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AEO WEATHER JAN: 35 / 19 FEB: 40 / 23 MARCH: 51 / 32 APRIL: 63 / 41 MAY: 74 / 53 JUNE: 82 /61 JULY: 86 / 65 AUG: 84 / 63 SEP: 77 / 55 OCT: 66 / 44 NOV: 52 / 34 DEC: 39 / 24

ondrea


Indiana weather

FUN FACTS Indiana 's climate is affected by 6 air masses at different times of the year. About 20% of Indiana 's annual precipitation comes from regional sources. The main regional source is Lake Michigan . Excessive late-winter rainfall is the cause for the most widespread floods in Indiana Maximum temperature ever recorded: 116F at Collegeville in 1936. Minimum temperature ever recorded: -36F at New Whiteland in 1994. (1887 Lafayette -33F). Most days ever recorded when temperature was over 90F: 105 times in 1953 at Evansville. Most days ever recorded when temperature was over 100F: 33 times in 1955 at Evansville. Maximum snowfall ever recorded: Jan 26, 1978 , Up to 20 inches of snow fell in the central and south with 40 inches up in the north. A federal state of emergency was declared because of the worst blizzard on record to hit Indiana . Maximum ice accumulation ever recorded: 2 inches in 1988. Maximum flooding ever recorded: 27 feet above flood stage in 1913 at least 90 lives lost $15 million in damage. Maximum precipitation in 24 hours: 10.5 inches recorded in 1905 at Princeton Maximum snow in 24 hours: 30 inches recorded in December 2004 at southern and east central Indiana . Highest wind gust on record of 111 MPH in Indianapolis occurred on June 29, 1929. Indiana has a humid climate with cool winters and warm, wet summers. The extreme southern portion of the state is within the humid subtropical climate area and receives more precipitation than other parts of Indiana. Temperatures generally diverge from the north and south sections of the state. In the middle of the winter, average high/low temperatures range from around 30 °F/15 °F in the far north to 39 °F/22 °F in the far south. In the middle of summer there is generally a little less variation across the state, as average high/low temperatures range from around 84 °F/64 °F in the far north to 90 °F/69 °F in the far south. The growing season typically spans from 155 days in the north and 185 days in the south. While droughts occasionally occur in Indiana ,rainfall totals are distributed relatively equally throughout the year. Precipitation totals range from 35 inches near Lake Michigan in northwest Indiana to 45 inches along the Ohio River in the south, while the state's average is 40 inches. Annual snowfall in Indiana varies widely across the state, ranging from 80 inches in the northwest along Lake Michigan to 14 inches in the far south.Lake effect snow accounts for roughly half of the snowfall in northwest and north central Indiana due to the effects of the moisture and relative warmth of Lake Michigan upwind. Lake-effect snow is produced during cooler atmospheric conditions when cold winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, providing energy and picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on the leeward shores. The same effect also occurs over bodies of salt water, when it is termed oceaneffect or bay-effect snow. The effect is enhanced when the moving air mass is uplifted by the geographic influence of higher elevations on the downwind shores. This uplifting can produce narrow but very intense bands of precipitation, which deposit at a rate of many inches of snow each hour, often resulting in copious snowfall totals.The areas affected by lake-effect snow are called. Northwestern and north central Indiana (mostly between Gary, IN and Elkhart,IN) In a 2012 report, Indiana was ranked eighth in a list of the top 20 tornado-prone states based on NWS data from 1950 through 2011. A 2011 report ranked South Bend 15th among the top 20 tornadoprone cities in the United States, while another report from 2011 ranked Indianapolis eighth. Despite its vulnerability, Indiana is not a part of tornado alley.


