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The magazine for our people

October 2016

04 Feeling the heat: Using thermal imaging on DC third rail

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BEING ME Wendy Philips shares her story of coming out as a transgender woman

Graphic content: Reaching the fourth dimension in project planning

11 Manchester united: Bridging the gap between Manchester’s stations

14 Delay DNA: The impact of delays on the network


WELCOME AND NEWS

CONTRIBUTOR’S WELCOME Rob Williamson,

Charing Cross station manager

There are more trains than ever on the railway, with passenger numbers soaring too, creating more congestion on the network. Among the challenges we face as a company is doing our utmost to prevent delays to services through infrastructure problems, and resolving any issues as soon as possible to make sure people get to their destinations on time. On pages 14 to 16 we take a look at how a delay in one area can affect services across Britain, and I share the impacts delays can have at Charing Cross. Wendy Philips shares her personal journey of being a transgender woman and the day she decided to be her real self at work on pages eight to 10, while on four and five the Liverpool DU team explain how they’ve been working with Merseyrail to reduce the impact of insulator pot failures using thermal imaging. There’s plenty more inside, including, on page 18, how teams in South East route created an artificial river bed to protect a bridge and viaduct from scour damage.

In the spotlight “The health and wellbeing of colleagues is a key priority,” says Brenda Desbonne-Smith, mental health and wellbeing advisor. “All colleagues at Network Rail can take an online wellbeing assessment, which gives an insight into physical, social and mental health. It provides a confidential personalised report, wellbeing age and advice on how this age can be improved upon by making lifestyle changes. It also provides valuable information that helps the business to promote the right wellbeing initiatives that support employees. “It’s all part of making sure we’re fit for the future and the small things we can all do to keep us happy and healthy and safer every day – both in and out of work.” Just type in bit.ly/nrwellbeing into the browser on your computer or smartphone and answer the questions presented to you. The assessment window closes on 31 October. If you have any queries, or require further support, please contact healthandwellness@networkrail.co.uk

Get in touch: October 2016 View this issue online: http://goo.gl/aJPU3J Published by: The internal communications team and beetroot. www.beetroot.co.uk 100%

Network is a carbon neutral publication printed on Cocoon Silk (130gsm) 100% recycled stock. Do your bit and recycle Network.

OCTOBER 2016

internal.communications @networkrail.co.uk On the cover: Wendy Philips, planning assistant, talking to Network about being a transgender woman at work and coming out to her team. Read the full story on pages 8 to 10. Disclaimer: Photography featured in Network has been specially commissioned and undertaken in a place of safety. Always be aware of your surroundings and do your part in making sure you and your colleagues get Home Safe Everyday.

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See page 11

NETWORK


WELCOME AND NEWS

NETWORK KNOWLEDGE What’s making news across the business

Network Rail receives £4m fine

On 24 August 2011, 82-year-old Olive McFarland was struck and fatally injured by a train passing over Gipsy Lane footpath crossing near Needham Market in Suffolk. The Office of Rail and Road has prosecuted Network Rail under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. At £4m the fine is one of the largest of its kind received by Network Rail.

Everyone together

Everyone Week took place between 3-7 October, with colleagues across the network involved in more than 100 events and activities. This year’s focus was on collaboration. Events included the launch of an Everyone eLearning programme, the exhibition of software and hardware aids available as reasonable adjustments and the Everyone Summit, where Sir Peter Hendy, chair, discussed collaboration in practice with representatives from both Network Rail and contractors/suppliers.

A handback first: IP track has achieved a 125mph line speed handback on an East Coast Main Line signals and crossings project – a British first. Date set: Grove Lane bridge, which partially collapsed over the Midland Main Line in Leicestershire, will be fully repaired by early 2017. New charity of choice: Barnardo’s has been named as Network Rail’s new charity of choice, taking 47 per cent of colleagues’ votes.

Cycle to work scheme is back The autumn window of Network Rail’s cycle to work (C2W) scheme is now open, allowing people to lease a brand-new bike and safety equipment worth between £100 and £1,000, tax-free. Those who already own a bike can apply for accessory-only packages.

Britain runs on rail

The Rail Delivery Group (RDG), which represents Network Rail, freight and train operating companies, has launched a campaign to showcase the modernisation of Britain’s railway and its important role in national life. The ‘Britain runs on rail’ campaign will highlight the railway’s crucial role and explain to customers how their money is being invested to help sustain further investment in the industry. As part of the new campaign, the

Colleagues can find their nearest partner store and reserve the bike and equipment of their preference. Deductions to pay for bikes are made through salary sacrifice over 13 months. The scheme closes on Friday 18 November.

iconic 1965 National Rail logo has been refreshed to reflect the modern rail industry. The original logo’s designer, Gerry Barney, said: “The new version reinforces the totality of Britain’s rail industry working together, and the diversity of the different companies and Network Rail.”

