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THE NETWORK FOR RESEARCH IN JEWISH EDUCATION

24th Annual

Conference

JUNE.06 – JUNE.08.2010 HOSTED BY

Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development and the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies NEW YORK UNIVERSITY HEMMERDINGER HALL, SILVER CENTER, 100 WASHINGTON SQUARE EAST, NEW YORK, NY


Welcome to the

24th annual conference of the Network for Research in Jewish Education. We look forward to a fascinating conference as we convene academics, practitioners and researchers from many disciplines and institutions to share the latest studies in the field of Jewish educational research. As in previous years, sessions follow three formats: PANEL SESSION:

Papers presenting completed work SPOTLIGHT SESSION:

Interactive session about key issues in Jewish education CONSULTATION:

Collegial discussion of research in progress or preliminary findings

The conference promises to be an exciting venue for exchanging ideas and research findings. We are pleased to have you participate. PROGRAM COMMITTEE:

Benjamin M. Jacobs, Program Chair Stuart CharmĂŠ, Jeffrey Kress, Jon Levisohn, Renee Rubin Ross, Miriam Heller Stern LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS COMMITTEE:

Erich Dietrich and Harold Wechsler, Faculty Chairs Jennifer Auerbach and Naomi Kalish, Graduate Assistants


SCHEDULE SUNDAY, JUNE 6 2:00-6:00

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

1:00-3:00

MTG1 JOURNAL OF JEWISH EDUCATION: EDITORIAL BOARD MEETING ................................. Silver 403 Michael Zeldin, Editor and Susan Huntting, Managing Editor

3:00-4:00

MTG2 NRJE CONFERENCE ORIENTATION FOR FIRST-TIME ATTENDEES, GRADUATE STUDENTS, AND ANYONE ELSE WHO’S INTERESTED ..................................................................................... Silver 410 Renee Rubin Ross, NRJE Conference Program Committee

4:00-4:15

MTG3 WELCOME ............................................................................................................................ Silver 206 Benjamin M. Jacobs, NRJE Program Chair; Harold Wechsler and Naomi Kalish, NRJE Conference Local Arrangements Chairs; Jeffrey Kress, NRJE Chair

4:15-6:00

S1A PAPER PANEL.............................................................................................................................. Silver 206 THE PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF JEWISH EDUCATORS CHAIR: Helena Miller, UJIA

Reframing the Teacher Recruitment Challenge through Case-Study Alex Pomson, Hebrew University

Mentoring Teachers at Orthodox Day Schools: A Collaborative Partnership Model Between a University and an Agency for Jewish Education Jeffrey Winter and Sherri Bressman, National Louis University

Change Leadership:The Impact of Professional Development for Congregational Educators Evie Levy Rotstein, Leadership Institute for Congregational School Educators and Susan Shevitz, Brandeis University

Teacher Retention and Career Commitments among DeLeT Graduates: The Intersection of Teachers’ Background, Preparation to Teaching, and School Context Eran Tamir and Raquel Magidin de Kramer, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education, Brandeis University DISCUSSANT: Gail Dorph, Mandel Foundation

S1B PAPER PANEL ............................................................................................................................ Silver 208 SOCIALIZATION AND RELIGIOUS IDENTITY CHAIR: Stuart Charmé, Rutgers University

A Critical Exploration of Rosenak’s Construct of “Language and Literature” in Jewish Education Jon Levisohn, Brandeis University

Reflections on God: Exploring Children’s Reasoning about Religious Questions Howard Deitcher and Jen Glaser, Hebrew University

Motivation to Study Talmud among American High School Senior Boys Aaron S. Ross, Yeshiva University

Becoming a People of the Book: Language Socialization and Religious Identity Sharon Avni, CUNY DISCUSSANT: Moshe Krakowski, Yeshiva University 24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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SUNDAY, JUNE 6 6:00

DINNER ................................................................................................................................... Hemmerdinger Hall

7:30-9:00

SPL PLENARY ........................................................................................................................... Jurow Lecture Hall TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY: TWO PROGRAMS AND TWO PARADIGMS Robert Chazan, NYU; Marc Kramer, RAVSAK; Peter Nelson, Facing History and Ourselves; Daniel Cohen, George Mason University; Benjamin M. Jacobs, University of Minnesota

MONDAY, JUNE 7 8:00-9:00

BREAKFAST .............................................................................................................................. Hemmerdinger Hall

9:00-10:30

M1A PAPER PANEL ..................................................................................................... Silver 411 INPUTS AND OUTCOMES OF JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR & DISCUSSANT: Sharon Avni, CUNY

Hebrew Oral Reading Fluency in First and Second Grade Scott Goldberg, Elana Weinberger, Nina Goodman, Shoshana Ross, and Aliza Klapholz, Yeshiva University

Unlocking the Gateway for Lifelong Jewish Living: Empowering the Jewish Early Childhood Center through Institutional Taskforces Mirele Goldsmith, Tracy Kaplowitz, and Michelle Finkel, Marker Goldsmith Advisers

The Long-term Influence of Jewish Day School Education Shari Rosenberg-Reiss, Yeshiva University

M1B SPOTLIGHT SESSION ............................................................................................................. Silver 408 UNDERSTANDING EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: EXPLORING CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS Miriam Heller Stern, American Jewish University; Shaul Kelner, Vanderbilt University; Stephen Hazan Arnoff, 14th St. Y of the Educational Alliance 10:30-10:45

BREAK

10:45-12:00

M2A PAPER PANEL ........................................................................................................................... Silver 411 EXPLORATIONS IN THE HISTORY OF JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR: Harold Wechsler, NYU

Zakon Bozhii: Teaching Jews God’s Law in Russian High Schools Eliyana R. Adler, University of Maryland

Raising Expectations and Lowering Hemlines: How Changes in American Society Affected the Policies of Orthodox Girls’ Schools Leslie Ginsparg Klein, Beth T’filoh Dahan School DISCUSSANT: Michael Zeldin, HUC-JIR

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MONDAY, JUNE 7 10:45-12:00

M2B PAPER PANEL ............................................................................................................................ Silver 408 ISSUES IN ISRAEL EDUCATION CHAIR: Kate O’Brien, JESNA

All Four Commonplaces at Once: A Conceptual Framework for Mifgash Ofra Backenroth, JTS; Alex Sinclair, MAKOM; Roberta Bell-Kligler, Oranim

Parents’ Responses to Their Children’s Year in Israel: Preliminary Descriptive and Correlational Findings Rona Novick, Natan Goldstein and Steven Eisenberg, Yeshiva University DISCUSSANT: Daniel Pekarsky, University of Wisconsin-Madison 12:00-1:00

LUNCH / PRESENTATION OF NRJE EMERGING SCHOLAR AWARD ............................... Hemmerdinger Hall

