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THE NETWORK FOR RESEARCH IN JEWISH EDUCATION

25

th

Annual Conference JUNE 12 – JUNE 14, 2011

hosted by

FACULTY OF EDUCATION AND THE ISRAEL & GOLDA KOSCHITZKY CENTRE FOR JEWISH STUDIES, YORK UNIVERSITY


Welcome to the

25

th

Annual Conference of the Network for Research in Jewish Education. We look forward to a fascinating conference and celebration as we convene academics, practitioners and researchers from many disciplines and institutions to share the latest findings in the field of Jewish educational research. As in previous years, sessions follow three formats: PAPER SESSION: Papers presenting completed work SPOTLIGHT SESSION: Interactive session about key issues in Jewish education CONSULTATION: Collegial discussion of research in progress or preliminary findings

The conference promises to be an exciting venue for exchanging ideas and research findings. We are pleased to have you participate. PROGRAM COMMITTEE:

Jonathan Krasner, Program Chair Ofra Backenroth, Shani Bechhoffer, Stuart Charme, Benjamin Jacobs, Alex Sinclair, and Miriam Heller Stern. LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS CHAIR:

Laura Wiseman


Welcome

York University’s Faculty of Education and Israel & Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies welcome all participants to the 2011 NRJE Conference. LOCATION: NRJE sessions will take place at the Keele Campus of York University. The main entrance to the campus is via York Blvd. at traffic signals on the west side of Keele Street, between Finch and Steeles Avenues. For on-campus directions on Sunday, June 12, call: (416) 650-8300. For the main York University switchboard on Monday and Tuesday, please dial (416) 736-2100 to speak to an operator. ROOM NUMBERS listed are in the Executive Learning Centre inside the Seymour Schulich Building (ELC and SSB on the campus map, respectively), unless otherwise noted. Link to Interactive Campus Map: http://www.yorku.ca/web/maps/ PBR PDR S124 S128 W132

Penthouse Boardroom Private Dining Room - enter via Main Dining Room Seminar Room Seminar Room Plenary Room

Renaissance Room in Vanier College. On Sunday evening, following the Plenary Session, the NRJE Twenty-fifth Anniversary dinner takes place in the Renaissance Room of Vanier College, a short walk across campus. Volunteers will be on hand to show delegates the way, and see them back to the Executive Learning Centre (ELC) afterward, to walk to the nearby Pond Road Residence, or board a shuttle bus bound for the Novotel, North York. LUGGAGE may be checked upon arrival at the reception desk of the Schulich Business Hotel, adjacent to ELC, and retrieved after dinner. REFRESHMENTS: Please note that coffee, tea and pitchers of fresh water will be available throughout, as will biodegradable paper cups. Sealed, reusable water bottles will be provided for presenters during their sessions. Please consider bringing a reusable covered mug or water bottle. ALL MEALS AND SNACKS will present dairy and pareve choices, prepared by the kosher caterer on campus. (Milk and cream will be Halav Yisrael.)

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SCHEDULE

sunday TIME

SESSION

ROOM

1–3 p.m.

JOURNAL OF JEWISH EDUCATION EDITORIAL BOARD MEETING..................................... PDR

3–4 p.m

FIRST TIMER ORIENTATION.......................................................................................... PDR

3–6 p.m

REGISTRATION & REFRESHMENTS............................................. Coffee-bar area adjacent to PDR

WELCOME........................................................................................................... W132

4–4:15 p.m

4:15–5:45 p.m

PLENARY SESSION................................................................................................ W132

FIELDS OF ENGAGEMENT: DEBATING SOME KEY QUESTIONS OF RESEARCH IN JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR: Dr. Michael Zeldin, Hebrew Union College PANELISTS: Dr. Helena Miller, UJIA, Dr. Alex Pomson, Hebrew University, and Dr. Lisa Grant, Hebrew Union College

5:45 p.m

WALK ACROSS CAMPUS TO VANIER COLLEGE. Take elevator (inside right-hand glass door to the building) down to Level “G”. Turn left and walk through set of double doors to reach the Renaissance Room.

NRJE 25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATORY DINNER....................................... Renaissance Room

7–8:30 p.m

NRJE 25TH ANNIVERSARY PROGRAM........................................................ Renaissance Room

CHAIR: Dr. Carol Ingall, Jewish Theological Seminary DISCUSSANTS: Dr. Hanan Alexander, University of Haifa, Dr. Isa Aron, Hebrew

6–7 p.m.

Union College, Dr. Michael Zeldin, Hebrew Union College, Dr. Alex Pomson, Hebrew University, Dr. Lisa Grant, Hebrew Union College

8:30–9 p.m

DESSERT AND COFFEE............................................................................. Renaissance Room

9:15 p.m.

RETURN, ON FOOT, TO THE EXECUTIVE LEARNING CENTRE in the Seymour Schulich Building [SSB on campus map] to retrieve luggage and walk to the nearby Pond Road Residence, or to board the shuttle bus to Novotel, North York.

9:30 p.m.

SHUTTLE BUS TO NOVOTEL, NORTH YORK. Bus departs from doors near the reception desk of the Schulich Business Hotel (adjacent to ELC).

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monday 7 a.m.

SHUTTLE BUS FROM NOVOTEL TO ELC AT YORK UNIVERSITY

7:30–8:30 a.m.

BREAKFAST............................................................................................................... PDR

8:30–10:15 a.m.

SESSION I

PAPER SESSION 1.1 ............................................................................................... S124

HAVRUTA STUDY AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Brandeis University

Conceptual and Pedagogical Foundations of Havruta Text Study as a Form of Professional Development Dr. Elie Holzer, Bar Ilan University

Empowering Professional Development Leaders through Jewish Text Study Dr. Gail Z. Dorph, MTEI

Building a Relational Learning Community: Jewish Text Study, Cultural Identity and Challenging Practices Dr. Miriam Raider-Roth, University of Cincinnati

Moving from Theory to Practice and Back Again: An Emerging Conception of Havruta Based Professional Development with Classroom Teachers Dr. Orit Kent, Brandeis University

PAPER SESSION 1.2 ............................................................................................... S128

REIMAGINING JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR: Dr. Wendy Rosov, Rosov Consulting RESPONDENT: Dr. Jon A. Levisohn, Brandeis University

Rival Theories of Pluralistic Jewish Education Dr. Jen Glaser, Mandel Leadership Institute

The Prospects of Jewish Citizenship Education in a Post-Modern/ Ethnic/ Denominational/ Zionist/ Diapora/Nationalist/etc. Age Dr. Benjamin M. Jacobs, New York University

Pedagogy of Unfinishedness – A Modern Orthodox Response to Jon Levisohn’s Pedagogy of Integrity Mr. Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto

10:15–10:30 a.m.

