% Participation

Jane Bulger Gallagher

Laurie S. Lipman

Charles L. Gardner

Gayley Atkinson Patterson

Pam Rahmann Conant

Martin L. Jack

Ann Patton

Clifford G. Gately

Patricia Missner Johnson

Polly Ross

Charles H. Ingram

Margot Kenly

Donald K. Whiteman

Karen Stone Kaplan

Christopher J. Charnas

CLASS OF ’79 22% Participation Catharine Kleiman Bartholomay Peter H. Eklund Scott Olson Andrew J. Sullivan

Alison Wirtz

CLASS OF ’84 10% Participation David Brown Maxine Lechter Comisky Laura Wirtz Jenkins

23% Participation

Matthew R. Leibowitz

Kimberly Louis Stewart

Miller Bransfield

Marilee Upton-Spatz

Courtney Spore Clift

Mark A. Wollaeger

Thomas Farmer

29% Participation

Jason G. Smith

CLASS OF ’80

Timothy H. Macdonald Robert G. Nathan

Wendy Aggens Griffiths

Kenneth M. Karmin

Matthew S. Kaplan

CLASS OF ’71

Caroline Kullberg Godellas

Matthew Berman

Courtney Kling Luddecke Wendel W. Meyer

Sharon Cooper

Arla Medvin Silverstein Nadia Wallace

CLASS OF ’85

Jeffrey J. Foreman

Pamela Anderson Sawyer

John P. Ayer, Jr.

Charles H. Schweppe

Robert W. Dehlinger

CLASS OF ’76

Malinda Smyth

David R. Dobkin

33% Participation

Molly Brown Stephan

Stephen B. Edge

Thomas B. Stibolt

Stephen S. Fargo

Howard R. Strong

Jane Franke

15% Participation

Howard I. Goldblatt

James A. Gassel

Beth Kaplan Karmin

Rashid M. Ghazi

Nancy Gottlieb Bauer

Miriam Feinstein Lupien

Elizabeth Schroeder Hough

Walter A. Goldstein

Andrew W. Brown

Molly Ingram McDowell

Thomas B. Nachbar

Elizabeth Waldman Frazier

Ann Howard Hanna

Betsy Bruemmer

Melinda Roenisch

Tracy Bach Vogel

Frances Winston

Curtis E. House

Jim Deuble

Lucy Sievers

Paul C. Westhead

Robert Y. Jordan

Karey Wirtz Fix

S. Scott Smith

Irl H. Marshal III

Peter W. Flanzer

Robert S. Rogers

Thomas Freisem

John C. Stern

Mary S. Hubbard

Katharine Galt Allen

William C. Stern

Lewis G. Hunt

V. Blake Allison III

Boetius H. Sullivan III

Gwen Jessen

Richard J. Appel

Mark J. Bransfield

Faye Donohue

Nancy Green Whiteman

Richard A. Meyer

Roger G. Fortune

Paul DeWoskin

Sara Green Handley

W. Rockwell Wirtz

Clint O’Connor

David F. Hines

Helen Loennig

David Misch

Elizabeth Ruwitch Ryan

Jeffrey D. Kerr

Apur Patel

Marcia Durling Williams

Michael L. Smerling

J. Jeffry Louis

Bruce E. Peters

Elliot S. Weisenberg

John P. Molner

Kristen Moffat Powell

Alison Leeds Puth

Sarah Geist Rosen

Charles F. Sample

Rebecca Andreou Sabri

George D. Smith III

Jessica Kotler Stahl

CLASS OF ’68 13% Participation

CLASS OF ’69 29% Participation

CLASS OF ’72 21% Participation Phyllis Beattie Andrew S. DaMiano

CLASS OF ’77 39% Participation

CLASS OF ’81 20% Participation

CLASS OF ’86 23% Participation Christy Aggens

Arthur M. Wirtz III

Lucy Bartholomay

Peter A. Dammann, Jr.

William W. Berry

Charles H. Herndon, Jr.

Jane Alexander Beck

Bruce B. Blair

Nicholas M. Johnson

Jane Berliss-Vincent

Jill Witte Dillon

Nancy Pfisterer Leon

Charles C. Colbert

Christina Fleps

Andrew J. Scheman

Daniel D. Deuble

Anonymous

Susan Pettibone Fraser

Susan Stetson

Joanne Turley Elisha

Courtney Nigro Fitzgerald

Anonymous

Miriam Geraghty

Robert D. Stibolt

W. Robert Elisha

Elizabeth R. Ingram

Christopher C. Avery

Carolyn Jarchow Haggerty

Joel I. Feinstein

Lisa Jones

Bill Bach

Suzanne Folds McCullagh

Kathryn Lewis Ginebaugh

Thomas Marrinson

Julie Pokorny Bellanca

Michael J. Lipman

Jennifer L. Stone

Dan Bloedorn

Derrick G. Nedzel

Robert T. Vieregg II

Joel de la Fuente

Andrew I. Philipsborn Douglas Severson Catherine Askow Thompson Alice Marshall Vogler Brad Williams

CLASS OF ’73 18% Participation

17% Participation

CLASS OF ’87 25% Participation

William H. Hines

Soma Getty Priddle

Lauri Reagan Harris

Sam Howe

David A. Sahlin

Ari Kogut

Ned Jessen

Lauren Stone

Christine Griffin Norton

Victoria H. Leslie

John L. Strauss, Jr.

Molly Shotwell Oelerich

Peter S. Reed

Matthew D. Wells

Alexandra Silets

David F. Webster

John N. Wilking

Laurence H. Williams

Laura Pettibone Wright

Lucille Yee Anne Hines Young

30

CLASS OF ’82


“NSCDS is a wonderful school and I’ll always treasure my memories there!”

“ G I V I N G A M O N T H LY D O N AT I O N I S A N E A S Y A N D F I N A N C I A L LY M A N A G E A B L E W AY T O H AV E A L A R G E R I M PA C T O N T H E N O R T H S H O R E

ALISON LEEDS PUTH ’81

COMMUNITY THAN I WOULD OTHERWISE BE ABLE T O H AV E W I T H A S I N G U L A R A N N U A L D O N AT I O N . I N T H E PA S T I M A D E A N N U A L D O N AT I O N S T O A S E R I E S O F C H A R I T I E S AT T H E S A M E T I M E , A N D IT MADE IT HARD TO BE AS GENEROUS AS I’D L I K E B E C A U S E A L L T H E D O N AT I O N S H A P P E N E D ON TOP OF ONE ANOTHER. FURTHER, BECAUSE I T ’ S A U T O M AT E D , I T ’ S N O W O N E L E S S T H I N G F O R M E T O R E M E M B E R T O D O, W H I C H M A K E S G I V I N G B A C K E V E N E A S I E R . M O S T I M P O R TA N T LY, T H E M O N T H LY D O N AT I O N E N A B L E S M E T O G I V E M O R E B A C K T O A S C H O O L T H AT H A S HELPED SHAPE AND PROMOTE MY SUCCESS A N D H A P P I N E S S .”

Kathryn Rooney ’02

594

alumni participated in Annual Giving 17-18 Alumni Breakfast

CLASS OF ’88

CLASS OF ’91

CLASS OF ’96

CLASS OF ’01

CLASS OF ’04

16% Participation

5% Participation

9% Participation

9% Participation

10% Participation

Annie Aggens

Kristen Gardiner-Barry

Dana Brown Davenport

Leigh Dailey Cross

Sarah Cody Gallas

William H. Ake

Robert A. McClung

Hilary Bishop Scott

Brendan Kolton

Alexander Kerr

Mina Takahashi

Andrew S. Syfu

Quinnetta Bellows-Miller

Brian D. Dole Elizabeth Peruchini Graham Aaron M. Koral Jeffrey J. McCarter

CLASS OF ’92 5% Participation

Bradley L. Savage

Michaela Murphy

Courtney Williams Shelton

Elizabeth Deitrick Trafelet

CLASS OF ’89 13% Participation

CLASS OF ’93 6% Participation

John J. Anton

Seth Coppock

Mark K. Ferris

Gary Meltz

Chesly J. Manly Kerry L. Moore Cyrus W. Oelerich Thomas P. Smith

CLASS OF ’94 11% Participation Nathan C. Appleton

CLASS OF ’90 6% Participation

Jennifer Edidin Eugene A. Kuznetsov

Andrew Wood

CLASS OF ’95

Emi Neithercut

CLASS OF ’02 CLASS OF ’97 11% Participation

21% Participation Eric Alexander

Janet Schroeder

CLASS OF ’05 7% Participation

Luke H. Bakalar

Katherine Bearman

Gabrielle Edidin

Benjy Blenner

Alexander Greenough

David S. Gorelick

Naomi Hattori

F. Todd Searle

Hillary Wirtz

Brian Jessen

Ashleigh Cross St. Peters

Brendan Leonard

CLASS OF ’98 12% Participation Rachel Abarbanell

Matthew S. Ozmun Kathryn O. Rooney Meera Sinha Emily Breece Smith

Jennifer Gonzalez-Gent Jonathan S. Syfu

Kristopher R. Baade

Paula Castillo Ciara McDonagh

Kathryn Todd

CLASS OF ’00 3% Participation James Breece

CLASS OF ’06 7% Participation Kelsey Andersen Mullery Doar

CLASS OF ’03 8% Participation

Sophie Smith Finnerty George Whiteman

Ross Blumenfeld Charlie Doar Molly Whiteman Vreede

3% Participation Nathaniel Durbin

*Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

31


“I WOULDN’T BE WHO I AM WITHOUT NORTH SHORE A N D I W I L L A LW AY S B E G R AT E F U L F O R T H AT.”

Carlos A. Angeles ’12

Archive photo from the 1940s

Thank you

to all of our Decade and Class Reps and reunion classes who helped boost their decade’s participation, with 4 classes surpassing 50%! Archive photo from the 1940s

Decade | Annual Giving Participation 1940s

37%

1960s

33%

1950s

28%

1970s

25%

1980s

17%

1930s

15%

2010s

13%

2000s

12%

1990s

7%

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O THE

1940S DECADE FOR

H I G H E S T PA R T I C I PAT I O N AND THE

1960S DECADE

FOR THE MOST DONORS

Decade | Number of Donors 1960s

140

1970s

104

1980s

85

2010s

71

1950s

59

2000s

58

1940s

49

1990s

25

1930s

3

32

Archive photo from the 1960s


Performing Arts: Sabrina Mulvaney ’28, Margot Ake ’28 and Colin Mooney ’28

556

Annual Giving donors made gifts of $100 or less (averaging $47 each) raising a total of $26,132 Upper School Service Interim: Jonathan Ramirez ’20

CLASS OF ’07

CLASS OF ’15

Melissa Jesser

Jeannie Peters

Alex Kaplan Keefe

Rebecca Reategui

Caroline McCarthy

Daniel E. Schur

John W. Elam

Daniel J. Nolan

Katherine Simmons

Nick David

Becky Hofstein Grady

Emily Paull

Samuel J. Skinner

Manvel Hodzic

Bertram K. Kelly-Jarchow

Joshua M. Propp

Prescott B. Nicholson

Mick B. Reedy

Meredith Price

Matthew B. Thomas

Jack P. Reedy

Jack K. Viellieu

18% Participation

Jessica Murphy Richard Alexander Vertrees Emily Finlay Vertrees

CLASS OF ’08 6% Participation

Stephen M. Lowinger Kelly Powers

CLASS OF ’09 27% Participation

Sophie Conant Sara Cunningham

12% Participation

Anne Kroll Hannah Lumberg Alexander K. Mitchell Michael Morette

Floris H. Hondmann

Gus W. Murray

Michael S. Jaharis

Mackenzie Nolan

Alissa Nolan

Samuel G. Reategui

Will Finlay

Ilhana Redzovic

James A. Robinson

Genevieve Nielsen

Olivia Scheyer

Kayla Robinson

CLASS OF ’10 5% Participation

Jonathan G. Segal

Julia Price

CLASS OF ’14 CLASS OF ’11 6% Participation

15% Participation Jack Colley

Linzey Upton-Spatz Daniel Viellieu

Clayton Cottingham

Melina Jaharis

Ryan C. Fraleigh

Leigh Kukanza

Jacob L. Hoeflich

Rachel Cantor

Madeline Tank

John McHugh

Dillon Forester

Xieyang Qiao

Anita Klaeser

Josie Santi

William T. Lawler

Jack J. Valenti

Emily Leiter

CLASS OF ’12 12% Participation

Katie Winslow Lille van der Zanden

CLASS OF ’17 16% Participation Katherine Abrams Elise Adu Dylan M. Cotter Hannah Fortier Vivien Hough Katie Karmin Julia Kolbe Sarah Lumberg Firouz J. Niazi Jack H. Pierre Isaac Pratt Richard E. Santi

CLASS OF ’16

Michael Creatura

Jordan R. Blenner Karen Block

Valerie Jaharis

CLASS OF ’13

Anonymous (2)

Madelaine Kukanza Daniel H. Lowinger

19% Participation

Megan Trott

22% Participation

Charlie E. MacVicar

Elizabeth Doi

Carlos A. Angeles

Matthew L. Morette

Emily Gavin

Alexandra Barker

Cooper M. Ochsenhirt

Blair Hunt

Grace Flickinger

Adeline Rohrbach

Jake M. Kann

Camille Scheyer

John M. Kelly *Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

33


70%

Annual Giving Parent Participation

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O T H E SK, 2ND AND 10TH GRADE CLASSES WHO REACHED 8 0 % O R M O R E PA R T I C I PAT I O N ! Performing Arts: James Keller ’21 and Patrick Fitzgerald ’21

CURRENT PA R E N T S

North Shore parents enthusiastically support the School in countless ways. Their contributions and leadership are vital to North Shore’s success. Participation reflects Annual Giving contributions.

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Kohn Edward and Amy Kraus Mr. and Mrs. F. David Leiter Ms. Paula Lemond Olivier and Anne Leonetti Mr. and Mrs. William T. McDowell (Molly Ingram ’80) Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Niemann Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Pasin Dr. Matthew M. Rizai and Ms. Lana Skopcenko Tonja Rizai Hall

Mr. John and Dr. Jane Forester Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Freiburger Dr. Carmen Gomez-Fiegl and Dr. Patrik Fiegl

Julie and Rich Carrigan

Ms. Anne Richardson

Cheryl and Chris Charnas ’83

Nat Roberts and Laura Zung

Dr. Sungjoon Cho and Dr. Mehyun Song

Michal and Jana Rozsival

Marian and Robert Collins

Steve Rosenberg Karen and Chris Segal

The Graboys Family

Jackie and Chris Cotter

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald A. Hansell

Mr. Richard W. Smirl and Ms. Holly K. Halsted-Smirl

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Dart II

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Terlato

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hoffman

Michael and Kenzie Doornweerd

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wilson

Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Jaffe

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey D. Echt

Alison and Robin Winslow

Liz and Mike Kohler

Mr. Michael Edwards and Ms. Melissa Mizel

Ms. Lynsey L. Wollin-Casey and Mr. Shawn Casey

Michael and Amy Ellis

Debbie and Ethan Youderian Mr. Weifang Zhou and Ms. May Xue

Dr. and Mrs. Demetrius K. Lopes

Katherine and Jim Umpleby

12TH GRADE

Mr. and Mrs. Marquis Sauvage

73% Participation

Gary and Karen Savin

Mr. and Mrs. Peter McCabe

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Flannery

Dr. and Mrs. Morton O. Schapiro

Eileen and Mike Murdock

Susan and Steven Fortier

The Joseph Nolan Family

Purnendu and Terri Gupta

9TH GRADE

Dr. Franklin Baumann and Dr. Tina Mattera

Brian and Katie Scullion

Mr. and Mrs. Terrance J. O’Bryan

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hayward

67% Participation

Mr. and Mrs. Brian Smith

Amy and Andy Bluhm

Mr. and Ms. Kwesi E. Steele

Laura and Robert Probst

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stoll

Maria and Mohan Rao

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hough (Elizabeth Schroeder ’85)

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Swimmer

Tina G. Rice

Nichole and Scott Humphrey

Catharine Bell Bartholomay ’79 and William T. Bartholomay

Matthew and Katherine Roszak

Mrs. Stacy Hunt

Kevin Bell

Dr. Christine Tremper

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Kaplinsky

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berghammer

Mr. and Mrs. Fareed A. Khan

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux

Anonymous

Ms. Leslie Shad and Mr. Joseph H. Brennan Ms. Denise Bulgar Mr. and Mrs. Richard Buterbaugh

Rich and Julie Ugarte

Sean and Heather Martin

Stacey and Lowell Cantor

Jim and Tricia Valenti

Mr. and Mrs. Marquis Sauvage

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Chandler

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Yamada

Kenneth and Heidi Small

Mr. and Mrs. Massimiliano Chiara

11TH GRADE

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Dart II

63% Participation

David and Catherine Durning *Bob and Carol Gailen

Alison and Bill Fitzgerald

Scot and Anita Tyson

Dr. Valerie and Mr. James T. Leesch

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Freiburger

The Watrous Family

Anonymous

Loren and Diane Weil

Joseph and Laura McKeown

Rich and Susan Gallun

Mr. and Mrs. Olufemi Aderupatan

Brad and Mary Ann Whitmore

Scott and Leslie McLamore

Mr. and Mrs. Alan George

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Zavala

Mark and Kim Morgan

Amy and Jim Gray

Ms. Marie-Claire Mukundente

Todd and Lana Gray

Mr. and Mrs. Steven J. Arenson

Carey and Colby Gifford

Askew Family

Jill and David Greer

Suzanne and Douglas Bade

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Heller, Sr.