1:15-2:00

C1 CONSULTATION ............................................................................................................. Hemmerdinger Hall Longitudinal Study to Explore the Outcomes and Impact of a JCoSS Education on the Lives of the School Community Helena Miller, UJIA and Alex Pomson, Hebrew University

Developing a Research Manual for Teaching Midrash Deena Sigel, Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture

Core Syllabus on Jewish Peoplehood: Finding Ways to Implement Internationally Naama Sabar-Ben Yehoshua and Nurit Chamo, Tel Aviv University

A Hebrew College Reinvents Itself: How Does a Jewish Education Program Flourish on a State University Campus? Hana Bor and Rebecca Shargel, Towson University

Play in School: Teachers as Coaches and Coaches as Teachers Judd Kruger Levingston, Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy 2:15-3:00

C2 CONSULTATION ............................................................................................................ Hemmerdinger Hall Knowing Jewishly: Exploring the Educational Consequences of Constructivism within a Traditional Religious Epistemology Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto

Rethinking Multicultural Education: Religious & Cultural Dynamics Naomi Kalish, NYU

Implementation Issues in Social Emotional School-Change Projects Rona Novick, Ilana Turetzkey, and Jenny Isaacs, Yeshiva University

Engaging Jewish Men in the Early Childhood Years Zachary Price, JTS

Artists as Emissaries? Using the Encounter with Art as a Means of Connecting Jews to Judaism Bethamie Horowitz, NYU 3:00-3:15

BREAK

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MONDAY, JUNE 7 3:15- 4:45

M3A SPOTLIGHT ............................................................................................................................... Silver 408 “KIDNAPPING” JEWISH SCHOOLS FOR HEBRAISM AND PEOPLEHOOD: CHANGING THE CONTENT AND DELIVERY OF JEWISH EDUCATION (1910-1965) Carol Ingall, JTS; Jonathan Krasner, HUC-JIR; Rebecca Boim Wolf, NYU; Ofra Backenroth, JTS

M3B PAPER PANEL ............................................................................................ Silver 411 THE LIVES AND WORK OF DAY SCHOOL EDUCATORS CHAIR: Eran Tamir, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education, Brandeis University

The Influence of Formative Pre-Service Experiences on the Teacher Self-Efficacy of Jewish Day School Teachers Elie Tuchman, Yeshiva University

Genesis Encounters Darwin: Educators’ Perspectives on the Integration of Science and Religion in a Jewish High School Rebecca Shargel, Towson University and Leslie Smith Rosen, Shoshana S. Cardin School

Mature Love is Complicated: Collaborative Curriculum Development for Israel Education in a Jewish High School Meredith Katz, JTS and Teachers College, Columbia University DISCUSSANT: Barry Holtz, JTS 5:00-6:30

MTG4 MEETING ..........................................................................................................................Waverly 366 WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?: AN OPEN SOURCE CONVERSATION ON JEWISH EDUCATION WITH GRADUATE STUDENTS IN JEWISH EDUCATION Session sponsored by the Covenant Foundation. Harlene Appleman, The Covenant Foundation and David Bryfman, BJENY-SAJES

TUESDAY, JUNE 8 8:00-9:00

BREAKFAST .............................................................................................................................. Hemmerdinger Hall

8:15-9:00

C3 CONSULTATION ............................................................................................................. Hemmerdinger Hall A Ruah Hadash – Spirituality and Pastoral Care’s Impact on Rabbinic and Jewish Professional Education Alan Abrams, NYU

Finding Their Place In A Broken World: Privileged Jewish Teens and Community Service Beth Benjamin, Ma’yan and Yona Shem-Tov, NYU

Methods of Teaching Hebrew Decoding to Students with Dyslexia and other Language Learning Disabilities Sonia Levin, Independent Scholar

Kehillah: Portraits from Camp JRF Nehama Benmosche, JTS

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TUESDAY, JUNE 8 9:00-10:15

T1A PAPER PANEL .............................................................................................................................. Silver 411 INFLUENCES ON THE CULTURE OF EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS CHAIR: Evie Levy Rotstein, Leadership Institute for Congregational School Educators

Jewish Education and Parents: Alignment and Expectations Renee Rubin Ross, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education, Brandeis University

Individual and Organizational Jewish Identity: Match and Mismatch at Jewish Summer Camps Amy L. Sales, Nicole Samuel and Matt Boxer, Brandeis University

Beit Midrash within a School: An Ethnographic Study in Form and Function Aliza Segal, Hebrew University DISCUSSANT: Carol Ingall, JTS

T1B PAPER PANEL ............................................................................................................................. Silver 414 PLURALISM AND IDENTITY IN JEWISH SCHOOLS CHAIR: Wendy Rosov, Rosov Consulting, LLC

Pluralism Three Ways: Jewish High Schools, Diversity, and Community Jeffrey Kress, JTS

From High School Freshmen to Seniors: Changed Understandings of Pluralism and Identity Susan Shevitz, Brandeis University DISCUSSANT: Isa Aron, HUC-JIR

T1C SPOTLIGHT ................................................................................................................................. Silver 410 ARTICULATING LEARNER OUTCOMES: PROCESSES AND APPROACHES Leora Isaacs, JESNA; Renae Cohen, JESNA; David Bryfman, BJENY-SAJES; Reuven Greenvald, MAKOM 10:15-10:30

BREAK

10:30-12:00

T2A SPOTLIGHT................................................................................................................................. Silver 411 THE INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOK OF JEWISH EDUCATION:WINDOW AND MIRROR Helena Miller, UJIA; Alex Pomson, Hebrew University; Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Brandeis University; Barry Holtz, JTS; Jack Wertheimer, JTS; Jonathan Woocher, JESNA

T2B SPOTLIGHT ................................................................................................................... Silver 414 KEY FINDINGS FROM THE JEWISH DAY SCHOOL PEER YARDSTICK™ PARENT SURVEY CONDUCTED IN OVER 60 SCHOOLS, 2008-2010 Sacha Litman, Measuring Success 12:00

LUNCH ............................................................................................................ Hemmerdinger Hall

12:15-2:15

MTG5 NRJE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING ...........................................................................Room 209 Jeffrey Kress, NRJE Chair

12:30-2:30

MTG6 ALOHA MEETING ............................................................................................ Silver 414 RECRUITMENT FOR THE FIELD IN A TIME OF ECONOMIC CRISIS: A CONVERSATION ABOUT CURRENT TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR PREPARING JEWISH EDUCATORS Ofra Backenroth, JTS and Hana Bor, Towson University

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ABSTRACTS

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S1A

SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M. / SILVER 206

P A P E R

P A N E L

THE PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF JEWISH EDUCATORS CHAIR: Helena Miller, UJIA DISCUSSANT: Gail Dorph, Mandel Foundation

