Page 1

Nauset Regional High School

Program of Studies 2009-2010 100 Cable Road North Eastham, MA 02651 www.nausetschools.org/nrhs Administration Thomas Conrad, Principal Paul Markovich, Asst. Principal Eduardo MacDonald, Asst. Principal Dee Smith, Director of Guidance

NRHS Telephone Numbers Main Office: 508-255-2505 Main Office Fax: 508-255-9701 Guidance Office: 508-255-1510 Guidance Office Fax: 508-240-5417


TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION.....................................................................................................................................3 GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT SERVICES ...............................................................................................................4 GRADE PROMOTION POLICY..............................................................................................................................5 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS..........................................................................................................................5 MISSION STATEMENT / EXPECTATIONS .........................................................................................................7 BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY......................................................................................................................................8 ENGLISH ...................................................................................................................................................................15 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS - ART ........................................................................................................................22 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS - MUSIC ...................................................................................................................27 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS – CULINARY...........................................................................................................32 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS – LIVING ARTS .....................................................................................................33 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS - ART METALS ......................................................................................................35 FINE AND APPLIED ARTS – WOOD FABRICATION......................................................................................37 HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE ......................................................................................................................38 LEADERSHIP ...........................................................................................................................................................44 MATHEMATICS ......................................................................................................................................................45 PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH ...................................................................................................................52 SCHOOL TO CAREERS .........................................................................................................................................56 SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL (SWS) .................................................................................................................57 SCIENCE ...................................................................................................................................................................60 THEATER AND ACTING .......................................................................................................................................67 WORLD LANGUGES ..............................................................................................................................................69

2


GENERAL INFORMATION NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission to Nauset Regional High School, or in obtaining the advantages, privileges and courses of study at Nauset on account of Race, Color, Sex, Religion or Natural Origin (Chapter 622 of the Acts of 1971.)

SUBJECT SELECTION Due to the Educational Reform Act that calls for the elimination of study halls, all students must select seven (7) full year courses or the equivalent. This booklet furnishes some of the information you will need to plan your high school program. You should also evaluate your interests, aptitudes and abilities when selecting courses in rounding out your program. This evaluation should be carried out cooperatively with your parents, teachers and counselor. The following pages contain descriptions of courses by department. The number to the left of the course title is the computer number. To the right of the course title is the unit Credit for the course. If you select any semester electives for half Credit, please make certain to sign up for two (2), one in each semester.

COURSE SELECTION PROCESS When you have selected your courses for next year, enter the computer number of the courses selected on the separate course selection sheet. Sign the form and have a parent sign where indicated and return only this form on Pre-registration day.

3


GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT SERVICES Guidance is the systematic process of helping individuals, through educative and interpretive procedures, to gain a better understanding of their own characteristics and potential and to relate these to satisfactory social requirements and opportunities. It is that function which aids the student in assessing his/her abilities so that he/she is able to utilize his/her potential. In order to integrate the services provided by the Guidance Department into the school’s curriculum, the following programs have been implemented: Grade 9 •

Middle school to high school transition (Advisor/Advisee Program) o Orientation, high school services and and study skills program

Grade 10 • Career exploration and career inventory testing Grade 11 • Post-high school planning • Junior Seminar (Spring) Grade 12 • Individual counseling

4


GRADE PROMOTION POLICY Freshmen: Students in Grade 9 must earn 6 Credits, including English 9 in order to be promoted to Grade 10. Sophomores: Students in Grade 10 must have earned 12 Credits including English 9 & 10 in order to be promoted to Grade 11. Juniors: In order to be promoted to senior status in the 4th year, students must complete the following requirements: Seniors: 19 Credits including English 9, 10, 11 in addition to sufficient academic course work that insures graduation requirements as listed below.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Seven (7) full units must be taken each year. The following subjects must be included in the student’s four year program: • • • • •

Four (4) in English U.S. History and two (2) other history and social science credits Three (3) in math (beginning with the class of 2011) Three (3) in science (beginning with the class of 2011) Three (3) years of physical education/ health

English is cumulative in its skill development; therefore, students who fail English for the year must attend summer school and receive a passing grade before they can continue at the next level. Students will not be allowed to enroll in two (2) English courses in the same semester. Students must pass six(6) units in the senior year regardless of their previous accumulation of Credits. Graduation requirement is 26 Credits.

5


ACADEMIC REVIEW A.P. and Honors Any student who receives a C or lower in A.P. or Honors at interims or at the end of the quarter must attend after-school help sessions a minimum of twice a week (student or teacher sessions) until the grade comes up at the end of the marking term. Failure to improve the grade may lead to a recommendation of placement in a lower level class.

SWITCHING LEVELS No student will be allowed to drop a level without demonstrating a sincere effort to get help. The expectation is for a student to meet with their teacher in after-school help. If this effort is not enough, the student should take advantage of meeting with a tutor from the National Honor Society.

HOMEWORK EXPECTATIONS Advanced Placement Honors “A” Level “B” Level

2 hours or more 1 ½ hours or more 45 minutes 30-45 minutes

6


MISSION STATEMENT / EXPECTATIONS “As they say on my own Cape Cod, a rising tide lifts all the boats. And a partnership, by definition, serves both partners without domination or unfair advantages.” President John F. Kennedy, 1963 Nauset Regional High School, in partnership with its member communities, strives to develop responsible and educated citizens by providing an environment that expects and encourages respect for each other and the community. We uphold rigorous academic standards through a variety of teaching and learning strategies so that all students may acquire the skills, the knowledge, and the work ethic to become contributing members of an evolving society. We provide diverse extra and co-curricula activities to complement the academics, creating a rich variety of valued and supported offerings. Academic Expectations: •

All students will engage in a variety of learning experiences to develop skills in: o Evaluating information o Critical thinking and problem solving o Reading comprehension o Oral communication o Written communication

Social Expectations: • •

Students will develop self-worth and emotional maturity using positive interpersonal and intra-personal skills Students will develop coping skills that promote self-advocacy and self-confidence in real-life situations

Civic Expectations: • •

Students will have the opportunity to in knowledge and respect for the diversity on our campus, in our communities, and the world beyond. Students will have the opportunity to be knowledgeable advocates of their civic obligations and privileges

7


BUSINESS / TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY ACADEMIES The Business Technology Department is introducing a new series of courses called Academies. These academies are designed for college-bound business majors or for the students planning to enter the business world. It is suggested that you take a variety of courses in the academies to achieve a broad prospective and enhance your technological skills. The suggested courses for each academy: EXECUTIVE ACADEMY

LEGAL ACADEMY

BTBA21 BTBA22 BTBA23 BTBA26 BTBA28

BTBA62 BTBA61 BTBA63 BTBA65

Accounting I Accounting II Advertising and Marketing Developing a Business Plan Intro to Business

Criminology Contractual Law Consumer Law Mock Trial

VIDEO ACADEMY COMPUTER ACADEMY BTBA12 BTBA13 BTBA14 BTBA15 BTBA16 BTBA17 BTBA18

Comic Book Creation Computer Aided Drafting I (mechanical) Computer Aided Drafting II (architectural) Computer Creations and Design Technology World Web Design Intro to Cartoon Animation

BTBA82 BTBA81 BTBA83 BTBA25

Advanced Video Technology Intro to Video Technology Video Production Community Filming

RESEARCH 101 BTBA10 ½ Credit

PERSONAL LIFE ACADEMY

BTBA41

College/Business Techno

MA35

Consumer Math

BTBA63

Law and the Consumer

BTBA46

Life-The Real Survivor

BTBA47

Personal Finance

BTBA48

Personal Finance II

8


BUSINESS / TECHNOLOGY

Business/Technology Elective Courses RESEARCH 101 BTBA10 - ½ Credit This class offers the knowledge, skill and information necessary for success in either college or business. This course teaches the correct MLA formatting style required by colleges and Nauset Regional High School. Stress is placed on multi-tasking research strategies, avoiding plagiarism and problem solving effective research.

ACCOUNTING I Grades 10-12 BTBA21 - 1 Credit – Math A full-year course recommended for college-bound students planning a career in any area of business and for students entering accounting, secretarial and general office occupations. Accounting I will acquaint students with the principles and practices of double-entry accounting. Students will examine the entire accounting cycle as applied to sole proprietorships and partnerships. The relationship of using the computer to do accounting functions will also be covered.

ACCOUNTING II Grades 11-12 BTBA22 - 1 Credit – Math Prerequisite: Accounting I Accounting II is a full-year course focusing on accounting concepts, theory and computerized accounting. This advanced accounting course introduces the student to corporate accounting, cost accounting, inventory accounting and payroll accounting.

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING Grades 10-12 BTBA23 - ½ Credit The study of the components of advertising and its function within the total marketing function. The course examines advertising campaigns and procedures dealing with planning, creation, production, media, management, research and budgeting. Students will explore how advertising is used to identify specific tasks to help promote business sales. COLLEGE/BUSINESS TECHNO Grades 9-12 BTBA41 - ½ Credit This hands-on, personal-use course builds an excellent foundation for college or employment. Emphasis is placed on advanced functions of Microsoft Office and other Internet communications skills. Market your talents by creating a portfolio of projects from Microsoft Office to demonstrate your knowledge and creativity.

9


BUSINESS BUSINESS // TECHNOLOGY TECHNOLOGY COMIC BOOK CREATION Grades 9-12 BTBA12 - ½ Credit This course is the perfect entry point for the budding cartoon creator. Conventional and computer drawing methods will be used as students learn about the practical steps in successful comic book creation. Steps include preparative sketches, storyboards and character model sheets to fully illustrate a completed comic book. In addition, students will look at successful artists past and present, comparing their styles, influences and techniques.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING I Drawing on the computer! Grades 9-12 BTBA13 - ½ Credit Introductory course in mechanical design drafting using the computer as a tool. Mostly hands on drawing experience in a lab/lecture environment that will enable students to learn to draw on the computer. Uses the professional CADKEY software program. Develop the ability to communicate ideas through the medium of mechanical drawing.  Upon completion you will have a mechanical drafting portfolio.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING II Design a house from the ground up! Grades 9-12 BTBA14 - ½ Credit An introductory course in architectural design drafting using the computer as a tool. Mostly hands on drawing experience in a lab/lecture environment that will enable students to learn about designing a house from the first steps to completion. Uses DATACAD professional software program. Develop the ability to communicate ideas through the medium of architectural drawing oriented toward residential construction.  Upon completion you will have an architectural drafting portfolio

INTRODUCTION TO CARTOON ANIMATION BTBA18 – ½ Credit This is an introductory course on making cartoon strips using the software program Flash. Learn how to animate a character by using frame by frame motion. Students will learn how to use Flash, then create a looped cartoon strip.