Art and Lili Duquette

Jeff and Marianne Markowitz

Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85

Dr. Negar Mansourian-Hadavi and Dr. Ahmad Hadavi

Mr. and Mrs. Jon F. Tilkemeier

Mr. José Isasi and Ms. Charlene Kittredge

Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Bay Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berghammer

10TH GRADE 85% Participation Anonymous

Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Niemann Richard and Christine Norton ’87

Dr. Negar Mansourian-Hadavi and Dr. Ahmad Hadavi Ms. Lisa Altenbernd and Mr. Stephen Hagerty Mr. and Mrs. Abdulah Hodzic

Andrew and Georgia Pappas

Nichole and Scott Humphrey

Atia Family

Mr. and *Mrs. Noel Pfannerstill

Constantine Kanellos and Hariklia Karis

Mr. Douglas Anderson and Ms. Colette Kelsey

Fred and Jill Hersh

Dr. Judith L. Nerad and Mr. Bruce B. Blair ’69

Cassandra and Chris Hiland

Therese and Lee Block

Heather and Robert Bartell

Mr. and Mrs. David Pierre

Shelley and Ed Keller

Alberto Colzi and Gianna Risaliti

Dayna Block

Pedro Ramirez and Mayra Diaz

Deb and Bryan Keyt

Katie Hazelwood and Todd Kaplan

Sean and Diana Connolly

34

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Canmann

Mr. Andy Richardson

Ms. Paula Lemond


“Our seniors write the parents (of their buddy) a note introducing themselves and we take a picture of the buddies together during their first meeting. We send these two items home on the day of this first meeting. One of our JK students insisted that his parents put his buddy picture up on his bedroom wall right next to his favorite dinosaur picture. These connections are very special for all involved - Kindergarteners and seniors.” K AT H Y I R V I N , Director of Early Childhood Program; Junior Kindergarten Teacher

Hot Chocolate House: Devin Todd ’27

Dr. Aneta and Mr. Kris Leschynski

Mr. David Green and Ms. Jamie Querciagrossa

Dr. and Mrs. Eun-Kyu Koh

Carole and Steven Levin

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hallinan

Mr. John Lillig and Ms. Anna Lee

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald A. Hansell

Mr. John Lillig and Ms. Anna Lee

Candice and Peter Luglio Dr. Clark McKown and Ms. Elizabeth Hollenberg

Olivier and Anne Leonetti

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rosen (Sarah Geist ’86)

Susanna and Renaat Ver Eecke

Mr. and Mrs. Brian Smith

Mr. and Mrs. Conrad J. Winkler

Melissa and Chuck Smith

Mrs. Stacy Hunt

Dr. Amanda and Mr. Thomas T. Macejko, Jr.

Mr. Kyle Jones and Ms. Nichola Roberts-Jones

Mr. and Mrs. Steven MacGeachy

Duff and Chase Stevenson

Mostofi Family

Mr. and Mrs. Fareed A. Khan

Heather and Greg Metz

Eileen and Mike Murdock

Mr. David Klaskin

Christine Olatunji Kenny Olatunji

Ryan Paulson and Darla Hovden

Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87)

Mary and Frank Phillips

Dr. and Mrs. David H. Potter

Christine Olatunji

Maria and Mohan Rao

Sarah and John Rountree

Kenny Olatunji

Matthew and Katherine Roszak

Jane and James Saccaro

Andrew and Georgia Pappas

Melissa and Chuck Smith

Brooke and James Sabia

Brooke and James Sabia

Gary and Karen Savin

Gary and Karen Savin

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Souder

The Scheyer Family

Duff and Chase Stevenson

Mr. Richard W. Smirl and Ms. Holly K. Halsted-Smirl

Mary Kelly and Michael Schneider

Katherine and Jim Umpleby

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stoll

Mr. and Mrs. Qiao Xing

The Watrous Family

Brian and Katie Scullion

Mr. and Mrs. Sun Yoo

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Sherman

Debbie and Ethan Youderian

Mr. and Ms. Kwesi E. Steele Mr. Robert Szymanski and Ms. Van N. Ven Rich and Julie Ugarte Debbie and Ethan Youderian Yang Yang and Heyi Zhang

The Watrous Family

Ms. Lynsey Wollin-Casey and Mr. Shawn Casey Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Zavala

4TH GRADE 72% Participation Atia Family

5TH GRADE

Natalia and Forest Barbieri

79% Participation

Bruce Culleton and Katherine Gooch

Gretchen and William Ake ’88

Mr. Bruce Ettelson and Ms. Missy J. Bundy

Amy and Clay Brock

Drs. Hamad and Dolores Farhat

Scott and Ranell Conine Jackie and Chris Cotter

6TH GRADE

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux

72% Participation

Chuck and Julie Floyd

Shari and Trey Felty Diana and Tom Flemma Mr. Bernard Ford and Mrs. Heather O’Shea

John and JP Forrest

Mr. David Green and Ms. Jamie Querciagrossa

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Buckner

Randy and Natascha Freeman

Ms. Lisa Altenbernd and Mr. Stephen Hagerty

Anonymous

Dombalagian Family

Mr. and Ms. William Gallaga

Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Jaffe

Gretchen and William Ake ’88

James and Kelly Epstein

Tim and Lorri Gerdeman

Dr. and Mrs. David Kalainov

Anne and Mike Fiascone

Patrick and Tessa Kalotis

Louise and Tom Flickinger

Anonymous

Mr. Douglas Anderson and Ms. Colette Kelsey

Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85

Jennifer and Jon Bunge

Michael and Jennifer Larsen

Mary and Christopher Ainsley Atia Family

Brian and Heidi Capozzi

Dr. Carmen Gomez-Fiegl and Dr. Patrik Fiegl

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hayward

Dr. Judith L. Nerad and Mr. Bruce B. Blair ’69

Marian and Robert Collins

Amy and Jim Gray

Dr. and Mrs. Eun-Kyu Koh

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux

Purnendu and Terri Gupta

Michael and Jennifer Larsen

Patrick and Tessa Kalotis

Mr. Ed Loeb

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Canmann

Jeff and April Diehl Susan and Steven Fortier

Dr. Valerie and Mr. James T. Leesch

Mr. and Mrs. Steven M. Medvin

Jackie and Chris Cotter

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Gascoigne

Ms. Di Li and Mr. John Schultz

Dean and Maureen Nelson

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rosen (Sarah Geist ’86)

The Preston Family

Sarah M. Schmidt

Steve Haislet and Karen Strehle

Mark and Kim Morgan

James and Jennifer Shreve Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Skinner

Mr. and Mrs. Sean T. Scott (Hilary Bishop ’96)

Dr. and Mrs. David Kalainov

Richard and Christine Norton ’87

Mr. and Mrs. Rock Khanna

Brett and Jessica O’Brien

Jennifer L. Stone ’82

Mr. José Isasi and Ms. Charlene Kittredge

Mr. and *Mrs. Noel Pfannerstill

Katherine and John Sprenger

7TH GRADE

Mr. and Ms. Kwesi E. Steele Bridget and Jeffrey Stump

8TH GRADE 62% Participation

Mr. and Mrs. George Bury

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Dietz Michael and Amy Ellis Diana and Tom Flemma Louise and Tom Flickinger Tim and Lorri Gerdeman Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85

*Deceased

Heather and Robert Bartell

67% Participation

John and JP Forrest

Dr. and Mrs. David Kalainov

Mr. David Klaskin Dr. Amanda and Mr. Thomas T. Macejko, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89 (Molly Shotwell ’87)

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Shelley S. Shultz and T. Pierson Peter and Deborah Smith

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

35


“A D D I T I O N A L F U N D I N G F O R T H E S C H O O L VIA ANNUAL GIVING ENABLES THE SCHOOL T O E N S U R E I T I S AT T H E F O R E F R O N T O N T E C H N O L O G Y, E Q U I P M E N T, P R O G R A M S A N D FA C U LT Y — A L L A R E A S T H AT C O N T R I B U T E T O T H E O U T S TA N D I N G E N V I R O N M E N T N O R T H S H O R E C O U N T R Y D AY S C H O O L P R OV I D E S F O R O U R C H I L D R E N .”

Rob Brindley Parent of Austin ’29 and Sebbie ’31

Academics: Carter Smirl ’23 and Michael Olatunji ’23

“ I A S K E D M Y S O N I N S K ‘ W H AT D O YO U L I K E T H E M O S T A B O U T N S C D S ? ’ H I S R E S P O N S E W A S , ‘ YO U G E T T O H AV E F U N A L L D AY ! ’ ”

Dolores Farhat, Annual Giving parent representative, parent of Ava ’26 and Adam ’30 Academics: Brady Phillips ’25 and Colin Casey ’25

3RD GRADE

2ND GRADE

1ST GRADE

SK

JK

78% Participation

80% Participation

73% Participation

83% Participation

76% Participation

Anonymous

Anonymous (2)

Mr. and Mrs. Kiernan Aiston

Tim and Deneen Brennan

Mr. and Mrs. Kiernan Aiston

Jackie and Chris Cotter

Gretchen and William Ake ’88

Mr. and Mrs. Rob Brindley

Jody Elliott-Schrimmer and Jeffrey Schrimmer

Mr. and Mrs. Rob Brindley

Brian and Heidi Capozzi

Lauren and David Grossman Steve Haislet and Karen Strehle

Jody Elliott-Schrimmer and Jeffrey Schrimmer

John and JP Forrest

Bruce Culleton and Katherine Gooch

Drs. Hamad and Dolores Farhat Andrew and Katherine Florig

Randy and Natascha Freeman

Jody Elliott-Schrimmer and Jeffrey Schrimmer

Dr. and Mrs. Mark Haupt

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Giffen

Mr. Bruce Ettelson and Ms. Missy J. Bundy

Michael and Melissa Howard

Tracie and Brian Frederick

Mr. Bruce Ettelson and Ms. Missy J. Bundy

Jackson Family

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Giffen

Mr. and Mrs. K. Kalil

Eric and Jennifer Jacobson

Keswani Family

Dr. Kristen Kaczynski and Dr. Christopher Shaw

Mr. and Mrs. Rashid M. Ghazi ’85

Mr. and Mrs. Jasen E. Day Mr. Bernard Ford and Mrs. Heather O’Shea

Michael and Melissa Howard

Randy and Natascha Freeman

John and JP Forrest

Annie and Seamus Collins

Patrick and Tessa Kalotis

Jennifer Gonzalez-Gent ’98 and Mark Gent

Dr. Amanda and Mr. Thomas T. Macejko, Jr.

Ms. Di Li and Mr. John Schultz

Pascal and Oona Manzari

Lara and Benjamin Port

Mr. and Ms. William Gallaga

Brian and Jessica Montgomery

Dr. and Mrs. Mark Haupt

Lara and Benjamin Port

Michael and Jennifer Larsen

Mr. Kyle Jones and Ms. Nichola Roberts-Jones

Mark and Rebecca Sansoterra

Manzari Family

Dennis and Christina Self

Deidre and Michael McClurg

Dennis and Christina Self

Mr. and Mrs. Strib Koster

Jason and Susan Millner

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Shelley

Mr. and Mrs. Bong Shinn

Tim and Maggie Storino

Peter and Deborah Smith

Bethany Schwartz and Benjamin Smith

Ms. Heather Mooney

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Lumpkin

Brett and Jessica O’Brien

Ms. Heather Mooney

Mr. and Mrs. Bernhard J. Sander

Mr. David Pickering and Ms. Malessia Howland

Jayanth Surakanti and Chethra Muthiah

Zachary and Laura Steinhandler

Brad and Kristin Sheftel

Jackson Family Mr. and Mrs. K. Kalil Mr. and Mrs. Strib Koster

Mrs. Kathryn Todd ’96 and Mrs. Kelly Todd Susanna and Renaat Ver Eecke

Tim and Maggie Storino

Susanna and Renaat Ver Eecke

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sheehan

The Watrous Family

Melissa and Matthew Wessel

S. Shultz and T. Pierson

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wood ’90

Mr. Richard W. Smirl and Ms. Holly K. Halsted-Smirl Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wood ’90

36

Mrs. Kathryn Todd ’96 and Mrs. Kelly Todd

Mr. and Mrs. Sun Yoo

Rudy and Nichole Wilson


Contribution of Dollars Raised by Constituent Type: C U R R E N T PA R E N T S

42.7%

ALUMNI

22.6%

TRUSTEES

13.5%

PA R E N T S O F A L U M N I

13.0%

G R A N D PA R E N T S

3.2%

M AT C H I N G G I F T S

2.8%

O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

1.5%

FA C U LT Y A N D S TA F F

0.5%

FRIENDS

0.2%

Total Number of Annual Giving Volunteers:

8 FA C U LT Y A N D S TA F F R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S 2 9 PA R E N T G R A D E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S 93 19 OV E R

D E C A D E A N D C L A S S R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S YO U N G A L U M N I C O M M I T T E E M E M B E R S

100

C O N N E C TAT H O N V O L U N T E E R S

Performing Arts: The cast of The Music Man

PA R E N T S O F ALUMNI

North Shore is grateful for the generosity of parents of alumni, who continue to remain supportive of the School beyond the graduation of their children.

The Parents of Hannah Bottum ’13 and Sam Bottum ’16

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Doar III

C. Gary and Virginia Caspari Gerst ’60

Michael Johnson and Leslie Fung

Sharon Dole

Mr. and Mrs. Bert A. Getz, Jr.

Shirley and Ken Johnston

Edward J. Burnell III

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Downing

Chuck and Linda Glew

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Butz

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Drake ’61 (Barbara Bulger ’66)

Richard D. Golden ’44

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew S. Kaplan ’75 (Karen Stone ’75)

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Durbin (Cece Ewen ’67)

Jennifer and Jeffery Goldstein

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

Gary and Deborah Vainder Edidin ’67

Mr. Richard Gonzalez

Dr. and Mrs. William D. Kerr, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Campbell (Heather Ramsey ’63) Ms. Barbara Castilla Mr. Jac Cerney and Ms. Mary L. Doi Nancy Geyer Christopher

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Goldman

Peter and Stephanie Keehn Mr. and Mrs. Vincent K. Kelly

Arlene H. Elisha

Dr. Jacques N. Gordon and Ms. Elizabeth H. Wiltshire

Mr. Reed Fellars and Ms. Reven Uihlein-Fellars

Mrs. Barbara Gorham

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Klapperich, Jr.

Sherry Gormanous

Ms. Susan Klingenstein

Mr. Edward Harney and Ms. Kathryn A. Mikells

Mr. Robert L. Kotler and Ms. Yoko Kono

Betsy Perkins Hill ’70

Mr. and Mrs. Peter T. Lawler

David F. Hines ’81

Jim and Claudia Lockhart

Marcia McMillan Hines ’56

Mrs. John J. Louis, Jr.

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Lowinger

Anonymous (3)

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Churchill

Mr. Lorenz W. Aggens Mr. and Mrs. John Ake

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Cody ’70

Amboian Family

Mr. and Mrs. Jules G. Cogan

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fix (Karey Wirtz ’76)

Mr. Cameron S. Avery and Ms. Lynn B. Donaldson

Jeff and Lucy Colman

Mrs. Harold M. Flanzer

Pam Rahmann Conant ’75

Stephanie and Tom Formolo

Jay and Patti Bach

Sharon and Dick Cooper

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Fortson

Christine and John Bakalar

John and Tura Cottingham

Greg and Elizabeth Barr

Ms. Mary Pat Cross

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher J. Fraleigh

Rob and Marcie Bearman

Earl and Karen Cunningham

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Beerheide

Timothy Curren

Rory and Mary Ann Finlay

Dirk and Inge Hondmann Dr. and Mrs. Richard Horevitz

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Lumberg

Teresa and Harley Hutchins ’60

Franklin J. Lunding, Jr. ’56

Ms. Nancy Emrich Freeman Marjorie Sinek Gaile ’50

Dr. and Mrs. Steven Jaharis

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Mabie

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Gardner ’67

Mr. and Ms. Bruce A. Jarchow ’66

Mr. and Mrs. David E. Mason (Margaret Krasberg ’57)

Mrs. Jane Deuble

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Gaud, Jr.

Arthur ’70 and Diane Flint Jessen ’70

Mr. and *Mrs. James G. Maynard ’44

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Cynthia Turley Gentles

Mr. Howard E. Jessen

*Anita Straub Darrow ’38

Laura Thomas Bergman

John S. Darrow ’65

Ms. Anne M. Bloedorn

Oscar and Melissa David

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Blumberg

Emily and Michael Denesha

Elizabeth Waldman Frazier ’67

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gerber *Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

37


“ T H A N K YO U F O R T H E W O N D E R F U L E D U C AT I O N A N D G U I D A N C E YO U ARE GIVING OUR GRANDDAUGHTERS. T H E Y L OV E AT T E N D I N G N O R T H S H O R E C O U N T R Y D AY S C H O O L ! ”

-Antoinette and Jesse Jackson, grandparents of Antonia Manzari ’27 and Emmanuelle Manzari ’30

Science Olympiad: Ellie Yarandi ’23 and Coach Howard Jessen

Elizabeth Waldman Frazier ’67

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Schroeder

Mr. and Mrs. W. Rockwell Wirtz ’71

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Garmash

Mrs. Susanna Souder

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Giffen

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Stone

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Wiznitzer

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Gilleland

Mrs. Marion McFarland Taylor

Mrs. Caroline Howard McCarty

Julie Schmidt

Mrs. Anne C. Whittlesey

Susie Brew Schreiber ’58

Arthur M. Wirtz III ’86

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas F. McClanahan

Mr. William G. Schur and Ms. Donna Fletcher

Mr. and Mrs. James A. McClung

Stefan and Yuko Schwarzfischer

Mr. Grant G. and Dr. Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69

Cynthia Scott and Daniel Kegan

Kathy and Patrick McHugh

Mr. and Mrs. J. Dennis Scully (Jeannie Lea ’63)

Mr. and Mrs. Breece R. McKinney

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Schroeder

Sheila and Harvey Medvin

Alfred Shotwell ’61 and Lynne Wavering Shotwell ’60

Mr. James W. Molzahn Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moore Dr. Donald A. Morrison and Dr. Flora Zaitseva Mr. and Mrs. Todd A. Murray

Prabhakant and Anita Sinha Mr. and Mrs. Samuel K. Skinner Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Slotkin

Suzu and David Neithercut

Susan Stetson ’72 and Alan Vertrees

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Oelerich

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Stone

Mr. Michael Peccia

Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Strong, Jr. ’60

Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Perkinson Allan and Carla Price Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rankin Ms. Erica Regunberg and Dr. Robert Dann

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Viray

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Haupt

Mrs. Laurie Weisberg

Ms. Maria L. Zaring and Ms. Selene Garcia

Mr. and Mrs. John Hazelwood

Mr. and Mrs. Graham R. Wood

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Hudson

FORMER

Mr. Jack Jordan

G R A N D PA R E N T S

G R A N D PA R E N T S

Grandparents are a vital part of our North Shore community. We are grateful for their commitment to the School and for all the ways in which they support their grandchildren.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kendall Mrs. Linda Kenny Dr. and Mrs. Suk Lee Mr. and Mrs. John Mangel II Mr. Edward E. Matthews Mrs. Caroline Howard McCarty

Many grandparents of alumni continue to support the School, and we thank them for their ongoing commitment and loyalty. William C. Bartholomay ’46

Mr. and Mrs. Byron D. Trott

Anonymous (3) Mr. and Mrs. William Aiston

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Butz ’48

Helen Turley

Sheila and Harvey Medvin

Mr. Larry Spatz and Mrs. Marilee Upton-Spatz

Mr. and Mrs. John Ake

Mrs. Richard Nerad

Lois R. and Maurice J. Beznos

Mr. and Mrs. James J. O’Connor

Mr. Daniel W. Boone

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Oelerich

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Brooks

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Olson

Mr. Howard E. Jessen

Martin and Joan O’Malley

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Clark

Ms. Nancy O’Shea

Mr. and *Mrs. James G. Maynard ’44

Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Day

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Read

Pam Whalley

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Ebershoff

Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Rice

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Roderick

Mrs. Weston K. Whiteman

Mrs. Mary Ann Flemma

Ms. Barbara Richardson

Helen Turley

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon I. Segal

Mrs. Weston K. Whiteman

Drs. James and Beverly Shaver

Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Robinson Kevin Rooney

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick F. Webster, Jr.