COFFEE, TEA, WATER, REFRESHMENTS........................................................................ PDR

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10:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

SESSION II

PAPER SESSION 2.1................................................................................................. S124

TEACHER AND TEXT

CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Gail Z. Dorph, MTEI

Moving From Theory to Practice and Back Again: An Emerging Conception of Havruta and Professional Development with Classroom Teachers Dr. Orit Kent and Ms. Allison Cook, Brandeis University

Reconciling Competing Values: Teaching David and Batsheva Ms. Tamara Beliak, Yeshiva University

Havruta Learning: A View from the Yeshiva Ms. Aliza Segal, Hebrew University

Analyzing Lament in Hebrew Sources: An Effective Access Skill for Text Study? Dr. Laura Wiseman, York University

PAPER SESSION 2.2................................................................................................. S128

ISSUES IN EDUCATION AND JEWISH IDENTITY CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Bethamie Horowitz, New York University Exploring the Limits of Schools’ Influence on How Students Think and Feel about Israel Dr. Alex Pomson, Hebrew University and Mr. Daniel Held, Jewish Theological Seminary 12:30–1:30 p.m.

1:30– 2:10 p.m.

LUNCH.................................................................................................................... PDR

SESSION III CONSULTATION 3.1

Can Jewish Summer Camp become a Context for Optimal Experiences? Dr. Joseph Reimer, Brandeis University

Artist Beit Midrash: The Intersection of Art and Jewish Education................................................. S124 Dr. Ofra Backenroth, Jewish Theological Seminary

Seeds of Jewish Peoplehood among Educational Agents in Israel .................................................... PDR Dr. Naama Sabar-Ben Yehoshua, Tel Aviv University

You Can’t Wrap Herring in an iPad: Digitization of Sacred Jewish Books, the Stripping of Embodied Ritual, and Implications for Jewish Education . ........................................ S128 Rabbi Owen Gottlieb, New York University

We Teach Who We Are: Personal and Professional Identities in Practice............................................. PDR Ms. Frayda Gonshor Cohen, Mills College

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2:15–3:45 p.m.

SESSION IV

PAPER SESSION 4.1................................................................................................. S124

ISSUES IN DAY SCHOOL EDUCATION CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Rabbi Judd Kruger Levingston, Barrack Hebrew Academy

What Does it Take to be a Prosocial Bystander in a Jewish Middle School?: The Role of Self-Esteem in Prosocial Bystander Behavior Ms. Ilana Turetsky, Yeshiva University

In a Different Place Now: Towards a Multifocal Account of Jewish Family Development through the Study of School Choice Dr. Alex Pomson, Hebrew University and Dr. Randal Schnoor, York University PAPER SESSION 4.2................................................................................................ S128

MODELS OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Evie Levy Rotstein, Leadership Institute

Educational Policy Making: A Case Study of Relationships between Mega-Donors and Professionals Dr. Seymour Kopelowitz, Jewish Education Center of Cleveland; Siegal College

Analysis of Leadership in Three Jewish Congregational Schools: Implications for Jewish Academia Dr. Elissa Kaplan, Growing Projects

PORTRAIT OF THE CONGREGATIONAL RABBI AS TEACHER OF ADULTS Dr. Sarah Tauber, Solomon Schechter School of Westchester

3:45–4 p.m.

COFFEE, TEA, WATER, REFRESHMENTS........................................................................ PDR

4–5:15 p.m.

SESSION V

SPOTLIGHT SESSION 5.1......................................................................................... S124

PREPARING AND RETAINING HIGH-QUALITY TEACHERS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF JEWISH DAY SCHOOLS IN NORTH AMERICA CONVENER: Dr. Eran Tamir, Brandeis University PARTICIPANTS: Ms. Andrea Schaffer, Downtown Jewish Day School; Rabbi Mark Smiley, Associated Hebrew Schools; Dr. Carol Ingall, Jewish Theological Seminary

PAPER SESSION 5.2................................................................................................. S128

EDUCATIONAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TEACHING OF JEWISH HISTORY CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Miriam Heller Stern, American Jewish University

Z Cars meets In Treatment: A Paradigm for Israel Education through Television and Film Rabbi Owen Gottlieb, New York University

Virtual Relief: The Role of an Online Discussion Forum in Promoting Elements of Resilience in Holocaust Education Ms. Ilana Turetsky, Yeshiva University

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Evening in Toronto 5:30 p.m. promptly, s.v.p .

BOARD MOTOR COACH at doors near the reception desk of the Schulich Business Hotel (adjacent to the ELC)

6:15–7:30 p.m.

DINNER AT BISTRO GRANDE, fine kosher cuisine

7:30 p.m.

BOARD MOTOR COACH FOR “SENSE OF SPADINA”

8–9:30 p.m.

“SENSE OF SPADINA” Two docents of the Ontario Jewish Archives will guide groups on a walking tour of Old Jewish Toronto

9:30 p.m.

MOTOR COACH RETURN Three drop-off options:

 Upscale Yorkville/Hazelton Lanes area for outdoor cafés, bars, window-shopping and people-watching; return to accommodations by public transit/taxi

 Novotel, North York

 Campus at Schulich Business Hotel and Pond Road Residence

7 a.m.

SHUTTLE BUS FROM NOVOTEL TO THE ELC AT YORK UNIVERSITY

tuesday

7:30–8:30 a.m.

BREAKFAST............................................................................................................... PDR

7:30–8:30 a.m.