COMPUTER CREATIONS AND DESIGN Grades 9-12 BTBA15 - ½ Credit Electronic desktop publishing is one of the most rapidly advancing technologies in the computer field today. Create elaborate presentations, calendars, brochures, flyers and timelines. Using digital technology create a publication of your high school memories. Learn how to personalize your designs by integrating photographs, artwork and digital media.

10


BUSINESS / TECHNOLOGY CONSUMER MATH Grades 11-12 MA35 - 1 Credit – Math Students are introduced to such everyday life skills as balancing a checkbook, calculating net pay, budgeting expenses, making cost comparisons, buying and renting a home and finding the cost of operating a motor vehicle. The goal of this course is to enable students to make good decisions concerning matters of money and finance in their daily lives.

CONTRACTUAL LAW What do you need to know before you sign your name??? Grades 10-12 BTBA61 - ½ Credit What is a contract? What are my rights? What are my responsibilities? What form must a contract be in? When does the contract end? This course will tie content into real life situations (contracts), emphasize practical points to reduce your legal risks for individuals and businesses.  How do contracts come about?  What is legal and illegal in a contract?  What form must the contract be in?  How do I know when the contract is ended?

CRIMINOLOGY What do police officers really do and need to know? Grades 10-12 BTBA62 - ½ Credit An introduction to criminal justice. What happens when the police arrive? This class will explore the methods used by police officers in solving crimes.  Search and seizure 4th amendment  Initial Investigation  Direct and circumstantial evidence  Basic leads and information  Major investigative techniques

DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN Grades 10-12 BTBA26 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Introduction to Business

Introduction to business plan development. Achieving success in business starts with a business plan. Using information from Introduction to Business, students will design a comprehensive business plan for a retail, wholesale or service type business. This course will tie content into real life situations.

11


BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY INTRO TO BUSINESS Grades 9-12 BTBA28 - ½ Credit Are you thinking of pursuing a business/management career or maybe owning your own business someday? This course is designed to introduce students to the important role business plays in the lives of individuals as consumers and workers. College-bound students are encouraged to take this course to help strengthen management and leadership skills. The course covers different types of businesses, management and leadership theories, marketing and advertising and managing and operating a small business. Students will also learn how to develop commercials, provide publicity, design products, understand promotion techniques and develop pricing strategies.

CONSUMER LAW What are your rights and responsibilities as a consumer? Grades 9-12 BTBA63 - ½ Credit An overview of consumer law for individuals and businesses. The course will tie content into real life situations, emphasize practical points to reduce legal risks and discuss alternative ways of resolving disputes.  Buying a car  Buying other things  Insuring a car  Importance of warranties  Unfair and deceptive sales practices  Staying at a hotel  Flying, riding the train or bus

LIFE – THE REAL SURVIVOR SHOW Grades 9-12 BTBA46 - ½ Credit Figuring it all out. You and life beyond high school. An overview of planning for the future. Do you know yourself – what influence does the revolution in the workplace, civics and citizenship, marriage, a place to call home and advertisement have on you.

MOCK TRIAL Grades 9-12 BTBA65 - ½ Credit Mock trial provides an active learning opportunity and requires cooperation among participants. This course helps students gain a practical understanding of the way the American legal system functions, while learning the details of trial processes and procedures. Students will develop important lifetime skills: critical analysis of problems, reasoning, listening, oral presentation (argue cases).

12


BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY

PERSONAL FINANCE Grades 10-12 BTBA47 - ½ Credit Learn financial survival skills. You will discover how to efficiently handle personal finance and consumption expenditures. Topics will include budgeting, Credit cards, checking and savings accounts, risk management (property, life, health and auto insurance) and consumer rights.

PERSONAL FINANCE II Grades 10-12 BTBA48 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Personal Finance I Most people dream of becoming wealthy. The time to learn wealth-building strategies and to develop successful financial planning is now – while you are young. Students will study financing for the future, how to manage Credit and risk, how to make effective buying decisions, investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and real estate.

TECHNOLOGY WORLD Grades 10-12 BTBA16 - ½ Credit - English This course will be a global meeting ground, a virtual think tank, where class members will focus on technology of the present and future. Students will use magazines, the internet, textbooks and blogs to introduce themselves into emerging innovations in the technology world. Coverage includes hardware, software, networking, wireless computing, personal technology, security and cutting-edge technology form the business and consumer world. Discussions on readings and keeping a journal will play an important role in students’ grades.

WEB PAGE DESIGN Grades 9-12 BTBA17 - ½ Credit This course introduces students to basic web page design. Students will first learn HTML code and apply it to web pages that they create and edit in class. Dreamweaver is then introduced to provide students with the basic editing skills necessary to create and maintain an Internet web page.

INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY Grades 9-12 BTBA81 - ½ Credit Want to learn invaluable lessons which can open doors in multiple career fields? Are you the next Katie Couric, Dick Vitale, or Steven Spielberg! Then get ready for some action! We’ll even supply the lights and cameras too. Learn how to “tell the story” like a pro, or frame a camera shot like a freelance videographer working for the PGA tour. There’s a niche for everyone. Whether you are the talent or the crew, writer or set designer – we will discover your best side. You might even show up on Nauset News. No make-up required!

13


BUSINESS / TECHNOLOGY VIDEO PRODUCTION Grades 10-12 BTBA83 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Intro and Advanced Video or teacher permission. Think you’ve done it all? Not until you top it off with Video Production. A course geared toward the student with an amazing critical eye. Digital cameras and digital editing will be on hand to tap into your creative side. Routine filed trips will occur to capture unique outdoor and indoor footage such as surroundings of Salt Pond Visitors Center and the local beaches. Interesting stories that arise in the community will also be incorporated for the class to cover. School related events, advanced camera techniques, and script writing will all be incorporated into the class. Consider Video Production a journey. Whether you like to work alone or with a small multi-camera crew, we will cover the techniques and organization involved in transforming your ideas in your head into a persuasive presentation on the screen.

ADVANCED VIDEO Grades 9-12 BTBA82 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Intro to Video Do you think 400 sound effects could shake up your movie making? Does the word “Director” mean anything to you? Your skills achieved in BU60 (intro to video) will help sort out the bells and whistles added to this class. Digital cameras, editing, voiceovers, music inserts, and creating action shots using shadows are only a mere sampling of the innovative techniques you will be introduced to. Come find the magic recipe for creating attractive and interesting programs. With some added “know-how” your productions will be as successful as you!

COMMUNITY FILMING Grades 10-12 BTBA25 - ½ Year – ½ Credit; Full Year – 1 Credit Do you want to be in the film industry capturing the action on the fields and in the community? Film real life action and events! Receive Credit for your passion and gain experience for a future career in videography.

14


ENGLISH ALL STUDENTS MUST PASS 4 YEARS OF ENGLISH. English is cumulative in its skill development; therefore, students who fail English for the year must attend summer school and receive a passing grade before they can continue at the next grade level.

9th GRADE ENGLISH 9 HONORS EN11 – 1 Credit As an enriched and accelerated introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, A Separate Peace, Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, and Crime and Punishment, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and myths. A primary emphasis will be on writing organized, welldeveloped literary analysis essays and developing critical and creative thinking. This course is recommended for highly motivated students with exceptional reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation and placement testing.

ENGLISH 9A EN12 - 1 Credit As an introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, To Kill a Mockingbird, and House on Mango Street, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and Greek & Roman myths. The primary emphasis will be on developing organized, well-developed literary analysis essays. This course is recommended for students with good reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation and placement testing.

ENGLISH 9B EN13 - 1 Credit As an introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, To Kill a Mockingbird, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and Greek & Roman myths. The primary emphasis will be on developing essay-writing skills. This course is recommended for students with developing reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation and placement testing.

ENGLISH 9 N104 - 1 Credit As an introduction to literature, students will study a variety of literary works. The primary emphasis will be on developing reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon Special Education Team recommendation and student's Individualized Educational Plan.

15


ENGLISH 10th GRADE ENGLISH 10 HONORS EN21 - 1 Credit The l0th grade Honors curriculum is an introduction to World Literature and its universal themes. The reading and writing focus at this level is to promote close analysis of literature and the use of supporting details from a primary or a secondary source. In addition to close reading and analytical writing, students are expected to produce projects and oral presentations for the class. Students will continue developing composition, vocabulary, and literary analysis skills. They will also prepare for MCAS. Enrollment is based upon the recommendations of the 9th grade English teachers.

ENGLISH 10A EN22 - 1 Credit Sophomore English introduces students to World Literature and its universal themes. Students will explore a wide range of novels, short stories, essays, drama, and poetry. Students will develop essay writing techniques, vocabulary, and literary analysis skills. They will also prepare for MCAS.

ENGLISH 10B EN23 - 1 Credit World Literature in the form of the novel, drama, short prose and poetry will be studied. The emphasis is on the reinforcement and development of reading, writing, critical thinking, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon teacher recommendation. They will also focus on preparation for MCAS.

ENGLISH 10 N204 - 1 Credit World literature in the forms of the novel, drama, short prose and poetry will be studied. The emphasis is on the reinforcement and development of reading, writing, critical thinking, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon Special Education Team recommendation and student's Individualized Educational Plan.

16


ENGLISH 11th GRADE A.P. ENGLISH 11 EN30 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Completion of English 10 with a final grade of B or higher; recommendation of English 10 teacher and approval of department head and an interest in writing.  Students must take an after school diagnostic writing test to familiarize them with academic expectations of an A.P. course. Students in this accelerated course will study a variety of texts in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition. Using a number of American classics as a springboard, they will analyze and produce mature prose. Students will explore narrative, descriptive, and analytical modes of discourse, and consider audience and purpose. In addition, students will work on making their own writing more sophisticated. All students will take the A.P. Exam in May, which will serve as the final exam for the course. Students who score 3 or higher on this exam may receive college credit or advanced college placement in English.

ENGLISH 11 HONORS EN31 - 1 Credit What is our literary heritage? How does American literature embody the diverse voices of the American Experience? In English 11 Honors we will explore the major themes and trends in American literature, and develop an awareness of how the literature of the United States reflects the inherent complexities and paradoxes of the American culture and the American identity. The reading and writing focus of this course will be on making connections between literature in its historical and social context. All course work revolves around a rigorous reading syllabus; works studied include The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick, My Antonia, The Grapes of Wrath, A Raisin in the Sun, The Great Gatsby, Walden, The Color Purple, poetry, short stories, and nonfiction. Students will continue to develop literary analysis skills and essay writing techniques. Enrollment is based on the recommendation of 10th grade teacher.