>>> Read these articles in full, plus more, on Connect and Connect Mobile <<<

NETWORK

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OCTOBER 2016


B E T T E R E V E RY D AY

HEAT SEEKERS Colleagues at Liverpool DU have found a new way to identify faults on DC third-rail

There used to be a bad case of tunnel vision when the team at Liverpool DU tried to locate cable and insulator pot failures on the DC third-rail Merseyrail line. That was until the team, working with train operator Merseyrail, hatched a plan to use thermal imaging in a new way. Paul Linder, conductor rail section manager, explained: “Over the past few years there’s been an increase in these types of faults but we had no real way of spotting them remotely. “So when an insulator pot exploded we had to go down and investigate, which meant stopping services. We needed to isolate the track as it’s electrified and then walk along the line OCTOBER 2016

between Liverpool and Birkenhead – a stretch of two miles – to try and find the one pot that was damaged.”

Changing tactics

Tony Jones, infrastructure maintenance engineer, added: “We needed a way to know individual pots could be about to fail instead of waiting until they did and having to do a wholesale change of all the pots, costing the business an unnecessary amount of money and putting our people on the tracks for long periods. “Thermal imaging is used across the company but we’ve never been able to use it live in an underground section as the only time you can access a tunnel is

04

when you’ve got a possession at night and the line is isolated – by which time the heat signatures have dissipated and you can’t find the problem. “To get round this we sat down with Merseyrail, and devised a way of fitting the thermal camera to their train, which has been a huge success for us.”

A complete picture

“Now we’ve got a complete video of all the underground sections showing all areas where there are hotspots,” said Dave Roberts, assistant electrification and plant maintenance engineer. “We can break this down from station to station to identify areas that require immediate attention. NETWORK


B E T T E R E V E RY D AY

All about: Insulator pots An insulator pot supports the conductor rail and insulates it from earth, keeping it powered and services running.

A contaminated insulator pot can result in electrical tracking down the side of the insulator and ultimately the loss of traction supply for a whole section of rail, stopping services.

Dave Roberts

Tony Jones NETWORK

“For example, we can view high-risk sections where an insulator box is at 50-60 degrees and get out there to change the one pot instead of a whole row, but we can also view areas that might be showing 20 degrees, which is still a risk but not immediate and we can plan for its replacement later on.” Tony added: “We’re now detecting faults before they occur, allowing us to change individual cables and insulators in a much more proactive way, reducing costs and minimising impact on services. “We’ve not had one failed insulator or cable that the thermal imaging hasn’t picked up. It’s been a huge benefit for us, for Merseyrail and for our passengers.” n

“Now that we can plan replacements we can fit other work into the same isolation periods, meaning even less disruption to passengers.” Paul Linder 05

OCTOBER 2016


B E T T E R E V E RY D AY

THE RIGHT DIMENSION

From 2D drawings to 4D simulations and beyond, Network Rail is reaching the next frontier in project visualisation The fourth dimension has arrived, allowing Network Rail to see the future. But while the company hasn’t discovered the secret of time travel – 4D simulations (and 3D models) are already helping to plan and manage today’s projects for tomorrow’s railway. These tools are not only well embedded in current processes, but the company has also been involved in further developing them. Fergal Malone, principal programme engineer (CAD), currently works in the Greater Western route modernisation programme and has been involved in

Solid modelling of Reading proposed station Signal sighting at Reading station

modelling and simulations since the 1990s.

Drawings and models

“3D models are the key to everything that we produce and the backbone to how our suppliers produce their 2D drawings,” said Fergal. “Back in the early days of designing in CAD, suppliers would draw parts of the project independently – civils, architecture and railway – and then these designs would be delivered to the team that would do the building or engineering work. “But because these drawings were

4D Simulation Transfer Deck Launch RSAR Project OCTOBER 2016

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NETWORK


B E T T E R E V E RY D AY

3D visualisation of City Thameslink project

Augmented reality plant movements

3D visualisation of Didcot OLE as built

3D Visualisation OLE at Oxford

done separately from one another, there was a big chance of making mistakes: sometimes a side view of a footbridge would have fewer steps than a front view, for example. “Modelling in 3D gives us the ability to see all the sides of an object, removing the chance of those mistakes. Then, based on the 3D models it’s possible to produce accurate 2D drawings.”

be removed to install the new bridge. Thanks to the simulation it became apparent ahead of the possession that the space to manoeuvre the new bridge would be insufficient and would have made the blockade overrun. “Using 4D we can see when plans are faulty and give time for teams to resolve the issues before they happen.”