DAY SCHOOL TEACHER INDUCTION AND RETENTION BREAKFAST SPONSORED BY THE COVENANT FOUNDATION..........................................................PBR

CONVENERS: Dr. Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Brandeis University and

Sharon Feiman-Nemser will explore how we can work together to promote strong, school-based induction of new teachers. Hear about a new, research-based induction “toolkit” and how you can learn to use it with day school leaders, mentors and new teachers. See program description below for more details. Open to all conference attendees involved in teacher induction and retention.

8:30–10:30 a.m.

SESSION VI

Paper Session 6.1................................................................................................... S124

FAITHFUL DEMOCRACY: EXPLORING FAITH EDUCATION IN A DEMOCRATIC CONTEXT CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. John Portelli, University of Toronto

Harlene Apelman, Covenant Foundation

Beyond Teaching Religious Values, Beliefs, and Practices: Islamic Education as an Alternative Pedagogy Dr. Nadeem Memon, University of Toronto

Leadership in Diverse Contexts: Embracing Multiple Centers and Moral Imperatives Dr. Herveen Singh, University of Toronto

Faith Schools: A Space for Autonomy and a Challenge to Hegemony Fr. Francois Mifsud, University of Toronto

Talmudic Pedagogy as a Framework for Educating Toward Pluralism Mr. Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto

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PAPER SESSION 6.2........................................................................................................... S128

SPIRITUAL AND SOCIO-AFFECTIVE ISSUES IN JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR AND RESPONDENT: Dr. Jeffrey Kress, Jewish Theological Seminary

Seeing is Believing: Developing Moral and Spiritual Sensitivity Rabbi Laurence Scheindlin, Sinai Akiba Academy

Carrying the Burden of the Other’: Musar and Adult Spiritual and Socio-Emotional Development Ms. Arielle Levites, New York University

Soul-Play: Spiritual Education and Moral Education Rabbi Judd Kruger Levingston, Barrack Hebrew Academy

Transcendence Across the Curriculum Dr. Carol Ingall, Jewish Theological Seminary

10:30–10:45 a.m.

COFFEE, TEA, WATER, REFRESHMENTS........................................................................ PDR

10:45–11:30 a.m.

SESSION VII

CONSULTATION 7.1

Gender Role Expectations and Teacher Self-efficacy in Jewish Day Schools ...................................... S124 Dr. Elie Tuchman, Yeshiva at the Jersey Shore

Challenge of Jewish Education for the Russian-speaking Immigrant Community.................................. S128 Mr. Yigal Kotler, Jewish Theological Seminary

Judaic Knowledge of Experiential Educators............................................................................. PDR Mr. Daniel Held, Jewish Theological Seminary

11:45–1 p.m.

SPOTLIGHT SESSION 8.1....................................................................................... S124

PLURALISM IN PRACTICE: BRIDGING THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATION CONVENER: Dr. Susan Shevitz, Brandeis University PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Aryeh Davidson, Jewish Theological Seminary, Dr. Jeffrey Kress, Jewish Theological Seminary, Rabbi Allen Selis, Solomon Schechter Day School of St. Louis, Rabbi Bradley Solmsen, Brandeis University

1 p.m.

BOX LUNCH AND DEPARTURE..................................................................................... PDR Tables will be available in the Private Dining Room for people not departing immediately. Assistance calling taxis for the airport is available at the reception desk of the Schulich Business Hotel (adjacent to ELC).

1:15–3:15 p.m.

NRJE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING....................................................................... PDR

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EVENT DESCRIPTIONS

plenary

SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M. / ROOM W132

FIELDS OF ENGAGEMENT: DEBATING SOME KEY QUESTIONS OF RESEARCH IN JEWISH EDUCATION The purpose of The International Handbook of Jewish Education has been to interrogate the field that is known as Jewish Education. Our authors were each asked to provide an overview of their fields, comment on the successes and challenges they face, and raise research questions for the future. We asked our authors, where possible, to make each chapter globally relevant without losing the integrity or rigor of the arguments discussed. The resulting book reflects the broad range of theorists, academics, practitioners and policy makers currently working in the field of Jewish Education. After a brief introduction and account of the processes that led to publication, we will debate some of the key questions of Research and Jewish Education. We will explore who and what is driving the agenda of Jewish educational research and development. What roles do the research communities in Israel and the Diaspora play, separately and together, in shaping this agenda? To what extent is research in Jewish Education multi-disciplinary? What are the new ideas? Finally, we will reflect on successes and gaps? Through the process of compiling this book, what surprised us? What is missing? What advice do we have for the editors of the next major book on Jewish Education? By debating some of these key issues, we hope to leave you with enduring questions with which to enter the discussions taking place throughout the remainder of the conference.

special programs

SUNDAY, 6:00 P.M. / RENAISSANCE ROOM

NRJE 25TH ANNIVERSARY PROGRAM Join us in celebrating the 25th birthday of the Network for Research in Jewish Education with past chairs of the Network reflecting on its origins and highlights of their terms. The discussants, live and via video, will include Hanan Alexander, Isa Aron, Michael Zeldin, Alex Pomson, and Lisa Grant. Carol Ingall and Jeff Kress will facilitate this walk down Memory Lane and discussion of future directions.

TUESDAY, 7:30 A.M. /PBR

DAY SCHOOL TEACHER INDUCTION BREAKFAST SPONSORED BY THE COVENANT FOUNDATION New teacher induction as a lever for improving teaching and learning in Jewish day schools: a breakfast meeting for people involved in day school teacher preparation and induction, sponsored by the Covenant Foundation. Join Sharon Feiman-Nemser from the Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education at Brandeis University to explore how we can work together to promote strong, schoolbased induction of new teachers. Hear about a new, research-based induction “toolkit� and how you can learn to use it with day school leaders, mentors and new teachers. Breakfast will be available in the meeting room starting at 7:30 a.m.. Please come on time so that we can start the discussion at 7:40 a.m. and conclude in time for people to get to sessions at 8:30 a.m.