ENGLISH 11A EN32 - 1 Credit Junior English focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600's to the present. Students will explore a range of novels, short stories, essays, drama and poetry. Students will continue to develop essay writing techniques and engage in literary analysis. They will study vocabulary and work on research skills. They will also prepare for SATs.

ENGLISH 11B EN33 - 1 Credit Junior English B focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600's to the present time. Students will explore poetry, drama, short prose and novels. This course will emphasize strongly the development of those basic learning skills including reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is limited to l5. Recommendation by l0th grade English teacher is needed.

17


ENGLISH ENGLISH N304 - 1 Credit Junior English focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600's to the present time. Students will explore poetry, drama, short prose and novels. This course will emphasize the development of those basic learning skills including reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and student's Individualized Educational Plan.

VERBAL SAT PREP EN43 – ½ Credit - English (Seniors); ½ Credit - Elective (Juniors) This half-year elective for Juniors and Seniors will focus on preparing students for the Verbal sections of the SAT test. Practice tests, vocabulary boosting, and sentence structure will be the focus of the course. Students will be more fully prepared for one of the most important tests of their lives after their experience in this course.

AMERICAN STUDIES Grade 11 SWS10E – 1 Credit - English See SWS10E in School Within a School

18


ENGLISH 12th GRADE Seniors must take one half-year course each semester from the elective sections. The A.P. English, Honors English, and Great Books are yearlong courses. All courses will assist students in preparing their college application essays. Note: Students will not be allowed to enroll in two (2) English classes in the same semester without the express permission of the English department head.

GREAT BOOKS EN40 - 1 Credit This year long course will be based upon the Great Books Series - an exciting, dynamic method of shared inquiry in which students will read and discuss the greatest treasures of Western Civilization. Compositions based on reading and the senior research and exhibition paper will be required. This course is for the self-motivated, avid reader/thinker. Students who desire to improve critical thinking skills are particularly encouraged to sign up.

A.P. SENIOR ENGLISH EN41 - 1 Credit Prerequisites: Completion of English 11 with a final grade of B or higher; recommendation of English 11 teacher and approval of department head. Students of A.P. English Literature and Composition will read a variety of literature, representing a diversity of time periods, cultures, and points of view. Through a comparative reading of literature, students will construct meaning in literature by being attentive to language, imagery, characterization, action, argument, and the various techniques and strategies authors use. Students are expected to write a literary analysis essay after each major work. Autobiographical essays will be written for college applications. Verbal language skills will be strengthened through prepared formal presentations, interactive discussions, student-taught lessons, and dramatic performance. All students will take the A.P. exam in May, which will serve as the final exam for the course. Students who score 3 or higher on this exam may receive college credit or advanced college placement in English.

ENGLISH 12 HONORS EN61 - 1 Credit Students in this year long course will study in-depth the classic works of British Literature including Chaucer, the drama and poetry of Shakespeare, l7th century metaphysical poets and the l9th century novel. The effects of Romantic poetry and the rise of the novel on our native literatuere will comprise the "colonial response.� In addition to the work of the selected American and South American poets, students will study the artists of the Irish Literary Revival including Joyce, Wilde, O'Casey, and Beckett. Students should love reading. Enrollment in this course is with the recommendation of the English II teacher and with the permission of the department head.

19


ENGLISH ENGLISH 12 N404 - 1 Credit This course focuses on improving literacy in the reading and written language areas. Course content includes compensatory reading and writing strategies and remediating basic skills such as spelling, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and the students' Individualized Educational Plan.

SENIOR ENGLISH ELECTIVES CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: DISCOVERING VOICE EN49 - ½ Credit This class is a workshop format, so we do a lot of in-class writing and sharing. We will write 100-word stories. We will write six-word stories. We will write poems and more poems. Poems about objects (maybe a toaster), poems about lunch (the café haiku), goofy love poems and hate poems, poems about the past and future, poems about cartoons and fairytales, poems about paintings and photographs. We will paint poems and “poem” paintings. We will write one-act plays. We will read and respond to writing as well. We will find out that even those of us who have tiny voices have something very important to say. Requirement for course: a positive attitude and the belief that writing can unlock great thoughts.

FILM AS LITERATURE EN46 - ½ Credit This course will explore the relationship between cinema and literature. Emphasis is placed on learning the basic vocabulary of film and writing about works of literature and their cinematic adaptations. This is not a course for fans of popular movies.

HOME AND AWAY EN58 - ½ Credit Home and Away is a senior elective designed around the study of Cape Cod literature and American travel novels. In this course, students will rediscover their local surroundings, studying selections written by and about Cape Codders. After studying about our home, students will embark on a series of adventures around America. Two novels of adventure and self-discovery by Steinbeck and Kerouac will provide the backbone for our trips across the country. This course includes some of the most exciting and relevant reading that you will experience in high school. If you are interested in learning about your community, your country, and yourself, this course is for you. Students will be required to complete reading assignments, essays, projects, and a journal-based final project.

20


ENGLISH

JOURNALISM EN62 – 1 Credit English (Seniors); 1 Credit –Elective (Sophomores and Juniors) EN62A – ½ Credit English (Seniors); ½ Credit – Elective (Sophomores and Juniors) – 1 semester Are you an aspiring photojournalist, reporter, graphic artist, writer, blog designer, or business manager? Then become a staff member of the first official online newspaper of NRHS. You will learn the craft of journalistic writing and news production. All facts of student and school life, including investigative news, features, arts & entertainment, sports, editorials & opinions, reviews and classifieds will be reported with fair and objective coverage. Attention will also be paid to civic, political and global issues in order to promote awareness and discussion with the Nauset regional community. Editorial positions will be filled by full-year students only. Parental permission will be required for Internet publication.

SPEECH AND DEBATE EN48 - ½ Credit Students will practice various types of public speaking such as extemporaneous, impromptu, manuscript, and memorized speech. They will be required to compose and deliver a persuasive speech, a speech on a theme of their choice, and several impromptu speeches. Memorizing a piece of literature for dramatic interpretation will also be required. Students will also be responsible for team presentations, either a Mock Trial or Debates. Students will be evaluated on their class participation, homework, composition, research skills, quizzes and delivery techniques. Peer evaluations of speeches will be encouraged.

YOUR FUTURE IN RESEARCH EN51 - ½ Credit This course is a review of the research process. It includes topic choice, writing thesis statements, outlining, note taking, writing, in-text citation, and works cited and consulted. This course is meant for college bound seniors who want to polish their research skills and realize the importance of writing and avoiding plagiarism as they continue their academic career. Students will be expected to research an approved topic of choice over the summer and be prepared to complete a correctly formatted research paper by the end of the semester.

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES SWS40E – 1 Credit - English See SWS10E in School Within a School

WORLD CITIZENSHIP IN THE NEW MILLENIUM SWS20E – 1 Credit - English See SWS20E in School Within a School

21


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART~ The prerequisite for taking a Level II course in the Fine and Applied Arts is a grade of C+ or better in the previous level.

STUDIO ART I Grades 9-12 AR10 - 1 Credit Studio art is a full year course offered to all grade levels 9-12. Good studio habits are stressed as students experience working in a variety of art media. While the emphasis is on learning art techniques in the areas of observational drawing, design, painting, sculpture, and graphic arts projects, opportunities are also provided for students to learn about the world’s great art and to develop an appreciation for the art of many cultures. Course requirements include research projects and maintaining a sketchbook. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should go on to Studio Art II.

STUDIO ART II Grades 10-12 AR20 - 1 Credit Studio Art II is a full year course open to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed the Studio Art I course. Students will work in media similar to that covered in the Art I class but on a more sophisticated level. Emphasis will be on the development of a personal style of artistic expression. Appropriate presentation of work and critiques are important aspects of this course. Students will study art works of historical importance as well as work by contemporary artists and art from a variety of cultures. Course requirements include research projects and homework. This course may not be repeated.

A.P. STUDIO ART Grade 12 APSTUDART - 1 Credit AP Studio Art is a course open to students in Grades 12 who have had previous art courses that they have successfully completed with a grade of B or better. Students should exhibit a high level of skill, good work habits, and a commitment to art. AP students will be in the Honors Portfolio class and must meet all the regular class requirements including a general portfolio of artwork. In addition, advanced placement students must complete either a drawing portfolio, a 2-D design portfolio or a 3-D design portfolio that includes a series of works reflecting an area of concentration. Students should be prepared for extensive homework and study outside of school (including summer projects). Admission to class is based on teacher recommendation and a review of previous artwork. A fee is required when the portfolio is submitted.

AP ART HISTORY APARTHIST – 1 Credit This class will include a full survey of Western art with a significant component devoted to non-Western styles and themes. Focused on visual understanding and analysis, this class is intended for seniors who are both first time and experienced AP students. The required course work will demand significant work outside of class, while in-class work will focus on discussion, student presentations, virtual tours of museums, comparative writing and analysis. All students will take the spring AP exam and payment of a fee is required.

22


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART~ HONORS PORTFOLIO Grades 11-12 AR40 - 1 Credit Portfolio is a full year course offered to students in Grades 11 and 12 who have completed previous art courses with a grade of B or better. Students must have the instructor’s permission to take this course. They must demonstrate strong basic skills in artwork submitted for review. This course is designed for the student with a strong commitment to art that may want to prepare for post-high school art education. A strong emphasis is put on observational drawing, painting, and sculpting. Homework designed to improve composition and drawing skills will be assigned. While working in a variety of media,

students are encouraged to develop a personal style, self-evaluate their work, participate in critiques, and ultimately prepare a portfolio.

DRAWING AND DESIGN I Grades 9-12 AR44 - ½ Credit Drawing is a one-semester course offered to all students. Students will work from direct observation and from their imagination. The class will explore subject matter such as figure drawing, portraits, landscapes, and perspective. Aspects of good composition and design will also be covered. Students will work in a variety of media including ink, oil pastel, pencil, and paper-design. Course requirements include research projects and homework. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should go on to Drawing and Design II.

DRAWING AND DESIGN II Grades 10-12 AR46 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Design I with a C+ or better Drawing and Design II is a one-semester course offered to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed Drawing I. This course is suggested for the serious drawing student. Subject matter such as self-portrait, landscape, and light and shade will be covered in depth. Students will continue to develop their composition and design skills. Course requirements include research projects and homework. This course may not be repeated.

SCULPTURE Grades 9-12 AR50 - ½ Credit Sculpture is a one-semester class that is offered to all grade levels 9-12. Sculpture is considered from a contemporary, multi-cultural, and historical perspective. Students will work both abstractly and realistically in a variety of media: clay, wood, paper and cardboard, wire, junk, papier mâché, etc. Group projects will be included. This course may not be repeated.