Graphic visualisation

“The next step for us would be to improve visualisations. We want to use new software that would enable us to show seasonal changes, changing weather conditions, lighting conditions determined by the time of day, and auto-animated vehicle and pedestrian movements. “This would improve the delivery of signal sighting by showing us the visibility of a signal in all weathers and all times of day, even before it’s been placed. It can also be used to produce animations where drivers could be trained for a new stretch of railway before they actually have to drive on it.” n

The fourth dimension brings 3D models together to create a virtual reality timesimulated graphical environment. “With 4D simulations it’s possible to see the process of building a structure from beginning to end. It allows us to see where people are going to be working, the access routes they need to use, how they’ll need to move the materials, everything. “We used 4D to plan the Caversham Road bridge replacement on the Reading station area redevelopment programme. The bridge was pre-built on site and the partial scaffolding in place had to

The final frontier

3D visualisation of Bath Spa station

FAST FACTS Some of the projects that have used 4D simulation: • Greater Western route modernisation programme • The Crossrail programme • Reading Station Area Remodelling • High Speed 2 •Thameslink.

Cab View 360 photo embedded in MicroStation NETWORK

“With 4D simulations it’s possible to see the process of building a structure from beginning to end. It allows us to see where people are going to be working, the access routes they need to use, how they’ll need to move the materials, everything.” Fergal Malone

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OCTOBER 2016


C E L E B R AT I N G O U R P E O P L E

‘‘YOU DON’T COME OUT ONCE, ON A SINGLE DAY, AND IT’S DONE. I’M STRONG BUT IT’S DIFFICULT’’ Wendy Philips shares her story of coming out as a transgender woman

OCTOBER 2016

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NETWORK


C E L E B R AT I N G O U R P E O P L E

“I joined Network Rail 13 years ago out on track on the P-way. I was working as a male but in my private life I was living as a woman. I felt that in the P-way environment it would be a no-go to come out as transgender. “I went off work for six months due to an injury on track, that break led me to decide that it was time to make the change at work. “I considered leaving Network Rail, and expected my team not to understand, so I contacted Matt Anton as my senior manager to talk about things. He didn’t want me to quit without having a conversation. “He came round my house – he had spoken to a HR Business Partner, and the diversity and inclusion (D and I) team who directed him to HR Direct and shared the Everyone Guide for Trans employees. It was daunting for him and he had hoped someone from HR or from D and I would go with him, but they aren’t resourced to provide that support unfortunately. “Matt wasn’t unprepared, there was some information available for him to work with. But on a personal level he was just like ‘oh my God, I’ve never dealt with this’ but he jumped in with both feet, and fair play to him. We were both doing this for the first time; it’s quite a lonely thing to go through in that way.”

Back at work

“I stepped out of the office three or four times thinking ‘I can’t do this’. Everyone was quiet and I felt they were avoiding me. “Lesley Hull, my direct line manager, who has been great to me, told me that everyone was worried about talking to me because they didn’t want to make a mistake. “Halfway through the afternoon I stood up and said ‘Look, you’ve all known me for 14 years as somebody else. If you make a mistake it’s not the end of the world, I’m not going to curl up and die or phone the police. You shouldn’t be afraid of me in your own office’. “As soon as I said that, people started talking and integrating with me.”

Better every day

“You don’t come out once, on a single a day, and it’s done. I have to clarify who I am in many ways, and scenarios, all the time. I’m strong but it’s difficult. “There has to be a give and take between cisgender (a person whose self-identity conforms with the gender that corresponds to their biological sex) and transgender colleagues. Consideration and understanding between us all. “It’s important to have a manager who’s on your side, but they don’t know what you’re going through as a trans person, and they need help personally too. Continued overleaf >>

“Walking into work that day was the hardest thing I’ve ever done – the hardest thing through the whole process. If only I’d had another trans colleague with me that first day for support.

What is transgender?

Transgender people, trans people or gender variant people are people whose gender identity or gender expression differs in some way from the assumptions made about their gender when they were born. Gender reassignment is one of the nine protected characteristics in the Equality Act 2010.

NETWORK

Support: Lesley Hull and Matt Anton with Wendy

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OCTOBER 2016


C E L E B R AT I N G O U R P E O P L E

“I’d like people to contact me if they have questions about managing a transgender employee or coming out as transgender.”

“It can be difficult in the kind of environment that we work, but if you reach out and talk to people – to managers, to HR – there are options to make the transition at work. “But together we can do more to help people with the process of coming out, – to enable us to do our job and make the change too. To ensure everyone has a safe space to ask questions.”