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SESSION ABSTRACTS

paper session 1.1

MONDAY, 8:30 A.M. / S124

HAVRUTA STUDY AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT This paper session will highlight research and practice from three professional development settings. It will consist of (a) a conceptual introduction (b) three cases of havruta text study and its impact on Jewish educators in the context of professional development programs; (c) a cross case analysis. Elie Holzer will introduce havruta text study as a “conversation” among three partners – a pair of learners and a text – and discuss conceptual foundations of this unique form of professional development for Jewish educators. Gail Dorph will present findings about the impact of havruta text study on participants in the Teacher Educators Initiative (MTEI), a national, two-year professional development program for senior Jewish educators sponsored by the Mandel Foundation. Miriam Raider Roth will discuss the contribution of havruta text study in the formation of a relational learning community in the context of the Summer Teachers Institute (STI), a two-week program for rabbis and day school teachers in one community. Orit Kent will discuss the practical and theoretical outcomes of a design experiment, centered on core practices of havruta learning, for the full faculty of a Jewish supplementary school. Sharon Feiman-Nemser will chair the symposium and offer some closing comments on shared aspects of the pedagogy and impact of havruta text study as a form of professional development.

paper session 1. 2

MONDAY, 8:30 A.M. / S128

REIMAGINING JEWISH EDUCATION RIVAL THEORIES OF PLURALISTIC JEWISH EDUCATION Jen Glaser, Mandel Leadership Institute I begin by introducing the notion of rival theories of pluralism and then explore the practices and educational policies that flow from them. I suggest that Jewish educational institutions need to give serious thought to which version of pluralism they endorse. If not, they not only run the risk that their policies and practices will fall short of generating the particular educational ends to which they aspire, but may also achieve ends that they deem to be undesirable. I then conclude by suggesting five educational imperatives that might act as a guide for educational institutions that aspire to be pluralistic. THE PROSPECTS OF JEWISH CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION IN A POST-MODERN/ ETHNIC/ DENOMINATIONAL/ZIONIST/ DIAPORA/NATIONALIST/ETC. AGE Ben Jacobs, New York University Judaism, Jewish life, the Jewish people, the Jewish state, Jewish identity—indeed, almost all facets of the Jewish experience—are in a postmodern, post-denominational, post-ethnic, post-Zionist, postDiaspora, postnationalist, or, what we may simply call a “post-everything” age. The post-everything consciousness has precipitated talk among Jewish educators of whether identity and continuity are sufficient justifications for Jewish education anymore. Drawing on theoretical explorations of various post-everything “isms” as well as empirical investigations of their real-world manifestations, this conceptual study enters the debate by interrogating contemporary notions of Jewish identity formation and relating them to ideas of Jewish citizenship education historically and contemporarily.

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PEDAGOGY OF UNFINISHEDNESS: A MODERN ORTHODOX RESPONSE TO JON LEVISOHN’S PEDAGOGY OF INTEGRITY Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto Recent research on Modern Orthodox (MO) education has pointed to the tensions and contradictions in MO religious life, with the concomitant implication for its educational institutions. To help MO institutions navigate and take advantage of these tensions, this paper supports Jon Levisohn’s move to pedagogy and away from curriculum in Jewish educational integration. However, this paper will propose that integrity does not sufficiently account for the complexities of MO life. Instead it will look to Friere’s notion of unfinishedness as a cognitive and pedagogical category to give students and teachers the flexibility to confront the complexity of MO education life.

paper session 2. 1

MONDAY, 10:30 A.M. / S124

TEACHER AND TEXT MOVING FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE AND BACK AGAIN: AN EMERGING CONCEPTION OF HAVRUTA AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WITH CLASSROOM TEACHERS Orit Kent and Allison Cook, Brandeis University Text study and collaborative learning are used widely in many educational settings. They are highly complex endeavors, demanding a great deal of diverse skills from teachers and students alike. This study will examine two Jewish supplementary school classrooms in order to probe how these teachers plan for and engage their students in these complex enterprises. We will develop cases of two teachers-- one a novice and one a more experienced teacher --and their 4th/5th and 6th grade classrooms and present video footage and written work. We will analyze these cases in light of the following questions: How did these teachers shift their practice? How did they draw on particular tools and concepts in their planning? What specifically took shape in their classrooms? And what might we learn about the differences between novices and more experienced teachers as teachers of text and collaborative learning?

ANALYZING LAMENT IN HEBREW SOURCES: AN EFFECTIVE ACCESS SKILL FOR TEXT STUDY? Laura Wiseman, York University This paper conveys research, conducted through textual analysis, on the genre of lament in primary and secondary sources, particularly its hallmarks and purposes. It raises a set of working questions to link the research to an applied study in Jewish education. Action-research is proposed to assess whether analysis of specific texts, through the lens of lament, serves students as an effective ‘access skill’ to discern and interpret present, muted and silenced voices in classical sources such as TaNaKh, and contemporary writing such as Hebrew poetry and prose.

RECONCILING COMPETING VALUES: TEACHING DAVID AND BATSHEVA Tamara Beliak, Yeshiva University In this presentation I propose to share research findings from a qualitative study about teaching difficult Biblical texts in Jewish day schools. While we know that teacher beliefs are instrumental in teaching choices we do not know much about the ways teachers reconcile competing values or tensions between their personal responses to a text and their beliefs about how they ought to teach that text in order to convey Torah values. In the course of interviews about their experiences teaching David and Batsheva to middle school students, teachers described their own attempts to reconcile values. The 20 minute presentation will focus on several teachers in Orthodox Day Schools and describe the conscious and unconscious ways they tackle the issues of texts.

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HAVRUTA LEARNING: A VIEW FROM THE YESHIVA Aliza Segal, Hebrew University This paper presents a study of paired havruta study in the context of a Talmud class in a boys’ yeshivah high school in Israel. Using ethnographic methods informed by discourse analysis, it explores the interactional and epistemological elements of a transcribed havruta session, uncovering the reading practices and their embedded meanings. In dialogue with other current research on havruta, this study aims to elucidate a culturally situated set of practices from within what its participants perceive to be its organic context.

paper session 2. 2

MONDAY, 10:30 A.M. / S128

ISSUES IN EDUCATION AND JEWISH IDENTITY EXPLORING THE LIMITS OF SCHOOLS’ INFLUENCE ON HOW STUDENTS THINK AND FEEL ABOUT ISRAEL Alex Pomson, Hebrew University and Daniel Held, Jewish Theological Seminary In recent years, Jewish day schools have been ever more heavily burdened with the tasks of Israel education. Drawing on interviews with some 40 students from four different American Jewish high schools, we seek to explore the extent to which schools can reasonably be expected to carry this burden. We approach this task by asking what might be learned from student talk about, first, what is and is not meaningful in the Israel education experienced at school, and, second, how what students learn at school compares with what they learn from other sources of meaning in their lives.