Donald ’70 and Nancy Green Whiteman ’71

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Fortier Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Frazier

38

Dr. and Mrs. Harold Kaplan

Scott and Karen McKown

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Viellieu

Mr. and Mrs. E. Scott Santi

Mr. Richard Gonzalez

Larry and Courtney Wright

Mr. and Mrs. James A. McClung

Nancy Kimball Robinson ’58

Mr. Michael A. Sachs

Mr. and Mrs. Graham R. Wood

David C. Thomas

Mr. Steven L. van der Zanden and Ms. Kimberly Orput

John H. Roberts ’49

Grandparents’ Day: Graham, Bronwyn ’28 and Lynda Wood

Alfred Shotwell ’61 and Lynne Wavering Shotwell ’60

*Anita Straub Darrow ’38 Mrs. Jane Deuble Arlene H. Elisha

Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. McHugh


100% Annual Giving Participation from Trustees, the Alumni Board, Faculty and Staff

Faculty and staff observing the solar eclipse

FRIENDS

We acknowledge the School’s friends who have provided support to North Shore this year.

David C. Thomas Susanna Ver Eecke John Watrous Hillary Wirtz ’97

ALUMNI BOARD 100% Participation

Tynesha G. Artis Mr. and Mrs. William L. Ewen

Annie Aggens ’88

Jonathan and Lauren Locke

Kelsey Andersen ’06

Dr. Sheryl L. Murray

Catharine Kleiman Bartholomay ’79

Mr. David A. Nimick Marcia and Jerry Osher

FA C U LT Y / S TA F F 100% Participation

Gifts from our faculty and staff are just one of the many ways they express their commitment to North Shore. We thank them for their participation and all that they give to the School.

Phyllis Beattie ’72

Josh Fidler

Alejandra Canet de Mendoza

Tom Flemma

Jenna Nemec-Loise

Tracie Frederick

Cyrus W. Oelerich ’89

Brian Frederick

Diane Olson

Barrington Fulton, Jr.

Tobye Ostrow

Drea Gallaga Arturo Garcia

Mike Peccia *Jen Pfannerstill

Marcy Giesler

Brian Posner

Lizzy Giffen

Dave Potter

Jason Giffen

Sara Pyne

Jennifer Goldstein

Ellen Rasmussen

Carmen Gomez-Fiegl

Rebecca Reategui ’12

David Green

Froy Reyes

Benjy Blenner ’02

Kiernan Aiston

Nazlie Green

Lucilla Richards

Karen Block ’09

Kristen Allen

David Grossman

Jerry Rietveld

Cece Ewen Durbin ’67

Montserrat Alsina

Austin Gruber

Catalina Rincón-Bisbey

Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80

Steven Arenson

Patrick Healy

Christine Ritchey

Sarah Cody Gallas ’04

Cristy Athas

Will Hester

Leo Roth

Thomas F. Geraghty III ’62

Jay Bach

Cassandra Hiland

Joan Ryder

Naomi Hattori ’02

Kim Baker

Winder Holeman

Ship Safford

Betsy Perkins Hill ’70

Dorothy Biel

Jordan Holod

Tom Saleh

Chesly J. Manly ’89

Claire Birkhauser

Cindy Hooper

Brian Sarfo

Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69

Zach Blickensderfer

Laura Hsieh

Ty Scaletta

Lee Block

Ciara McDonagh ’90

Kathy Irvin

Ceil Scanlan

Dayle Block

Edward U. Notz ’53

Kyle Jones

Susan Schinleber

Chris Boyle

Jeannie Lea Scully ’63

Chris Jurack

Julie Schmidt

Sheila Burke

Todd Searle ’05

Kristen Kaczynski

Annie Scribner

Zaro Buterbaugh

Alexandra Silets ’87

Jake Kann ’12

Jeff Shaw

Barbara Castilla

Andrew J. Wood ’90

Rebekah Kauffman

Tim Sheehan

María Elena Centomo

Liz Kindig

Amy Shuldiner

Yun-Chu Chen

Linda Kiracibasi

Keith Sklar

Annie Collins

Tom Kowalczyk

Amy Sneor

Erik Cooper

David Kubacki

Dana Specht

Becky Corrigan

Jim Lechowicz

Izzy Steach

James W. Lumberg

Dick Golden ’44

Tura Cottingham

Jim Leesch

Christine Wachter

Tom Macejko

Liz Price Hunt ’42

Vinny Cousineau

Anya Leist

Sarah Walsh

Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04

Katrina Wolcott Kelley ’43

Rita Crocker

Di Li

Terri Webb

Michael H. Murdock

Alice Pirie Wirtz ’49

Karen Cunningham

Sharon Lieberman

Berkley Wellstein

Tim Curren

Janet Lord

Nancy Green Whiteman ’71

Anne-Marie Dall’Agata

Julia Macholl

Maureen Wilde

Jim Deuble ’76 Tom Flemma

Leanne Marcus

Lynsey Wollin-Casey

Mullery Doar ’06

Jay Bach

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80

Grace Wood

Sue Downing

Patrick McHugh

Patrick McHugh

Debbie Youderian

Alex Downing

Kathy McHugh

Alyssa Dudzik

Beatrice McKenna

Jody Elliott-Schrimmer

Caitlin McLennan

Libby Ester

Mark Medhurst

Felicia A. Tate

TRUSTEES 100% Participation Michael S. Canmann Cori Chandler Elizabeth Doi ’09 Vahe Dombalagian Timothy J. Flannery Tom Flemma Thomas R. Flickinger Jeffrey J. Foreman ’80 Katie Freiburger Ginny George Rashid M. Ghazi ’85 Amy Gray Mary Pick Hines ’49

HONORARY

Anne Kelly Charlene Kittredge David Klaskin

Molly Shotwell Oelerich ’87 Kenny Olatunji Noreen Potempa Sarah Geist Rosen ’86 Maggie Scheyer Kwesi E. Steele Duff Stevenson

*Deceased

Alice Graff Childs ’37 *Anita Straub Darrow ’38

EX-OFFICIO

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

39


“ONE OF THE HALLMARKS OF NSCDS IS THE SENSE OF C O M M U N I T Y T H AT E X T E N D S T O S T U D E N T S , PA R E N T S , A L U M N I , PA R E N T S O F A L U M N I , G R A N D PA R E N T S , FA C U LT Y, S TA F F AND FRIENDS. AS AN UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHER, I F E E L F O R T U N AT E T O B E I N C L U D E D S O C O M P L E T E LY W I T H I N T H I S C O M M U N I T Y A N D PA R T I C I PAT I N G I N A N N U A L G I V I N G STRENGTHENS MY CONNECTION TO THE SCHOOL WHILE S U P P O R T I N G I N I T I AT I V E S , I N C L U D I N G T H E P R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E L O P M E N T O P P O R T U N I T I E S T H AT B E N E F I T S O M A N Y O F M Y C O L L E A G U E S , T H AT M A K E N O R T H S H O R E A B E T T E R P L A C E .”

David Grossman, Upper School English teacher; Annual Giving Faculty/Staff Representative; parent of Ezra ’29 and Arlo ’32 First Day of Lower School: Tim Sheehan greets students

F O R M E R FA C U LT Y

Sheldon Rosenbaum

Globe Foundation

Thistle and Rose Foundation

A N D S TA F F

Allan Stern

Gordon H. & Karen M. Millner Family Foundation

Tobey Foundation

North Shore’s faculty and staff continue to remain connected to and supportive of the School even after they move on to other endeavors. We thank them for their ongoing loyalty.

Madeline Tank ’11 Ethan Timmins-Schiffman Helen Turley

Hagerty Altenbernd Family Charitable Fund

Frank Wallace

Half Moon Foundation

Pam Whalley

Hamill Family Foundation

Anne Whittlesey

The Handley Family Foundation, Inc.

Hillary Wirtz ’97 Lynda Wood

F O U N D AT I O N S Larry Aggens Dean Athas Bob Beerheide Elvira Butz Nancy Geyer Christopher Sharon Cooper

North Shore is grateful to the many foundations that supported the School with their contributions this year.

Sara Cunningham ’09

Indian River Community Foundation The Jaharis Family Foundation, Inc. Josephine P. Louis and John J. Louis Foundation J. Jeffry and Elizabeth S. Louis Foundation The Krasberg-Mason Foundation

Ayco Charitable Foundation

Tom Doar III Sharon Dole

Barbara Notz Hines Foundation

The Lincoln Avenue Charitable Fund

Eileen Donoghue

Bessemer Trust

Louis Stewart Foundation

Nancy Emrich Freeman

Beth & Ken Karmin Family Foundation

Loewenberg Charitable Foundation

Betsy Perkins Hill ’70 William B. Hinchliff ’64 Liz Price Hunt ’42 Art Jessen ’70 Shirley Johnston Edee Madsen Caroline Howard McCarty Mark McLennan Jackie Melissas Pete Nelson Leonie O’Donohoe Paul Perkinson Noreen Potempa Cindy Pozzi Kevin Rooney

40

The Benson Foundation

Sarah M. Schmidt Family Charitable Fund

M AT C H I N G G I F T S

North Shore is grateful to the many foundations and corporations that supported the School with their contributions this year.

The Mary and Tom Belshe Foundation

Allstate

Boeing Gift Matching Program

Kevin Bell Demonte Collins ’20 Marcia and Jerry Osher Will ’18 and Isabel ’20 Dart Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Dart II

Tynesha Artis Jonathan and Lauren Locke Felicia A. Tate Wyatt ’27 and Tucker ’30 Giffen Mr. and Mrs. Terry Giffen

Chicago Community Trust

Mary Pick Hines ’49

Dover Foundation

David F. Hines ’81

Goldman, Sachs & Co.

William H. Hines ’73

Google Gift Matching Program

Anne Hines Young ’77

The Buettner Family Foundation for Leigh Schweppe Buettner ’66

Merle Chambers Fund

Henry Crown and Company

Christine and John Bakalar Charitable Fund

Pattis Family Foundation

Illinois Tool Works Inc.

Richards Family Foundation

Ingredion Incorporated

Cricket Fund of the Toledo Community Foundation

Robert A. Waller Foundation

Marsh & McLennan

Roberts Family Foundation

Mead Johnson Nutrition

Roger and Susan Stone Family Foundation

Pepsico Foundation Matching Gifts Program

Saint Paul Foundation

RBC Dain Rauscher Employee Gift-Matching Program

Daniel Murphy Scholarship Foundation

Charley Bell ’21

BP America, Inc.

McClung Family Charitable Fund

Dan/Merrie Boone Foundation

North Shore acknowledges those contributions made this year in honor of others.

Kamryn Day ’27

Bank of America

Emily Denesha

Leo and Yuki Graham Foundation

Bill Bartholomay Foundation

The Winthrop Foundation

American Academy of Dermatology Association

Anonymous (2)

Dick Hall

Winona Corporation

Leslie Fund, Inc.

Lew Davis

Sherry Gormanous

Trott Family Foundation

I N H O N O R O F. . .

Grainger, Inc.

Liz Price Hunt ’42 David A. Nimick Melina ’11, Michael ’13 and Valerie ’15 Jaharis The Jaharis Family Foundation, Inc. Diane and Art Jessen ’70 Charlie Doar ’03 Paul Krajovic

Edidin Family Charitable Trust

Sinha Kikeri Foundation

Edward E. & Marie L. Matthews Foundation

Stearns Family Charitable Fund STS Foundation

Wells Fargo

Jonas ’21 and Ethan ’21 Levin

The Fortson Family Charitable Fund

Sun and Nina Yoo Charitable Fund

West Monroe Partners

Carole and Steven Levin

The Geraldi Norton Foundation

Tazewell Foundation, Bank of America, N.A., co-Trustee

Souder Family Foundation

Steelcase Foundation Takeda Pharmaceuticals

William Blair & Company Charitable Matching Gift Fund

Tara Steinschneider Vossough ’74


John and Anna Lillig

Philip Boal ’75

Julie Hall

Maria Papanicolau

General Scholarship Fund

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rankin

Charles H. Ingram ’75

Jay and Patti Bach

Mike and Emily Denesha

Christine and John Bakalar

Jen Pfannerstill

Daniel Murphy Scholarship Foundation

Nathalie Griswold Bradley ’54 Mrs. Caroline Howard McCarty

Ellen Reeves Walin ’54

Elizabeth R. Ingram ’82

Louis Conant ’11

Thomas McDowell ’18 Charles H. Ingram ’75 Jackie Melissas Barbara Castilla Jonathan Ramirez ’20 Marcia and Jerry Osher Barbara Sherman Barbara Castilla

Ari Kogut ’87

Carolyn Howard

Kerry L. Moore ’89

George D. Smith II ’38 and Rosemarie K. Smith Scholarship

Kristen Gardiner-Barry ’91

Thomas P. Smith ’89

Thomas P. Smith ’89

Mike and Emily Denesha

Gilbert Rosenberg

Edward C. Huebner ’57

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Hester & Lawrence Howe Fund for the Humanities

Carolyn Miller Short ’64

Anne Huebner Abercrombie ’61

Susan Rosenberg ’74

Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63

Jack Ingram

Estelle Miller Weedon ’60

Kristen Gardiner-Barry ’91

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76 Sally Hunt Cooper ’64 Julia Drake Berkowitz ’64 Virginia S. Deane ’41

Michael E. Elisha ’80

Nancy Geyer Christopher

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Molly Ingram McDowell ’80

George F. Eldredge ’41 Elizabeth Allison Owen ’61 Clark Elliott ’75 Charles H. Ingram ’75

North Shore acknowledges Mary Lyon Ewen ’35 those contributions made Mr. and Mrs. this year in remembrance William L. Ewen of others.

Eunice Jackson Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83) David Jaicks ’76 Amy and Jim Deuble ’76 Robert Kramer Allan and Carla Price

Duncan G. Farrell ’43

Dr. Karla Landau

Mrs. June Farrell

Cynthia Walk ’63

Carol Abelmann Scott Fernlund ’86

Frank Loennig

Mark J. Bransfield ’86

Eileen F. Donoghue

Elizabeth Ames ’61

John P. Flanzer ’66

Susan Marshall ’76

Barbara Berndtson Bamberg ’62

Mrs. Harold M. Flanzer

Mary Hubbard ’76

Bill Freisem

Mac McCarty

Nancy Geyer Christopher

Nancy Geyer Christopher

Thomas Freisem ’76 and Betsy A. Bruemmer ’76

Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83)

Vincent B. Allison

Leeanne Mitchell King ’61 Carolyn Miller Short ’64 Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63   John Almquist Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83) Tara Steinschneider Vossough ’74

Eileen F. Donoghue Michael Gallaga Amy and Jim Deuble ’76 Mary Garvin’70 Robert W. Dehlinger ’71

Mike and Emily Denesha

Charles H. Ingram ’75

Lew Davis

Mr. John Lillig and Ms. Anna Lee

Roe Salzynski

Jim Schmidt

Elizabeth R. Ingram’82

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Carol Marshall Allen ’74

Mike and Emily Denesha

Walter Y. Elisha

Varsity and JV girls field hockey coaching staff

Mike and Emily Denesha

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Schroeder

Mike and Emily Denesha

Mike and Emily Denesha

Trevor Yamada ’18

I N M E M O R Y O F. . .

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76 Alex ’89 and Nicholas ’93 Piper

Lew Davis Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Read

Mr. and Ms. Michael W. Bransfield ’83 (Alison Wirtz ’83) Robert W. Dehlinger ’71

Pam Rahmann Conant ’75

Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 Sharon Dole

Mark J. Bransfield ’86

Frances R. Stanton ’27 Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63 William P. “Bim” Stanton ’64 Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63 William Steel Bruce A. Everett ’60

Margi Morse Delafield ’65 and Lawrence Howe Delafield The Rebecca Reategui ’12 and Sam Reategui ’15 Fund for Diversity Pattis Family Foundation

THE DOAR FUND

We acknowledge the following donors for their contributions to The Doar Fund during fiscal year 2017-18, which supports The Doar Scholarship and the Immediate Impact Fund.

Jean and William W. Talley Nancy Geyer Christopher

Anonymous

Barbara Schilling Stanton ’63

Janet Schroeder

Barbara and Seymore Waldman

Jordan R. Blenner ’09

Elizabeth Waldman Frazier ’67

Andrew M. DeYoung ’00

GIFTS-IN-KIND

Mr. and Mrs. William Aiston María Elena Centomo Mullery Doar ’06 Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Doar III

Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Bedford

Sophie Smith Finnerty ’06

John Ver Bockel and Kathleen Carbonara

Shirley and Ken Johnston

Mike and Emily Denesha

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Flannery

Alejandra Canet de Mendoza

Constant Grant Meyers ’51

Mr. and Mrs. John Watrous

Philip G. Meyers Vanessa Molzahn Maria Elena Centomo

RESTRICTED FUNDS

Stanley Gray, II ’02 Sarah A. Lumberg ’17 Firouz J. Niazi ’17 Emily Paull ’09 The Preston Family Allan and Carla Price Sarah M. Schmidt

Margaret Bagheshian

Robert Green

Barbara Castilla

Athletic Department

Janet Schroeder ’04

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Amy and Jim Deuble ’76

Shirley and Ken Johnston

Alexandra Silets ’87

Jamie Molzahn

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Glew, Jr.

Timothy Bannon

Jean Wright Haider ’60

Jay and Patti Bach

Deirdre Healy Henderson ’60

Linda Fairbank Nesbitt ’61

Campus Flowers

Lew Davis

Marnie Winston Rodgers ’60 and John A. Rodgers ’56

Elizabeth Allison Owen ’61

Dorothy Biel

Bruce Benson ’30

William F. Steel ’60

Hitoshi Nikaidoh ’86

Duncan Farrell ’53 Memorial Garden

Lucia Farwell Dhaens ’55

Mark J. Bransfield ’86

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Slotkin

Mrs. June Farrell

Terry R. Ostrom ’61 Patricia Ostrom Kohnen ’60

*Deceased

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

41


accomplishmen t s

Model UN: Columbia University Model UN in New York City

National Geography Bee: Jack Hunt ’22

Model United Nations North Shore sent 85 students to eight Model United Nations conferences this year, both local and national. Upper School students participated in two daylong events locally and five four-day events in Chicago; Evanston; Berkeley, California; New York City; and Washington, D.C. Middle School students also participated in one daylong conference in Chicago. Model United Nations is an authentic simulation of the UN General Assembly and its various committees, which introduces students to the world of diplomacy, negotiation and decision-making. Students step into the shoes of ambassadors of countries that are members of the UN, from Argentina to Zimbabwe. The students, known as “delegates,” debate current issues on the organization’s vast agenda. They prepare draft resolutions, plot strategy, negotiate with supporters and adversaries, resolve conflicts and navigate the UN’s rules of procedure— all in the interest of resolving problems that affect the world. In some simulations, they also take on historical topics and local government bodies like the Chicago City Council. While the options for Upper School students are plentiful, there is only one local conference for Middle Schoolers, held in the fall. Next year, North Shore plans to host a Middle School conference in the spring to help extend the Middle School season. Upper School students will help plan and execute the conference, 42

National Geography Bee and schools from all over the Chicagoland area will be invited. Proceeds from the conference will be funneled back into the Model UN scholarship fund, to help North Shore students pay for entrance fees and travel costs. “It will be great to be able to provide an opportunity for our Middle School students, but also for students from other schools to participate,” explained Middle School Humanities Teacher and Model UN Program Coordinator Dana Specht. It will also give Upper School students an opportunity to step up. “Working on the opposite side of it, running a committee, grading papers, writing committee guides—it will help our kids get better at those things themselves,” Dana said. Because students involved in Model UN at North Shore also tend to have a lot of other commitments—between sports, performing arts and other activities— practice time for Model UN is limited. Students commit to five meetings in advance of a conference. “The kids who volunteer to do this are pretty exceptional,” Dana said. “And the fact that we have so many students who want to take time away from their lives to participate in an activity about diplomacy, practicing public speaking and writing voluntary papers, it really says a lot about the quality of our academics here at North Shore. The students couldn’t do as well at Model UN if they weren’t so well-prepared—not only in their English and social studies classes, but also in science.”