REFRAMING THE TEACHER RECRUITMENT CHALLENGE THROUGH CASE-STUDY Alex Pomson, Hebrew University This paper seeks to re-view perceptions of the difficulties in recruiting and retaining teachers for Jewish schools by reframing them as an “adaptive challenge” rather than a “technical problem.” The paper draws on ethnographic research conducted at five Jewish day schools that were selected for case-study because they were presumed to have developed distinctive forms of expertise in meeting the challenges of teacher recruitment and retention. The paper finds that what was significant about these schools was not so much the innovative solutions they had developed, but rather how the most successful approached recruitment and retention as a practice that reflected at the deepest level how they conceived of their missions as Jewish schools. Teacher recruitment was not a technical problem to be solved but a challenge that drew upon and built up the core purposes of the school. MENTORING TEACHERS AT ORTHODOX DAY SCHOOLS: A COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP MODEL BETWEEN A UNIVERSITY AND AN AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION Jeffrey Winter and Sherri Bressman, National Louis University Given the ongoing need for day schools to attract and retain effective teachers, it is important to provide necessary support for teachers once they begin employment at a school. While mentoring has been shown to be a powerful support mechanism, there are schools which lack adequate resources to provide this type of support for teachers who in some cases have not earned certification and may have little formal training in pedagogy. This paper summarizes a year-long innovative pilot program in which faculty at a college of education collaborated with local Orthodox Jewish day schools to provide mentoring for non-certified teachers. Data is presented and discussed. CHANGE LEADERSHIP: THE IMPACT OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR CONGREGATIONAL EDUCATORS Evie Levy Rotstein, Leadership Institute for Congregational School Educators and Susan Shevitz, Brandeis University Our research addresses the relationship between a professional learning experience for congregational school principals and the participants’ development as leaders. Specifically we are exploring the skills, knowledge, beliefs and values necessary to support Jewish educators as they grow and develop as leaders with the capacity to both influence and implement change in the congregational setting. This question is important to people who are interested in improving congregational education and identifying the role of educational leader in that process. TEACHER RETENTION AND CAREER COMMITMENTS AMONG DELET GRADUATES: THE INTERSECTION OF TEACHERS’ BACKGROUND, PREPARATION TO TEACHING, AND SCHOOL CONTEXT Eran Tamir and Raquel Magidin de Kramer, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education, Brandeis University

This paper analyses retention and career patterns among graduates of the DeLeT (Day School Leadership through Teaching) teacher preparation program at Brandeis University University and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Employing chi-square to survey items’ responses, we identify salient factors that support and shape teachers’ career commitments to Jewish day schools. Our findings suggest that those who stay in Jewish day school teaching are more likely to choose teaching because of Jewish related reasons, teacher preparation experience, and school support. These findings highlight the interaction between person, program and setting which suggests a multi-layered understanding of teachers’ lives and career commitments.

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S1B

SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M. / SILVER 208

P A P E R

P A N E L

SOCIALIZATION AND RELIGIOUS IDENTITY CHAIR: Stuart Charmé, Rutgers University DISCUSSANT: Moshe Krakowski, Yeshiva University A CRITICAL EXPLORATION OF ROSENAK’S CONSTRUCT OF “LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE” IN JEWISH EDUCATION Jon Levisohn, Brandeis University Since he began using the twin concepts of language and literature in the 1990s, the construct has been central to Michael Rosenak’s thought and influence. In this metaphorical usage, language is the basic assumptions embedded in the terms we share, and literature is what we make out of that language. This paper will explore this theoretical construct, investigating its roots in general philosophy of education, articulating the work that the construct does for Rosenak, and then offering a critique. Most fundamentally, it will be argued that the construct does not generate a defensible model of pluralism as Rosenak intends it to do. REFLECTIONS ON GOD: EXPLORING CHILDREN’S REASONING ABOUT RELIGIOUS QUESTIONS Howard Deitcher and Jen Glaser, Hebrew University This paper is based on a close reading of a series of conversations with a small group of 9-11 year old children from Orthodox Jewish American families. Within this dialogue we see children puzzling over issues concerning the possibility of knowledge of God, and the proper object of prayer and its limits. In analyzing the contents of the conversations we shall address 3 main issues that provide greater insight into children’s reasoning about religious questions: (a) the role of imagination in shaping theological reasoning, (b) the dynamic between children’s reasoning about their own experiences and understandings, and the messages they internalize from their religious traditions and cultures, (c) the process of faith development in children. MOTIVATION TO STUDY TALMUD AMONG AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR BOYS Aaron S. Ross, Yeshiva University The study of Talmud serves as the centerpiece of the Orthodox Yeshiva curriculum. However, it is not clear to what degree this emphasis is producing results, or even what the desired results are. A study was done of high school senior boys to determine the degree to which they were motivated to study Talmud, separate from their general academic motivation, and to determine some of the factors that contributed to their motivation. While motivation to study Talmud often dovetailed with general academic motivation, students often reported an affinity for their rebbeim that was independent of their affinity for the subject. BECOMING A PEOPLE OF THE BOOK: LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION AND RELIGIOUS IDENTITY Sharon Avni, CUNY This presentation examines how a classroom discussion about the Bible in a liberal Jewish day school encodes a belief system that links a textual tradition to the construction and reproduction of Jewish communal identification and morality. Drawing from the theoretical model of language socialization, the ethnographic and linguistic data in this presentation reveal how classroom talk socializes a group of seventh grade students to a particular set of values, beliefs, world views, and identities. This presentation will show that language socialization provides a crucial lens through which to view the construction, maintenance, and reproduction of religious identity.

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SPL

SUNDAY, 7:30 P.M. / JUROW LECTURE HALL

P L E N A R Y

TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY: TWO PROGRAMS AND TWO PARADIGMS Robert Chazan, NYU Marc Kramer, RAVSAK Peter Nelson, Facing History and Ourselves Daniel Cohen, George Mason University Benjamin M. Jacobs, University of Minnesota Jewish history is a neglected element in the Jewish day school curriculum. Two recent projects have addressed this neglect. The first is an offshoot of Facing History and Ourselves, which has committed itself to invigorating Jewish history teaching in day schools in the Boston and Los Angeles areas. The second is Re/Presenting the Jewish Past, jointly sponsored by NYU’s Network for the Teaching of Jewish History and RAVSAK: The Jewish Community Day School Network. This session will present these two projects, along with insights on the use of the internet for disseminating history resources, presented by the Director of the George Mason Center for History and the New Media. Discussion will focus on future directions for research and practice.