Here to help

“Having the support of someone else who has done the transition and has gone back to work could make things easier. I’m sure it would mean the world to them. It would’ve meant the world to me. “I’d like people to contact me if they have questions about managing a transgender employee or coming out as transgender, or simply if they want to know how to prepare for welcoming back a colleague for their first day as a trans person.” n

FIND OUT MORE More information for line managers and colleagues is available in the Managing Transgender Colleagues guide, which can be found by typing the name of the guide into the search bar on Connect. Call the employee helpline:

0844 371 0115

Email the LGBT employee network:

archway@networkrail.co.uk OCTOBER 2016

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NETWORK


B E T T E R E V E RY D AY

Talking Business

PULL OUT

People measure Welcome to Talking Business – the team briefing guide for everyone in the organisation. It’s included with every issue of Network magazine and available on Connect and Connect Mobile. Each month the Talking Business team brief will focus on one of Network Rail’s scorecard measures and ask ‘how can you make a difference?’ Our corporate scorecard (right) shows us how we are doing against our targets for the year. Using it to discuss how we can be better every day can really make a difference to our performance. Additional information and materials for line managers is on connect/talkingbusiness. Mark Carne, chief executive, said: “Talking Business is about having

Use th Business is Talking su in your repplement team briegular fing

How to use Talking Business:

a quality conversation, as a team, to understand how you can focus on the most important improvements you can make together to be safer at work and to improve performance.” Home

NATION

Safety

AL SCOREC

AREA

Train Performanc e

Finance & Efficiencies

ARD PER

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PERFORMAN

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Lost Time

Workforce Safety

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Train Accident

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Income and

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Aggrega te of Route Aggrega te of Route Aggrega te of Route

of metrics

Aggrega te of Route hitting target

action plans

measure

Reduction in Complaints Railway Work

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9.3% 7/24

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WORSE THAN TARGE T

6/24

0%

10/18

0%

4.0% 7/8 6/8

nts received

Various measure

50.0%

50.0%

P2 FOR PUBLICAT

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4/14

-0.2%

5/8

100%

2/8

100%

-4.6%

2/4

50%

0.0%

100%

TARGET

0%

2/8

by routes

50%

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7/8

1/8

50%

1/8

s

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5/8

50% 0%

100% 100%

6/8

100%

0.0%

56.3%

BETTER THAN TARGE T

-7.5%

2.8%

5/8

P4

100% 50% 50% 7/8

WORSE THAN TARGE T

9.0%

P3

100%

-12.3%

0%

PREVIOUS

4/8

51.9% P1

BETTER THAN TARGE T

50%

0% 1/4

CURRENT

3.0%

3/8

RD - NOT

100%

TARGET 50% 12/18

1.6%

AIP % WEIGHTING

95%

1.7%

0.7%

0%

16.3%

0.5%

11/24

8/18

3/14

2.2%

DRAFT SCORECA

94.6%

1.6%

Performance

BETTER THAN TARGE T

15.9%

90%

3/14

and local people s

10 100%

2%

TARGET 15.0%

3.5%

Performance

Performance

9

92%

WORSE THAN TARGE T 13.7%

PRIOR PERIOD

D

BETTER THAN TARGE T

0

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5.8% Count of

PRIOR PERIO

96.1%

CURRENT PERIO

+ £47m

-74

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6.5

TARGET

100%

CURRENT PERIO

5.0%

Survey Results

Bonus Positi ed by number of metrics hitting target on 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%

+ £70m 0

WORSE THAN TARGE T

1/4

Your Voice

tion

Performa nce represent

+ £100m 0

4

100%

AIP % WEIGHTING

BETTER THAN TARGE T

0 -28 -112

92.1%

Arrivals

Measures

YTD

100% 100%

0%

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6

5.0%

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Performa nce represent ed by number

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-11

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CURRENT PERIO

10.0%

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Key mileston es of top 10 renewal enhance s& ment projects

CRI

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70%

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0.425

-0.002

120 K

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0.442

90 K

76.9%

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FORECAST

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Total Efficienc y Generat ed (£m) excludin Enhance g ment ( Net , Gross ) Enhance ments Only ( Net , Gross (£m) )

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Satisfaction Reputation &

FULL YEAR

0.447

64,816**

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calls closed within close out 90 days only calculated (%) 4 Period in ArrearsŦ for Non-IP Close Calls (MAA)

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P6

P7

Page 3

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P9

THIS ISSUE’S TOPIC: People measure

P10

P11

P12

P13

Your voice really matters – be it about your job, your wellbeing, safety, or training needs – your feedback has the potential to make life at work better every day. So it’s good to talk, but it’s even better to listen, and teams who turn that into action are the most engaged across our workforce. See inside and page four of this section.