The competition to represent North Shore at the National Geographic Bee began early in the spring of 2018 when the Middle School finalists gathered on stage in the Auditorium and Jack Hunt ’22 qualified to compete in the state event. On April 6, Jack took part in the state tournament at Illinois State University in Normal. Competing that day were 103 students in grades 4 through 8 who participated in and won their school competitions. While Jack scored 7 out of 8 correct in the qualifying round at State, he needed a perfect score to advance to the finals. Nevertheless, he enjoyed the experience. When asked if he prepared or studied for the NSCDS or State competition, he answered no. However, Jack does list reading as one of his interests, along with basketball and video games. “Right now I’m reading The Great Gatsby” he said. Next on his list, Catcher in the Rye.

Student Artwork Published When Vivian Zhang ’24 painted her picture titled “Interaction,” she had no idea it would be selected as part of the student artwork published in the Celebrating Art book, fall 2017. Her painting won recognition in the 4th-6th grade division. Middle School Art Teacher Keith Sklar said, “Vivian’s painting is complex, personal and skillful. For me, it is no surprise that her art was chosen.”


“Interaction” by Vivian Zhang ’24

The organization that produces the book is devoted to the promotion and appreciation of student art. “The intent of our student art contests is to motivate student artists.The top entries are published in an anthology that records the creative works of today’s student artists.” Students in kindergarten through 12th grade are invited to submit artwork into one of four divisions. There is no entry fee for students and roughly 25% of the work submitted is selected to be included in the book. In addition, the top 10 winners in each division earn $25. The organization also offers a Classroom Rewards program to help fund classroom supplies for teachers across the United States and Canada. Any type of art is considered, including charcoal, collage, computer graphics, drawing, fiber/fabric, mixed media, mosaics, paintings, pastels, printmaking, sculpture and watercolors.

Playing at the Next Level From the very beginning, participation in athletics has been a vital part of the North Shore experience. Founding Headmaster Perry Dunlap Smith, a former Harvard University lineman, required all Middle and Upper School students to play a sport. That requirement remains to this day. And while full participation has always been the emphasis, there have always been winning seasons and students who have stood out. This year, seven members of the Class of 2018 have committed to play sports in college.

Class of 2018 college athletes: (from left) Braden Adamson-Tate, Jessica Hourihane, Thomas McDowell, Flynn Hersh, Quigg Veach, Thandi Steele and Jack Mangel

Jessica Hourihane ’18 played ice hockey before switching over to field hockey the summer before 6th grade. Because of the School’s policy, she needed to pick a sport, so field hockey it was. But she soon fell in love with the iceless variation. “After I started playing, it never felt like the next season was mandatory because I was always so excited to start up again,” she said. Developing character in young people is one of the main reasons the School has remained so committed to maintaining an athletic requirement. Flynn Hersh ’18 transferred to North Shore his junior year and will be playing baseball for Knox College next season. “Without North Shore, I wouldn’t be playing in college,” he said. “I was cut from New Trier’s sophomore team, but that didn’t stop me from chasing my dream of playing college baseball. The mandatory athletics policy also got me to try soccer, which I wouldn’t have tried had I not transferred here. I used to not want to try things I wasn’t already good at, but North Shore changed that. Soccer improved my endurance and footwork, which I was able to carry over to the diamond.” Braden Adamson-Tate ’18 played both soccer and basketball all through high school, and he’ll continue his soccer career at Denison University in the fall. He began playing soccer when he was 5, but playing basketball at North Shore taught him some valuable lessons that will carry over to his soccer game. “I learned

from playing basketball that team chemistry is everything,” he said. “You can have all the potential in the world, but it’s the hard work that makes everything come together.” Last year, North Shore discontinued its tackle football program after 98 seasons, which came as a blow to Jack Mangel ’18 and Thomas McDowell ’18, who will both be playing football at Denison University this fall. “At first I was upset and disappointed that I would not get the chance to play my final season as a Raider,” Thomas explained. “But it forced me to focus on track and field, and basketball to deepen my experience with being on a team. Playing sports at North Shore taught me how to overcome adversity and keep going—even when things get tough.” Members of the Class of 2018 playing college sports

• Braden Adamson-Tate Denison University, Soccer • F lynn Hersh Knox College, Baseball • Jessica Hourihane The Ohio State University, Field Hockey • Jack Mangel Denison University, Football •T  homas McDowell Denison University, Football •T  handi Steele Williams College, Track and Field • Quigg Veach Denison University, Soccer


dis t inguished gues t s

Julian Rhee with Nolan Howard ’27, Kami Day ’27 and ZeeAnn Blair ’27

Susan Marshall ’76 Memorial Concert: Julian Rhee performs at Morning Ex

Alice Marshall Vogler ’69, Julian Rhee, Bucky Marshall ’71 and Tom Flemma

Julian Rhee

Susan Marshall ’76 Memorial Concert North Shore welcomed 17-year-old violinist Julian Rhee to campus on April 25 for the annual Susan Marshall ’76 Memorial Concert. Julian, who resides in Brookfield, Wisconsin, and was a senior at Brookfield East High School at the time of his visit, studies the violin at the Music Institute of Chicago with Almita Vamos. He recently won first prize in the 2018 Johansen International Competition for Young String Players in Washington, D.C. Julian also advanced to the semifinals of the prestigious Irving M. Klein International String Competition and will be competing in San Francisco this June. Julian began his visit with a concert for the entire North Shore community during 44

Morning Ex time, where he wowed the audience with his expert execution of classical pieces by Bach, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. “It’s so wonderful to be able to take a break in the middle of a busy day to slow down, listen to the music and feed the soul,” said Head of School Tom Flemma as he thanked Julian for sharing his immense gift with the school. “That’s really what the Susan Marshall concert is all about—to remember how important music is to our lives individually and to the lives of everybody at North Shore.” After the concert, Julian joined members of the Marshall family for a reception. This year, two of Susan Marshall’s siblings were in attendance: Bucky Marshall ’71

and Alice Marshall Vogler ’69. Then he met individually with Upper, Middle and Lower School music students and answered questions about his practice routines and how he fell in love with music. The annual concert series is a North Shore tradition that was established in 1983 by Susan Marshall’s parents, Irl and Barbara Favill Marshall ’46, in memory of their daughter’s lifelong love of music. Susan played the violin and piano, and she also enjoyed singing. She graduated from North Shore in 1976, then continued her studies at Dartmouth College and in graduate school at the University of Denver. Each year, an emerging young musician is invited to perform a concert and visit with students and faculty.


Lea Loveless Maurer

Cindy Pierce

Daniel Pink

Hélène Stelian

Ted Dintersmith

Lea Loveless Maurer Lea Loveless Maurer shared advice on parenting athletes at a Parent Education program on April 18, based on her experiences as an Olympic gold medal winner, a coach of Olympians and former head coach of the Stanford University women’s swimming and diving teams. In 1992, she represented the United States at the Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, where she won a gold medal swimming the backstroke leg of the women’s 4x100-meter medley relay. She also won a bronze medal in the 100-meter backstroke. More recently, Lea has swum in multiple events with Swim Across America (SAA), a charitable organization that enlists former Olympic swimmers to raise funds for cancer research.

Cindy Pierce On April 30, the Parent Education committee hosted Cindy Pierce who spoke on “Helping Our High School and College Bound Students Develop Healthy Sexuality.” She is a social-sexuality educator and comic storyteller who is on a mission to give students perspective and information so they can better navigate cultural, media and peer pressures, particularly around their social lives and sexual relationships. She also equips parents and educators with key information to help them guide their children and students by weaving

bestselling books include A Whole New Mind, Drive and To Sell is Human. Pink’s latest book When takes a deep dive into the topic of timing. He looked Ted Dintersmith, Daniel Pink at night owls, early birds, when to take standardized tests, when to get surgery. Two nationally recognized authors drew He argues that the time of day when we crowds to campus as part of the Family do things matters a great deal, and that Action Network (FAN) speaker series. On we move through our day in three stages— April 12, Ted Dintersmith held small a peak, a trough and a recovery. The key group discussions with faculty and staff piece is to figure out your cycle and then before addressing parents and the general schedule your days to optimize attention, public in the Auditorium. He is the author mood and performance. of the recently published What Schools Could Be: Insights and Inspiration from Hélène Stelian Teachers Across America as well as a producer on the films Most Likely To Succeed Life coach, blogger, speaker and mother (which NSCDS faculty and staff screened to 20-year-old twin girls, Hélène Stelian three years ago) and The Hunting Ground. shared her insight and advice regarding After a career in innovation and as a “Midlife Transitions” with NSCDS parents highly successful venture capitalist, Ted is on April 23. Sponsored by the Parent now focused on issues at the intersection Education committee, she acknowledged of innovation and education. He supports many people will face an overload of initiatives that improve the life prospects demands in midlife coming from their of youth around the nation and globe. work, children and aging parents, not to He has become one of America’s leadmention their own struggles with relationing advocates for education policies that ships, health and identity. As a result, they foster creativity, innovation, motivation will feel a need to examine who they are, and purpose. Ted knows what skills are where they’ve been and what they want out valuable in a world of innovation, and of their second half. how schools can be transformed to As a Midlife Empowerment Coach, prepare kids for their futures. Hélène helps women who are struggling in On April 25, Daniel Pink, author of midlife—who wonder if their best years are six provocative books, spoke on his newest, behind them and what’s next for them. She When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect shows them how to put themselves first, Timing, which has spent months on the reclaim their identity, figure out what’s New York Times bestseller list. His other next, and feel excited about their future. together expert opinions, personal anecdotes and feedback from current college and high school students.

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

45


events

Parents’ Association Faculty/Staff Appreciation Lunch

Musical Tea: Bethany Schwartz and Eva Smith ’31

JK/SK Musical Tea In the spring of 1988, the junior and senior kindergartners at North Shore Country Day School happened to be really great singers, and Lower School Music Teacher Linda Kiracibasi wanted to give them a chance to showcase what they had learned in music class during the year. So they invited the parents to what was then the Lower School music room and sang a few songs for them, she explained. And that was the beginning of the North Shore tradition now known as the Musical Tea. While the event has evolved over the years—the number of students has increased and the tea has moved from the classroom to the Multi-Purpose Room— it’s still an intimate event. “It’s not a performance,” stressed Linda, who has been teaching at North Shore for more than 40 years. “Some people have suggested we move it to the Auditorium and put the kids on stage, but that’s not what this is about.” All of the students make colorful hats and boutonnieres out of paper and present them to their parents at the beginning of the concert. The students sit in a horseshoe on the floor and parents are seated around them. This year, the students sang a selection of songs in English, Spanish and even Swahili. Some of the songs incorporated clapping, snapping and even a little American Sign Language. After the concert, parents and other guests were invited back to the classroom for tea, cookies and other light refreshments.

46

Former Faculty Lunch

Former Faculty Lunch North Shore former faculty and staff returned to campus for the annual luncheon in their honor. It was an opportunity to visit with colleagues and current faculty as well as meet and hear from Head of School Tom Flemma about NSCDS today. Those who attended included (front row) Maxine Mitchell, Patti Bach, Lynda Wood, Linda Semel, Liz Price Hunt ’42, Leonie O’Donohoe, Jay Fry; (back row) Bob Beerheide, George Mitchell, Jay Bach, Larry Aggens, Michael Querio, Noreen Potempa, Emily Denesha, Helen Wood ’88, Pam Whalley, Art Jessen ’70, Caroline (Ingram) McCarty and Dave Osberg. “I was glad to see other former faculty and staff who were at the school for a range of years,” said Larry Aggens, who was the business manager and in an adjunct role of junior boys advisor. “I am always impressed how everyone shares that North Shore was a great place to work.”

PA Faculty/Staff Appreciation Lunch The Parents’ Association hosted a lovely end-of-the-year faculty/staff luncheon on June 7 to honor those who play a critical role in the success of North Shore students, either directly or indirectly.

Teachers, administrators and other support staff from all three divisions, as well as the staff from Handcut Foods, gathered in the cafeteria for an endless buffet of international treats. More than 60 parents brought food— an array of salads, sandwiches, casseroles, sushi, cookies, cakes and so much more. And 259 families contributed nearly $80,000 to provide generous year-end appreciation gifts to all faculty and staff. “Not every school has such a wonderful, strong and supportive Parents’ Association,” said Head of School Tom Flemma. “We’re lucky to be able to partner with them in so many different ways.” Tom spent a few minutes thanking the faculty and staff for their hard work, and acknowledging those who will not be returning next year. He emphasized that in the end, what matters most are the connections between people and how we care for each other, and he shared an email from a parent of a graduating senior, thanking him for the values North Shore instilled—“simple, soulful acts of nurturing over years, that manifest blissfully in the beautiful arc of life, where kids share with other kids and impart friendship and love in the simplest ways, in a nurturing, thoughtful environment.”


Royal Breakfast

Grandparents’ Day: John Dienner and Vivian Florig ’30

Race Against Hate

Grandparents’ Day On a sunny day in May, more than 200 grandparents visited campus to share the afternoon with their grandchildren as part of North Shore’s annual Grandparents’ Day. Head of School Tom Flemma welcomed grandparents attending from 17 states, and from countries as far as Italy and China. Among them were 20 parents of alumni, two alumni and two former faculty. Four grandparents who came had four or more grandchildren currently attending North Shore. Guests were entertained by Lower, Middle and Upper School chorus performances in the Auditorium, followed by the highlight of the day—classroom visits. Experiences included Lower School students singing songs in Spanish, creating art with Middle School students and an overview of the Upper School collegecounseling program. Caroline Howard McCarty, who is a former North Shore teacher, a parent of three alumni and a grandmother to Thomas McDowell ’18, shared her thoughts after attending her 14th Grandparents’ Day. “Whether you are in the early years, the Middle School years or in the final four years of Upper School, these moments are special for all of us,” she said. “It was incredible to see so many grandparents come together to experience what our grandchildren are doing every

Race Against Hate day. This glimpse of a day in the life of a North Shore student made me feel nostalgic and grateful for all that this school has done for these students.”

Royal Breakfast Make sure you bring your toothbrush, computer and phone, in case you want to call your family. Don’t forget to bring healthy snacks like strawberries, watermelon and chips. And, of course, be sure to pack a crown and dresses in case you want to pretend to be a princess. And a treasure chest. Filled with gold and silver coins. For the annual Royal Breakfast, the final buddy activity of the school year, North Shore junior and senior kindergartners bestowed nuggets of wisdom like these upon their 12th-grade buddies, as they prepared for life after graduation. The cafeteria was decorated with laminated letters of advice and painted cutouts of the senior buddies, which the pairs created at one of their very first activities during Homecoming week in September. After performing a selection of songs, the kindergartners joined their buddies for a delicious breakfast of fruit, pastries and chocolate milk. Then they exchanged gifts, and after visiting for a while, said their final goodbyes.

This Father’s Day marked the 19th year for the annual Ricky Byrdsong Memorial Race Against Hate organized by the YWCA in Evanston, and the eighth year that NSCDS has sponsored a team. On June 17, 58 members of the North Shore community—including students, parents, faculty and staff from all three divisions— joined nearly 5,000 others to walk or run in unity against racial hatred and violence. The Race honors the legacy of Ricky Byrdsong, former Northwestern University basketball coach, vice president of affairs at Aon Corporation and Skokie resident who was murdered by a white supremacist in 1999 while walking in his neighborhood with two of his young children. Because of Ricky’s lifelong love of sports and his compelling work with young people in the community, the Race was launched by his family and friends (and entrusted to the YWCA Evanston/ North Shore in 2007) to honor Ricky’s legacy and bring attention to the need to combat hatred in all its forms. Proceeds from the Race are used to further the mission of YWCA Evanston/ North Shore, in particular their efforts in the areas of racial justice and violence prevention.

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

47


book re v ie ws

Wild Hundreds by Nate Marshall PUBLISHED 2015, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PRESS

I first encountered Nate Marshall in the documentary Louder than A Bomb, which chronicles one season of Chicago’s annual spoken word poetry competition from which the film takes its name. Marshall’s poem “Look” so captivated me that I share it with my students every year when we discuss spoken word poetry. Not surprisingly, therefore, I was elated to learn of the opportunity to explore Marshall’s recent collection of poems, Wild Hundreds. Wild Hundreds invites readers to enter into a world that teems with life, where the lived experiences of AfricanAmericans emerge with a striking vitality. The collection’s opening and closing lines, from the poem “repetition & repetition &,” set the tone for the intervening pages: “ours is a long love song, / a push out into open air, / a stare into the barrel, / a pool of grief puddling / under our national body.” This “love song” presents the dreams and realities that characterize Marshall’s experiences living on the South Side of Chicago. Although no brief review can convey all that Marshall communicates, the poems’ titles, ranging from “Fame Food & Liquor” to “Mama says” to “Indian summer” to “picking flowers,” indicate the scope of his exploration as he considers how our life circumstances shape our identities. Marshall’s authentic voice expanded my perspective on a reality that frequently has been marginalized in our society. These poems explode with an emotional intensity that reverberates powerfully every time I return to them. I highly recommend this collection.

david grossman Upper School English Teacher

48

I’m Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez

And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

PUBLISHED 2017,

PUBLISHED 2005,

RANDOM HOUSE

SIMON & SCHUSTER

I’m Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter holds a mystery the reader, along with Julia, the principal character, has to solve: Her sister Olga, the perfect Mexican daughter, was hiding a scandalous secret that comes to light after her tragic death. But discovering Olga’s secret is the least interesting narrative thread of this novel. It actually becomes a bit long and boring at the end. Nevertheless, the book is worth reading because of Julia’s sharp and, at times, cynical sense of humor and her struggle between the two cultures she belongs to without fully belonging to any of them: the United States, represented by her daily life at school and with her privileged, white boyfriend from Evanston, and Mexico, represented by her home life with her grieving parents in her barrio on the South Side of Chicago. Her experience of being trapped by her family’s ultraconservative values—built upon religious superstitions—and her desire to access the world and culture through secular education is one that migrants from many different cultures can relate to. That tension between otherness and belonging of migrants and their children is ontological because it becomes part of one’s self, of one’s identity. Julia’s identity is built upon that tension—she isn’t just Mexican, she isn’t just American, she is both and neither—and in the end she manages to navigate those two worlds to her advantage and to learn to be fine living with that tension.