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M1A

MONDAY, 9 A.M. / SILVER 411

P A P E R

P A N E L

INPUTS AND OUTCOMES OF JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR & DISCUSSANT: Sharon Avni, CUNY HEBREW ORAL READING FLUENCY IN FIRST AND SECOND GRADE Scott Goldberg, Elana Weinberger, Nina Goodman, Shoshana Ross, and Aliza Klapholz, Yeshiva University In Jewish education today, there is a need for standardized, validated Hebrew reading assessments in order to improve instruction and monitor student progress. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) Oral Reading Fluency is a standardized test of accuracy and fluency of English reading. Similar measures entitled Mivchan Dinami shel Y’cholot Kriah (MaDYK) were developed and tested as a Hebrew benchmark assessment tool. Results of pilot data collection (N=77) provide evidence for alternate form reliability and inter-rater reliability. Results from benchmark data collection (N~450) provide evidence for content validity. Additional results will also be discussed. UNLOCKING THE GATEWAY FOR LIFELONG JEWISH LIVING: EMPOWERING THE JEWISH EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER THROUGH INSTITUTIONAL TASKFORCES Mirele Goldsmith, Tracy Kaplowitz, and Michelle Finkel, Marker Goldsmith Advisers Jewish early childhood centers are theoretically positioned to engage families at moment in the life-cycle when they are open to participating in a Jewish community. However, host synagogues and JCCs in which ECE centers are located are often ill prepared to support early childhood centers in reaching out to families. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of a two-year transformation project intended to increase the capacity of early childhood centers to become gateways for Jewish engagement. A comparative analysis of case studies of the five institutional taskforces provides insights into the opportunities and obstacles faced by such projects. THE LONG-TERM INFLUENCE OF JEWISH DAY SCHOOL EDUCATION Shari Rosenberg-Reiss, Yeshiva University This research presentation examines the long-term impact of the Jewish day school experience on the religious engagement of adult graduates. Two of the key questions explored are: a. How strongly does day school education predict adult religious engagement, controlling for parents’ observance? b. What role does having Jewish friends during high school play in the religious engagement of adults, controlling for both their parents’ religious engagement and the number of years of their day school education? Five variables serve as “markers” of religious engagement: a) having mostly Jewish friends, b) charitable giving to Jewish and to non-Jewish causes, c) synagogue attendance, d) ritual observance, and e) retaining the denominational affiliation of their upbringing.

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M1B

MONDAY, 9:00 A.M. / SILVER 408

S P O T L I G H T

UNDERSTANDING EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: EXPLORING CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS Miriam Heller Stern, American Jewish University Shaul Kelner, Vanderbilt University Stephen Hazan Arnoff, 14th St. Y of the Educational Alliance This spotlight session will introduce two different interpretive frameworks for unpacking the category “Jewish experiential education” and invite the audience to engage in a critical conversation about the way we conceptualize what we mean by “experiential education” across Jewish educational settings. Shaul Kelner’s work draws on Bourdieu’s and others’ notion of “practice” to frame a way of thinking about Israel experience education. Miriam Heller Stern’s work takes the historical view, suggesting reintroducing a discussion of William Kilpatrick’s project method in the context of the contemporary experiential education conversation. The session will allow significant time for audience discussion, including generating new research questions and agendas for the field.

M2A

MONDAY, 10:45 A.M. / SILVER 411

P A P E R

P A N E L

EXPLORATIONS IN THE HISTORY OF JEWISH EDUCATION CHAIR: Harold Wechsler, NYU DISCUSSANT: Michael Zeldin, HUC-JIR ZAKON BOZHII: TEACHING JEWS GOD’S LAW IN RUSSIAN HIGH SCHOOLS Eliyana R. Adler, University of Maryland This paper will explore Jewish religion textbooks used in Russian high schools in the late nineteenth-century. As more and more Jews began attending elite Russian institutions, where weekly instruction in Zakon Bozhii (Divine Law) was required, many of the schools began introducing Jewish religion courses. This in turn required Jewish educators to formulate lessons and textbooks to meet the new need. With firm grounding in the historical scholarship, and utilizing approaches to textbooks from the field of education, I will examine a set of twelve textbooks to learn about the teachers, the students, educational mores, and conceptions of Judaism and how to create a modern educated Jew. RAISING EXPECTATIONS AND LOWERING HEMLINES: HOW CHANGES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY AFFECTED THE POLICIES OF ORTHODOX GIRLS’ SCHOOLS Leslie Ginsparg Klein, Beth T’filoh Dahan School In the 1960s-1970s, the leadership of Yeshivish Orthodoxy in America advocated greater halakhic (Jewish law) observance and increased isolation from secular culture in response to its perceptions of a loosening of morals in American public behavior. This paper investigates the relationship between this shift and changes in Yeshivish girls’ education in Bais Yaakov schools. Faculty and student writings in school publications, oral history interviews, and the writings of Orthodox leaders in popular periodicals trace how Yeshivish leaders’ perceptions of new external threats led schools to more strictly define standards of halakhic observance and appropriate behavior for girls by adding new rules and policies.

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M2B

MONDAY, 10:45 A.M. / SILVER 408

P A P E R

P A N E L

ISSUES IN ISRAEL EDUCATION CHAIR: Kate O’Brien, JESNA DISCUSSANT: Daniel Pekarsky, University of Wisconsin-Madison ALL FOUR COMMONPLACES AT ONCE: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MIFGASH Ofra Backenroth, JTS Alex Sinclair, MAKOM Roberta Bell-Kligler, Oranim In this presentation we consider a conceptual and theoretical framework for “mifgashim.” Mifgashim are generally recognized, in the research literature, in anecdotal evidence, and in our own wisdom of practice, as thoroughly successful modes of engagement for both Diaspora and Israeli Jews who take part in them. But why? We suggest that by understanding them as a curious combination of all four of Schwab’s commonplaces, we can better understand how they work, why they work, and how we can make them better in the future. We end with some reflections about our own work as creators of particularly complicated mifgashim between Israeli Arabs, Israeli Jews, and American Jews, using the theoretical framework developed to shed light on questions raised. PARENTS’ RESPONSES TO THEIR CHILDREN’S YEAR IN ISRAEL: PRELIMINARY DESCRIPTIVE AND CORRELATIONAL FINDINGS Rona Novick, Natan Goldstein, and Steven Eisenberg, Yeshiva University The post- high school year of study in Israel occurs at a time when family religious practices and values may be accepted or rejected. Building on previously obtained student data, parents were emailed surveys regarding their response to their children’s post-Israel year spiritual changes and areas of parent-child conflict. Most parents reported moderate religious growth in their children, felt they were highly respectful of their families, and experienced limited parent-child conflict around religious behavior. Exploration of interactions between student change and family response can further inform counselors, students and parents as they prepare for this popular rite of passage.