23


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART~ PRINTMAKING I Grades 9-12 AR60 - ½ Credit Printmaking is a one-semester course offered to all grade levels 9-12. Students will learn the techniques involved in a variety of printmaking methods. Included will be work in monoprinting, stencil and relief print processes, linoleum and woodblock work, and dry point etching. While the emphasis is on the production of prints, students will also be introduced to the history of printmaking, study prints by the world’s great artists, and consider the place of printmaking in the art of different cultures. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should go on to Printmaking II.

PRINTMAKING II Grades 9-12 AR69 - ½ Credit Printmaking II is a one-semester course offered to Grades 9-12. Students must have successfully completed Printmaking I and be ready to move on to more advanced work. While working in a larger format, students will build on knowledge and techniques learned in level I. Additional printmaking methods will include reduction linoleum prints, collagraph, and silkscreen printing. This course may not be repeated.

CLAY I Grades 9-12 AR80 - ½ Credit Clay is a one-semester class offered to all grade levels 9-12. This class introduces students to the basic hand building and wheel throwing skills. A variety of building techniques and glaze applications are explored. Students combine techniques to produce both functional and sculptural clay pieces. While emphasis is on handballing, students have the opportunity to work on the potter’s wheel. Exposure to a wide variety of ceramic art, both historical and contemporary, from a variety of cultures is included. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should move on to Clay II.

CLAY II Grades 10-12 AR88 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Completion of Clay I with a C+ or better Clay II is a one-semester class, open to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed the Clay I class. Entrance into this course is with the permission of the instructor and is based on a review of the student's previous ceramic work. Students will further develop the techniques and procedures learned in Clay I taking them to a more advanced level of design and craftsmanship in the field of ceramics. This course may not be repeated.

WHEELTHROWING Grades 10-12 AR 96 - ½ Credit Learn how to throw on the potter’s wheel. This is a half-year course designed for both beginning and more advanced students. While the primary focus is developing technical skill needed for making pottery on the wheel, other ceramic techniques will also be explored. In addition to first time students, students who have already successfully completed this course may repeat it to further develop their skills.

24


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART~ PHOTOGRAPHY I Grades 10-12 AR91 - ½ Credit Photography is a one-semester course offered to students in grade levels 10-12. This course introduces the student to the functions of the 35mm camera, the process of developing black and white film, and the production of black and white photographs. Included in the coursework is an introduction to digital photography. Compositional skills are emphasized as well as both standardized and creative darkroom techniques. Proper use and maintenance of photography equipment and darkroom facilities is stressed. In addition students experience a variety of photography related projects such as montage, collage, slide presentations and photograms. The history of photography and the study and appreciation of the world’s great photographs is included in the course. There will also be an introduction to digital photography included in this course. Requirements include: research projects and a significant amount of homework assignments. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should continue in Photography II. Students must supply some of their own materials and must have a fully manual 35mm camera in good working order.

PHOTOGRAPHY II Grades 11-12 AR93 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photo I with a C+ or better, permission of instructor and a review of the student’s previous photographic work. For students in grades 11-12 who have successfully completed the Photography I course and who demonstrate strong basic skills in a portfolio of photographs submitted for review. Students will continue to refine and further develop their compositional and technical skills in the advanced photography course. This course will also include a digital photography unit. This course may be repeated for credit. Students must supply some of their own materials and must have a manually operated 35mm camera.

PAINTING AND DESIGN I Grades 9-12 AR86 - ½ Credit Introduction to Painting is a half-year course offered to all students in grades 9-12. Assuming students have little or no prior experience, this structured course starts with the basics of color mixing, brush handling, and use of water media (tempera, acrylic, watercolor, etc). Students will be working from nature (such as still-life, figure, and portrait) or imagination. Students will work in additional media, including ink, oil pastel, colored pencil and paper-design. Course requirements include research projects and homework. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should sign up for Painting Level II.

PAINTING AND DESIGN II Grades 9-12 AR89 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Completion of Painting & Design I with a C+ or better In Painting and Design II students will continue to develop their skills and techniques learned in level I. Emphasis will be on larger format projects and new media explorations. This course may be repeated for credit.

25


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART~ INTRODUCTION TO FASHION DESIGN Grades 9-12 AR68 – ½ Credit This one-semester fashion design course offers students a chance to use their creativity and eye for style by introducing them to apparel design. Students will learn the basics of fashion sketching, principles of design, and clothing construction (sewing). A sketchbook of fashion illustrations will be created by each student and used to complete class assignments. Innovation and creativity are emphasized in this class, however students do not need prior experience or knowledge or experience in sketching or clothing construction to succeed. This class may not be repeated. Interested students should proceed to Fashion Design II or full year.

FASHION DESIGN II Grades 9-12 AR71 - ½ Credit This one semester course is a continuation of Fashion Design I and is offered to students who have successfully completed that course. Techniques and practice in creating original garments will be the emphasis of this course as well as advanced fashion sketching, and clothing construction. Class projects incorporate selection and preparation of fabric, fittings, fine hand finishes, computer-aided design and fabric analysis. Students will also take a more in depth look at the fashion industry and take part in a fashion show.

FASHION DESIGN Grades 9-12 AR72 - 1 Credit This full year course is a comprehensive study of apparel design. Students will be introduced to the basic skills of clothing construction (sewing) and basic principles of design, history of fashion and textiles. A sketchbook of fashion illustrations will be created by the student and used to create a finished garment. Class projects incorporate selection and preparation of fabric, fittings, fine hand finishes, computer-aided design and fabric analysis. Students do NOT need prior knowledge or experience in sketching or clothing construction to succeed in this class. This class may be repeated for credit.

YEARBOOK PRODUCTION / GRAPHIC DESIGN YRBK - 1 Credit This course is offered to students seriously interested in the creation and production of the Nauset Tides yearbook. Emphasis is placed on layout and design, graphics, digital photography and the use of Adobe In-design (desktop publishing). Students interested in taking the class are required to have a letter of recommendation and a completed application form. (Application forms may be found in H135). This class may be repeated for credit.

26


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~MUSIC~ MUSIC TECHNOLOGY I Grades 9-12 MU35 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Previous musical experience: (i.e. band, orchestra, choir, music majors, or outside (nonschool) equivalent). This is a half-year course for students in grades 9-12 with some previous musical experience. This course is designed for students who wish to know more about music production and multi-media in the digital world. This is a project-based class with subjects to include: podcasting, computer music notation, computer music sequencing, and an introduction to sound design, Foley and film scoring. In addition, students will be given instruction on basic piano skills, MIDI implementation and synthesizers. Students will create a digital portfolio by the conclusion of the class. Previous musical experience and music reading is helpful for this course. This course may not be repeated for credit.

CONCERT BAND Grades 9-12 MU50 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Prior scholastic instrumental experience or director’s approval This is a full-credit course for experienced brass and woodwind players. Band music spanning the past 400 years will be experienced and performed. Students will hone their performance skills through the practice and rehearsal of contemporary band literature. In addition, students will learn the background of composers, musicians as well as the genre and performance techniques of various musical selections throughout the year. In addition, students will learn the importance of democracy, teamwork and leadership. Four evening concerts per year are generally performed. Home practice is required for this course.

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE Grades 9-12 MU50P – 1 Credit Prequisite: prior scholastic experience or director’s approval. This is a full-credit course designed to challenge students at the intermediate and advanced level of percussion performance. Students will rehearse and perform music from Grade III level (ABD Manual and State Lists). Students will experience performance in many areas of percussion including, but not limited to: snare drum, timpani, mallets and hand percussion. In addition, students experience playing drum line music for snare, tenors and bass drum lines. Students in this class act as the battery for the concert band as well.

27


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~MUSIC~ CONCERT BAND / HONORS MU51 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful audition similar to those of area music festivals. In addition to the requirements for Concert Band, Honors students selected for honors level must meet additional requirements including but not limited to: weekly private lessons on their instrument, auditions for All Cape and Islands Music Festival, and those at the district level. Students in this course will be expected to demonstrate leadership roles in the larger ensemble.

ORCHESTRA Grades 9-12 MU58 - 1 Credit Orchestra is a full year full credit course for players of stringed instruments (violin, viola, cello and bass). Literature is drawn from various styles and genre written for stringed orchestra. Requirements include home practice, written assignments and projects. In addition, students are required to attend and perform in concerts and performances throughout the year. Many of these are night and weekend commitments. Students enrolled in this ensemble may choose to audition for outside ensembles as well. To include: All Cape and Islands Music Festival, as well as District and State music festivals. This course may be repeated for credit.

ORCHESTRA / HONORS MU71 - 1 Credit Students accepted into Honors Orchestra must meet the requirements of Orchestra (MU58) plus a series of additional requirements that include: solo and ensemble recitals, community performances, regional competitive festival auditions (District and All-Cape), and leadership positions in Orchestra. This course may be repeated for credit.

CONCERT CHORUS Grades 9-12 MU60 - 1 Credit Concert Chorus is a full-credit performance group open to all male and female students in grades 9-12. Chorus studies a variety of music styles, covering Classical to Rock. Vocal training in incorporated into each class. Opportunities for solo, small ensemble and 2, 3, & 4 part music study are provided. Course requirements include public performances, some in the evening. Practice outside of school is expected. This course may be repeated for credit each year. No prior experience is required. This course is designed for inexperienced singers as well as experienced singers. Students may elect to audition for more selected ensembles including: All Cape, District and All State. Students must be enrolled in this class, Treble Chorus or Honors Chorus in order to participate in these select ensembles. Enrollment in this class includes the option of participating in overnight music department trips. Acafellas is a sub-group of this class.

28


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~MUSIC~ HONORS CHORUS Grades 10-12 MU61 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful Audition or teacher approval Enrollment in this course is through audition of upon teacher approval. Traditional choral compositions and jazz selections requiring fewer voices will be studied. Advanced vocal training will be included in each class period. Compositions requiring as many as eight parts will be performed. Students participating will be required to sing alone on a part within the ensemble. Sight reading, memorization and foreign language diction will be studied. Public performances will be required, including competitions, some in the evening and weekends. Overnight travel is also frequently required. Students may elect to audition for more select ensembles including: All Cape, Districts, and All State. Enrollment in this course includes the option of participating in Music Department trips and events. This course may be repeated for credit. Acafellas is a sub-group of this chorus.