LAKE EFFECT SNOW Lake-effect snow is produced during cooler atmospheric conditions when cold winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, providing energy and picking up water vapor, which freezes and is deposited on the leeward shores. The same effect also occurs over bodies of salt water, when it is termed ocean-effect or bay-effect snow. The effect is enhanced when the moving air mass is uplifted by the orographic influence of higher elevations on the downwind shores. This uplifting can produce narrow but very intense bands of precipitation, which deposit at a rate of many inches of snow each hour, often resulting in copious snowfall totals.The areas affected by lake-effect snow are called. Northwestern and north central Indiana (mostly between Gary, IN and Elkhart, IN) CLIMATE The entire state of Indiana falls into the hot-summer humid continental climate category. This climate classification includes four different seasons as well as moderately high humidity and precipitation. Precipitation is fairly uniform throughout the year; the annual average is around 40 inches, with the south typically receiving a few inches more than the north. Year-round, temperatures tend to be a few degrees warmer in the south than in the north, due solely to the differing latitudes. Winter Although not the wettest time of the year, winter is the cloudiest season. The northern and especially northwestern parts of the state receive more snow than the south because of the winds that blow across Lake Michigan to produce lake effect snow bands. Lake effect snow is heaviest near the lake, but lake-induced snow showers and cloudiness can sometimes extend as far south as central Indiana. Snow accumulations vary each season, but mean totals range from about 15 inches in the southwest to over 70 inches on the shores of Lake Michigan. Measurable snowfall usually begins in late November and ends in late March. Daytime high temperatures in January, the coldest month of the year, average in the middle 30s, with overnight lows averaging in the upper teens. Summer Summer weather in Indiana can range from pleasant to sultry. Daytime highs average in the low-to-mid 80s and overnight lows in the mid-60s, but heat waves can cause the mercury to soar. Combined with elevated humidity, temperatures can feel quite oppressive. Fortunately, extended periods of searing heat are rare, as cold fronts regularly usher in relatively cooler and drier Canadian air. Droughts can occasionally occur during summer, causing disruption to the state's agricultural backbone. On the other hand, thunderstorms are common during the summer months as well. Spring and Fall Temperatures in spring and fall lie between the extremes of winter and summer, but can fluctuate significantly within a short time span as warm and cold air masses battle for control. This clash of differing air masses causes severe weather, particularly in spring, which is peak tornado season in the state. Spring is also the wettest time of the year and can bring floods, whereas autumn tends to be much drier, often the sunniest and least humid season.

ondrea


Hurricanes

Have you ever been in a hurricane or seen one? If not,  I will tell you about them because I have researched one and I’m going to tell you all about it. A hurricane is a tropical storm with winds that have reached a constant speed of 74 miles per hour or more. The eye of a storm is usually 20-30 miles wide and may extend over 400 miles. Tropical cyclones are like giant engines that use warm, moist air as fuel. That is why they form only over warm ocean waters near the equator. The warm, moist air over the ocean rises upward from near the surface. Because this air moves up and away from the surface, there is less air left near the surface. Another way to say the same thing is that the warm air rises, causing an area of lower air pressure below. Air from surrounding areas with higher air pressure pushes in to the low pressure area. Then that "new" air becomes warm and moist and rises too. As the warm air continues to rise, the surrounding air swirls in to take its place. As the warmed moist air rises and cools off, the water in the air forms clouds. The whole system of clouds and wind spin and grow fed by the ocean's heat and water evaporating from the surface. Storms that form north of the equator spin counter clockwise. Storms south of the equator spin clockwise. This difference is because of Earth's rotation on its axis.

The dangers of a storm include torrential rains, high winds and storm surges. A hurricane can last for 2 weeks or more over open water. Hurricanes are very common by the oceans. The strongest hurricane recorded was the Florida Keys Storm of 1935, 500 people were killed from the Category 5 storm. The largest storms recorded were the Category 5 Labor Day Storm of 1935, which killed 400 in Florida. Hurricane Camille that also hit Louisiana and Mississippi in 1969 causing a 25-foot storm surge, that killed 256 people and caused flooding all the way to New England. The deadliest hurricane in U.S. history was called the Texas storm of 1900, at Galveston Island estimated to be a Category 4 storm with a storm surge of 16 feet. This storm claimed more than 6,000 deaths and is noted as the worst natural disaster in our country's history.Eighteen of the 54 direct deaths attributed to Hurricane Andrew occurred during the recovery phase. Of those identified, eight were stress-induced heart attacks, three were either people falling in damaged buildings or hit by debris while cleaning up, and two were children who died in fires in damaged homes.