1. The centre-spread is the focus for your discussion. A copy of this pull-out can be electronically displayed for the team 2. At the start of the meeting, line managers should nominate a team member to make a note of the discussion and, at the end of the session, send in the team’s response to question four 3. The featured topic should be introduced and the team then discuss questions one to four in the centre-fold 4. The team’s response to question four should be submitted by the date requested. The best examples will be highlighted on Connect.

PEOPLE MEASURE

NETWORK

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S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 01 6


Scorecard metric: Q1:What is the People measure? What is in our Your Voice action plan?

Q2:Why is it important? In our team, what improvements are being made?

E MORATION RM / INFO n to connescstto

Log o gbusine guides n l talki d usefu our a y o l r o n f dow d tools gs n n a briefi

PEOPLE MEASURE 02

YOU VOI MATT


: People measure Q3:Howâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our team doing?

OUR ICE TERS

What has been achieved in our team so far?

Q4: What can we do to make a difference and be better every day? What shall we prioritise next?

--------------------------------------Write your answer here.

--------------------------------------Manager name and contact number.

---------------------------------------

Send your response...

Nominate one team member to share your response by 6 November, using one of the following: Snap and send: Take a picture of this box on your phone and send to talkingbusiness@networkrail.co.uk Email: Type out your response and send to talkingbusiness@networkrail.co.uk

The best of these will be highlighted as best practice.

TURN TO NEXT PAGE TO READ MORE ABOUT PEOPLE MEASURE >>>

PEOPLE MEASURE 03


Talking Business

Your voice really matters – be it about your job, your wellbeing, safety, or training needs – your feedback has the potential to make life at work better every day. So it’s good to talk, but it’s even better to listen, and teams who turn that into action are the most engaged across our workforce. That’s why from 2016 the national scorecard includes the people measure, which tracks Your Voice action plan completion across all routes as one of the locally-set measures (except Scotland where overall employee engagement is measured). Wessex runs an additional survey on safety maturity.

The Your Voice survey

More than half of Network Rail colleagues shared their views on working for the company in the Your Voice 2015 employee engagement survey – a five per cent increase from 2013. The survey, which runs every two years, provides an opportunity for employees to express views on a range of key topics and as a team understand what people find positive about where they work, as well as identifying areas that need improving. PEOPLE MEASURE 04

From insight to action

Following the 2015 results, managers received their reports and teams around the business have started conversations and created action plans.

What did the survey tell us overall?

Our overall engagement score was 73 per cent. Generally, these are the things people think are great about working at Network Rail: • 78 per cent of employees are clear about how their work contributes to delivering Network Rail’s purpose, vision and role • 78 per cent of employees feel they have the knowledge, training and skills necessary to do their job • 76 per cent of employees feel they are treated with respect as an individual. And these are the areas where you’d most like to see improvement: • Leadership skills of our senior managers • Open and honest communication from our senior managers • Action as a result of the survey.

Making Network Rail a better place to work for everyone means turning the insight from the Your Voice survey into action. It’s not about reinventing the wheel, but about continuous improvement. Of course the survey isn’t the only way to gather feedback either: oneto-ones, performance conversations, team meetings and briefings are all opportunities to have open and constructive conversations about what your team can do to improve things.

Top tips for Your Voice team action planning:

• Keep using the results of the survey and any other feedback you gather over time • Share and discuss that insight as a team regularly • Brainstorm and prioritise actions to improve things • Add to your action plan and keep taking action • Regularly update each other on progress • Assess the impact it’s had and celebrate your success. Help is on hand either through your local HR business partners or Your Voice partners as well as online resources available on Connect.


R A I LWAY U P G R A D E P L A N

City united Merging heritage with progress, the Ordsall Chord is making history by linking three Manchester stations

Continued overleaf >>

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OCTOBER 2016


R A I LWAY U P G R A D E P L A N

Small in size but big in stature, the Ordsall Chord will be the perfect combination of heritage preservation and ground-breaking engineering. Despite only being roughly 300 metres long, a lot of preparatory work has gone into the project that will provide a direct link between Manchester Piccadilly, Oxford Road and Manchester Victoria for the first time. Mike Heywood, senior programme manager, said: “The chord will support the wider works of the Northern Programme, which include reducing congestion. It will help remove congestion on the railway at Manchester Piccadilly by rerouting some services through Manchester Victoria. This will create extra capacity, allowing more trains to run, and will help stimulate economic growth in the north of England. “It’ll also open up new direct routes to Manchester Airport from across the east and north east of England, freeing up significant capacity in this area and improving train performance.” Delivered by the Northern Hub Alliance, a close collaborative alliance agreement, the project started construction in October 2015 and is more than halfway through. OCTOBER 2016