TREBLE CHORUS Grades 9-12 MU65 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful Audition or teacher approval Enrollment in this course is through audition of upon teacher approval. All styles of choral compositions written for the female voice will be studied. Vocal training will be included in each class period. Course requirements include public performances (some nights and weekends), written assignments and private practice. Enrollment in this class includes the option of participating in overnight Music Department trips and events. Students may elect to audition for more select ensembles including: All Cape, District and All State. This course may be repeated for credit.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE Grades 10-12 MU67 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful Audition to the ensemble Enrollment in this class is by audition only. The First Encounter Jazz Ensemble is a highly respected performance at Nauset High school. Students in this course study jazz literature from the last century. Styles include: Swing, Be-bop, Funk and rock. Students in this class are expected to practice outside of the school day. Many students take private instrumental lessons outside the school day. Improvisation skills, performance techniques and ensemble playing are emphasized. Students in this group are required to participate in concerts (many nights and weekend events) throughout the year as well as participation in other outside ensembles. This course may be repeated for credit.

29


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~MUSIC~ JAZZ ENSEMBLE / HONORS MU81 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Audition in which student demonstrates playing ability in many styles of music In addition to meeting the requirements for Jazz Ensemble (MU67), students enrolled in Honors Jazz Band must complete a series of additional requirements including, but not limited to: weekly private lessons, auditioning/participation in All Cape Jazz, Senior District Jazz and MAJE. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in monthly recitals and performances. This course may be repeated for credit.

MUSICAL THEATRE Grades 9-12 MU90 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: None. All students are encouraged to enroll This half-year course explores the Broadway Musical through singing. Learn how to perform your favorite Broadway songs and prepare for an audition. Learn proper microphone technique. Expand your knowledge to include musicals you have not yet seen. Students will have the opportunity to perform in after-school monthly studio recitals and a musical revue at the end of the semester if they wish. No previous singing or stage experience is necessary. Each student will be able to work at his or her own level of experience. This course may be repeated.

WORLD CULTURES I Grades 9-12 MU63 - ½ Credit Understand and learn how to play musical forms from the world’s primal cultures. Learn how cultural and geographical issues impact the world’s music. Discover what part music plays in mysticism, meditation and metaphysics. Experiment with instruments from Africa, India, Australia and the Middle East. This half-year course may not be repeated.

WORLD CULTURES II Grades 10-12 MU68 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intro to World Music In this class, students will gain exposure to instruments from around the world. Then, we will compose by ear in instrumental ensemble, compose computer-generated music in the computer lab, design and build an instrument, participate in song-writing and steel drum workshops and learn about the history of rock and roll. This course will culminate with a steel drum performance at the Fine and Applied Arts Nights in the spring. This class is project based, so full participation is expected.

30


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~MUSIC~ MUSIC IN MOVIES Grades 9-12 MU70 - ½ Credit This half-year course explores the use and effectiveness of music in film by critiquing current and former composers who have scored for film. Composers such as John Williams, Danny Elfman, and Randy Newman are featured. Students will explore the art of composing for music in various film genres. Orchestral instruments as well as the elements of music will also be discussed. Students have the opportunity to compose music and sound effects for short films.

MUSIC FOR MUSIC MAJORS Grade 11-12 MU85 - 1 Credit This is a full year course for juniors and seniors who are anticipating majoring in music or music education at the collegiate level or to challenge their advanced musical skills. Preparation for college placements exams and auditions will be emphasized. Music theory skills, as well as music history and appreciation will also be explored. Students will be preparing and audition portfolio for college acceptance. Teacher recommendation is suggested.

31


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~CULINARY ARTS~ BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS Grade 10-12 HE50- 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary Arts I. This course will explore the science of baking and Pastry arts from the basics of measuring and ingredient functions to the creation of breads, desserts, cakes and pastries. The class will also operate a business introducing food safety and sanitation, cost analysis, marketing and business math. Students will bake for school functions. The course may not be repeated.

CULINARY ARTS I Grades 9-12 HE91 - ½ Credit Basic nutrition, meal planning, food preparation, cooking principles and wise consumerism are studied. Creativity and experimentation are encouraged in this class. This course may not be repeated for credit. Interested students should continue to Culinary Arts II.

CULINARY ARTS II Grades 9-12 HE92 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary Arts I This is a challenging course designed for experienced and intermediate cooks. Areas of study include: advanced meal planning, food preparation techniques with an emphasis on gourmet and international cuisines. This course may not be repeated for credit.

32


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~LIVING ARTS~ LIFE – THE REAL SURVIVOR SHOW Grades 9-12 BTBA46 - ½ Credit Figuring it all out. You and life beyond high school; an overview of planning for the future. Do you know yourself – what influence does the revolution in the workplace, civics and citizenship, marriage, a place to call home and advertisement have on you?

EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES I Grades 9-12 EX10 - ½ Credit This is a one-semester course that provides an in-depth look at differences in society and how they develop. What makes hate groups do what they do? Can activism really make a difference? What fuels the formation of cults and extremists? How can we effectively mediate conflicts in our own lives and in our society at large? The course targets these issues and current event topics of student interest. This is a discussion and project- based class.

EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES II Grades 9-12 EX20 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Exploring Differences I This course is built on the exploration of civil rights groups, humanitarian organizations, NGOs, and global activism movements and their impact on the world. This course looks at what YOU can do to become more active in your local, regional and global community. The class is based on current events, documentary film and guest speakers. An interactive media project will be counted as the final grade.

EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES – HONORS Grades 10 – 12 EX11- ½ Credit Prerequisite: E.A.R.D. I and E.A.R.D. II In this class we learn how to become activists and mobilize for change. Small groups, and indeed, even just one person can help change the world. In this course you will learn how to organize, fund, and implement the change you want to see in the world. We will start school-wide and branch out into the community with an outreach philosophy, understanding that through education, dedication and living by example we can make change to the actual paradigm of how we live and in what context. The honors designation for this course constitutes learning how to write grants for the funding of various school projects in our school and community, and implementation of them. This is a half year course and may be repeated for credit.

33


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~CHILD DEVELOPMENT~ CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Grades 9-12 HE41 - 1 Credit This course offers students an opportunity to learn about children. Students will study the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of the child from conception to school age. Topics include the brain, motor skills, language development, gender roles, play, special needs, and family and community interaction. Students have opportunities to observe children and are expected to participate in the simulated baby program providing a hands-on newborn experience. Students interested in working with children should follow this class with Early Childhood Education.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Grades 10-12 HE88 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Child Psychology with a C average or better If you are interested in working with children, this course provides the opportunity to develop and expand your skills necessary to do that. Ways that early childhood programs support the development of children and the professional roles and responsibilities of the early childhood educator are studied. Students are expected to integrate classroom study with actual practice (internship) at a local preschool/elementary school setting.

34


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART METAL~ ART METALS I Grades 9-12 IA30 - ½ Credit This course is designed for students interested in exploring metal crafts as an art form. Students will be exposed to making basic designs with copper, brass, tinwork and techniques in soldering and brazing. The use of appropriate tools will be explored. Students at all levels of ability and interest may apply. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should continue to Arts Metal II.

ART METALS II Grades 9-12 IA32 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art Metal I with a C or better This course is a one-semester course where students will further develop the techniques and procedures learned in Art Metal I, taking them to a more advanced level of design and craftsmanship in the field of metal work. Technique in artistic casting, welding, brazing, and forming will be explored. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should continue to Advanced Arts Metals.

ADVANCED METALS Grades 10-12 IA36 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art Metal I and II Advanced Metals is an advanced course for students who have met the prerequisites. This is a ½ year course where entrance is based on a review of students’ previous work in metal and the approval of the instructor. Students will be expected to work at a sophisticated level where an emphasis will be placed on individual design and techniques. Topics of instruction will be lost wax casting, hallow fabrication, fold forming, etching, metal patinas, and advanced instruction in welded structure. This course may be repeated.

JEWELRY Grades 10-12 IA37 - ½ Credit This class introduces basic issues and techniques that are unique to jewelry making as a creative and expressive medium. Traditional and contemporary designs will be explored. Techniques covered: basic fabrication (cold connections, sawing, forging, soldering and finishing), casting and stone setting. Safety and proper use of tools will be covered in all areas. This course may not be repeated.

35


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~ART METAL~ JEWELRY – PART II Grades 10-12 IA39 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Jewelry I and instructor’s approval. This course is designed for those students who want to continue their study of jewelry making. Students will be expected to further explore the techniques learned in Jewelry I. Emphasis will be placed on individual projects that integrate all the skills learned in Jewelry I. Students will also be required to research a new technique and complete a project that employs this technique. Possible areas of study: casting, repouse/chasing, Makume Gane, mechanisms, chain making, faceted stone setting.

36


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS ~WOOD FABRICATION~ ELECTRIC GUITAR BUILDING Grades 10-12 IA52 - 1 Credit In electric guitar building, we will design and build our own electric guitar or electric bass guitar entirely of raw materials. The process of building an electric guitar incorporates many skills: basic woodworking, working from blueprints, calculations, attention to detail, design, physics, chemistry, and basic electronics. Students must have good patience and listening skills as well as the ability to work cooperatively. These skills are much more important than woodworking skills, which will be taught as the course progresses.

ACOUSTIC GUITAR Grades 10-12 IA55 - 1 Credit In acoustic guitar building, students will build an acoustic guitar or acoustic bass guitar entirely from raw materials. The process of building an acoustic guitar incorporates many skills: basic woodworking, working from blueprints, calculations, attention to detail, design, and even a little physics and chemistry. Students must have good patience and listening skills as well as the ability to work cooperatively. These skills are much more important than woodworking skills, which will be taught as the school year progresses.

INTRODUCTORY WOODWORKING IA60 - ½ Credit This course is for students who have not previously taken a high school level woodworking class. All facets of woodworking will be explored, from wood production to joinery. Special emphasis will be given to the proper use offhand tools. There will be three assigned projects. This course may not be repeated. Students who have met the requirements should go on to Woodworking II or another woodworking course.

WOODWORKING II IA73 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Introductory Woodworking Students will explore advanced concepts in woodworking, including decorative joinery, tuning, and advanced finishing techniques. There will be one mandatory assignment and then students may build projects of their own design. This course may be repeated for those interested in advanced woodworking.

37


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES All students are required to take and pass three (3) full year courses, one of which must be U.S. History.

9th GRADE All Freshmen must take one of the following:

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I / HONORS SO11 - 1 Credit An accelerated and comprehensive introduction to some of the great civilizations of the past and their achievements. Extensive readings of primary sources and frequent essays are required. This section is open to highly motivated students who have exceptional language arts and reading comprehension skills. Enrollment based on teacher recommendation and placement testing.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I / A LEVEL SO12 - 1 Credit The course begins with the Renaissance and ends with the implications of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna and the Industrial Revolution roughly 1250-1870. This course is recommended for students with very good reading and writing skills. Enrollment based upon teacher recommendations, but the vast majority of students can work at this level.