And Tango Makes Three is one of those books that makes me smile every time I read it. It is based on the true story of a penguin family living in Central Park Zoo in New York City. Two male penguins, Roy and Silo, fall in love. After observing other penguin couples standing on their eggs, they try it too. Like the other penguins, they would like to be a family. However, being two males, they cannot lay eggs. Noticing their behavior, the zoo keeper places an abandoned egg in their nest. Thrilled, Roy and Silo take care of it, just like the other penguins. One day the egg hatches, and a baby penguin named Tango pops out. Roy and Silo now feel like a complete family. Today’s society has changed the definition of what makes a family, and this book is perfect for introducing this concept of same-sex partners to young children (ages 2-5). It demonstrates how all kinds of love can create a family. The story is very sweet, and a wonderful example of tolerance and acceptance. It is also the winner of multiple awards, including The ASPCA Henry Bergh Children’s Book Award.

catalina rincón-bisbey Upper School Spanish Teacher

sharon lieberman Lower School Reading and Learning Specialist


facult y Faculty Profile: Ceil Scanlan R E A D I N G A N D L E A R N I N G R E S O U R C E S D E PA R T M E N T H E A D ; U P P E R S C H O O L L E A R N I N G S P E C I A L I S T

we go through everything. And it’s a good touch point because after that, students see us as a resource, and most of our kids are good self-advocates. We also provide programming for parents. We offered a session on understanding executive function development in the spring, and another one at the end of the year on applying for accommodations for the ACT and SAT. Q . What was your path to North Shore?

Q. Now you’re not just a teacher, you’re also a student. You’re currently finishing up your doctor of education in human development I first taught at a residential therapeutic and learning at National Louis University. school, and then I taught at Glenbrook Why did you decide to go back to school? North High School for several years. Then I was home raising my three kids. Barbara A. I had a friend who called me a Sherman recruited me to come teach here. “consumer of knowledge.” I like learning, We knew each other from one of our first I’m curious. I think it makes me a better teaching positions years ago, and I came teacher to be going to school. It’s funny in as a learning specialist. This will be because with all the research I’ve done, my 16th year at North Shore. When I it actually helps me support our students first started, I worked part-time, but I’ve really well. I can empathize with them been full-time for about 10 years now. when they’re writing a paper and feeling A. My background is in special education.

Q . What’s your typical day like? A. It varies from day to day. Most of

the work I do is one-on-one support with students—some who have learning disabilities, but really any student who needs a little short-term support in planning out their work, writing papers or test preparation. But I have regular students with whom I work weekly. We spend a lot of time with applying to the ACT and College Board to get accommodations for our kids. We also collaborate with teachers to figure out how to best support individual students, and we spend a lot of time talking with parents, either on the phone or in person. Q . What other programming does your office do throughout the year? A. Upper School Learning Specialist Tom Saleh and I lead a series of sessions with the 9th graders on study skills. This year, we’re hoping to expand that a bit. It’s helpful because I think for most kids high school is a big transition from 8th grade. So we talk about what a good student looks like and we kick off the first lesson with an active listening exercise. We provide lessons on planning and organizing, note taking, paper writing, test prep, test-taking strategies—

challenged or overwhelmed because I’m experiencing the same thing. This has really been a labor of love. It will have been nine years by the time I finish. It’s a 60-hour program, but I took one class at a time. I’m done with the classwork at this point. Now I’m just in the throes of the dissertation writing. My goal is to apply for graduation mid-September and graduate by December. Q. As you sit down to write, do you find yourself listening to your own advice? A. I do try to employ the study skills I

teach to students when I’m supposed to be writing every day. I try not to procrastinate, but sometimes we all get distracted. I like to go to the library. For a while, I was reserving one of the study rooms at the Glenview library. I found if I actually have people around me, even if they’re not talking, I’m able to focus much better just by being in a “study” atmosphere. And I’ve said that to kids. If Starbucks works, go to Starbucks. If the library works, go to the library. Getting out of an environment where you are easily distracted is a good habit. I’m a much more effective student when I do that.

Q. Tell us about your dissertation. How did you come up with the topic? A. I’m looking at the first-year experience

of first-generation Latino college students. Working with some of our Latino students here is what inspired me to look into what supports we could put in place to help them more successfully transition to college. One of the things I’m looking at is supporting our parents of firstgeneration students early on in the process. A lot of our parents are very involved, and I think sometimes when you come from outside the community, it’s a little harder to do that. So it’s helpful to get the parents involved earlier, when the kids are first coming to school—especially for firstgeneration students whose parents haven’t walked that walk and can’t necessarily guide them through some of the processes and aren’t really sure how to answer college questions. Q. As you prepare for your own graduation, what advice do you have for our recent graduates in the Class of 2018? A. Turn off the distracting technology! Completely turn off technology for 45 minutes at a time when studying or writing papers to be more productive and focused. You’ll get more accomplished and it will be of higher quality. Reward yourself after 45 minutes of undivided attention by checking texts, Snapchat, etc. Then go back to work!

Aiming Higher Being a lifelong learner and having a strong commitment to ongoing professional development are values that North Shore Country Day School holds in high regard. Almost two-thirds of North Shore faculty and staff hold advanced degrees in a variety of disciplines. • 64% of faculty and staff hold an advanced degree • 8 faculty members have completed or are in the process of completing doctoral degrees (Ph.D. or Ed.D.) • 61 faculty and staff hold master’s degrees

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

49


facult y

Julia Macholl

Susan Schinleber

Professional Development The entire faculty and staff engaged in large-group and individual work with Chere Nabor of the Kaleidoscope Group around the Intercultural Development Inventory, an instrument that supports greater understanding of areas for growth in individual and group intercultural competencies. A number of faculty and staff participated in a two-day workshop on risk management in off-campus study experiences provided by Lodestone International: Social Studies Department Head and Upper School Social Studies Teacher Kiernan Aiston, Upper School English Teacher Christina Baik, Upper School Mathematics Teacher and Penn Fellow Zach Blickensderfer, Upper School Mathematics Teacher Carissa Clark, Middle School Counselor Laura Cooper, Head of Middle School Barrington “Barry” Fulton Jr., Upper School English Teacher and Director of Service Learning Drea Gallaga, Middle and Upper School Computer Science Teacher Arturo Garcia, Instrumental Music Director and Middle and Upper School Music Teacher Ann Goodrich, Technical Theater Director and Middle and Upper School Theater Arts Teacher Austin Gruber, Assistant Director of Educational Technology Patrick Healy, Choral Music Director and Middle and Upper School Music Teacher Will Hester, Middle School Humanities and Science

50

Teacher David Kubacki, Middle School Spanish Teacher Alejandra Mendoza, Junior and Senior Kindergarten Assistant Teacher and Spanish Teacher Rebecca Reátegui ’12, Middle School Mathematics Teacher Graham Rosby, Upper School Learning Specialist Tom Saleh, Upper School Social Studies Teacher and Penn Fellow Brian Sarfo, Middle School Science Teacher Ty Scaletta, Middle School Visual Art Teacher Keith Sklar, Middle School Mathematics Teacher Rachel Sun, Communications Associate—Print Specialist Christine Wachter, Development Associate—Annual Giving Maureen Wilde, and Middle School Mathematics Teacher Grace Wood. Dana Specht, Middle School Humanities Teacher and Global Citizenship and Model United Nations Program Coordinator, coordinated the training. Lower School Visual Art Teacher Montserrat Alsina received a Benefit Board Grant to support a trip to Indonesia for yoga-certification training. Laura Cooper, Middle School Counselor, attended the Institute for Social and Emotional Learning Summer Institute in Chicago. Zach Blickensderfer and Alejandra Mendoza attended the Independent School Experiential Education Network’s Summer Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Fourth Grade Teacher Claire Detjen attended a summer course in creative writing through the University of Chicago’s Graham School for Liberal and Professional Studies. The following faculty and staff participated in an administrative risk management training for off-campus study experiences provided by Lodestone International: Head of School Tom Flemma, Assistant Head of School and Academic Dean Chris Boyle, Middle School Assistant and Centennial Events Coordinator Sheila Burke, Upper School Dean of Students Erik Cooper, Director of Marketing and Communications Tura Cottingham, Head of Middle School Barry Fulton, Director of Development Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Head of Upper School Dave Potter, Assistant to the Head of School Izzy Steach, Upper School Counselor Terri Webb, Assistant Head of Upper School and Upper School French Teacher Lynsey Wollin-Casey. Barry Fulton attended the Independent Schools Association of the Central States Academy for New Division Heads. Third Grade Teachers David Green and Berkley Wellstein, and Lower School Reading and Learning Specialist Sharon Lieberman received a Summer Curriculum Grant to support a revision to the 3rd Grade Literacy Program.


Linda Kiracibasi (center) with Northwestern Professor Sarah Bartolome and composer Jim Papoulis

English Department Head and Upper School English Teacher David Grossman attended the Advanced Placement English Summer Institute. Middle School Humanities Teachers Elizabeth Kindig and Sarah Walsh as well as Dana Specht received a Summer Curriculum Grant to complete the third year of Middle School Equity, Inclusion and Diversity curriculum project development. Sharon Lieberman also attended the Learning & The Brain Summer Institute entitled The Neuroscience of Reading: Using Research to Understand Reading Acquisition and Disorders which took place in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She also attended a SLANT phonics training workshop. Performing Arts Department Head and Middle and Upper School Theater Teacher Julia Macholl received a Benefit Board Grant to attend the 2018 Broadway Teachers Workshop and One Day Director’s Workshop in New York City. Additionally, she attended the The Vagabond School’s On-Camera Training Program. Fourth Grade Teacher Caitlin McLennan attended the Chicago Literacy Group’s workshop entitled Building Strong Comprehension Through Interactive Read Aloud. Upper School French Teacher Beatrice McKenna attended the Advanced Placement Annual Conference in

Houston, TX. Additionally, Beatrice and Lynsey Wollin-Casey received a Summer Curriculum Grant to develop a curriculum for students who have advanced past the Advanced Placement language level and will serve as Language Teaching Assistants. Alejandra Mendoza was awarded the 2018 Alliance for Early Childhood Teacher Tribute award. Associate Director of Admission (JK-5) and Lower School Administrative Assistant Diane Olson and Izzy Steach attended the ISACS workshop entitled Managing it All: A Workshop for Administrative Assistants in Independent Schools. Rebecca Reátegui ’12 attended a four-day Responsive Classroom workshop. Middle School Learning Specialist Christine Ritchey attended the Learning & The Brain Summer Institute on Neuroscience and Executive Function in Santa Barbara, California. Middle School English and Public Speaking Teacher Susan Schinleber attended the International Conference on Holocaust Education led by the International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. She also received a Benefit Board Grant to further her study of the Holocaust through a travel experience to Poland. Dana Specht attended the National Outdoor Leadership School’s Wilderness First Aid Training course.

Director of Finance Sue Downing and Communications Associate—Digital Specialist Jay Young attended the 2018 Blackbaud K-12 User Conference in Seattle. Tura Cottingham attended the annual INDEX Communications Conference in Salt Lake City. INDEX is a member-driven, non-profit dedicated to empowering independent schools through data, analysis, collaboration and research to aid in decision-making, policy development and strategic planning. Lower School Music Teacher Linda Kiracibasi presented at the national Chorus America conference in Chicago, along with Northwestern University Music Education Professor Sarah Bartolome and composer Jim Papoulis. Eleven Lower School Chorus members joined her at the conference and talked about their experiences, answered questions from the audience and sang a song they wrote with Jim in 2015 entitled “We Are the Hope.”

Faculty and Staff Recognition Jay Young was recognized by the Hoosier State Press Association for his photography in 2017. Jay, who was previously a staff photographer for The Goshen (Indiana) News, won second place for best sports feature photo and third place for best general news photo in the daily newspaper division (circulation 6,000-13,999).

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

51


facult y

DEPARTING FACULTY Dayle Block U P P E R S C H O O L M AT H E M AT I C S T E A C H E R

Cassandra Hiland E N G L I S H D E PA R T M E N T H E A D AND UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHER

To simply say that Dayle Block has made a positive impact on her students each and every day over the past 11 years would be an “My friends are my estate.” The wise words of Cassandra Hiland? understatement. Her work with students goes beyond teaching Well, Emily Dickinson actually wrote them, but Cassandra lives mathematics. She has built strong enduring relationships with them. She has an extraordinary gift for friendship, and so many the students. She is the individual many students at school turn students, colleagues and parents have received this gift. She is to whenever they are in need of thoughtful advice, kind words, or fun and funny; brilliant and interesting; insightful and just the comfort of someone who’s caring and compassionate. compassionate. Dayle has always been willing to give all of herself in order to It’s no wonder, then, that she has been such a successful ensure students are able to find success in her class and at school. and beloved teacher and advisor. Cassandra’s students clearly Her selflessness is something I have always admired and is recognize how much she cares about them, and they often something that’s truly special to witness. If a student needs time seek her out for advice. Anyone watching her interactions with with Mrs. Block, she will find time for them, no questions asked. students can see her genuine enjoyment, and there is always Dayle is the consummate team player. With her, it’s always about so much laughter. Consistently, she goes above and beyond the needs of the students and the school. Time and time again, typical expectations, including having students over for dinner Dayle has been willing to step into any role. Her ability to conand sponsoring the alumna-initiated Feminist Book Group.  nect with all students and form a strong rapport with them has Academically, she challenges each student to work hard, to take made her successful in each and every one of these roles. risks and to grow, while providing the instruction and support Anyone who is fortunate enough to have spent time with needed to make that happen. Dayle outside of the classroom has come to know someone who’s Her impact on her colleagues has also been so multifaceted. an equally amazing friend as she is a teacher and colleague. Through Cassandra’s collaborative and encouraging leadership as English Department Head, she has helped teachers grow as brian frederick well. All of her colleagues know that they can count on her in Mathematics Department Head; so many ways. On Interim trips to New Orleans, Cassandra  Upper School Mathematics Teacher willingly did whatever was needed, even when that meant construction work in 30-degree weather in a house with no heat. Faced with a week sleeping in a very dirty, mouse-infested hogan on the Navajo reservation, Cassandra never uttered a complaint. We will deeply miss Cassandra’s warmth and wit but know she will maintain her many friendships.

kathy mchugh Upper School English Teacher

52


Tom Kowalczyk

Jim Leesch

MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL BAND TEACHER

M I D D L E S C H O O L M AT H E M AT I C S T E A C H E R

Tom Kowalczyk is a legend. Tom’s passion for teaching and music reaches each student he encounters and makes a longlasting impression. One rarely gets to see what goes on behind the scenes with concert preparations and regular music classes. Tom went above and beyond to make sure each student was able to actively participate by spending countless hours arranging music to fit all instruments involved. He instilled discipline, responsibility and a drive to become a musician who was able to feel, listen and tell the story. Some students have studied with Tom Kowalczyk for eight years, from Lower School through Upper School. It is rare that a teacher can bridge all three of our divisions, and Tom has built a music program with a solid foundation for years to come. He also used to be the woodworking teacher and keeper of the large plants displayed in the arts center and around campus. He is a man of many talents. Tom always put students first. Any performance opportunity offered, he would take advantage of and do his traditional stand to the side and gesture to the group. This is a performing arts teacher. Letting the students have their moment. I will let the students have their moment below in a creative writing exercise entitled, “I have learned…” I have learned how to love music. I have learned that practice makes almost perfect. I have learned how to be a better person. I have learned how to really feel music and have an open mind. I have learned how to play as a group and how to work with people who play different instruments than me. “What we play is life.” -Louis Armstrong

When I think of Jim Leesch, I think of a quote from Maya Angelou. “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Jim thrives when he is learning something new and that’s every day. He is passionate about many things (books, theater, technology, games and a lot more), and he is really, really good at those things. He is compassionate about all souls. He always looks for the good. His humor is wickedly sarcastic and it keeps us on our toes. And he has nothing but style when he walks into a room. From his long ponytail he kept for many years (He said it was for his role as Dracula...sure it was, Jim), to his fedora and leather jacket, to his booming voice and his fast talking when he gets excited. We love it all! I think of Jim often as a friend, a walking and talking thesaurus, a human computer, a comedian, a gamer and a bourbon connoisseur. Now who wouldn’t want to know Mr. James Leesch! I wish he was here in California! Well maybe in the next chapter, Jim. For now, I wish you the very best with your new journey. With love in my heart,

la vina lowery Former Head of Middle School

julia macholl Performing Arts Department Head; Upper and Middle School Theater Teacher

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

53


facult y

Home. By María Elena Centomo ‘When you dream, it is always home’ —John O’Donohue This simple wooden chest with my father’s name engraved on its sides departed from the Port of Genoa, Italy, on a ship destined for Argentina in 1950. It represents one of the most pioneering odysseys that would set the way for much of my family history. This journey that my father undertook in the aftermath of World War II was no small feat. He left his future wife behind until he could get set up in Argentina, to embark on a 38-day journey by boat with no job or certainty in sight, with the promise of a land of opportunity. As for myself, growing up in Argentina as the daughter of Italian immigrants without grandparents or relatives, I had to learn to adopt friends as family, which completely changed the meaning of a conventional family and taught me how a community of friends can fill one’s need for belonging. However, the early loss of my father and the silence surrounding the history of my family sparked a relentless curiosity and a longing to search for my identity in order to answer the most fundamental questions about myself: “Who am I and where is home?” In July of 2000, 50 years after my parents’ odyssey, I too, set off on a cross-continental adventure to establish a new life in a new country. I emigrated to the United States, together with my own family, but under a different set of circumstances: a big container instead of a simple wooden chest, an 11-hour flight, and a very promising new job for my husband. A much better situation than theirs, no doubt, but with similar challenges and comparable life lessons.