Ordsall Chord

Ground-breaking design

Peter Jenkins, BDP lead architect, said: “The River Irwell crossing will be the first network arch bridge in the UK and the first asymmetrical network arch in the world. “It’s being built in sections, assembled on site and will be lifted into place by a 1,350 tonne and 850 tonne crane. “We designed an 89-metre singlespan network arch bridge, the secondlongest in the world to carry twin heavyrail tracks. “This design uses inclined hangers which cross each other at least twice

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instead of vertical hangers, which allows for a more elegant design that is thinner and uses less material. This is particularly important due to the proximity with Grade 1 and 2 listed buildings.”

Protecting railway heritage

Mike added: “From a heritage point of view, the site is of international significance. The chord is being built on the Manchester to Liverpool railway – the first passenger inter-city railway line in the world – and that includes the Grade 1 listed Stephenson Bridge.” Built in 1830, the bridge remained NETWORK


R A I LWAY U P G R A D E P L A N

FAST FACTS 28.5k tonnes of ballast

22

new switches and crossings

5km

of plain line renewal

100

engineering trains (approx)

“The chord is being built on the Manchester to Liverpool railway – the first passenger inter-city railway line in the world – and that includes the Grade 1 listed Stephenson Bridge. It will be reconstructed and the public will be able to see it in its former glory.” Mike Heywood

hidden for 150 years by a girder extension that, due to its state of disrepair, was taken down. It will be reconstructed and the public will be able to see it in its former glory. The next stage of works will take place over a 16-day blockade in December to install a new bridge crossing over Water street, complete overhead line equipment de-wiring and re-wiring, widen Castlefield and Middlewood viaducts, and track realigning works. n NETWORK

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new wire runs

66

new or altered signals

600+ piles

4,000+ tonnes of steelwork

Northern programmes

The Ordsall Chord is part of the Northern Programmes rail upgrades, a group of individual projects that will improve east-west connectivity and deliver better services for passengers across the London North Eastern and London North Western routes. Chris Montgomery, programme director, said: “The Northern Programmes include large scale projects and upgrades that present the opportunity to develop the talent and skills that already exist in Network Rail. “By coming together as one team, the programme will also benefit from shared resources and contracts.”

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700+

people working on project during peak of construction.

OCTOBER 2016


S A F E TY A N D P E R F O R M A N C E

THE RIPPLE EFFECT

Network looks at the effects train delays can have on the entire railway network Public performance measure (PPM) is a locally-driven metric on Network Rail’s scorecard and gives the percentage of all passenger train journeys that arrive on time. The percentage of trains that don’t run to time is analysed for delay attribution figures (the reasons for delays), which are split into three sections: •Network Rail (e.g. track and signal failures, ‘acts of god’, weather and railway suicides) •TOC on self (delays caused by TOCs themselves – driver shortages etc.) •TOC on TOC (TOC delays caused by another TOC). Delays are measured in minutes and Network Rail calculates the delay minutes by all trains affected by a single incident, including the effect of the delay across the network after the initial incident is resolved.

The price of success

There are more trains on the railway than ever before and significantly more passengers. The consequences of this success is that there is more congestion, and, because between 40 and 50 per cent of PPM is attributed to Network Rail, delays have a much further and immediate OCTOBER 2016

reach across the network. Faults do happen and can be fixed quickly by colleagues on the front line, but once the trains start moving again the effect can last for hours.

Typical incidents that can affect PPM and cause delays

• Signalling system and power supply failures • Overhead line equipment/third rail faults • External fatalities and trespass • Track circuit failures • Track faults • External causes (train operator) • Technical fleet delays • Signalling faults • Train crew causes • Station delays • Level crossing failures

All aboard

The crew that makes up a single train is rarely from one location. The train itself could come into a station from Liverpool, the new driver from Manchester, train guard from Birmingham, and the catering team from Scotland. It only needs one element of this team to be late to disrupt other services on different routes.

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Incident Map Delay Spread - 06: - 30 September

Map incident: Cambridge 30 September 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 06:30

(Inset image) Overhead line/ third rail defect in Cambridge. Small, localised delays in Anglia route.

 0 September 3 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 22:00 Legend: = Incident location = Delay (the greater the size, the greater the delay).

(Main image) Delays spread throughout six routes in total, including as far as Scotland and in both morning and evening peaks. Total of 4,095 delay minutes.

FAST FACTS Period 6 national PPM finished at 87.4 per cent, 4.6 per cent worse than target for the Period The result is 3.8 per cent worse than the same period last year and 1.4 per cent worse than last period The moving annual average, a rolling figure that represents average performance over the past 365 days, is at 88.0 per cent.