INTRODUCTION TO CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT / A LEVEL SO15 - 1 Credit What’s the difference between a Democrat and a Republican? Who really elects the President? How is the State House different from the White House? What happens at Town Meeting? Introduction to Civics and Government offers civic-minded students the chance to explore the structure, function, and role of government in the United States. Students will examine the Constitution, the three branches of government, the evolution of politics in America, and the responsibility of citizenship. Like Western Civilization I, this rigorous course satisfies the first-year history requirement. It is recommended for students with strong reading and writing skills and an interest in changing the world.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I / B LEVEL SO13 - 1 Credit This course begins with the Renaissance and ends with the implications of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna and the Industrial Revolution roughly 1250-1870. This course emphasizes the development of reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment based upon teacher recommendation.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I N56 - 1 Credit This course follows the SO12 curriculum with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s Individualized Education Plan

38


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES 10th GRADE All sophomores must take one of the following:

A.P. EUROPEAN HISTORY SO20 - 1 ½ Credit Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation and an A- or better in previous course. This college level course examines European history from about 1450 to the present. The course work provides a narrative of events and movements to help students develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history; (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence; and (c) an ability to analyze and to express historical understanding in writing. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam administered in May. It is expected that all course members will take this exam. (Payment of fee required).

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / HONORS SO21 - 1 Credit An accelerated and comprehensive study of European History from @1870 to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through Reconstruction. Extensive reading of primary sources and frequent essays are required. This section is open to highly motivated students who have exceptional language arts and reading comprehension skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year History teachers’ recommendations.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / A LEVEL SO22 - 1 Credit A study of European History from @1870 to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through Reconstruction. This course is recommended for students with very good reading and writing skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year History teacher’s recommendations.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / B LEVEL SO23 - 1 Credit The study of European History from @1870 to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through Reconstruction. This course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year History teacher’s recommendations.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II N94 - 1 Credit This course follows the SO23 curriculum with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s Individualized Education Plan.

39


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES 1lth GRADE All juniors must take one of the following: A.P. U.S. HISTORY SO41 - 1 ½ Credits An in-depth study of American History from colonization to the present. Students will develop skills in advanced methods of historical analysis through extensive writing and research assignments using primary source materials. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which a fee is required. Teacher recommendation is required.

U.S. HISTORY / A LEVEL SO32 - 1 Credit A study of U.S. History from reconstruction to the present with an emphasis on the 20th century. Students will polish research skills by writing a comparative analysis essay. Enrollment based upon 10th grade History teacher recommendations.

U.S. HISTORY / B LEVEL SO33 - 1 Credit A study of U.S. History with an emphasis on the 20th century. This course will emphasize reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is limited to 18. Recommendation by 10th grade History teacher and Department Head.

U.S.HISTORY N36 - 1 Credit This course follows the SO33 curriculum with an emphasis on reading, writing, and organizational skills Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s Individual Educational Plan.

SOCIAL STUDIES SWS10S - 1 Credit - History

See SWS10S in School Within a School.

40


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES 12th GRADE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SO50 - 1 Credit This class will include an examination of the political, economic and social issues shaping our world today. National and international current issues will be examined and four major units focusing on areas such as Electoral politics, Middle East including Israel and the Persian Gulf, Genocide including the Holocaust and contemporary Africa, and the rise of China may be taught each year. A foundation in basic theoretical principles will be provided. Course work includes: active discussion, research and presentation of individual and group projects, and consistent reading and viewing of media sources in addition to those provided in class. The course can be taken as either an Honors section or an A-level. Blevel students are encouraged to enroll.

A.P. ECONOMICS SO61 – 1 Credit This course offers a broad examination of the principles of microeconomic theory. After introducing opportunity costs, the concepts of scarcity and the law of comparative advantage, the course focuses on marginal utility analysis, the laws of supply and demand, the law of diminishing return, the costs of production, profit maximization, the theory of the firm in perfect and imperfect competition, the factor markets, and finally international trade. Selected topics in macroeconomics will also be covered. This college level course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination in microeconomics. It is expected that all course members will take the A.P. Exam. Enrollment is limited to students who have achieved a B or better in U.S. Honors or A.P. (Payment of a fee is required.)

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT / HONORS / A LEVEL SO62- 1 Credit SO62H – Credit (Honors) Are you a news junky addicted to C-SPAN? Do you dream of power lunches with Nancy Pelosi or John Roberts? Are you intrigued by the workings of the Presidency, Congress, and Supreme Court? If so, this course is for you! American Government is an exploration of the structure, function, and role of national, state, and local government in the United States. It’s intended for students who want to become active, life-long participants in our democracy. Students examine the Constitution, the evolution of government and politics in America, and the responsibility of citizenship. This rigorous Pre-AP/Honors level course focuses on historical analysis, policy making, and current events. There is a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, and knowing what’s going on “Inside the Beltway.”

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES SWS40S – 1 Credit - History See SWS10 School Within a School

WORLD CITIZENSHIP IN THE NEW MILLENIUM SWS20S – 1 Credit - History See SWS20S in School Within a School

41


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES ELECTIVES GRADES 10-12 HUMANITIES SO65 – ½ Credit This course examines selected events, landmark ideas, creativity and human interaction through the perspective of the humanities. Photography, literature, sculpture, architecture, music, painting, poetry and cinema reveal what people think and do. Library research, analysis, discussion and interviews are complemented by field trips, especially to meet members of the Cape’s diverse art community.

AMAZING ASIA SO86 - ½ Credit A study of Asian culture focused on China, Japan, and various South East Asian countries. Geography, 20th century history and current issues will be the major emphasis, but classwork will also include projects related to Asian religion, medicine, and the arts. Speakers and field trips will be integral to the program. Our goal will be to develop an understanding of the relationship between the United States and Asia as we enter what may be termed the “Pacific Century”.

NEWS YOU CAN USE SO47- ½ Credit The colleges and universities you apply to want to know who you are. This is the major reason they devised the college essay. This course is designed to help you write that essay and to help you define who you are by looking at current issues that affect you, your country and your world. Newspapers, the Internet and film will provide the basis for our discussions and the grading will reflect your participation, in-class writing and college essay(s).

U.S. ART HISTORY S045 - ½ Credit This course will examine painting, sculpture, photography and architecture as students trace US History through the prism of art. Students will research, analyze and present on a series of pieces from time periods chosen throughout the year. We will do a wide variety of virtual field trips to museums and, space permitting, visit the MFA in the spring.

A.P. ART HISTORY APARTHIST – 1 Credit This class will include a full survey of Western art with a significant component devoted to non-Western styles and themes. Focused on visual understanding and analysis, this class is intended for seniors who are both first time and experienced AP students. The required course work will demand significant work outside of class, while in-class work will focus on discussion, student presentations, virtual tours of museums, comparative writing and analysis. All students will take the spring AP exam and payment of a fee is required.

42


HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES

CURRENT EVENTS N26 - 1 Credit Utilizing newspapers, magazines, and the Internet, students will review current events with a historical perspective. The development of basic reading and writing skills will be emphasized. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and the student's Individualized Educational Plan.

PSYCHOLOGY These psychology courses may be taken separately or together as a full-year psychology course: PSYCHOLOGY – PART I Grades 11 & 12 SO51 - ½ Credit What is it that makes us human? Scientists and philosophers have explored this question for millennia. This ½ credit course will investigate the human mind, and give a broad survey of what psychologists know. The course will focus on the mind-body connection, including topics like development from infancy through adolescence, how your brain senses and perceives the world, and the psychological basis of stress and wellness. The last part of the semester will explore learning and memory. Each unit in this survey course will include readings, internet assignments, application activities and a knowledge test or project.

PSYCHOLOGY – PART II Grades 11 & 12 SO52 - ½ Credit A ½ credit course which will investigate different aspects of the human mind. The course will open with an exploration of sleep, dreams, and the neurological effects of drugs. We will explore thinking, intelligence, and key elements of social psychology. The second half of the course will focus on clinical issues – psychological disorders and therapies. Each unit in this survey course will include readings, internet assignments, application activities and a knowledge test or project.

A.P. PSYCHOLOGY SO60 - 1 Credit This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and animals. Students will investigate the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. There is an emphasis on critical thinking, reading and writing within the context of scientific methodology and questioning. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam administered in May. It is expected that all course members will take this exam. (Payment of a fee for the exam is required.)

43


LEADERSHIP LEADERSHIP Grades 9-12 LEADER - ½ Credit This course is offered to all potential or existing class officers, team captains, members of school leadership groups and any student(s) that perceives themselves as assuming leadership roles within the student body. The course will offer the student the opportunity to develop basic leadership skills as well as the opportunity to understand the importance of making appropriate decisions. Students will be required to generate various examples of real life leadership issues and resolve them in the appropriate manner. The course will be designed to accommodate those students who anticipate leadership as being an integral part of their school.

44


MATHEMATICS

Mathematics education at Nauset Regional High School is greatly influenced by Massachusetts Education Reform, Curriculum Frameworks, The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards, and the MCAS testing program and the College Board Advanced Placement Testing Program. Calculators may be used for selected topics in Pre-Algebra, Algebra, and Geometry. A TI-83 or TI-84 will be required for all other courses.