54

Coming to the United States presented a whole different set of challenges: leaving everything that was familiar behind, adapting to a completely new place with a different culture and a different language. To state the obvious, I was well outside my comfort zone. I learned about distance, loneliness and longing. I became used to interim periods of disconnection, sounding foreign even to myself. However, I stepped into the unknown, trusting to find along the way those special people who would open the doors to a new sense of belonging. Still, even though my multiple “belongings” pushed me to deal with some heartbreaking choices, my life has always been colorful, eventful, arduous and unlike any other. I really believe that to move freely is a human birthright, and migration is a long and deep journey of self-discovery and transformation. I have learned this from my own experience. I have now begun an exploration of my family’s roots in the north of Italy, to reconnect with my family there and to begin my research about my ancestors. In August 2017, I made a trip to Molino, my parents’ little village, where I visited cousins, aunts, uncles and other family members and friends. I talked with them and learned about my family history by reliving their memories through each one of the stories they told me, and I started to record information in order to build my family tree. Unexpectedly, one of my cousins introduced me to a local well-known historian who had done extensive research into the

archives of the surrounding villages, who generously offered me his help. We worked together for several days and we were able to reconstruct nine generations of my family tree, covering four centuries of family history. Finally, I went to the State Archive in Vicenza to do research about my father’s journey as a prisoner of war in Germany during WWII. I was able to find and read all his files and I found out the location of his camp in Schwerin, Germany, the dates of his capture and release, and the hardships of those two years of his life. This poignant experience opened for me a new path to learning and understanding those stories that he had never shared with anybody. These findings were a crucial step for deepening the understanding of my family identity. Now that two of my children have moved to Europe, I have become a mother and grandmother of immigrants. Now I know that it was my parents’ courage when they set foot on those ships and left their homeland in search of a future, that gave me the freedom to choose my place in the world. I, and my children after me, have done the same. I am deeply thankful to have been awarded the 2017 Benefit Board Grant. It allowed me to start this inspiring journey that was an essential stage for re-discovering the beginnings of my complex identity and the legacy that I have passed on to my children.


live and serve

Senior Service: Drea Gallaga and Mickey Hughes ’18

Senior Service: Carlo Castellanos ’18

Senior Service An important part of the North Shore experience for students during their final year is their senior service projects. Each senior is required to plan and execute a service project with a nonprofit thereby demonstrating the School’s “Live and Serve” motto. Such was the case for Mickey Hughes ’18, who connected with City Farm. City Farm is a small organization that develops urban farming plots on abandoned city lots. The majority of the food grown by City Farm is sold to Chicagoarea restaurants, and the proceeds from those sales are funneled back into City Farm and its parent organization, The Resource Center. “I’ve always liked to garden and to farm, and I knew I wanted to work somewhere with food,” Mickey said as she explained how she decided to work with City Farm. During her two-week project, Mickey helped plant seeds and maintain the gardens. “The work was amazing,” Mickey said. “The first day it was really raining and we realized the beds were in the flood zone and at-risk for washing away. So we planted seeds in them to take advantage of the rain and then spent the next couple of days raising the beds out of the flood zone.” Another project Mickey helped with was finding ways to preserve the rainwater that did fall. “Chicago recently changed its policy on water rights,” Mickey explained. “So now to use the city’s hydrants you have

to pay $85 a day. City Farm doesn’t have water yet because they can’t afford it. So we planted with the rain cycle so a lot of it was making things waterproof and trying to find ways to preserve water in the beds.” Despite the challenging nature of her service project, Mickey really enjoyed the time she spent with City Farm, especially the unexpected wildlife in the middle of the city. “It’s one of the greenest areas in the entirety of Cabrini-Green,” Mickey recalled, “There were birds on it all the time; there were bunnies. We saw a hawk once. And so I kind of realized that to take care of nature you don’t have to go chain yourself to a tree, you can just very easily scatter seeds and things will take care of themselves.” Through the farming project, Mickey gained a better understanding of the School’s “Live and Serve” motto and how it applies to everyday life. “We were taking care of the people; taking care of the earth; taking care of the animals. We were finding ways for everything to co-exist in a space,” Mickey explained. “‘Live and Serve’ to me is knowing you don’t have to go and give up everything to serve, but you should live each day trying to make it better for someone or something else.” Fellow senior Carlo Castellanos ’18 was hoping for a similar experience with his senior service project. Carlo, who plans to

study nursing in college next year, signed on with a local hospice to get a head start on his training. Unfortunately, his plans with the hospice fell through at the last minute and he had to look elsewhere to complete his project. Undeterred, Carlo called Upper School English Teacher Drea Gallaga, who is also the Upper School director of service learning and community service and oversees the senior service projects, and asked her if there were any projects around the School that he could work on. “I showed up and did some garden work the first day,” Carlo explained. “I worked in the library with Mrs. Loise, helping organize books for a book drive. I worked with Ms. Hsieh (Upper School art teacher) to help clean up her room for summer camp. I also worked with communications to take some photos around campus and post them on social media.” Even though Carlo’s service project was not what he originally planned, he was happy with the results and felt he made a difference to those he was able to help on campus during those two weeks. “For me, living and serving is just being able to help someone,” Carlo explained. “It doesn’t matter who it is; it doesn’t matter how you help them, if it’s in a big or small way. It was still important because I could see I was helping things be less stressful. It was impactful for me.”

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

55


2nd Grade Bake Sale: Porter Hilton ’29, Vasu Surakanti ’29, Caleb Jackson ’29 and Emma Sansoterra ’29

Animals of Lower School Calendar: Pinelope

Lower School Calendar It all started with a gift. On the wall of Science Department Chair and Lower School Science Teacher Annie Collins’ classroom hangs a calendar featuring funny photos of hedgehogs. “The Lower Schoolers know that I love hedgehogs,” Annie explained. “And one 5th grader bought me a calendar with pictures of hedgehogs doing humanlike things.” Throughout the school year, the calendar has attracted the attention of all her students, particularly her 2nd graders. So when the time came to pick a project to go along with the 2nd grade bake sale, the choice was obvious. In previous years, 2nd graders have put together postcards to sell along with their baked treats at their annual sale, but this year they wanted to try something a little different. “A 2nd grader thought, wouldn’t it be kind of cool to create our own calendar featuring our own animals,” Annie explained. “And the idea just kind of evolved from there.” “The original idea was to do animal drawings,” said 2nd Grade Teacher Marcy Giesler. “It sparked other ideas that we could tie into science and into North Shore using the animals that Annie has in the science lab.” Over the next couple of weeks, the students brainstormed ideas for photographs that could feature the animals of the Lower School science room. Those animals include Puffy the bearded dragon, Miss Shell Obama the painted turtle, Popcorn the goldfish, Charles and Winston, a pair of bunnies and, of course, Pinelope the hedgehog. As they came up with ideas,

56

they brought in toys and amassed a large collection of potential props. Next, the 2nd graders enlisted the help of school photographer Jay Young. He set up a studio in the Lower School science room and over the course of two days, helped the students translate their ideas into photographs. “It was awesomely fun,” Charlotte Schrimmer ’28 explained excitedly. “We put the animals in props and put them by props. Some of them we put into stories, like for August it’s the tortoise and the hare with Miss Shell Obama and Winston. We made a setting based on each month.” Other scenes included a bunny sleep over, a beach scene with Pinelope and movie night with Miss Shell Obama and Popcorn the goldfish. “We weren’t sure the extent that we could take it,” said 2nd Grade Teacher Nazlie Green. “We were really happy and pleased with the final project. What’s really great about North Shore is we have the flexibility to develop the curriculum based on our students’ interests and this was one of those moments we saw their enthusiasm around this project and we wanted to help them run with that.” “It was wonderful to see the teamwork aspect within our classroom community,” Marcy added. “It took all of us as a class and all of our collective input to make it a success.” While the 2nd graders had a lot of fun and laughs while creating the calendar, it was also for a good cause. “Second grade has always taken part in a research project that benefits animals,” Marcy explained, “and through their projects they learn that many of the

animals they study are endangered and the kids want to help in some way.” Helping generally involves each student researching a different animal and presenting their findings to their classmates. The students also took field trips to Orphans of the Storm Animal Shelter where they read to the animals and spent time with them. Once the research is finished and the field trips are over, the 2nd grade holds a school-wide bake sale so that they can raise money for animal-related charities and share what they’ve learned with the rest of the school community. Along with their delicious baked treats, this year the students sold their calendar. The students raised $1,500 for Orphans of the Storm and another $700 for the World Wildlife Fund. The $2,200 total was about $500 more than previous years. Marcy attributes the increase due to the success of the calendar. As for next year, Annie is not sure how they will top this year’s calendar, but she looks forward to trying.

Econ Class Raises Money for Kiva By the end of last school year, North Shore Country Day School students had lent more than $60,000 to entrepreneurs in 34 countries in Central and South America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. They did this through a Kiva account, administered by Upper School Social Studies Teacher Tim Curren. Kiva is an international nonprofit, founded in 2005 and based in San Francisco, with a mission to connect


Cheesi Boyz: Clayton Durning ’18 and Chip Heller ’18

people through lending to alleviate poverty. By lending as little as $25 on Kiva, anyone can help a borrower start or grow a business, go to school, access clean energy or realize their potential. Kiva borrowers use the loans for a variety of projects and may be farmers, artisans, students, shopkeepers, builders or restaurant owners. Many Kiva borrowers work multiple jobs to generate enough income to support their families. Curren took over the account in 2009 from John Foley, who taught English at North Shore for many years. When Tim first began teaching at North Shore in 2003, he would have his economics students create small-business plans. But when he began managing the School’s Kiva account, he decided to take it up a notch and have the students not only write the plans but actually implement their small-business ideas. So instead of coming up with fictional bars and grills and other grandiose schemes, students would have to write a business plan for something they could actually implement during the spring of their senior year. All the profit would be deposited into the Kiva account. “Making it simpler helped them understand the basic components of what goes into a small-business plan,” Tim said. “You have to define your mission. You have to match your own individual skill set with whatever business you’re trying to implement. You have to come up with a marketing plan. And then you have to manage your accounts, make profit projections and predict your expenses. I think the experience of actually implementing the plan in a real world,

Pretty Chill: Sofia Baumann ’18

authentic way helps them at least get a tiny taste of what it’s like and the responsibility that’s required to run a small business.” New this year was a social entrepreneurship requirement. For the past few years, Tim has begun the term with a reading assignment—Mission in a Bottle: The Honest Guide to Doing Business Differently—and Succeeding by Seth Goldman and Barry Nalebuff. The two founders of Honest Tea tell the story of how they began their mission-driven business. By challenging students to come up with a business idea with a social component, it gave them another opportunity to put the School’s “Live and Serve” motto into action. “We talked about how you can make money and still make a positive impact on your community,” Tim explained. “In other words, profit isn’t necessarily a dirty word. You can be successful financially, but still have part of your business mission to make your community a better place.” Students came up with all sorts of ideas for their businesses, from handmade soaps with a mission to promote relaxation and self-care to stickers to spread awareness of teen suicide and support suicide prevention, to reusable water bottles that help reduce plastic waste to lanyards where a portion of the proceeds went to support the nonprofit GirlForward. The most profitable business this year was Cheesi Boyz, an artisan grilled cheese pop-up created by Braden Adamson-Tate ’18, Clayton Durning ’18 and Chip Heller ’18. Their main goal was to bring the North Shore community together over a meal, and they also chose to use Dave’s Killer Bread, a company that hires

ex-convicts to produce and manufacture a delicious and well-sourced product. They worked with Handcut Foods to source the other ingredients and supplies. And over the course of three days—two in April and one in May—they served lunch to students, faculty and staff and made almost $700 that was deposited into the Kiva account. “Here at Cheesi Boyz, we believe in two things: delicious, hand-crafted, grilled cheese sandwiches and their power to bring people together,” the boys wrote in their pitch to the North Shore community. “We believe that it’s important to share meals with the people who matter to you— anyone in the North Shore Country Day School community.” According to Tim, the boys accomplished their goal. “The events were really fun,” he said. “The kids enjoyed it and they mixed with each other. So I saw that as a win.” Success in the project isn’t determined by dollar signs. Students are graded on the quality of their plans, the market research they conduct and how consistent their plans are with the values of the School. Students learn about the importance of hard work, and discover all of the logistics and planning that goes into running a successful business. “Hopefully they get a sense of what social entrepreneurship is all about,” Tim said. “And I hope they feel a sense of satisfaction that the money that they earn is going to good use. Kiva is an organization that really makes a positive impact on people’s lives all over the world.”

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

57


v isua l a rt s

Alana Jackson ’18

Marissa Youderian ’22

Jane Scullion ’21

Amelia Atia ’22

Anna Umpleby ’22

James Forrest ’27


Ava Kahn ’20

Chloe Watrous ’23

Jesse Forrest ’25 Eun Hae Lillig ’21

Sophia Medvin ’25 Lily Biggs ’26


perfor ming a rt s Take 10! Play Festival Take 10! is North Shore Country Day School’s annual studentwritten, designed and directed 10-minute play festival. Students in the Upper School directing course spend about a month writing 10-minute plays based on personal experiences, observations, media events or just pure creativity. They then take on the role of producer and director by auditioning their peers, creating a concept, blocking their actors and watching everything fall into place along the way. Technical Theater students are paired with the directors to design the sets, lights and sound, bringing the director’s vision to life. This year, six plays premiered with about 40 students involved in this festival. T H E S E C R E T : By Izzy Cho ’20 Synopsis: Today is Nathaniel’s twenty-second birthday! Although he seems perfectly normal on the outside, Nathaniel carries an emotional burden that he is reluctant to share with anyone. Although his parents’ dream has always been for him to take over the family business, he wants to become a dancer. After a series of unlucky events, Nathaniel’s parents discover this dream that their son has been concealing for so long. The Secret is the story of their path to reconciliation, and an examination of the often complex relationships present between a parent and a child. M A S K S : By Alex Carrigan ’20 Synopsis: A sophomore at Peterson High, Beatrice Connelly faces problems with her friend, Mikayla, as Beatrice constantly feels that she can’t be herself due to Mikayla’s controlling attitude. As she tries to confront Mikayla, Beatrice finds out Mikayla’s true nature and struggles with what to do. Seeing this stress, Beatrice’s English and homeroom teacher, Mrs. Royler, makes her come to a slam poetry group she created with another struggling student, Mitchell Preston, to see if poetry will help her release her feelings and be herself. Will Beatrice show the world her true colors through her words? Or will she remain under the grip of Mikayla’s controlling attitude? Find out in Masks. W E D O N ’ T D O T H AT H E R E : By Carlo Castellanos ’18

Synopsis: One day a hardworking employee is called in by her boss about a rule violation. At the same time, another employee comes in for a different rule violation. The manager works out some unreasonable punishments for both employees at the same time, and it creates tension between those involved. T H E L U N C H D AT E : By Morgan Small ’19 Synopsis: While originally intended to be a fun lunch outing, this two-week-anniversary celebration goes awry when Sasha, the strict new boss shows up to lunch. Sasha’s new work policies say that co-workers are not allowed to date, so Ethan and David must keep their relationship a secret. While the couple slip up a few times and risk being outed, their friend continues to step in, in efforts to save the lunch, and ultimately their relationship. I K N O W A G U Y : By Tom Pratt ’18

Synopsis: The once prosperous small magnet store Magnet Mania is now on the brink of bankruptcy after the appearance of a Magnet Mart across the street. If they don’t find a way to scrounge up $30,000, and fast, they’re done for. In this moment of desperation, an employee calls in a corporate big shot to help them get back on track. Greeted with skepticism from some and gratitude from others, he nonetheless helps them achieve a surprising turnaround.

60

ZARA LEARNS TO RUN UNDER PRESSURE:

By Emmy Cho ’20 Synopsis: What is the meaning of life? Does it have something to do with Queen’s song, Under Pressure? Thirteen-year-old Zara is still not quite sure. As soon as his mother realizes that Zara has been failing all of his classes (including advisory), she quickly prohibits him from having any “fun,” and signs him up for spring track. It is an utter nightmare for our protagonist. Zara must brave the torturous hours of running, high-knees, pushups and other track exercises. To add to the misery, he continues with middle school and classes, having arguments with his one-time crush, Patty Benington. But it’s not all bad. Zara meets a friend, Dan, the boy who currently holds the record for the school mile with an astounding four minute and forty seconds. As the track season progresses, Zara finds himself becoming stronger, faster, and most surprisingly, happier. By the end, Zara has uncovered a part of himself that’s been buried over the past few years and he’s ready to run.

Middle School Spring Performing Arts Festival The North Shore Country Day Middle School Performing Arts Festival is an opportunity to showcase the work of the Middle School acting, dance, technical theater, visual art and instrumental ensemble classes. The festival is a celebration of the process and the journey that each of these classes has taken through the second semester, culminating in a visual art display and evening performance. The acting and technical theater classes presented the play Law & Order: Fairy Tale Unit by Jonathan Rand. In the fairy-tale criminal justice system, the characters from fairy tales and nursery rhymes are represented by two separate yet equally ridiculous groups: the fairy-tale police who investigate fairy-tale crime, and the fairy-tale district attorneys who prosecute the fairy-tale offenders. After the play, students performed a selection of hip-hop, jazz and musical theater dances. And during transitions, instrumental ensemble members delighted the audience with flute, viola, violin and piano solos. In conjunction with the performance, Life/Boat, an exhibition of artworks created by Middle School students individually and together, in a diversity of disciplines and materials, was on display in the Science Center Atrium. The art show featured large-scale collaborative models of a yacht, a lifeboat and La Amistad, a 19th century slave ship and site of an iconic slave revolt.

Chorus and Instrumental Ensemble Concerts The chorus and instrumental ensembles from all three divisions celebrated the hard work they put in this year during two separate concerts, held a week apart. The Upper School concert was held on April 26. The Lower and Middle School concert was held on May 3. Both concerts highlighted the tremendous progress the students made in just one short school year.