CAN JEWISH SUMMER CAMP BECOME A CONTEXT FOR OPTIMAL EXPERIENCES? Joseph Reimer, Brandeis University In this paper I will explore what “educating at summer camp” might mean by employing the lens of Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, discussed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. This conceptual exploration will be exemplified by research I conducted on the drama program at Camp Ramah in Wisconsin. I will hypothesize that when camp educators aim to create a distinctive program that yet honors the varied needs of diverse campers, they can set the conditions that allow the campers to have a flow experience. I will suggest that knowing these conditions could be a useful heuristic for camp educators who often are guided more by intuition that by sound theory and research.

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consultation 3. 1 ARTIST BEIT MIDRASH: THE INTERSECTION OF ART AND JEWISH EDUCATION Ofra Backenroth, Jewish Theological Seminary Art as a legitimate expression of Jewish knowledge and as a venue to Jewish education is becoming a popular venture. Congregations and Jewish communities open their doors to groups of artists who seek Jewish education and/or groups of adult learners looking for art education. In this study, I would like to explore questions such as how teaching texts and art might transform Jewish education? What is the impact of arts education on the formation of Jewish identity and Jewish practices? What are the outcomes of Jewish education on artistic development? MONDAY, 1:30 P.M. / S124

SEEDS OF JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD AMONG EDUCATIONAL AGENTS IN ISRAEL Naama Sabar-BenYehoshua, Tel Aviv University This study concentrates on education agents in Israel, who are in the midst of a learning process that includes broadening the concept of peoplehood. The research questions are: What does “being Jewish” and what does “being part of the Jewish people” mean to the participants? The results of the present study may encourage educational decision makers to seek new avenues to enrich and enhance Jewish peoplehood, and go beyond the social experience of “Mifgash” only, thereby offering an educational program designed to generate peoplehood consciousness. We hope that the consultation will help us think about the following questions: Do we on both sides of the ocean share a crosscommunal consensus regarding the meaning of peoplehood? Does Peoplehood curriculum require a robust consensus? What kind of attitudes and cooperation is required within a diverse community to be able to function as a community? MONDAY, 1:30 P.M. / PDR

YOU CAN’T WRAP HERRING IN AN IPAD: DIGITIZATION OF SACRED JEWISH BOOKS, THE STRIPPING OF EMBODIED RITUAL, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR JEWISH EDUCATION Owen Gottlieb, New York University This paper addresses the need for Jewish educators to be aware of and then to guide Jewish learners through the forthcoming loss of Jewish book-based rituals as sacred texts move to digital e-readers and mobile devices. The methodology employed combines anthropology of ritual with history of the book, using primary source analysis of ethnography, web-based discussion forums, halakhic precedents, and contemporary journalism. Demonstrating how cultural values are preserved by the seldom-discussed print-based rituals, the paper calls for educators to teach how Jewish rituals carry values and then to nurture and encourage new digital rituals. MONDAY, 1:30 P.M. / S128

WE TEACH WHO WE ARE: PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES IN PRACTICE Frayda Gonshor Cohen, Mills College This study will explore how Jewish Day School teachers integrate professional and personal identities. In particular, it will consider if and how personal Jewish values impact classroom decision-making. Given the inherent uncertainty of teaching, and that most dilemmas teachers face have no clear answer about how to proceed, teachers are left on their own to determine how to act. Understanding if and how Jewish values influence teacher decision-making has important potential implications for teacher preparation and on-going support. In this consultation, we will discuss which theories of identity are most appropriate to apply to these questions, and how best to describe the relationship between identity, values and decision-making. MONDAY, 1:30 P.M. / PDR

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paper session 4. 1

MONDAY, 2:15 P.M. / S124

ISSUES IN DAY SCHOOL EDUCATION WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A PROSOCIAL BYSTANDER IN A JEWISH MIDDLE SCHOOL?: THE ROLE OF SELF-ESTEEM IN PROSOCIAL BYSTANDER BEHAVIOR Ilana Turetsky, Yeshiva University Given the evidence that most instances of bullying occur in the presence of bystanders, the role of bystanders in bullying events has received increased attention. The current study explored the relationship between self-esteem and prosocial bystander behavior in Jewish middle schools. Threehundred and nineteen middle school students in 11 Orthodox Jewish schools completed anonymous self-report questionnaires on social problem-solving and on self-esteem. Analyses revealed that self-esteem was a significant predictor of self-reported prosocial bystander behavior. These results were consistent even when controlling for grade and gender. Implications for future research and for interventions are discussed.

IN A DIFFERENT PLACE NOW: TOWARDS A MULTIFOCAL ACCOUNT OF JEWISH FAMILY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE STUDY OF SCHOOL CHOICE Alex Pomson, Hebrew University and Randal Schnoor, York University This paper explores the similarities and differences between Jewish parents’ considerations when selecting elementary school and when selecting high school. Our research provides an opportunity not only better to understand the choices of Jewish parents at different moments in the life course of the family but also to fill a lacuna in the broader literature on school choice. The discussion section of the paper takes up two interpretative frames to explore the surprising finding that parents do not seem especially concerned with ensuring that high school will provide their children with Jewish knowledge and identity or that their school-choice must fit with how they think of themselves as Jews.

paper session 4. 2

MONDAY, 2:15 P.M. / S128

MODELS OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP EDUCATIONAL POLICY MAKING: A CASE STUDY OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MEGA-DONORS AND PROFESSIONALS Seymour Kopelowitz, Jewish Education Center of Cleveland; Siegal College Over the past 50 years of Jewish education in North America, Jewish educators have been the dominant policy-makers. The assumption of this study is that today the power relationship has changed, and that donors are the major influencing factor in policy-making in Jewish education. The underlying premise in the study addresses the question of building a successful partnership. Through the case study method the paper explores four institutions of Jewish education, and unpacks the process of decision making between these two sets of decision makers. One significant finding was that the power relationship was not only dependent upon the amount of money a mega-donor gave, but rather on other factors such as the quality of the relationships for a successful partnership, a shared and compelling vision, that each partner was open and willing to be educated by the other, and a thoughtful planning process.