NETWORK

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OCTOBER 2016


S A F E TY A N D P E R F O R M A N C E

Delay impacts at stations

Rob Williamson, station manager for Charing Cross, shared how small incidents can have big impacts at the station. “We’re running 26 trains in and 26 out of the station each hour. That means we have a train every two minutes coming in and being a terminus station our arrivals will directly feed into departures. So on six platforms we need a train to arrive and depart in around 12 minutes. “Driver changes normally take between seven and nine minutes and of course you need the passengers to move off the train and board it safely, so there’s not a lot of room to play with if there is a delay.

Far reaching

“Delays can mount up from very small incidents away from the station, which can

snowball into huge delay-minute figures. Our trains come in from as far as Dover and Hastings – even a 30-second delay there can become minutes and by the time the train arrives here it could be 20 minutes behind. “This will put everything out of sync as that train has missed its slot and other services start to back up. Then the problem moves further along the network – if trains are slow going down through London Bridge they start backing up and remain at the platforms as there’s nowhere for them to go, which in turn delays the trains coming into the station. “Then you start backing down to London Bridge in the other direction. We’ve had trains that have taken 60 minutes to get from here to Waterloo East – a distance of just 200 metres.”

Everything we do

“Minimising delays and maximising PPM figures really does comes down to every single thing we do at Network Rail. Whether it’s on the front line repairing infrastructure faults as quickly as possible or doing our very best to prevent faults with new technology and maintenance, and making stations are run effectively. “At Charing Cross, if we’re not giving the right information across on the concourse, we’ve got slip and trip incidents or we’re not managing the crowds properly, this can all impact on delays to trains arriving or leaving late because it adds to the time passengers take to get on or off the train. Everything we do comes back to getting trains in and out on time.” n

“Minimising delays and maximising PPM figures really does comes down to every single thing we do at Network Rail... Everything comes back to getting trains in and out on time” Rob Williamson

Map incident: Three Bridges

p Delay Spread Incident - 06: - 29 September Map Delay Spread - 14: - 29 September

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1

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Incident Map Delay Spread - 14: - 29 September

29 September 2016 06:00 Signalling system and power line failure at Three Bridges station, West Sussex, South East route. Immediate disruption can be seen in London and surrounding areas.

OCTOBER 2016

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2

&



3

29 September 2016 13:00 Delays spread throughout London and surrounding areas and across four routes. Main delays during morning peak. Total of 1,796 delay minutes.

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Access all areas New software makes it easier for everyone to communicate

Software that makes the web, documents, office applications and files more accessible has been launched to the business. With its easy-to-use intuitive toolbar, Read&Write Gold gives people discreet help with everyday tasks like reading on-screen text and proofing written documents and emails. The software is available to everyone and is promoted as especially useful for people with dyslexia, literacy difficulties or English as a second language. It can be used on PCs, laptops and tablets. The software was launched as part of Everyone Week (see page 3). Frances McAndrew, programme manager, said: “Network Rail is committed to supporting our people to be the best they can be, whatever their abilities or challenges, roles or responsibilities. “From the health and wellbeing perspective, making assistive technology openly available can reduce stress, improve confidence and help everyone perform and achieve to their full potential.”

Unlimited access

“Network Rail has invested in a corporate licence for Read&Write Gold, giving unlimited access to all staff now and in the future as part of our goal to create a fully inclusive culture and workplace.” Loraine Martins, director of diversity and inclusion, added: “Effective communication NETWORK

Have your say

This story was also published on Connect. Here are some views from colleagues: I used this software at University to help with Dyslexia and glad to see it has been rolled out to Network Rail. James Barlow, Manchester Frances McAndrew

Loraine Martins

between colleagues, clients, customers and stakeholders is the lifeblood of this organisation, and written communication lies at the heart of this.” Colleagues can download it for free to their devices from the software catalogue on Connect. Line managers won’t need to approve this download.

Key features:

• text-to-speech for emails and on-screen documents • converting emails, on-screen documents and scanned documents into mp3 audio files • intuitive word prediction • advanced spellchecker, dictionary and homophone checker • screen masking that improves focus on a particular section of a document by blocking out peripheral distractions. n

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I think this is brilliant and I’m so thankful it’s available to everyone. I’m not diagnosed with any particular literacy difficulty myself, but I definitely struggle to read large texts off a screen and often find myself having to reread it all in order to understand what I read first time round. Having those extra little bits to help me will be so invaluable. Thank you. Rebecca Grogan, Milton Keynes Has there been any progress on getting this to work on Wyse terminals? David Murray, Derbyshire We are indeed making progress with the software being available on the Wyse devices via Citrix. This is a more complex process than the desktop and laptop deployment. For Wyse devices the software needs to be packaged and presented via the Citrix servers which is taking a bit longer to implement. Tony Antoniou, Milton Keynes, in reply to David Murray.