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C1

MONDAY, 1:15 P.M. / HEMMERDINGER HALL

CONSULTATION

LONGITUDINAL STUDY TO EXPLORE THE OUTCOMES AND IMPACT OF A JCOSS EDUCATION ON THE LIVES OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY Helena Miller, UJIA and Alex Pomson, Hebrew University There are many examples of cross communal, or pluralist, Jewish High schools in North America. JCoSS will be the first cross communal Jewish secondary school in the UK. We are in the exciting position of creating something new for British Jewry. We are uniquely placed to build in a review and evaluation process which will enable us to reflect upon the outcomes and impact of the Jewish Education on the school community and further. Our research seeks to understand the school’s significance in the lives of the families enrolled in the school, by focusing on knowledge, attitude and commitment. DEVELOPING A RESEARCH MANUAL FOR TEACHING MIDRASH Deena Sigel, Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture This project is for the preparation of a scholarly, educational handbook for teaching midrash (Biblical interpretation). Midrash is an important genre of Jewish interpretive and cultural traditions. Due to its nature as the beginning of Bible commentary in the post-prophecy era, it sheds light on the way that the rabbis placed Scripture at the center of Jewish life. Teacher-training programs for Jewish studies usually do not include midrash pedagogy in their training purview, despite the inclusion of midrash in the curriculum. The aim of this project is to address the need to help teachers in understanding midrash and in effectively transmitting this traditional materials. CORE SYLLABUS ON JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD: FINDING WAYS TO IMPLEMENT INTERNATIONALLY Naama Sabar-Ben Yehoshua and Nurit Chamo, Tel Aviv University The International School for Jewish Peoplehood Studies (SJPS) was established five years ago at the Museum of the Jewish Diaspora at Tel Aviv University. Its overall aim is to instill Jewish peoplehood consciousness among Jews living in Israel and around the world. One of the tools for effectively disseminating the notion of Jewish peoplehood in formal education is constructing a core syllabus to be utilized both in Israel and in international Jewish communities. This presentation addresses the very need of developing a core syllabus. Other questions that will be dealt with are: Is it at all possible to construct a core syllabus for diverse Jewish communities? Why is it important to construct one comprehensive syllabus? Who is best qualified to teach such a syllabus, how can they be trained, and what teaching strategies are most appropriate? A HEBREW COLLEGE REINVENTS ITSELF: HOW DOES A JEWISH EDUCATION PROGRAM FLOURISH ON A STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS? Hana Bor and Rebecca Shargel, Towson University Jewish Education professors who have joined the faculty of TU’s College of Education conduct research and train future teachers and administrators to work within Jewish educational institutions. Underlying the curriculum is a respect for diversity, with a unique focus on understanding Jewish culture and civilization, and an emphasis on rigorous academic research. We invite colleagues to explore our pioneering program within a public university while addressing the following: How do Jewish education programs fit within public universities? Synergies? Shared curriculum? Can Jewish education degrees combine with general education certification? How are Jewish Education programs perceived within the university and broad educator community? How can Jewish education professors contribute to the general university community? What might potential students in a Jewish Education program in a public university expect in terms of their personal and professional lives? PLAY IN SCHOOL: TEACHERS AS COACHES AND COACHES AS TEACHERS Judd Kruger Levingston, Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy Theodore Sizer’s Horace’s Compromise (1984) argues that teachers should serve as coaches who facilitate learning. In this consultation, we will ask how far to extend this metaphor of teachers as coaches. Should classes function with team-like unity, or should diverse, cacophonous voices flourish? This consultation will explore ways of testing the effectiveness of classroom-based coaching and play through drama, debate, and the arts. Because young people look to their coaches as moral leaders, we will focus on play and content that promotes moral development.

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C2

MONDAY, 2:15 P.M. / HEMMERDINGER HALL

CONSULTATION

KNOWING JEWISHLY: EXPLORING THE EDUCATIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF CONSTRUCTIVISM WITHIN A TRADITIONAL RELIGIOUS EPISTEMOLOGY Rafi Cashman, University of Toronto This paper tries to re-think the epistemological and pedagogical tensions between constructivism and traditional, transmission-based, Modern Orthodox education. Working within the context of Devrah Lehmann’s critique on discourses in Modern Orthodox schools, this exploration will help allow for a more diverse and authentic learner experience, one that is more responsive to today’s educational and social realities. This groundwork will be laid by looking at a number of contemporary Orthodox Jewish philosophers (specifically Tamar Ross, Jose Faur and Avi Sagi) who have explored religious ideas in non-educational contexts that do not conform to an empirico-realist conception of knowledge. Attempts outside the Jewish system to meet similar challenges will also be considered using the work of Graham Macdonough and Ian MacMullen. RETHINKING MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: RELIGIOUS & CULTURAL DYNAMICS Naomi Kalish, NYU In this session I seek consultation about my proposed ethnographic research in the phenomenon of Jewish pastoral education. I have proposed to study the current practice of training rabbis, cantors and lay leaders in the science and art of pastoral counseling. I plan to study them in academic, clinical (such as hospitals), and conference settings. I seek insight regarding my ethnographic approach and sampling strategy, as well as guidance for expanding my theoretical foundation. IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES IN SOCIAL EMOTIONAL SCHOOL-CHANGE PROJECTS Rona Novick, Ilana Turetzkey and Jenny Isaacs, Yeshiva University Schools are increasingly aware of the importance of social-emotional learning and of the value of school-wide programs that promote positive school culture. The Brave bully-prevention and social-leadership project is one such program that has been implemented among middle school students in 11 co-educational Jewish day schools across the country. This descriptive study examines factors that influence implementation of the Brave project, including program fidelity, faculty and administrative support, parent engagement, school bullying policies, program visibility, and school structure. Implications for future implementation of school-wide programs are explored. ENGAGING JEWISH MEN IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD YEARS Zachary Price, JTS Traditionally, fathers have been absent during the early childhood years. Beginning in the early 1980s, secular communities began to hold conversations about how to better engage and involve fathers in caring for their children. The Jewish conversation about this topic, however, has been heretofore rather limited. This paper explores the historical construct of the father’s identity in light of societal changes over the centuries. Additionally, this paper looks at several programs ranging from Head Start, Sure Start, and Boot Camp for New Dads in order to generate conversation in Jewish communities about how to involve Jewish men in their children’s lives during the early childhood years. ARTISTS AS EMISSARIES? USING THE ENCOUNTER WITH ART AS A MEANS OF CONNECTING JEWS TO JUDAISM Bethamie Horowitz, NYU What are the consequences for the creators and audiences of experiencing art that is somehow Jewish or Israeli? As part of developing a conceptual framework for considering art and artists as part of the changing sociology of American Jewish education and Jewish life, in this paper I discuss findngs from two recent studies of Jewish/Israeli artists and their audiences. This paper is an initial foray in attempting to conceptualize where art sits and how it functions in comparision to traditional text study. What can we learn by comparing this emerging trend to our modal cultural patterns/habits?