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ANALYSIS OF LEADERSHIP IN THREE JEWISH CONGREGATIONAL SCHOOLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR JEWISH ACADEMIA Elissa Kaplan, Growing Project This cross case study examined the leadership of principals of three Jewish congregational schools – using qualitative research techniques of semi-structured interviews, review of documentation, and observations of teachers, staff, and principals of three Jewish congregational schools. Collected data were presented as individual cases and a cross case analysis through the lens of organizational leadership, educational leadership, and personal leadership. The principals were similar in that they were all change initiators, authority figures, demonstrators of unity of purpose, and problem solvers.

PORTRAIT OF THE CONGREGATIONAL RABBI AS TEACHER OF ADULTS Sarah Tauber, Solomon Schechter School of Westchester This paper explores the role of the contemporary congregational rabbi as a teacher of adults. Using the qualitative research method known as portraiture, the study describes and analyzes the aims of rabbinic teaching of adults in a synagogue setting. The findings of the study suggest that regularly facilitating learners’ intellectual and religious development, democratically guiding their communities’ evolution through an emphasis on learning, and collaboratively joining their congregants in shaping the on-going construction of personal and communal Jewish narratives are all central aims of successful congregational rabbinic teaching of adults.

spotlight session 5. 1

MONDAY, 4:00 P.M. / S124

PREPARING AND RETAINING HIGH-QUALITY TEACHERS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF JEWISH DAY SCHOOLS IN NORTH AMERICA What does it take to recruit, prepare, support and retain excellent teachers for Jewish day schools? Join us in this spotlight session to discuss these issues, drawing on findings from a recent report, The Delet Alumni Survey: A Comprehensive Report on the Journey of Beginning Jewish Day School Teachers. The interactive program will begin with a presentation of major findings from the report, followed by a panel including a day school teacher, head of school, and a researcher, and small group discussions.

paper session 5. 2

MONDAY, 4:00 P.M. / S128

EDUCATIONAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TEACHING OF JEWISH HISTORY Z CARS MEETS IN TREATMENT: A PARADIGM FOR ISRAEL EDUCATION THROUGH TELEVISION AND FILM Owen Gottlieb, New York University This paper uses Media and Cultural Studies methodologies to argue for a new method for teaching Israel using film and television. Stressing the unique value of television for teaching national culture, the paper calls for a diasporic media education practice. The paper draws on Michael Marland’s instructional design work, contemporary media studies pedagogies, Alex Sinclair’s approach to Post-Zionist Israel education, and indigenous media practices of Inuit and Aboriginal peoples. Using primary and secondary source analysis, the paper sets forth a reverse-indigenous media approach to Israel-Diaspora education, centering on social themes, values, and inquiry into practices of media production.

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VIRTUAL RELIEF: THE ROLE OF AN ONLINE DISCUSSION FORUM IN PROMOTING ELEMENTS OF RESILIENCE IN HOLOCAUST EDUCATION Ilana Turetsky, Yeshiva University Given the emotional difficulty of learning about the Holocaust, Holocaust educators are increasingly recognizing the importance of promoting effective coping among students. This qualitative study explores one educator’s attempt to cultivate elements of resilience by creating an online discussion forum for graduate students in a Holocaust Education class. Twenty-two students submitted weekly posts in response to class discussions and material. Student responses were coded according to components of resilience. Four resilience-related themes consistent with previous research emerged: self-expression, community, support from instructor, and meaning-making. Findings suggest that an online discussion forum can serve as a useful vehicle in promoting elements of resilience.

paper session 6. 1

TUESDAY, 8:30 A.M. / S124

FAITHFUL DEMOCRACY: EXPLORING FAITH EDUCATION IN A DEMOCRATIC CONTEXT BEYOND TEACHING RELIGIOUS VALUES, BELIEFS, AND PRACTICES: ISLAMIC EDUCATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE PEDAGOGY Nadeem Memon, University of Toronto This paper questions the extent to which alternative pedagogies are taken up as genuine, valid, and “acceptable” ways of knowing and teaching in faculties of education. When it comes to alternative pedagogies from faith traditions, such alternatives are most commonly misconstrued to be teaching about faith (values, beliefs, and practices) as opposed to through faith. Thinking of pedagogy in its broadest sense of principles of education, this paper centers an Islamic Pedagogy as a valid framework that can positively contribute to the multiple ways we as educators approach teaching. The benefit of an Islamic pedagogy, or alternative faith and spiritually based frameworks, is that it both clarifies the intent and challenges the perceptions of faith-based schooling. It will be argued that often through principles of faith-based education over individual practices the consistency of faithbased education with democratic values becomes evident.

LEADERSHIP IN DIVERSE CONTEXTS: EMBRACING MULTIPLE CENTERS AND MORAL IMPERATIVES Herveen Singh, University of Toronto This paper examines the short falls of dominant educational leadership pedagogy to effectively equip administrators to democratically lead in diverse contexts. Further, this paper examines the moral imperative of dominant educational leadership pedagogy and questions: Whose morals? What values? , What principles? And, for what purpose are we leading for? In place of dominant approaches to leadership, this paper argues for a multi-centric approach to leadership and offers a Sikh based approach to leadership for social justice and demonstrative strategies for its integration. Given the swift changing demographics in Canada’s major urban centers; succession planning; the realities of globalization; and the critical significance of social cohesion, educational leadership is faced with these new age realities and their corresponding responsibilities that have yet to be accounted for by dominant leadership pedagogy. The value of a multi-centric approach to educational leadership is the capacity to substantively engage with the changing contexts of leadership and to engage with multiple communities, moral imperatives and faiths using democratic means for democratic ends.