ALGEBRA I MA12 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Competency in Pre-Algebra skills and teacher recommendation. This course is designed to deliver a full Algebra 1 curriculum as mandated by the Massachusetts frameworks. Students will be expected to be competent in pre-algebra topics and will be expected to routinely complete independent text reading in preparation for each class. The main objective of Algebra 1 is to develop fluency in working with linear equations. Students will: further their knowledge with tables, graphs, absolute value and equations and solve linear equations and inequalities and systems of linear equations and inequalities, extend their comprehension of the number system to include irrational numbers, generate equivalent expressions, manipulate and use formulas, simplify polynomials and begin to study quadratic relationships. Functions and relations of ordered pairs will include: domain and range, graphing operations and inverse operations. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Geometry Level A (MA22) or Geometry Level B (MA23). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

ALGEBRA I / LEVEL B MA13 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Competency in Pre-Algebra skills and teacher recommendation. This course is designed to deliver a full Algebra 1 curriculum as mandated by the Massachusetts frameworks. Students will be expected to have prior knowledge of pre-algebra topics. The course is designed to accommodate students who may require reinforcement of topics covered in prior math courses. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Geometry Level B (MA23) or Geometry Level A (MA22). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

45


MATHEMATICS INTEGRATED ALGEBRA 1 AND GEOMETRY MA14 – 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Algebra and teacher recommendation. Integrated Algebra and Geometry is a course designed to accommodate Grade 10 students who have previously completed the Pre-Algebra curriculum. The course is designed to contain both Algebra and Geometry topics which include but are not limited to Number Systems their Operations and Properties, Algebraic Expressions and Sentences, Solving First Degree Equations and Inequalities, Ratio and Proportion, Geometric Figures, Area and Volume, Trigonometry of the Right Triangle, Coordinate Geometry which includes Graphing Linear Equations, Writing Linear Equations, Systems of Equations, Factoring, Operations with Radicals, Analyzing graphs and Introduction to Quadratic Equations. The goal of this course is to remediate Pre-Algebra skills and to cover topics within the Massachusetts Frameworks for both Algebra 1 and Geometry. Activities to prepare students for the 10th Grade MCAS Test in Mathematics will be performed throughout the course. The course that follows Integrated Algebra and Geometry is Advanced Algebra Level B (MA33). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

HONORS GEOMETRY MA21 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Advanced Proficiency in Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation. This is an accelerated and in depth course that is designed for the student whose goal is to complete the Advanced Placement Calculus course in high school. The curriculum for this course is driven by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Geometry with an emphasis on the development of deductive reasoning through the completion of geometric proofs. Students will be expected to have previously mastered all topics in Algebra I. The topics mastered in algebra will be coupled with topics in geometry to develop solutions to problems presented throughout the course. Additionally, students must be able to understand, apply and expand upon all geometric theorems, postulates and definitions that are presented in this course. The honors geometry student should be self-motivated, have a strong work ethic, be able to work independently and have an innate desire for mathematics. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Honors Advanced Algebra (MA31) or Advanced Algebra Level A (MA32). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

46


MATHEMATICS GEOMETRY / LEVEL A MA22 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation. This is a course designed for the college-bound student. The curriculum for this course is driven by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Geometry. The emphasis for this level course is in the application of geometric concepts versus the theoretical approach. Students are expected to have a thorough working knowledge of Algebra I and should be able to develop solutions to problems that combine Algebra with topics in Geometry. This course will include the study of angles, parallel lines, similarity and congruence of triangles, polygons, surface area and volume of solids, circles, introduction to trigonometry of the right triangle, proofs, and coordinate geometry. It is expected that students independently read from their textbook and take notes from those readings along with using their class notes and textbooks when completing homework assignments. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Advanced Algebra Level A (MA32) or Advanced Algebra Level B (MA33). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

GEOMETRY / LEVEL B MA23 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation. This course presents basic foundations of geometric topics as mandated by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, incorporating and reviewing prior topics from courses in Algebra I and Pre-Algebra. This course contains the same concepts and topics in Geometry Level A, but with a variation in delivery that presents ideas in a less theoretical manner. Activities to prepare students for the 10th Grade MCAS Test in Mathematics will be performed throughout the course. The course is designed to accommodate students who may require reinforcement of topics covered in prior math courses. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be recommended for Advanced Algebra – Level B (MA33). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student's performance and skill level in this course.

HONORS ADVANCED ALGEBRA MA31 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Advanced proficiency (B- or better) in Algebra I and Honors Geometry with teacher recommendation. This course focuses on the analysis and synthesis of functions and equations continuing a rigorous approach from Honors Geometry of applying new concepts to various models. Advanced Algebra teaches concepts through their applications, emphasizing the reading and writing of mathematics, providing a wide variety of meaningful problem-solving opportunities, and incorporating the graphing calculator. The content of this course integrates geometry, discrete mathematics, and statistics together with algebra. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

47


MATHEMATICS

ADVANCED ALGEBRA / LEVEL A MA32 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Algebra I and geometry with teacher recommendation. This course expands on the topics of Algebra 1 and integrates them with topics from Geometry, and provides further development of the concept of functions. Topics include but are not limited to quadratic functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions and trigonometric functions, variations and their graphs, and Systems of Equations and Inequalities. Students are expected to complete independent text readings in preparation for each class. This course is geared towards students who plan to eventually take pre-calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA / LEVEL B MA33 - 1 Credit Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I (MA12 or MA13) and Geometry (MA22 or MA23). This level of Algebra II is a continuation of a first year Algebra course. Emphasis, especially in the first semester, is placed on remediation and expansion of earlier skills and topics including operations of real numbers and of polynomials, methods of solving linear and quadratic equations, methods of solving linear systems, and the applications of these skills in Geometry and other problem solving situations. Algebra skills are also advanced by introduction of newer topics including operations of rational expressions and radical expressions, right triangle trigonometry with applications, functions as graphs and as formulae, and exponential and logarithmic expressions. Use of a graphing calculator, TI-83 is also introduced. For students planning to enroll in succeeding courses to Algebra II (eg College Prep Math and Pre-calculus), use of a suitable graphing calculator is required. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

CONSUMER MATH Grades 11-12 MA35 – 1 Credit See MA35 in Business / Technology

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS MA41 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Minimum of a B average in MA21 and MA31. This course includes a rigorous study of plane trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, analysis of functions and topics in Algebra. The course is designed to help prepare the high school student for a course in calculus. (Theoretical approach in trigonometry and pre-calculus topics.) A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required. NOTE: Use course code MA51 for concurrent enrollment in MA60 (A.P. Calculus).

48


MATHEMATICS PRE-CALCULUS I / LEVEL A MA42 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Advanced Algebra and teacher recommendation. This course integrates algebraic concepts and previews calculus. It has three major components: Statistics, Functions, and Trigonometry. Graphing calculators will be used primarily as they learn to explore data in various and meaningful ways as well as investigate probability and simulation of real-life experiments. Students will expand their knowledge and deepen their understanding of quadratic, exponential, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions as they explore transformations of graphs, function composition, and inverse function relationships. Other topics include polynomial functions, sequences, series, combinations, and binomial distribution. Students will apply all these skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences. Independent reading and work on assigned material is required prior to each class. This course is recommended for students who plan to continue their education beyond high school and who wish to be involved in a rigorous mathematical program. Juniors who successfully complete this course may be recommended for Pre-Calculus II (MA 52) or another upper level math course for their senior year, depending on the assessment of their performance and skill level. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

COLLEGE PREPARATORY MATHEMATICS MA45 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Advanced Algebra and teacher recommendation This course is a continuation of a course in Advanced Algebra designed to prepare students for placement into a credit bearing college math course. Topics include rational expressions, factoring, rational exponents and roots, quadratic equations and inequalities, direct and indirect variation, relations and functions, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and analysis and solution to open ended problems in mathematics. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required.

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS MA51 - 1 Credit See MA41

PRE-CALCULUS II MA52 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B- or better in MA42 This course includes a study of topics in analytic geometry, plane trigonometry anlysis of functions and topics in Algebra. The course is designed to prepare high school students for a course in calculus and is strongly recommended for all students planning to take calculus at the college level. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required.

A.P. CALCULUS (AB) Grades 11-12 MA60 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of MA41 or MA52, or concurrent enrollment in MA51 with approval. This full year course focuses on skills and applications of differential calculus, as well as, an introduction to the skills and modeling of integral calculus. It is expected that the students take the AP Calculus exam in May.

49


MATHEMATICS Students are required to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course.

A.P. CALCULUS (BC) Grade 12 MA61 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of MA60 This course, a continuation of MA60, fully develops skills and models of integral calculus, the applications of power series, as well as the calculus of vectors. It is expected that the student take and AP Calculus exam in May. A fee is required for this exam. Students are required to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course.

A.P. STATISTICS MA70 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B average in MA 41 or MA42 This course is a study of elementary concepts in statistics and probability. Having a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. The aim is to give students an understanding of the main ideas of statistics and useful skills for working with data. The goal and expectations is that students take the AP Statistics exam in May. Students are required to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course.

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS MA72 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B average in MA 32 or MA 42 This college level course is a study of concepts of elementary statistics. It will include an in-depth and rigorous study of probability with applications. Topics will include methods of data collection, analysis, and presentation, measures of center and spread, basic probability models, permutations and combinations (combinatorics), random variables, probability distributions, regression analysis, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Students must have a TI 83 or TI 84 graphing calculator and a willingness to do

independent reading and written assignments.

PRE-ALGEBRA N32 - 1 Credit This course is designed for students who need individualized or small group math instruction focusing on basic skills and a concrete introduction to Algebra I. Topics include the operations of fractions, decimals, and signed numbers, and their applications in solving elementary algebra, geometry and statistical problems. After successful completion of this course the student would be expected to take Algebra I the following year. Enrollment is based on the recommendation of the special education TEAM and the student’s IEP (Individualized Educational Plan).

50


MATHEMATICS TRANSITION MATH N54 - 1 Credit Curriculum appropriate books and materials are utilized to develop the student's math skills. Instructional level is determined by individual and group needs. Remedial instruction for basic math skills complements the course instruction. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and the student's IEP (Individualized Educational Plan).

51


PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH All Nauset students are required to pass one-semester of Physical Education/ Health Education during their 9th, 10th * and 11th grades. There are three health components and three P.E. components included in graduation requirements. Each semester of passing work receives ½ credit. Students are also offered various fitness based elective P.E. courses. *10th grade must take an additional term of PE for 1/4 credit.

FRESHMAN YEAR OUTDOOR EDUCATION/HEALTH PE01 - ½ Credit Outdoor Education / Fitness Center Orientation - 1 Term Students taking Outdoor Education will participate in group challenges based on trust and team building. A progression of individual and group initiatives will prepare the student for using the Outdoor Education Course made of logs, ropes, and cables. Students will learn spotting techniques and safety procedures for climbing. All classes are held outside – weather permitting. The fitness center orientation course will train students to safely use the various exercise equipment and stations in the fitness center. Successful completion of certification classes will allow students access to the fitness center after school.

Health – 1 Term The ninth grade health curriculum includes alcohol and drug education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive systems, pregnancy, birth, and dating relationships. There are individual student oral presentations on various health related topics, chosen by the students. Classes will also have guest speakers on different health issues.

52


PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH SOPHOMORE YEAR PE/ WELLNESS – 3 Terms PE02 - ¾ Credit

Wellness – 1 Term This course is designed to teach each student the importance of creating and following a personal lifetime fitness program. The following topics are discussed and studied: The 4 areas of fitness: Cardiovascular, Musculoskeletal, Nutritional and Psychological fitness; sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS, disordered eating; anorexia, bulimia and skin melanoma. Lifetime fitness activities may include Racket sports, Active Games and Yoga.