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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M3A

MONDAY, 3:15 P.M. / SILVER 408

S P O T L I G H T

“KIDNAPPING” JEWISH SCHOOLS FOR HEBRAISM AND PEOPLEHOOD: CHANGING THE CONTENT AND DELIVERY OF JEWISH EDUCATION (1910-1965) Carol Ingall, JTS Jonathan Krasner, HUC-JIR Rebecca Boim Wolf, NYU Ofra Backenroth, JTS The Women Who Reconstructed American Jewish Education (ed. Carol Ingall, Brandeis University University Press, 2010) examines the impact of American progressivism, refracted through the prisms of education and social reform, on Jewish education. It also analyzes the construction of an American-Jewish synthesis energized by Hebraism and Zionism. It tells the story of women connected with Samson Benderly and Mordecai Kaplan and their contributions to broadening the definition, curriculum, and audience for Jewish education in the early to mid 20th century. We in the 21st century take it for granted that the reach of Jewish education extends far beyond schooling, and that the Jewish texts we teach need to reflect the richness of the culture of the Jewish people. Our contention is that the roots of those initiatives begin here, with the encounter of progressivism, Hebraism, and Zionism.

M3B

MONDAY, 3:15 P.M. / SILVER 411

P A P E R

P A N E L

THE LIVES AND WORK OF DAY SCHOOL EDUCATORS CHAIR: Eran Tamir, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education DISCUSSANT: Barry Holtz, JTS THE INFLUENCE OF FORMATIVE PRE-SERVICE EXPERIENCES ON THE TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY OF JEWISH DAY SCHOOL TEACHERS Elie Tuchman, Yeshiva University This study examined the associations between formal and informal formative experiences and teacher self-efficacy utilizing the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale. The effect of years of teaching experience on these associations was also investigated. Formal training, student teaching, and experiences as youth advisors, camp counselors, and childcare supervisors were all found to have a positive association with teacher self-efficacy. Formal training was most strongly associated with efficacy for instructional practices, while informal experiences were most strongly associated with efficacy for student engagement. The efficacy beliefs of the most senior teachers appeared to be most related to their pre-service experiences. GENESIS ENCOUNTERS DARWIN: EDUCATORS’ PERSPECTIVES ON THE INTEGRATION OF SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN A JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL Rebecca Shargel, Towson University and Leslie Smith Rosen, Shoshana S. Cardin School Each year teachers at the “Keshet” High School prepare a week-long program around a single theme. As the first part of a three year study, this qualitative research investigated the question: what are the challenges of an integrated program in a Jewish high school? Through observing and interviewing teachers, we discovered various ways an entire faculty “plugged into” the topic of the origins of life on earth from either scientific or religious perspectives. This presentation will consider an existing model of curricular integration and extend it to an ideal model for high school education. MATURE LOVE IS COMPLICATED: COLLABORATIVE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT FOR ISRAEL EDUCATION IN A JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL Meredith Katz, JTS and Teachers College, Columbia University My study explores a curriculum development project for Israel education in a Jewish high school. Through an action research framework I investigated the affordances and challenges of a collaborative approach to Israel education curriculum development at a small school with a weak institutional culture. Faculty participants were eager to brainstorm plans for an interdisciplinary approach to Israel education but felt constrained by the school’s culture and context. Nevertheless, significant professional learning took place for members of the Israel Education Committee. 24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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MTG4

MONDAY, 5 P.M. / WAVERLY 369

M E E T I N G

WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND? AN OPEN SOURCE CONVERSATION ON JEWISH EDUCATION WITH GRADUATE STUDENTS IN JEWISH EDUCATION Harlene Appleman, The Covenant Foundation and David Bryfman, BJENY-SAJES The Covenant Foundation and BJENY-SAJES would like to hear from graduate students involved in Jewish education about the next frontiers of the Jewish educational landscape. What’s on your minds? What are your research interests? Where do you see the future of Jewish education? This will also be a great opportunity to meet and network with your fellow graduate students – and as we’ve learned, possibly develop networks and relationships that will last well beyond your graduate student years. Refreshments will be served.

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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C3

TUESDAY, 8:15 A.M. /HEMMERDINGER HALL

CONSULTATION

A RUAH HADASH – SPIRITUALITY AND PASTORAL CARE’S IMPACT ON RABBINIC AND JEWISH PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION Alan Abrams, NYU The CPSP, or the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy, describes itself on its Web site (http:// www.pastoralreport.com) as “a theologically based covenant community, dedicated to “Recovery of Soul.” Note the use of relationship-centered (“covenant”) and spiritual language here (“soul”; “theologically). In contrast, his kind of spiritual language is largely absent from the ACPE Web site’s “Who we are” statement, which describes the APCE in much more organizational and educational languge: as “a multicultural, multifaith organization devoted to providing education and improving the quality of ministry and pastoral care offered by spiritual caregivers of all faiths through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education.” FINDING THEIR PLACE IN A BROKEN WORLD: PRIVILEGED JEWISH TEENS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE Beth Benjamin, Ma’yan and Yona Shem-Tov, NYU As American high schools expand their community service requirements and Jewish communal institutions deploy service opportunities as a marketing tool to reach unaffiliated youth, what are Jewish teens learning in these programs about their place in the world and their role in addressing injustice and inequality? For this Consultation Session, we will present and open for discussion our ethnographic research examining Jewish teens’ understanding of privilege and social justice in a Jewish teen philanthropy program (currently underway). This brief session will include the presentation of preliminary findings, followed by a critical discussion of the substantive issues emerging from our research. METHODS OF TEACHING HEBREW DECODING TO STUDENTS WITH DYSLEXIA AND OTHER LANGUAGE LEARNING DISABILITIES Sonia Levin, Independent Scholar The area of Jewish Special Education often suffers from a gap between knowledge and practice; thus, many children with learning disabilities at times remain underserved. The purpose of this project is to address the specifics of teaching Hebrew reading to students with dyslexia and other Language Learning Disabilities (“LLD”). This thesis presents a synopsis of studies in this field of special education, addresses different reading methodologies, analyzes the unique features and specific aspects of Hebrew reading acquisition, and presents an instructional methodology based on findings and research in this area both in Israel and United States. KEHILLAH: PORTRAITS FROM CAMP JRF Nehama Benmosche, JTS This consultation is regarding a dissertation in-progress. The author seeks responses to initial findings based on an analysis of the “dimensions of difference” at the Reconstructionist summer camp, Camp JRF, and the analysis of factors contributing to the endeavor to support an inclusive community. Through the portraiture methodology, individuals and sub-groups of the camp community are described and through coding and ethnographic analysis, the author uses Richard Kilburg’s theory of organizational regression to identify the forces contributing to the natural regression and to the intentional development and health of the organization.