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FAITH SCHOOLS: A SPACE FOR AUTONOMY AND A CHALLENGE TO HEGEMONY Francois Mifsud, University of Toronto In this presentation I will evaluate the concept of autonomy in a faith school as a bridging concept of faith schools within society. I shall begin by giving an overall view of the liberal and communitarian conflicting theories about autonomy. This will lead me to set up a distinction between the dualistic and holistic models of autonomy, where in my judgment, the holistic model is the ideal model that can explain the relation of faith education and autonomy. Having developed the argument about the holistic model of autonomy, I will explore hegemony as a limit to autonomy and how faith schools could give the right tools to contest hegemony. My conclusive argument will illustrate how faith schools, from being instruments of indoctrination, could become spaces for autonomy that value diversity and critical thinking.

TALMUDIC PEDAGOGY AS A FRAMEWORK FOR EDUCATING TOWARD PLURALISM Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto This paper intends to look at the workings of pluralism within Jewish Orthodox learning, its implications for pedagogy, and the consequent value for democratic education. It begins by distinguishing between the Talmudic learning process and its halakhic (legal) product, and the way in which this learning-as-process embraces argument and contradiction as epistemologically valid from a religion point of view in its abandonment of authorial originalism. It will then explore, in contrast to objections that religious education cannot do so, how an emphasis on this process implicitly requires an understanding of the Other’s ideas, demands both a fundamental respect and curiosity about a position one has not taken. This occurs even as one defends one’s own ideas, thus educating students toward values of respect, humility, pluralism, and democratic thinking.

paper session 6. 2

TUESDAY, 8:30 A.M. / S128

SPIRITUAL AND SOCIO-AFFECTIVE ISSUES IN JEWISH EDUCATION SEEING IS BELIEVING: DEVELOPING MORAL AND SPIRITUAL SENSITIVITY Laurence Scheindlin, Sinai Akiba Academy Moral psychology increasingly recognizes the role of emotions in moral functioning. This session argues that a similar development in thinking about spiritual functioning is called for. Sensitivity—the capacity to see the moral or spiritual face of events—is a prerequisite to moral or spiritual reasoning or action, and is largely an emotional element. Michael Fishbane’s concept of attunement points to the need for development of spiritual sensitivity among our students. Such sensitivity can be nurtured in the classroom by developing students’ language of emotional expression in the context of studying literature as well as traditional Jewish texts.

‘CARRYING THE BURDEN OF THE OTHER:‘ MUSAR AND ADULT SPIRITUAL AND SOCIO-EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT Arielle Levites, New York University This presentation considers how the practice of musar impacts Jewish adults’ spiritual and socialemotional development. The study found that participants developed a rigorous and traditionally informed but rather idiosyncratic Jewish practice, which emphasized close attention to interpersonal interaction. Although the program consisted of many pedagogic components, participants credited peer feedback as the most beneficial element of the curriculum. Notably, participants valued musar for its positive influence over their relationships with family members. All of the engaged participants brought musar into conversation with psychotherapy, unprompted by the interviewer, suggesting avenues for further study. 25th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2011

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SOUL-PLAY: SPIRITUAL EDUCATION AND MORAL EDUCATION Judd Kruger Levingston, Barrack Hebrew Academy Spiritual education, a cousin to moral education, takes place in both non-sectarian and faith-based schools. This proposed session will present findings from academic research and field research (participant observation and artifact analysis) at Quaker, Muslim, Roman Catholic and Jewish schools. Character development and service learning in non-sectarian schools may lead to spiritual growth; in faith-based schools, spiritual education may come through prayer, ritual practices and through the study of a particular religious tradition. While there is no single best approach to spiritual education, especially in Jewish schools, this session will present several successful approaches.

TRANSCENDENCE ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Carol Ingall, Jewish Theological Seminary My paper suggests that we educators approach the task of nurturing the inner lives of our students by self-consciously teaching for transcendence across the curriculum. By approaching the teaching of spirituality as a skill-set like teaching writing across the curriculum or teaching critical skills across the curriculum, we can stretch our students l’eilah u’l’eilah. Transcendence can be approached from a universalistic perspective, in commitment to serious study, community-building, service projects; it can be approached from a particularistic perspective, in creating a relationship with the Divine in prayer, ritual, and responding to everyday miracles. Teaching for transcendence provides a curricular vision through which school leaders can integrate a curriculum, moral education, and religious life.

consultation 7. 1 GENDER ROLE EXPECTATIONS AND TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY IN JEWISH DAY SCHOOLS Elie Tuchman, Yeshiva at the Jersey Shore Women’s career self-efficacy tends to be higher for traditionally female-dominated occupations and lower for traditionally male-dominated occupations. Some researchers suggest that this explains the frequent finding that female teachers report significantly higher teacher self-efficacy than males, except for science teachers where this pattern is reversed. Recent research into the self-efficacy of teachers in Jewish day schools found no significant difference between males and females. One possible explanation for this anomaly is that gender role expectations in Jewish day schools may be different. This study will examine gender role expectations in Jewish day schools and their impact on teacher self-efficacy beliefs. TUESDAY, 10:45 A.M. / S124

CHALLENGE OF JEWISH EDUCATION FOR THE AMERICAN RUSSIAN-SPEAKING JEWISH COMMUNITY Yigal Kotler, Jewish Theological Seminary The subject of the consultation I am going to offer is the challenge of Jewish education for the American Russian-speaking community which represents a significant part of the local Jewish population. Why efforts to include Russian-speaking Jews into traditional American forms of Jewish education are far from success? What kinds of special educational approaches could be most appropriate for them? How the American Jewish education and the Russian Jewish experience can enrich each other? Finding answers to these questions will be the major goal of my future research. TUESDAY, 10:45 A.M. / S128

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JUDAIC KNOWLEDGE OF EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATORS Daniel Held, Jewish Theological Seminary The preceding quarter century has witnessed unprecedented interest in experiential Jewish education. The parallel growth of research has focused primarily on the experience of the learner rather than the educator. This study seeks to better understand the work of full-time experiential Jewish educators with a focus on the types of Judaic knowledge they have and use. Framed by Lee Shulman’s concept of pedagogical content knowledge, the study seeks to explore if there are particular areas of Jewish knowledge that are dominant in experiential education, if these domains differ from those of traditional pedagogy, and if there are nuances in pedagogic content knowledge unique to experiential learning. TUESDAY, 10:45 A.M. / PDR

spotlight session 8. 1

TUESDAY, 10:45 A.M. / S124

PLURALISM IN PRACTICE: BRIDGING THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATION The increasing prevalence and prominence of pluralistic Jewish settings underscore the need for theoretical frameworks through which to understand the construct as well empirical research of its manifestations. Research about pluralism is emerging in the field of Jewish education – much of it from “community” day schools. This Spotlight will include a brief summary of current theory and research related to pluralism in Jewish educational settings. Much of the session will be devoted to using existing frameworks to analyze case studies emerging from various field settings with the goal of articulating strengths of and needs for research and theory in this area.