Nationwide, hurricanes annually account for an average of 17 deaths while flooding deaths average 147 per year.Florida is the most hurricane prone state in the United States with the southeast being the most at risk. This state being a peninsula has the potential of having hurricanes strike from the Atlantic or the Gulf. Though busy years spark our attention, 1983 had only 4 named storms yet Hurricane Alicia hit Galveston, Texas while in 1992, there were only 6 named storms but Hurricane Andrew hit Florida and Louisiana. The average number of storms is probably overstated since it does not take in effect the intensity of the storms which exist and make landfall.

ondrea ivey


BLIZZARDS BLIZZARDS

“Have you ever been in a blizzard?” “In this article you will learn about them and how to stay safe.”Blizzards can be one of the most deadliest types of disasters ever.And in this article i will tell you how these storms are nothing to play around with. A blizzard is a severe snowstorm with high winds and low visibility. The way theses beast form are 1) Cold air (below freezing) is needed to make snow 2)Moisture is needed to form clouds and precipitation. 3)Warm, rising air is needed to form clouds and cause precipitation. The thing that make a blizzard so dangerous are these ways 1)you can’t see if you are driving one the road. you could spin out get into a crash and way more terrible things can happen. 2) You could get lost in the storm and get frostbite.3)If your not prepared you could get snowed into your house.Wind chill (often popularly called the wind chill factor) is the felt air temperature on exposed skin due to wind. It measures the temperature of the wind.The things that can some with a blizzard is an ice storm. a ice storm is a storm of freezing rain that leaves a coating of ice. The different types of perceptions are None No precipitation occurring Drizzle Very small, numerous and uniformly distributed water drops that may appear to float while following air currents Freezing Drizzle Drizzle that falls in liquid form but freezes upon impact to form a coating of glaze Rain Liquid water drops falling from the sky Freezing Rain Rain that falls in liquid form but freezes upon impact to form a coating of glaze on exposed objects (this will occur well before any ice forms on the ground) Ice Pellets/Sleet Small translucent balls of ice (not to be confused with hail) Snow Frozen precipitation in the form of flakes of crystalline water ice. These are why theses beast are so dangerous. But here are some good tips on how to stay safe. 1) you can be very prepared.2)You can stock on the supplies you need incase you get snowed in.3)You Need to stay safe at all times do go to far away from your house because you can get lost. [1]

avery hays


TORNADOS Do you know what a tornado is?NO?Well i'll tell you.A tornado is a violent rotating column of air extending for a thunderstorm touching to the ground.tornadoes can also form in a hurricane.the most violent can have wind speeds up 300 mph.they can destroy large building,uproot trees and hurl cars hundreds yards. They normally form from a thunderstorms. you need warm moist air from the gulf of mexico and cool dry air from canada when these two air masses meet, they create instability in the atmosphere In a year the average tornadoes that happen in indiana is 20 there are at least 5 dead and 80 or more injured.indiana’s rank number 15 frequency of tornadoes.there has been a total of 897 tornadoes in the state of indiana 1950-1995.

Elizabeth Zelaya


Monsoons I have some information that could blow your mind! Are you ready? Alright here we go. Did you know that monsoons are an annually recurring weather phenomenon, triggered by the earth’s tilt in relation to the sun. Although they return every year, it is still impossible to tell the timing, duration, and quantity of rain each season, a fact that leaves impacted areas without accurate storm information. Monsoons are set by land and sea temperature differences. Land reflects the sun’s rays, heating air over land more rapidly. Water is able to absorb a lot of heat without itself changing temperature much, so air over water stays relatively cooler.

angelic litting

Magz