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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T1A

TUESDAY, 9 A.M. / SILVER 411

P A P E R

P A N E L

INFLUENCES ON THE CULTURE OF EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS CHAIR: Evie Levy Rotstein, Leadership Institute for Congregational School Educators DISCUSSANT: Carol Ingall, JTS JEWISH EDUCATION AND PARENTS: ALIGNMENT AND EXPECTATIONS Renee Rubin Ross, Mandel Center for Studies in Jewish Education, Brandeis University What do schools expect from parents? To answer this question, I conducted a year of fieldwork at a Jewish, a Catholic and an independent school, interviewing school administration, teachers and parents and attending parent events. Findings: First, parents at all schools were expected to support learning, but what this actually meant varied significantly. Second, there was variation in how schools informed parents about expectations. Implications: families’ connection to schools is a significant issue in Jewish education today. This study suggests ways that Jewish schools might consider what they expect from parents and how they communicate this. INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL JEWISH IDENTITY: MATCH AND MISMATCH AT JEWISH SUMMER CAMPS Amy L. Sales, Nicole Samuel, and Matt Boxer, Brandeis University As part of a larger and ongoing study of Jewish overnight summer camps, we became interested in the question of the match between the Jewish identity and practice of the camp and that of its staff, campers, and families. Our study examines the degree of correspondence between organizations and individuals and tests the effect of the match/mismatch on two key outcomes, namely satisfaction with the summer experience and the decision to return the next summer. Data suggest a high level of correspondence on denomination, a low level on Jewish practices, and a preference for (and benefit to) being at a camp where Jewish life is more intense than back home. BEIT MIDRASH WITHIN A SCHOOL: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY IN FORM AND FUNCTION Aliza Segal, Hebrew University This ethnographic exploration of the beit midrash in one boys’ yeshivah high school in Israel aims to analyze the role that beit midrash activity plays in the socialization process within the school. The study addresses questions such as: how is the community of practice enacted within the school beit midrash? How do its features interact with features endemic to a school setting? The findings point to ways in which the limits placed on the beit midrash by the institution of school serve to reinforce the idealized version of Yeshivah as it is enacted within the school’s community of practice.

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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T1B

TUESDAY, 9 A.M. / SILVER 414

P A P E R

P A N E L

PLURALISM AND IDENTITY IN JEWISH SCHOOLS CHAIR: Wendy Rosov, Rosov Consulting, LLC DISCUSSANT: Isa Aron, HUC-JIR PLURALISM THREE WAYS: JEWISH HIGH SCHOOLS, DIVERSITY, AND COMMUNITY Jeffrey Kress, JTS Jewish pluralistic “community” day schools face the challenge of meeting a broad array of student religious needs. At the same time, attempts to address the specific needs of student sub-groups complicate efforts to create a sense of overall Jewish community that encompasses all students. Data from three pluralistic Jewish high schools are brought to illustrate the methods and challenges faced in achieving a balance of diversity and community. Each of these schools has developed its own culture of pluralism which can be seen as related to the community in which each is embedded. FROM HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMEN TO SENIORS: CHANGED UNDERSTANDINGS OF PLURALISM AND IDENTITY Susan Shevitz, Brandeis University Much of the research about pluralism in Jewish education focuses on the school as the unit being studied. In contrast, the research presented here looks at how students in an intentionally pluralistic day high school change in the course of their secondary school years. More specifically, it documents the ways in which their ideas about pluralism have changed as well as how their experiences with pluralism are influencing their Jewish identities. Pluralism has broadened most students’ world views, challenged their assumptions, and sometimes changed their ways of thinking and behaving Jewishly. While almost all students have developed a clearer idea of what pluralism is through their four years in the school, for some pluralism is a distraction and/or a cause of confusion.

T1C

TUESDAY, 9 A.M. / SILVER 410

S P O T L I G H T

ARTICULATING LEARNER OUTCOMES: PROCESSES AND APPROACHES Leora Isaacs, JESNA Renae Cohen, JESNA David Bryfman, BJENY-SAJES Reuven Greenvald, MAKOM Funders, institutions, and communities increasingly require proof of program impact on “learner outcomes.” To meet these demands, the field of Jewish education must bridge the gap between research theory about learner outcomes and practical, field-based experiments. Featuring BJENY-SAJES and MAKOM as exemplars of effective practice in experiential education for teens and Israel education, respectively, JESNA’s session will explore promising approaches and opportunities for the future of this work and will spark a conversation among research colleagues about making these vital theory-practice connections, collaborating to meet extant challenges, and considering the deeper analyses necessary to advance this area of inquiry.

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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T2A

TUESDAY, 10:30 A.M. / SILVER 411

S P O T L I G H T

THE INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOK OF JEWISH EDUCATION: WINDOW AND MIRROR Helena Miller, UJIA Alex Pomson, Hebrew University Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Brandeis University Barry Holtz, JTS Jack Wertheimer, JTS Jonathan Woocher, JESNA The publication of the International Handbook of Jewish Education is a landmark event. Bringing together 69 chapters and 89 authors spanning a wide variety of disciplines, subject areas and geographical contexts, this volume constitutes a signal demonstration of the maturation of the field of Jewish education. The volume’s publication provides an opportunity to take stock of the central questions that exercise researchers in the field of Jewish education, the theoretical frameworks on which their work draws, and some primary conclusions about the purposes and practices of Jewish education today. This spotlight session will be structured around the Handbook’s four sections: (i) “Vision and Practice,” (ii) “Teaching and Learning,” (iii) “Applications,” and (iv) “Geography.” Four presentations, framed by remarks from two of the Handbook’s editors, will invite the audience to consider what the Handbook reveals about the overall contents and concerns of Jewish education today, and what appear to be the implications of the Handbook’s contents for practitioners and researchers of Jewish education wherever they are located.

T2B

TUESDAY, 10:30 A.M. / SILVER 414

S P O T L I G H T

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE JEWISH DAY SCHOOL PEER YARDSTICK™ PARENT SURVEY CONDUCTED IN OVER 60 SCHOOLS, 2008-2010 Sacha Litman, Measuring Success Over the past two years, we’ve collected responses from over 12,000 parents in 56 Jewish Day Schools (with an average response rate of 78% per school) through the Jewish Day School Peer Yardstick™ Parent Survey. The survey yields many critical insights into what drives perceived value, how much parents are willing/able to pay, how different types of schools (by denomination, size, etc) perform, and how perceptions vary by demographics (income, observance level, etc). During this spotlight session, we will be discussing key learnings, proposing follow-on questions for further investigation, and learning how schools are using the data to inform their actions and decisions.