Take 10! Play Festival

Middle School Performing Arts Festival: Dance

Instrumental Ensemble: Syd LeSage ’23 Upper School Chorus

Rachel Olatunji ’21

Bo Stevenson ’24, Jameson Weyhrich ’22 and Cece Norton ’24

Lower School Chorus Mark Sanders ’19


at hle t ics Spring All-Conference 2018 B A S E B A L L : Peter Miles ’18, Flynn Hersh ’18;

Honorable Mention Trevor Hayward ’20, Teddy Wilson ’20 G I R L S S O C C E R : First Team Edith Edwards-Mizel ’20, Allie Charnas ’20, Caroline Segal ’20; Second Team Julia Fortier ’20; Honorable Mention Emily Weil ’19; All-Sectional Edith Edwards-Mizel; All-Sectional Honorable Mention Allie Charnas, Caroline Segal; All-State Edith Edwards-Mizel T R A C K A N D F I E L D : Julia Doyle ’18, Thandi Steele ’18, Julia Terhaerdt ’19, Thomas McDowell ’18; State Qualifiers Caroline Hagerty ’21, Thandi Steele, Brad O’Connor ’18, Aidan Zavala ’19, Nathan Keyt ’21, Sam Roszak ’21 B OY S T E N N I S : Honorable Mention Evan Fedin ’20, Trace Hefner ’19; State Qualifier Evan Fedin I S L C O A C H I N G S TA F F O F T H E Y E A R G I R L S S O C C E R : Head Coach Lizzy Giffen; Assistant Coaches Rebekah Kauffman, Michaela Bowler, Grey Beaudin and Mark Medhurst B OY S T R A C K A N D F I E L D : Head Coach Patrick McHugh; Assistant Coaches Harold Gauthier, Mike Moreau ’04, Brian Sarfo, Mullery Doar ’06, Timothy Barfield and Rebecca Dachille ’09

Girls Soccer The NSCDS girls soccer team had a historic season, bringing home a second place state trophy. Led by two senior captains, Gabby Greer ’18 and Anna Brennan ’18, the team finished the regular season with a record of 10-4, finishing second in the Independent School League. Moving into the postseason, the Raiders won the regional tournament for the fourth year in a row and, for the first time in school history, won the first-round game of the sectional tournament, beating Johnsburg, the school that knocked them out of the playoffs last year. The girls rolled through the sectional tournament, then won the super-sectional game, advancing to the state semifinals for the first time ever. In the first five tournament games, the girls outscored their opponents 39 to 3! The state semifinal game was perhaps the most exciting game of the year, where the Raiders faced University High School in temperatures close to 90 degrees. The score was 0-0 after 80 minutes, so they moved into a 20-minute overtime period. In the 92nd minute of play, the Raiders found the back of the net to win 1-0 and to advance to the state finals. Less than 24 hours later, they were back on the field for the state championship game, where they lost to Notre Dame from Quincy, Illinois. The NSCDS girls team found great success because of their hard work, determination, resilience and talent. The girls are so thankful to all of the fans who supported them along the way, and are very excited for next season!

Track and Field

Soccer Coaches: Lizzy Giffen, Mark Medhurst, Rebekah Kauffman, Grey Boudin and Michaela Bowler

Track and Field Coaches: Harold Gauthier, Michel Moreau ’04, Mullery Doar ’06, Timothy Barfield, Brian Sarfo and Patrick McHugh (Not Pictured: Rebecca Dachille ’09)

The boys and girls track and field teams had another successful season. Competing in a dozen meets this spring, 38 athletes gave one of the strongest team performances in recent years. The girls team finished second in the Independent School League—their best performance since 2014 and only the fourth time they finished in the top two during the conference meet. At the conference meet, Caroline Hagerty ’21 broke the school record in the 400-meter dash, Julia Doyle ’18 won the high jump, Julia Terhaerdt ’19 won the long jump, and Thandi Steele ’18 won the hurdles and finished second in the triple jump and shot put. The boys finished fourth in the conference— their best performance in three years. Thomas McDowell ’18 won the long jump, traveling 18’8”. At the sectional meets, Caroline, Thandi and Brad O’Connor ’18 qualified for state in individual events and Brad, Aidan Zavala ’19, Nathan Keyt ’21 and Sam Roszak ’21 won the 4x800meter relay. The teams lost a great group of 12 seniors who will be missed. But there are some strong underclassmen who look promising in the future.


Boys Tennis Whether with the girls in the fall or the boys in the spring, the basic philosophy for Raiders tennis remains the same: Work hard, have fun and improve a little each day. Within that framework, the team aspired to be relentless, aggressive, smart and opportunistic. On the first day of preseason, a number of players were beginners. From the end of spring break through the entire month of April, the weather limited outdoor playing time. The team faced a tough early schedule, but continued to work to improve. The Raiders finished 5-5-1 in dual meets. The boys finished strong, going 4-0-1 in the final five dual meets. The Raiders finished the head-tohead portion of the ISL season 3-3 and earned a tie for third place in the conference championship. Two players each earned honorable mention in that tournament. The team finished third in the Mundelein Sectional, where each of the four entrants won at least one match. Evan Fedin ’20 was the singles runner-up, qualifying for state for the second year in a row. Evan advanced to the 5th round of consolation, enabling the Raiders to tie for 30th overall in the state.

Baseball An extremely young Raiders squad pushed through the rain, sleet, snow and cold en route to a combined 15-14-1 junior varsity/varsity record. From the very first game, the Raiders demonstrated the tenacity that would enable them to plow their way through a difficult schedule of opponents and a spring full of crazy weather— which at one time forced them to play 12 games in 12 days. In the season opener, they came back from behind with seven runs in the bottom of the first and ended up winning the game 18-8. Over spring break, the Raiders posted a 2-2 record against impressive competition during their annual trip to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The remainder of the season was punctuated by a number of highlights—including victories over Latin, DePaul College Prep and Francis W. Parker. Throughout the season, the squad continued to mature. Their energy and tight bond eventually pushed the Raiders to a thrilling 10-5 IHSA regional semifinal victory over Chicago Hope Academy before North Shore ultimately succumbed to Elgin Academy in the regional finals.

Edith Edwards-Mizel ’20

Pressley Smith ’18

Brad O’Connor ’18

Thandi Steele ’18

Class of 2018 Iron Raiders: Brad O’Connor, Peter Miles, Will O’Connor, Cam Rizai, Julia Doyle, Thomas McDowell, Thandi Steele, Sam Leiter and Jack Mangel

Iron Raiders The Class of 2018 had a record number of Iron Raiders, with nine students participating in North Shore athletics every season since freshman year. Julia Doyle, Sam Leiter, Jack Mangel, Thomas McDowell, Peter Miles, Brad O’Connor, Will O’Connor, Cam Rizai and Thandi Steele all played 12 straight seasons in Upper School.

Evan Fedin ’20

Flynn Hersh ’18


homecoming Reunion Weekend | September 28-29 F R I D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 8

NOON

AFTERNOON

Middle and Upper School Games

Varsity Field Hockey vs. Evanston Halftime: Alumnae Shootout Competition

5 – 8 P. M .

1 P. M .

Art Exhibit Opening Featuring the work of former faculty Jackie Melissas with alumni artists Joanne Avery ’90, Clayton Cottingham ’14, Chris Davis ’00, Cindy Taylor Mooers ’08, Shaun Teamer ’08 and Ben Tullman ’06 John Almquist Gallery

Varsity Soccer vs. University High Halftime: Jay Bach Iron Raiders Recognition 6 P. M .

Reunion Class Dinners and Gatherings Off-Campus

5 : 3 0 – 7 : 3 0 P. M .

Family Fun Fest Playing Fields 6 – 8 P. M .

Complimentary Cocktail Party for Alumni, Parents of Alumni and Faculty Hall Library 7 : 3 0 P. M .

Bonfire 8 P. M .

Informal Reunion Class Gatherings Off-Campus 9 – 1 1 P. M .

Alumni Classes ’06–’13 Gathering Complimentary Refreshments Firehouse Grill, Evanston

F R A N C I S R . S TA N T O N ’ 2 7 RECOGNITION: SUSIE BREW SCHREIBER ’58

The Stanton Recognition is given each year to an alumnus of the School whose life work exemplifies the School’s motto “Live and Serve.”

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 9

SPECIAL WELCOME

9:30–10:00 A.M.

TO REUNION CLASSES

Little Raiders Field Hockey Clinic

1943, 1948, 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973, 1978, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013

10:30–11:45 A.M.

RAIDER REVIEW–Auditorium North Shore Today: Student Panel State of the School: Head of School Tom Flemma Francis R. Stanton ’27 Recognition Presentation to Susie Brew Schreiber ’58 Alumni Sing-along 1 0 A . M . – 1 P. M .

Fun and Games for Alumni and School Families 1 1 A . M . – 2 P. M .

Food Trucks, including Eric Hattori ’06, Piko Street Kitchen and more! 11:45 A.M.

Former Faculty/Staff and Alumni Reception School Tours (11:45 a.m.–1 p.m.) Auditorium Lobby

64

H O T E L A C C O M M O D AT I O N S

Renaissance Chicago North Shore 933 Skokie Blvd., Northbrook, 847.498.6500, reserved rate of $129 a night Sheraton Chicago Northbrook 1110 Willow Road, Northbrook 847.480.1900, reserved rate of $109 a night C O N TA C T U S

All campus events are complimentary. For further information, contact Director of Alumni Relations Nancy Green Whiteman ’71, 847.881.8848, nwhiteman@nscds.org. For the most current schedule, including all athletic games, please visit www.nscds.org/homecoming


a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

65


pho t os from our pa s t “A picture is worth a thousand words” and tells an important and interesting story. If you can identify any of these photos or tell us a story about them, please contact Director of Alumni Relations Nancy Green Whiteman ’71, 310 Green Bay Road, Winnetka, IL 60093, nwhiteman@nscds.org or call her at 847.881.8848.


a lumni connec t ions Tag! You’re It! Archives Gathering Event – Fun for All! North Shore alumni, parents of alumni and former faculty participated in the archives photo tagging event on April 15 in the Hall Library with Archivist Siera Erazo. After Siera provided an overview of the NSCDS archives, the group learned how to tag photos with identifications using computers to access the large online Flickr gallery of NSCDS scanned photos. There will be additional tagging events in the future to assist in preparing for the School’s Centennial in 2019-2020. Everyone is encouraged to help, and you can even tag from the comfort of your own home or come in to volunteer in the Archives Office—learn more by contacting Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 in the Alumni Office, nwhiteman@nscds.org, 847.881.8848.

Lunch in the Loop The Spring Lunch in the Loop program was held on April 19 at the Union League Club in Chicago. Alumni, parents, parents of alumni and friends attended the program that featured Head of School Tom Flemma who provided a school update followed by an interactive and engaging faculty program entitled Future Skills and North Shore Students. Program presenters included Director of Admissions Jason Giffen, Middle School Humanities and Science Teacher David Kubacki and 1st Grade Teacher Anya Leist.

Tagging: Beth Gerber and Mary Pat Cross

Florida Regional Events Florida Regional Gatherings for alumni and friends were held on April 22 and 23 in Fort Lauderdale and Naples, respectively. These gatherings of North Shore alumni and friends offered a fun time to connect as well as to meet and hear a North Shore update from Head of School Tom Flemma.

“Live and Serve” Day The Alumni Board launched North Shore’s first “Live and Serve” Day on May 12, led by committee members Annie Aggens ’88, Cathy Bell Bartholomay ’79, Phyllis Beattie ’72 and Betsy Perkins Hill ’70. Alumni have long recognized the importance of the school’s motto and are engaged in many ways in their communities. This NSCDS alumni day of service further highlights how we “Live and Serve” and the goal is to bring alumni together across the miles for an annual day of service. This year, for the Chicago-area effort, alumni volunteered at Feed My Starving Children in Libertyville. Alumni gathered in advance on campus to connect and visit, then continued on to work together finding it a positive and meaningful experience. Pictured are Jim Davis ’64, Susan Davis, Maureen Wilde, Diana and Andy DaMiano ’72, Anne Young Hines ’77, Francisco Gutierrez, Phyllis Beattie ’72, Alex Silets ’87, Cathy Bell Bartholomay ’79, Bill Bartholomay, Nancy Green Whiteman ’71, Rob Dehlinger ’71, Tom Flemma, Buff Winston ’63, Betsy Perkins Hill ’70, Jay Bach, Annie Aggens ’88, Doug Frohman ’72, Jeannie Lea Scully ’63, Donald Whiteman ’70, Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Elizabeth Ingram ’82, Melinda Roenisch ’80 and Ed Stojakovic. Several spouses and children of alumni also participated. If you are interested in helping organize a “Live and Serve” Day service project in your community for next year, please contact Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 in the Alumni Office. The Alumni Board looks forward to building coast-to-coast day of service participation.

68

Melinda Roenisch ’80 and Molly Ingram McDowell ’80


Lunch in the Loop: Charlene Kittredge, Suzanne Folds McCullagh ’69 and Kristin Coleman

David Kubacki, Anya Leist and Jason Giffen

“Live and Serve” Day

Florida: Price Patton ’68, George Dern ’68, Sally Green Handley ’68, Barbara Wells ’66 and Lewis Hunt ’76

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

69

Michael Wallace ’53, Harriet Fitzsimmons; (back) Janet Miller, Tom Flemma


a lumni connec t ions Class of 2018— Alumni Welcome Breakfast The Class of 2018 enjoyed a special breakfast in their honor on April 24 as soon-to-be alumni and received their special North Shore class mug with the names of their classmates. Sophie Hiland and Thomas McDowell will serve as class reps. Their role will be to keep classmates connected and informed about alumni events and activities, and support Annual Giving.

Alumni Networking Event On June 21, the North Shore Young Alumni Committee coordinated an Alumni Networking Event at Roof Crop in Chicago. The evening included networking and refreshments, a program and panel discussion that included current parent and trustee Tom Flickinger of Flickinger Wines, alumna and current trustee Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04 of Strive Together, parent of alumni Courtney Wright of Gemini and Rachel Jennings of University of Chicago Law School. In addition, guests had the opportunity to mingle with business representatives from varied industries as well as connect younger alums with other alumni who could share their career knowledge, guidance and networking support. The event was sponsored by Happy Spectacular, a firm co-founded by Nora Philbin ’11 (www.happyspectacular.com).

Class Reps: Sophie Hiland ’18 and Thomas McDowell ’18

The Young Alumni Committee has prioritized their efforts to focus on ways to increase the connections for young alumni with each other, the larger alumni community and school. If you are interested in serving on the committee, contact Nancy Green Whiteman ’71 in the Alumni Office.

2017-18 Young Alumni Committee Kelsey Andersen ’06 Benjy Blenner ’02 Karen Block ’09, Co-Chair Sarah Cody Gallas ’04 Ashleigh Cross St. Peters ’05 Mullery Doar ’06 Lisa Doi ’09, Co-Chair Melissa Jesser ’09 Jake Kann ’12 Wesley Keyser ’07 Leigh Kukanza ’11 Madelaine Kukanza ’08 Jonah Levi-Paesky ’13 Genevieve Nielsen ’10 Morgan Peters ’11 Nora Philbin ’11 Julia Price ’10 Meredith Price ’07 Madeline Tank ’11

70

Alumni Networking Event: Julian Price ’10, Courtney Wright, Emily Leiter ’16, Dillon Forester ’16 and CJ Charnas ’16

Lisa Doi ’09 and Caroline McCarthy ’09


Rachel Jennings, Courtney Wright, Tom Flickinger, Quinnetta Bellows-Miller ’04, John Philbin, Tom Flemma and Nora Philbin ’11

Karen Block ’09, Sarah Cody Gallas ’04 and Matt Thomas ’09

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

Blair Francke ’12, Grace Flickinger ’12 and Morgan Shaner

71


cl a ss notes

1930s

1960s

1980s

North Shore has lost one of its finest alumnae with the death of Anita “Onnie” Straub Darrow ’38 on June 15. She was an active and engaged North Shore alumna on many levels and always a proud and passionate advocate of the School. Many of her family were and are also alumni members of the NSCDS family. “She was predeceased by her brother John W. Straub ’44, her sister Suzanne Straub Petersson ’40 and her husband of 53 years, William Wheeler Darrow ’35. Anita, known as Onnie, was born April 8, 1920 to Walter and Anne Straub. She graduated from the North Shore Country Day School, attended Vassar College and later completed her BA degree at Northeastern Illinois University. She married Bill on September 3, 1941. After his death in 1995, she was never without his photo. She is survived by their six children, Peter ’60, Anne Darrow McCausland ’62, John ’65, James ’67, William ’73 and Philip, 13 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. A lifelong resident of the North Shore, Onnie was on the board of the Wieboldt Foundation for 40 years, including several terms as its president, and also served as chair of the Woman’s Board of the University of Chicago. An early and passionate advocate of social justice, she was a proud supporter of Interfaith Housing Center (now known as Open Communities), TWIG Day Camp, the ACLU, the League of Women Voters, Planned Parenthood and numerous other organizations. She was a patron of the arts and an amateur musician, playing for 50 years in the same string quartet. Onnie was an inspiration to the many whose lives she touched and to North Shore Country Day School.”

Tom Geraghty ’62 reports, “I continue to keep busy at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law (I stepped down recently as director of the law school’s Bluhm Legal Clinic), supervising law students in the representation of kids charged with serious criminal offenses in Cook County’s juvenile and criminal courts. I’ve also been active this year in projects involving access to justice and legal education in developing countries, including a training for young law teachers in Ethiopia, a children’s rights project that took Diane and me to The Gambia, a visit to NU students in Lebanon and an ABA-sponsored training for trial observers monitoring human rights in Bangladesh.”

Alumni friends gathered in Northbrook on April 13: Dan Deuble ’77, Scott Olson ’79, Eric Britton ’80, Miller Bransfield ’80, Matt Weisenberg ’80, his wife Katie and son Jack, Sheryl Murray, Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Jeff Foreman ’80, Bill McDowell and Howard Goldblatt ’80.

1950s Wendel Fentress Ott ’51, 86, died May 3

at St. Paul’s McColl Nursing center in San Diego. He was a native of Chicago, relocating to San Diego in 1977. He is survived by brothers, James F. Ott and John N. Ott III, nephews Jeffery, Anthony, Michael and nieces Gina, Letitia and Emily.

Rick Fall ’62 “moved to a wonderful home

in the foothills of Colorado with my life partner (KK Daugherty). We enjoy the wildlife wandering through our backyard and the nearby golf course.” John Samuels ’68 writes, “After many years in marketing, communications and branding, I’ve retired to live “la dolce vita” in Rome, Italy. My Italian is terrible, but thanks to my amazing bilingual wife, Valeria Barchiesi, we’re thriving. Some may remember that Valeria and I dated in the 1965-66 era. We reconnected after nearly 50 years. While I’m a pensionato, Valeria continues her midwifery practice focused on home birth, her maternity center and Il Nido, a cultural association that offers pre-and post-natal education and services for new moms and dads. We live in Testaccio, a quintessential Roman neighborhood that borders the Tiber River, about .5 km from the Coliseum. If anyone visits Rome, we love showing off our neighborhood’s pizza and other traditional foods.”