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INDEX OF PRESENTERS Harlene Apelman ...................................... Induction

Helena Miller ..............................................Plenary

Ofra Backenroth .............................................. 3.1

Francois Mifsud ............................................... 6.1

Tamara Beliak . ................................................ 2.1

Alex Pomson ............................................ 2.2, 4.1

Rafi Cashman ........................................... 1.2, 6.1

John Portelli ..................................................... 6.1

Frayda Gonshor Cohen ..................................... 3.1

Miriam Raider-Roth ........................................... 1.1

Allison Cook ................................................... 2.1

Joseph Reimer .................................................. 2.2

Aryeh Davidson ............................................... 8.1

Wendy Rosov................................................... 1.2

Gail Z. Dorph . ......................................... 1.1, 2.1

Evie Levy Rotstein . ............................................ 4.2

Sharon Feiman-Nemser ....................... 1.1, Induction

Naama Sabar-Ben Yehoshua . ............................ 3.1

Jen Glaser . ..................................................... 1.2

Andrea Schaffer ............................................... 5.1

Owen Gottlieb.......................................... 3.1, 5.2

Laurence Scheindlin .......................................... 6.2

Lisa Grant....................................................Plenary

Randal Schnoor ............................................... 4.1

Daniel Held ............................................. 2.2, 7.1

Aliza Segal ..................................................... 2.1

Elie Holzer ...................................................... 1.1

Allen Selis ....................................................... 8.1

Bethamie Horowitz ........................................... 2.2

Susan Shevitz .................................................. 8.1

Carol Ingall ............................. Anniversary, 5.1, 6.2

Herveen Singh . ............................................... 6.1

Benjamin M. Jacobs ......................................... 1.2

Mark Smiley .................................................... 5.1

Elissa Kaplan . ................................................. 4.2

Bradley Solmsen .............................................. 8.1

Orit Kent . ................................................ 1.1, 2.1

Miriam Heller Stern . ......................................... 5.2

Seymour Kopelowitz ......................................... 4.2

Eran Tamir . ..................................................... 5.1

Yigal Kotler ..................................................... 7.1

Sarah Tauber ................................................... 4.2

Jeffrey Kress . ............................................ 6.2, 8.1

Elie Tuchman ................................................... 7.1

Judd Kruger Levingston ............................... 4.1, 6.2

Ilana Turetsky ............................................ 4.1, 5.2

Jon A. Levisohn ................................................ 1.2

Laura Wiseman ............................................... 2.1

Arielle Levites ................................................... 6.2

Michael Zeldin.............................................Plenary

Nadeem Memon ............................................. 6.1

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NOTES

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THE NETWORK IS GRATEFUL TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THE CONFERENCE: PATRONS Anonymous Covenant Foundation Jim Joseph Foundation Mandel Foundation SPONSORS American Jewish University Baltimore Hebrew Institute – Towson University Brandeis University Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (OH) Jewish Theological Seminary Yeshiva University NRJE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Jeffrey Kress – NRJE Chair Jonathan Krasner – 2011 Program Chair Laura Wiseman – 2011 Conference Chair Leora Isaacs – Secretary Eli Schaap – Treasurer Benjamin Jacobs – 2010 Program Chair Harold Wechsler – 2010 Conference Chair Lisa Grant – Immediate Past NRJE Chair Carol Ingall – Past NRJE Chair Helena Miller – Past Newsletter Editor David Mittelberg – Israel Association for Research in Jewish Education Representative Alex Pomson – Past NRJE Chair Renee Rubin Ross – Newsletter Editor Michael Zeldin – Journal Editor With Special Thanks to: Ada Maradiaga and JESNA Nicole Ray Maxa Sawyer, Graduate Assistant Elma Thomas, Supervisor, Office of the Dean, Faculty of Education, York University Denise Dunbar-McFarlane, Faculty Secretary, Office of the Dean, Faculty of Education, York University Marva Milo, Acting Coordinator, Israel & Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies, York University Benjamin Jacobs Meredith Katz Miriam Heller Stern

PROPOSAL REVIEWERS Scott Aaron, AJL Pittsburgh Isa Aron, HUC Sharon Avni, CUNY-BMCC Ofra Backenroth, JTSA Shani Bechhofer, Yeshiva David Bryfman, JEP Stuart Charmé, Rutgers Barry Chazan, Spertus Howard Deitcher, Hebrew University Gail Dorph, MTEI Shira Epstein, JTSA Naava Frank, Yeshiva Scott Goldberg, Yeshiva Lisa Grant, HUC Barry Holtz, JTSA Bethamie Horowitz, NYU Carol Ingall, JTSA Leora Isaacs, JESNA Benjamin Jacobs, NYU Meredith Katz, JTSA Jo Kay, HUC Jeff Kress, JTSA Jon Levisohn, Brandeis Michelle Lynn-Sachs, JTSA Mitchel Malkus, Rabbi Jacob Pressman Academy Karen Reiss Medwed, Hebrew College Deborah Miller, JTSA Alex Pomson, Hebrew University Joseph Reimer, Brandeis Wendy Rosov, Rosov Consulting Aaron Ross, Yeshiva Renee Rubin Ross, Brandeis Evie Rotstein, Leadership Institute Diane Tickton Schuster, HUC Jeffrey Schein, Siegal College Alex Sinclair, JTSA Miriam Heller Stern, AJU Eran Tamir, Brandeis


2011 program book