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

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INDEX OF PRESENTERS ALAN ABRAMS ....................................................... C3 ELIYANA R. ADLER ..................................................M2A HARLENE APPLEMAN ...........................................MTG4 ISA ARON ..............................................................T1B SHARON AVNI ............................................. S1B, M1A OFRA BACKENROTH ......................... M2B, M3A, MTG6 ROBERTA BELL-KLIGLER ............................................ M2B BETH BENJAMIN ..................................................... C3 NEHAMA BENMOSCHE .......................................... C3 REBECCA BOIM WOLF ..........................................M3A HANA BOR ................................................. C1, MTG6 MATT BOXER.......................................................... T1A SHERRI BRESSMAN ................................................. S1A DAVID BRYFMAN ......................................... MTG4, T1C RAFI CASHMAN...................................................... C2 NURIT CHAMO....................................................... C1 STUART CHARMÉ ................................................... S1B ROBERT CHAZAN ................................................... SPL DANIEL COHEN ..................................................... SPL RENAE COHEN ..................................................... T1C HOWARD DEITCHER .............................................. S1B GAIL DORPH .......................................................... S1A STEVEN EISENBERG .............................................. M2B SHARON FEIMAN-NEMSER ..................................... T2A MICHELLE FINKEL...................................................M1A LESLIE GINSPARG KLEIN .........................................M2A JEN GLASER ........................................................... S1B SCOTT GOLDBERG ...............................................M1A NATAN GOLDSTEIN .............................................. M2B MIRELE GOLDSMITH ..............................................M1A NINA GOODMAN ...............................................M1A REUVEN GREENVALD .............................................. T1C STEPHEN HAZAN ARNOFF..................................... M1B MIRIAM HELLER STERN ........................................... M1B BARRY HOLTZ ................................................M3B, T2A BETHAMIE HOROWITZ ............................................ C2 SUSAN HUNTTING .............................................MTG1 CAROL INGALL ............................................. M3A, T1A JENNY ISAACS ....................................................... C2 LEORA ISAACS ....................................................... T1C BENJAMIN M. JACOBS ................................. MTG3, SPL NAOMI KALISH ............................................ MTG3, C2 TRACY KAPLOWITZ ...............................................M1A MEREDITH KATZ .................................................... M3B

24th Annual Network for Research in Jewish Education Conference 2010

SHAUL KELNER ...................................................... M1B ALIZA KLAPHOLZ ...................................................M1A MOSHE KRAKOWSKI ............................................. S1B MARC KRAMER ....................................................... SPL JONATHAN KRASNER ............................................M3A JEFFREY KRESS ...................................MTG3, T1B, MTG5 JUDD KRUGER LEVINGSTON ..................................... C1 SONIA LEVIN .......................................................... C3 JON LEVISOHN ...................................................... S1B EVIE LEVY ROTSTEIN ............................................... T1A SACHA LITMAN ......................................................T2B RAQUEL MAGIDIN DE KRAMER ................................ S1A HELENA MILLER ........................................ S1A, C1, T2A PETER NELSON ....................................................... SPL RONA NOVICK ..............................................M2B, C2 KATE O’BRIEN ....................................................... M2B DANIEL PEKARSKY ................................................ M2B ALEX POMSON ........................................ S1A, C1, T2A ZACHARY PRICE ...................................................... C2 SHARI ROSENBERG-REISS .......................................M1A WENDY ROSOV .....................................................T1B AARON S. ROSS .................................................... S1B SHOSHANA ROSS ................................................M1A EVIE LEVY ROTSTEIN ............................................... S1A RENEE RUBIN ROSS..................................... MTG2, T1A NAAMA SABAR-BEN YEHOSHUA .............................. C1 AMY L. SALES ........................................................ T1A NICOLE SAMUEL .................................................... T1A ALIZA SEGAL .......................................................... T1A REBECCA SHARGEL .........................................C1, M3B YONA SHEM-TOV ................................................... C3 SUSAN SHEVITZ ..............................................S1A, T1B DEENA SIGEL.......................................................... C1 ALEX SINCLAIR ...................................................... M2B LESLIE SMITH ROSEN ............................................. M3B ERAN TAMIR ................................................ S1A, M3B ELIE TUCHMAN..................................................... M3B ILANA TURETZKEY.................................................... C2 ELANA WEINBERGER ............................................M1A HAROLD WECHSLER ...................................MTG3, M2A JACK WERTHEIMER ................................................. T2A JEFFREY WINTER .................................................... S1A JONATHAN WOOCHER ......................................... T2A MICHAEL ZELDIN .......................................MTG1, M2A

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THE NETWORK IS GRATEFUL TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THE CONFERENCE: PATRONS Anonymous Covenant Foundation Jim Joseph Foundation Mandel Foundation I. Waldbaum Family Foundation, Inc. SPONSORS American Jewish University Brandeis University Gratz College Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (OH) Siegal College Jewish Theological Seminary Yeshiva University NRJE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Jeffrey Kress – NRJE Chair Benjamin Jacobs – 2010 Program Chair Erich Dietrich – 2010 Conference Co-Chair Harold Wechsler – 2010 Conference Co-Chair Leora Isaacs – Secretary Eli Schaap – Treasurer Lisa Grant – Immediate Past NRJE Chair Carol Ingall – Past NRJE Chair David Miller – 2009 Conference Co-chair Helena Miller – Past Newsletter Editor David Mittelberg – Israel Association for Research in Jewish Education Representative Alex Pomson – Past NRJE Chair Renee Rubin Ross – Newsletter Editor David Schnall – 2009 Conference Co-chair Miriam Heller Stern – 2009 Program Chair Michael Zeldin – Journal Editor With Special Thanks to: Jennifer Auerbach and Naomi Kalish, Conference Graduate Assistants Ada Maradiaga and JESNA Nicole Ray Kathryn Engebretsen Michelle Lynn-Sachs Renee Rubin Ross Miriam Heller Stern

PROPOSAL REVIEWERS Scott Aaron, Agency for Jewish Learning Isa Aron, HUC Sharon Avni, CUNY-BMCC Brenda Bacon, Machon Schechter Ofra Backenroth, JTS Shani Bechhofer, YU-Azraeli David Bryfman, BJENY Stuart Charmé, Rutgers Barry Chazan, Segal College of Jewish Studies Steven M. Cohen, HUC Beth Cousens, Hillel Howard Deitcher, Hebrew University Gail Dorph, MTEI Shira D. Epstein, JTS Lisa Grant, HUC Barry Holtz, JTSA Carol Ingall, JTS Leora Isaacs, JESNA Marlyn Bloch Jaffe, Jewish Education Center of Cleveland Meredith Katz, JTS Jo Kay, HUC Orit Kent, Brandeis Jonathan Krasner, HUC Jeff Kress, JTS Jon Levisohn, Brandeis Mitch Malkus, Rabbi Jacob Pressman Academy Helena Miller, UJIA Alex Pomson, Hebrew University Joe Reimer, Brandeis Wendy Rosov, Rosov Consulting Aaron Ross, YU-Azraeli Renee Rubin Ross, Brandeis Diane Schuster, Claremont Simone Schweber, University of Wisconsin Miriam Heller Stern, American Jewish University Eran Tamir, Brandeis Harold Wechsler, NYU

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