1970s

On May 12, a crew from the class of ’76 along with one member from ’75 gathered in New York City to celebrate their 60th birthdays together. In attendance were Betsy Bruemmer ’76, Tom Freisem ’76, Gwen Jessen ’76, Stewart Ames ’76, Charlie Ingram ’75, Janet Figg Kelly ’76, Peter Thorsen ’76, Karen Spencer Kelly ’76, Eunice Hull Drewsen ’52 passed away in Dick Meyer ’76, Karey Wirtz Fix ’76, April. Eunice was a resident of Palm City, Clint O’Connor ’76, Robin Lipsky ’76, Florida. She received her bachelor’s degree Kathy Button Bell ’76, Frank White ’76 from Vassar College in 1978. and Vernon James ’76. 72

Caren Jeskey ’87 shares, “I’m working as a medical social worker for the Seton Healthcare system, including the University of Texas hospital campus and Dell Children’s Medical Center. I have a growing private psychotherapy practice and I also teach yoga and meditation at the breathtaking Lake Austin Spa. My favorite classes to teach are an evening meditation course called Beditation, which is designed to put you to sleep, and a class called Driftaway where students float on rafts in a beautiful pool in a wooden barn. I play Native American flute to aid students in their relaxation practices. I also volunteer at a local women’s prison, and am involved with Yoga Hike where we... well, do yoga and hike. Look me up when you come to Austin and we can catch a show at ACL Live at the Moody Theatre.” David Plimpton ’88 is enjoying being a husband and father. He will be coming to his reunion this fall with Stacy, his wife of 22 years. David and Stacy reside in the countryside of Maryland with their seven children—four of whom are now teenagers. Stacy is homeschooling three of them. David continues to “super commute” to Philadelphia for work in the cosmeticingredients industry. They make it to Chicago a couple times a year for swim meets as their oldest son Christopher is a student athlete at Wheaton College, studying mathematics with a keen passion for stop-action animation. They are waiting (not so) patiently for their youngest (3.5-year-old) to graduate from diapers! Erik Almquist ’85 writes that he is running for Michigan’s State House District 80. “There has not been a Democrat primary here in many years.”

1990s Dana Brown Davenport ’96 has started an

internet talk radio show—Dana Being Dana www.danabeingdana.com. Pete Wentz ’97 played in celebrity Fornite.

Fornite is Epic Games’ hugely popular video game that hosted a June Fornite


Anita “Onnie” Straub Darrow ’38

Members of Class of ’75 and ’76 in New York City

Dan Deuble ’77, Scott Olson ’79, Eric Britton ’80, Miller Bransfield ’80, Matt Weisenberg ’80, his wife Katie and son Jack, Sheryl Murray, Molly Ingram McDowell ’80, Jeff Foreman ’80, Bill McDowell and Howard Goldblatt ’80

Linda Kiracibasi with NSCDS lifers Ben Kegan ’05, Caroline Blehart ’08 and Leigh Cross ’01

Hilary Bishop Scott ’96

Clemantine Wamariya ’08 and The Girl Who Smiled Beads

eight different countries. A couple of Celebrity Pro-Am—a duo tournament that Kristin Rooney Reenock ’03 emailed people have already read it, including put $3 million into the charity happy baby news: “Stephen and I welJunot Diaz, the author of The Brief of the winners’ choice. comed our baby girl, Avery, on April 27 Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and Samantha weighing 8 lbs., 5 oz. She is doing great Hilary Bishop Scott ’96 competed with Power, a former United States Ambassador and an absolute joy. Motherhood is an the New Trier Masters Rowing Club. to the United Nations.” The book was amazing experience and I’m truly enjoyOther team members include current published by Penguin Random House. ing it more than I ever thought possible.” parents Stacy Hunt and DeeDee McCabe. Born in Rwanda and displaced by conflict, Caroline Blehart ’08 writes, “I got engaged Clemantine migrated throughout seven this April to M.G. Proaps! We’re planning African countries as a child, at age 12 was a 2020ish wedding near New York City.” granted refugee status in the United States While visiting New York City, Lower and went on to receive a bachelor’s degree Clemantine Wamariya ’08 has written a School Music Teacher Linda Kiracibasi in comparative literature from Yale book, The Girl Who Smiled Beads, her was able to visit with NSCDS Lifers University. She is now a storyteller and memoir.“The book shares more of what Leigh Cross ’01, Ben Kegan human-rights advocate. I didn’t have the time to share on stage ’05 and Caroline Blehart ’08. detailing my experience growing up in Meera Sinha ’02 writes, “Nathan and I welcomed a baby boy, Rohan Sinha Rennicke, on March 26.” a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition 73

2000s


cl a ss notes

Allison Morris ’06 and Gavin McDermott

Amara Morris

Danielle Gensburg ’08 writes, “I have

recently written a film review that was published in the Chicago Reader on June 28. The review is titled ‘They’re Playing Our Song’ and it is about the new indie drama film, Hearts Beat Loud. In the same issue of The Reader on the opposite page, another North Shore alum, Charlie Greengoss’s ’07 company, Vinyl for a Cause, is mentioned as having released its fourth record. I thought I would mention Charlie’s news as well, as two former NSCDS alums were featured in the Reader’s June 28 issue and on side-by-side pages!” Mick Reedy ’09 reports, “I just graduated from University of Illinois College of Medicine and will be entering neurology residency at University of Wisconsin-Madison.”

Rohan Sinha Rennicke

Engagements

robert gailen

Caroline Blehart ’08 to M.G. Proaps

March 19, 2018 Father of Hannah Gailen ’18

Kristen Kuhns ’85 to Rob Kleiman ’82 Allison Morris ’06 to Gavin McDermott Kate Rooney ’02 to Chandler Gegg

Births amara morris November 27, 2017 Ho-Ming and Aaron Morris ’03

rohan sinha rennicke March 26, 2018 Meera Sinha ’02 and Nathan Rennicke

britton morphew doar

April 6, 2018

ray kleiman sr. April 19, 2018 Father of Cathy Bell Bartholomay ’79, Ray Kleiman ’81 and Rob Kleiman ’82 Grandfather of Charlie Bell ’21

janet loewenthal greenebaum ’48 April 19, 2017

marjorie lindsay reed ’39

avery summer reenock

Peter Shedd Reed ’73

Luke Gensburg ’10 is currently studying

claire stevie reitz April 28, 2018 Kristen and David Reitz ’04

In Memoriam elaine spiesberger frank December 28, 2017 Grandmother of Kenneth Kaplan ’98

bruce a. adams ’58 January 5, 2018

marion kimball purdy ’47 January 15, 2018

karl fernlund February 27, 2018 Father of the late Scott Fernlund ’86

74

April 4, 2018 Father of Deane Malott ’87

April 10, 2018 Shaina and Tom Doar ’00 April 27, 2018 Stephen and Kristin Rooney Reenock ’03

Riley Hall ’13 shares, “I’ll be continuing my finance rotational program at Apple that I started in October 2017. It is taking me to Sydney Australia for six months to support our regional team. Afterward, I’ll get the opportunity to travel around New Zealand for a few weeks with my older sister Marissa ’10 before returning back to San Francisco.”

robert h, malott

eunice hull drewsen ’52

2010s for a master’s degree in real-estate development at Columbia University.

Avery Summer Reenock

May 1, 2018 Mother of

wendel fentress ott ’51 May 3, 2018

bernard m. walchak May 15, 2018 Grandfather of Hannah Walchak ’09

ann wilcox jones ’43 June 10, 2018

anita “onnie” straub darrow ’38 June 15, 2018 Wife of the late William W. Darrow ’35 Mother of Peter Darrow ’60, Anne Darrow McCausland ’62, John Darrow ’65, James Darrow ’67, William Darrow ’73 Grandmother of Bennett Darrow ’91

jan bruemmer June 18, 2018 Mother of Betsy Bruemmer ’76


Diane Kaplan, Debra Campbell, Kate Rooney ’02, Matt Rooney and Chandler Gegg

Tom Flemma, Dick Hall and Tom Doar hosted a reception for former ASSIST host families

golf. A sports fan through and through, Wichita State and Kansas basketball were June 20, 2018 among Jim’s favorites. Grandmother of Samuel Keehn ’15, Jim was a loving husband, father, Caroline Keehn ’17 and Elinor Keehn ’20 son, brother and friend who took pride james “jim” keith schmidt in giving a helping hand to others and Former Faculty was always generous in spirit. Jim graduJune 23, 2018 ated from Moundridge High School in Moundridge, Kansas, in 1981. He was nancy waller nadler ’47 respected and admired by his peers and July 4, 2018 the community for his determination and skill excelling in football and basketball Former Faculty even though he fought cancer for years. Jackie Melissas and several former Everyone who had the chance to know Jim students—Joanne Avery ’90, Clayton knew him as a loving, caring and passionCottingham ’14, Chris Davis ’00, Cindy ate person. His main focus was family, Taylor Mooers ’08, Shaun Teamer ’08 and always checking in with his mother on Ben Tullman ’06—will be the featured art Sundays to find out how everyone was exhibit in the John Almquist Gallery with doing. Jim’s family always appreciated an opening reception during Homecoming that he made it a priority to attend family on September 28. weddings, graduations and reunions. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s Former faculty member and coach degrees at Wichita State University. Jim “James ‘Jim’ Keith Schmidt passed away worked in the education field as a teacher, on June 23 at the age of 55. Born to coach and administrator for over 30 years. Orlando and Ruth Schmidt in 1962 in Jim absolutely loved coaching young men Moundridge Kansas, Jim is survived by and women in many sports; football was a his wife of 29 years, Kari James Schmidt; favorite and basketball a passion. Jim will two daughters, Lauren and Taylor; son, be remembered for impacting the hearts Michael; mother, Ruth Schmidt; sisters and minds of hundreds of young adults and brothers-in-law, Elaine and Don over the years. His playfulness and wit will Hofman, Carol and Marty Ward; brother be remembered by family, friends and coland sister-in-law, Dwayne and DeAnne leagues alike.” As NSCDS Athletic Schmidt; nieces Christine, Lindsey, Director Patrick McHugh stated, Jim was Ashley, Krista; and nephews Jared, “a great coach and the definition of a genRyan and Kyle. tleman who made a big difference in the Jim loved to spend time with family and was forever active. He enjoyed exercis- lives of many young men and women and ing, coaching, and playing basketball and his colleagues.”

marcia lindquist keehn

Former Heads of School Dick Hall and Tom Doar, current Head of School Tom Flemma, and former Director of Admissions Dale Wentz, hosted a reception at NSCDS on June 10 to reconnect School families who have hosted ASSIST exchange students. North Shore joined the program in 1981 and has welcomed ASSIST students from around the world every year since, reaching a total of 52 young scholars from 16 countries who are now alumni of the School. ASSIST is a U.S.-based nonprofit organization that matches academically talented, multilingual international students with American independent secondary schools. Since 1969, 5,050 student scholarleaders from 52 nations have been matched with ASSIST-affiliated schools. The visiting students change their host communities, and they are changed by the experience. They become more independent and more open-minded. They are immersed in learning new topics, and learn new ways to study. And they return home to share what they have learned, and to become leaders across their own communities and across the world. This transformative year abroad gives these scholars a bridge to new possibilities realized immediately and throughout their lives.

Send in Your News! THE DEADLINE FOR THE WINTER ACORN IS DECEMBER 10, 2018.

Email nwhiteman @ nscds.org or call Nancy at 847.881.8848 .

a c o r n · Fall 2018 Annual Report Edition

75


a lumni r efl ec t ion by susan “susie” restin st. john ’68

RESILIENCE AND RESPONSIBILITY—A reflection 50 years after graduation

music of the Beatles, the Dylan & Baez • 9th grade, 1964—Civil Rights Act songs, and the emerging drug scene, passed by Congress; first major student demonstrations against the Vietnam War. many of us left in the spring of ’68 with a sense of loss and disconnect. It seemed • 10th grade, 1965—Selma to As I write this on June 5, 2018, tonight a burden to take up the “opportunities Montgomery marches marks 50 years since the assassination and responsibility” of our graduation. • 11th grade, 1966-67—Vietnam War of Robert Kennedy in 1968—just two days Friends broke apart, took separate paths, escalated; anti-war demonstrations before our graduation from North Shore. and many remain listed today as “lost” in intensified across the country. Two months earlier, Martin Luther King • 12th grade, 1968—Sen. Robert Kennedy the alumni files. Half of our 50 member was assassinated. When we were 8th class are lost or deceased. Our friends who assassinated; Martin Luther King Jr. graders, the country lost JFK. Now, most are lost are where? Why? I hope they are assassinated; the Democratic National of the Class of ’68 is 68 years old— somewhere safe, doing good work in the Convention violent protests in Chicago; and the world continues to astound and world, and finding they no longer need worldwide student anti-war and confound. Have we lived the words on to be connected to the past. civil-rights protests increased. our diploma...embracing opportunity As a teacher, that would be my highest Each of us is a complex composite of and bearing responsibility? many years of experiences. After 50 years, hope for all of us—to embrace what we All that I am today is built on the took for granted, to “live TO serve.” We we have become new and changed over tumultuous, traumatic, powerful years and over, letting go of the past, embracing who received a privileged education in of our high school education at NSCDS, the midst of war and assassinations the future and hoping to simply be pres1964-1968. North Shore held us close, and protests, carry a resilience and a ent. All successes I have achieved were yet pushed us forward; taught us truth responsibility. When I compare our fortunate surprises; yet I know they all while inspiring us to question, challenge connect back to North Shore’s Mr. Allison intimate school of 200 to the public high and communicate with confidence. As and his demand for excellence as I studied schools of my children (1,200) and the the world situation in which we lived voice and sang on the school stage. Based Parkland, Florida, school (3,000), how can smoldered and exploded, our fragile years I deny the gift that we, as North Shore on his inspired foundation, I continued at North Shore educated and prepared us students of the 60s, barely recognized? to study and perform for over 40 years. for a new independence and responsibility Even as I won the Metropolitan Opera “We must be the change we wish to see in a rapidly changing culture. Auditions and other international in the world.”—GANDHI. While we were playing hockey and competitions, completed my doctorate, basketball, singing Gilbert & Sullivan and I challenge each of us to make taught for 45 years, raised two wonderful the Hallelujah Chorus, reading Thoreau Gandhi’s words our constant intention, sons and served in the Peace Corps after and learning to build community—these and to use the resilience we were given at retiring, I remained aware that it all momentous events were shaping our lives. age 18 to be a true leader, a compassionate evolved from the North Shore motto • 7 th grade through college,1962-1973— listener, a giver and lifelong learner—and of “Live and Serve.” U.S. in Vietnam War affect positive change in this time, which Our years at North Shore were deeply • 8th grade,1963—President Kennedy influenced by the rampant violence in our is so similar to 1968. Onward! assassinated; MLK “I Have A Dream” culture and the world. Amidst the “new” and Washington D.C. March.

“.... graduated into larger fields of opportunity and responsibility.” —from the 1968 NSCDS Diploma

76


REMEMBERING JEN PFANNERSTILL Jen Pfannerstill, Upper School science teacher, Scientist-inResidence and girls volleyball coach, passed away on July 2 after a battle with cancer. In her five years teaching and coaching at North Shore, Jen made a lasting impact. Her loss will be felt widely and deeply throughout the North Shore community. Pictured: Jen (center) with her daughters Kali ’20, Haidyn and Meg ’24

Jen Pfannerstill touched our family’s life in important ways at NSCDS. She’s the reason our eldest daughter, Madeline, found such passion in biology and started in a biology program at university, and was a force for so much growth in our daughter, Bridgette, through an advanced open research project this school year. I had the opportunity more than once to thank her for being a teacher who pushes hard but still gives time and space for the process of learning, and honoring that each student grows uniquely. Jen was Bridgette’s varsity volleyball coach as well, where Bridgette loved playing with her friend and teammate, Kali Pfannerstill. Our son Simon and Meg Pfannerstill are classmates at NSCDS and each one of Jen’s and Noel’s three daughters holds the qualities that we all cherish in Jen. These few words are not enough to fully honor Jen, or this devastating loss in our community, but simply share my deep admiration for her love of touching lives through teaching and volleyball coaching.

julie ugarte, Parent Though I had only truly known Ms. Pfannerstill for a semester, she impacted my life in real and concrete ways. Ms. Pfannerstill was more than just my teacher; she was my colleague, my confidant, my role model, and, more than anything else, my friend. In just five months, Ms. Pfannerstill not only provided me with the scientific knowledge to follow my passion of preserving the environment, but also gave me a new lens with which to analyze and treat even the most complex of problems. Indeed, she added a depth, a layer, to my understanding of humans and this world. And, embedded deep in this lens, she instilled in me her own unique sense of optimism and courage towards solving those issues. These are the gifts Ms. Pfannerstill has given me, and I will forever cherish them and her alike.

clark o’bryan ’19

I first connected with Jen in early 2013, during the beginnings of her interview process. I called her from my classroom phone after students had gone home for the day, and to say we connected was an understatement. The length of our phone call was approaching 90 minutes (which felt like 9), and we probably could have shared our visions for 90 more. Suddenly, and unexpectedly, a tiny voice came on the line. Jen revealed that she also wasn’t ready to end the conversation but was now in the car with three daughters, shuttling one (or two?) to volleyball practice, another home to her husband as part of the daily handoff. Her daughters—each of whom we would all soon love and learn from as much as we did Jen— were quiet and respectful for who-knows-howlong as Jen and I chatted, and now chimed in with their names and a polite “hello.” Jen’s passion was not only in her big picture visions for science education, her day-to-day interactions with students really and truly putting their ideas and their process first, it was also in her role as a mother, a colleague, a coach and a friend. Jen and I used to talk a lot about the adventures that were inevitably part of any science story, and the fun part of the adventure was working together and getting messy (literally and figuratively). The story of Jen’s life was far too short and ended far too unexpectedly, but the lessons therein will live on forever.

annie collins, Science Department Chair and Lower School Science Teacher Jen was an amazing example of passionate teaching and of forging deep connections with her students; her students loved her and appreciated the ways she respected and trusted them, and how she celebrated their efforts and accomplishments. Jen often learned together with her students and propelled them to problem solve, ask important questions and then search for answers. Her teaching was inspired and her presence was powerful in the lives of her students.

dave potter, Head of Upper School

Jen was passionate about education and kids. She knew how to get the best work out of students who weren’t necessarily motivated by academic success, and she knew how to make students think deeply about science. Jen and her Upper School science colleagues spent countless hours discussing pedagogy, adolescent development and nerdy science things. She forced us to reflect and be critical about our work with students, and helped create a space where we could wonder, talk and get excited about science. Two years ago, when I became a mom, I learned what a gift it was to have the opportunity to watch Jen be a parent to Kali and Meg. She was always there to listen and offer support, and she made sure someone was taking care of me when I was learning to care for my new, little human. She delivered Starbucks when I was adamant that I wasn’t tired. She made sure there were always snacks in the office. She offered to help my students when my schedule made it difficult for me to do so. Jen helped build an atmosphere of camaraderie and love. I’m so grateful for my time with her, and I miss her very much.

joan ryder, Upper School Science Teacher Others have already written far more eloquently than I ever could about Jen as a transformative teacher and coach, and, of course, she was those things. I remember her also as a colleague—as a strong voice for her beliefs—beliefs that almost always reflected what she thought was best for students. She was fearless in her advocacy for students and was never afraid to offer a countervailing opinion if she thought it was the right thing to do. Jen was a model of both creative teaching and speaking your truth and inspired teachers at North Shore and across the country.

tom flemma, Head of School


North Shore Country Day School 310 Green Bay Road Winnetka, Illinois 60093–4094

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit #2026 Northbrook, IL

Profile for North Shore Country Day School

ACORN – Fall 2018  

ACORN – Fall 2018  

Profile for nscds