OCTOBER 2016


S A F E TY A N D P E R F O R M A N C E

Bed time story A man-made river bed has been built by teams in South East route to protect a bridge and viaduct

Added protection

Work has been completed to protect and reinforce the River Mole underbridge and viaduct in Dorking. The works were developed and delivered by the South East route works delivery team in partnership with the south east structures route asset management team. The structure was at risk of being undermined by scour, which happens when the river removes sediment from around the structure, affecting its stability. This was the last remaining high-scourrisk structure in the South East route.

existing river bed to restore it to its natural line and level. The new river bed is made of stone and gabion-type mattresses – a metal mesh frame filled with rocks – to make it durable. “We designed and used a temporary sheet-piled cofferdam – a watertight structure pumped dry to allow construction work below the waterline – and erected the mattresses in the river using military pontoons.”

Stephen added: “The river flow was temporarily diverted to undertake the works and to crane in the small plant and materials required. We also carried out brickwork and other structural repairs above and below the waterline to further strengthen and protect the bridge. “This work will avoid the potential need to close the railway during a flood event, as well as protecting the structure from damage or even collapse during flooding.” To obtain licenses to undertake work, the teams worked with the local authority, local drainage boards, Met Office and the Environment Agency. The project was finished within three months and with no safety or environmental incidents. n

New river bed

A new artificial river bed was built to protect the bridge and viaduct and to prevent the existing river bed from being washed away from the bridge. Stephen Gillen, works delivery manager, said: “When designing and building the new river bed, we had to make sure that it wouldn’t alter the long-term flow, levels or ecology of the river, and that it wouldn’t increase the flood risk in the adjacent area. “It had to be built below the level of the OCTOBER 2016

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CARING

Customer focus:

Retail sales soaring Network Rail-managed stations are becoming a top spot for gifts, lunch and a good cuppa

FAST FACTS

First quarter figures:

4.5m 204m

cups of coffee sold

people passing through managed stations

64m

station retailer visits – enough to fill Wembley Stadium more than 700 times

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key growth areas – gifts, technology and accessories.

New retail sales results for the first quarter (April-June) of the financial year show like-forlike sales at managed stations have increased by 4.14 per cent. This is the 17th consecutive quarter of sales growth for the organisation. Between April and June, 204 million people passed through the company’s managed stations, with almost one in three station users visiting Network Rail station retailers in the period – enough to fill Wembley Stadium more than 700 times.

Changing habits

Food and beverage outlets in Network Rail’s managed stations are proving increasingly popular with sales rising by 6.1 per cent overall compared to the same period last year. Traditional retail sales also continue to grow, increasing by 2.5 per cent. Sales at major stations in London (King’s Cross +8.7 per cent), and across the country (Manchester +9.6 per cent NETWORK

and Reading +10.2 per cent) performed well, pointing to the ongoing changes in consumer shopping habits as more people look for central locations to meet, eat, shop and travel. The like-for-like increase was also driven by three key growth areas in the second quarter of 2016. Year-on-year gifting purchases soared by 43.6 per cent, suggesting stations are becoming a major destination for gifts on the go, while technology sales grew by 20.6 per cent. Accessories completed the top three with 10.2 per cent growth over the threemonth period.

Quality offering

Alongside the figures for higher-value purchases were the daily journey type purchases, with visitors to stations around Britain buying the equivalent of 4.5 million cups of coffee. David Biggs, managing director, Property, said: “These figures show that the quality

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David Biggs

retail offering at Network Rail stations is driving strong customer traffic to the many shops, cafes and boutiques that stations now have to offer. That’s good news for shoppers and good news for passengers too. All profits from retail sales are reinvested back into the railway, helping fund the Railway Upgrade Plan.” n OCTOBER 2016


TOP TIPS FOR YOUR VOICE

ACTION PLANNING

Making Network Rail a better place to work for everyone means turning the insight from the Your Voice survey into action. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about reinventing the wheel, but about continuous improvement Keep using the results of the survey and any other feedback you gather over time

Share and discuss that insight as a team regularly

Add to your action plan and keep taking action

MORE INFORMATION Help is on hand either through local HR business partners or Your Voice partners as well as online resources available from Connect.

Brainstorm and prioritise actions to improve things

Regularly update each other on progress

Assess the impact itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had and celebrate your success

Network October 2016  

The magazine for our people. Available to download.

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