Introduction to Fitness Training – 1 Term The main purpose of this course is to train students to safely use the various exercise equipment and stations in the Fitness Center. Successful completion of certification classes will allow students access to the Fitness Center during and after school. Instruction will focus on the components of fitness and how they contribute to optimal health. Principles of strength training, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness, and formulation of a personal fitness plan are topics covered during this course.

Advanced Outdoor Education – 1 Term Focuses on the use of the high and more challenging elements of the Outdoor Education Course. Students will participate in challenges based on trust and group cohesiveness. The emphasis will be on developing climbing teams. Experiential learning will include safety procedures, dynamic and static belaying. Off campus activities include mountain biking through the National Seashore.

53


PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH JUNIOR YEAR PE/HEALTH PE03 - ½ Credit P.E. – 1 Term Junior students participate in Lifetime Fitness activities which may include Fitness Training, Spinning, Functional Core Training, Racket Sports, Yoga and Active Games. A recurring theme in all classes is a commitment to fitness and healthy lifestyles. Health – 1 Term Students enrolled in junior health classes will have an opportunity to be certified by the American Red Cross in Adult/Child/Infant CPR, Automatic External Defibrillator (A.E.D.) & First Aid techniques. Other topics include alcohol’s effects on driving, sexually transmitted infections, contraception, and abortion. There will be guest speakers and a field trip during the term.

ELECTIVE PE CLASSES FITNESS CENTER WORKOUT PE51 - ½ Credit This course is designed for the motivated student who is interested in improving their fitness level. A personal fitness plan will be designed with input from the teacher and monitored closely for progress. Students should plan to work out vigorously for the entire class. Fitness workouts will be customized for each student’s needs: overall conditioning for health, weight management and sports specific training.

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING PE52 - ½ Credit This course is designed for the serious fitness enthusiast interested in improving their knowledge of fitness concepts and workout practices. Students will design and follow a comprehensive personal fitness plan. Each plan will be monitored and assessed during the term. Students will work independently with the teacher functioning as a personal trainer. Personal fitness goals are determined and assessed by both the student and the instructor. Students should plan to work out vigorously throughout the entire class. Prerequisite: Fitness Center Workout

OUTDOOR FITNESS/TREKKING PE53 - ½ Credit This course will focus on cardiovascular fitness through various outdoor activities. Fitness walking on and off campus, aerobic games, orienteering, circuit training (Pars course style), and biking will be included. This will also include proper warm up, cool down and strength training. Heart rates will be checked through the use of Polar Heart Rate Monitor watches. Personal fitness levels will be tracked with the use of fitness based technology. Students will keep a log of activities and calories burned; time spent in training zone will be documented. All classes are held outside weather permitting.

54


PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HEALTH RACKETS AND CLUBS PE54 - ½ Credit Rackets and Clubs: Golf, Ultimate Frisbee These activities are often a choice for lifetime physical activity. During this course, students will learn the components of skill development, participation, fitness, specific training guidelines, singles and doubles strategy, game strategies, golf fundamentals and rules for play. Tournament play will be included.

Volleyball, Basketball, Badminton Skills, rules and strategy will be taught in depth; competitions and tournaments will be incorporated.

FUNCTIONAL CORE TRAINING PE55 - ½ Credit

Functional Core Training Students will focus on circuit training outside the realm of the Fitness Center. The training will focus on the use of medicine balls, physioballs, strength training bands, foam rollers, and core pole training.

Spinning This course is designed for the student who is interested in learning proper biking skills and techniques, as the focus of their cardiovascular fitness routine. Personal fitness levels will be tracked through the use of Polar Heart Rate monitors.

Rackets and Clubs: Badminton, Golf These activities are often a choice for lifetime physical activity. During this course, students will learn the components of skill development, participation, fitness, specific training guidelines, singles and doubles strategy, game strategies, golf fundamentals and rules for play. Tournament play will be included.

INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING PE59 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: First Aid, CPR, & AED Certification This class is designed for junior and senior students interested in studying allied health professions such as athletic training, physical and occupational therapy, and nursing. Instruction will be based on an overview of the five domains of athletic training which include prevention, treatment, evaluation and rehabilitation of injuries in conjunction with health care administration and organization. The primary focus will involve prevention and treatment of athletic injuries through class lectures and labs.

55


SCHOOL TO CAREERS Participation in these community based programs is open to enrolled students of Nauset Regional High School regardless of race, color, sex, religion or natural origin.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM INTERN / Full Year - 1 Credit INTERNS I / ½ Year - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Interview with Guidance Counselor to determine internship site. Students must provide their own transportation. Students must be l6 years or older to participate. This course will offer a community based learning experience for students that wish to gain skills in a particular career pathway. Students are paired with a mentor who will supervise their internship of a minimum of four (4) hours. The internship is unpaid. The mentor and Guidance Counselor will develop a Work Based learning Plan that evaluates the student’s performance. This evaluation and weekly time sheets make up the bulk of the student’s grade. This course may be taken for a full year for l credit or a half-year for ½ credit.

WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM WKEXP - 1 Credit – Full year WKEXP-S1 - ½ Credit – Half year Prerequisite: Interview with the Guidance Counselor to determine work site. Students must provide their own transportation. Work permit is necessary if student is under 18 years of age. Students must be 16 years of older to participate. Students in this program will learn the basic skills and training needed to succeed in a chosen work environment. They will work with an adult supervisor who will provide the necessary support to work at least four (4) hours in a community based work site. This is a paid work experience. The supervisor and the Guidance Counselor develop a Work Based learning Plan that evaluates the student’s performance. This evaluation, with weekly time sheets, make up the bulk of the student’s grade.

56


SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL ~GRADE 11~ Throughout its 36 year history, the School Within a School has always believed that students are more enthusiastic and engaged in learning in a more personalized environment that focuses on projects in which students teach and learn from each other, in addition to the use of traditional assessments. SWS continues to emphasize humanistic, student centered learning in a creative, supportive atmosphere that accommodates both a broad academic spectrum and individual learning styles. Confident in the knowledge that education is not something that takes place only inside school buildings, SWS courses extend learning to the surrounding community and beyond, requiring a high level of commitment and integrity.

AMERICAN STUDIES Grade 11 - 3 Credits including:

ENGLISH SWS10E - 1 Credit English

SOCIAL STUDIES SWS10S - 1 Credit History

AMERICAN STUDIES HUMANITIES SEMINAR SWS19 – 1 Credit A cooperatively taught, three credit integrated U.S. History and American Literature course. Through this interdisciplinary, project-based approach, students will study Apocalypse Then: To Civil War and Reconstruction with Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, When Monopoly Wasn't a Game: The Growing Empire from Wild West to World War I with Lakota Woman, The Sun Also Rises, The Jungle, Boom to Bust to Big Boom: From the Jazz Age and the Great Depression to Hiroshima with The Great Gatsby, Their Eyes were Watching God, The Grapes of Wrath, Commies, Containment, and Cold War: America in the Fifties and Vietnam with The Catcher in the Rye, The Things They Carried, From the Evil Empire to the Axis of Evil with current events. Students will have many opportunities to refine research and writing skills, and will also prepare for SAT's. Enrollment in the Humanities Seminar is also required for this course (below). American Studies Humanities Seminar meets twice monthly on Thursday evenings, and further integrates the SWS English and History curriculum. The course begins with a required camping trip to the White Mountains of New Hampshire to promote cooperation, self-confidence and team building skills. Throughout the year there are field experiences to Boston, Newport, Rhode Island, Provincetown, and others. In addition, there will be a guest speaker series including politicians, poets, journalists, and activists. The year ends with a visit to Philadelphia.

AMERICAN STUDIES – HONORS Grade 11 Available for English, history or both. SWS11E – 1 Credit English SWS11S – 1 Credit History Honors students will complete the American Studies curriculum above, with the addition of reading and writing assignments, research projects and class presentations.

57


SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL ~GRADE 12~ FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES Grade 12 – 2 Credits including:

ENGLISH SWS40E – 1 Credit English

SOCIAL STUDIES SWS40S – 1 Credit History Prerequisite: U.S. History

A cooperatively taught two credit integrated history and English course. Endorsed by President and Michelle Obama, this project-based, interdisciplinary class looks at identity, race, and genocide through the lens of films, art, science fiction, novels, poetry, children's literature, music, and field trips. Throughout, students and teachers confront past and present moral questions, and examine stories of courage, caring and compassion. They will also have the opportunity to complete college essays, scholarship letters, and participate in several related community events. This course, as former students have said, "had an amazing impact" on them, one that has continued to affect them long after graduation. WORLD CITIZENSHIP IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM Grade 12 - 2 Credits including:

ENGLISH SWS20E - 1 Credit English

WORLD CITIZENSHIP HUMANITIES SEMINAR SWS29 - 1 Credit History Current Nauset students have expressed the need for a literature course to help them become effective citizens of the world. This two credit class will investigate novels and stories that demonstrate peaceful ways to effect change towards a sustainable future. Students will be expected to explore important topics of their own choosing and then synthesize their findings in creative ways which enhance and enliven class discussion. Enrollment in the Humanities Seminar is also required for this course (below). World Citizenship Humanities Seminar meets twice monthly on Thursday evenings, and augments classroom activities with community experiences and contacts. The course includes an educational trip to New York City and a required camping trip to promote cooperation, self-confidence and team building skills. Throughout the year there are also visits to museums and various places of worship. In addition, there will be a guest speaker series.

MYTHOLOGY FOR WRITERS Grade 12 SWS33 - 1 Credit – English Through a structural examination of classical eastern and western mythologies, students will comprehend the interaction of myth and culture. Students will study the universal plot, themes, characterization and conflict present in all mythology in order to bring these fundamental aspects into their own writing. Students will also produce an original screenplay and a documented research paper.

58


SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL GRADE 12 INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY Grades 11 and 12 SWS 45 - ½ Science Credit Seen through an SWS model curricular approach, this course will examine the heavens and the relationship of humans to them. Major constellations and heavenly bodies will be identified, a basic overview of celestial navigation will be provided as well as a discussion of cosmology and the implications of quantum physics. We will look at space programs of the past, present and future, track satellites and study the building and operation of light telescopes. The course will conclude with an examination of the promise and problems inherent in extra-terrestrial colonization.

59


SCIENCE Most Nauset students take science all four of their years in high school. As the State continues to restructure its MCAS assessment program in Science, they are moving toward end-of-course exams in grades 9 and 10. Eventually, all students will be expected to take one of these subject specific exams. At Nauset, all students may take either Engineering/Technology MCAS exam in May of their freshmen year or the Biology MCAS at the end of their sophomore year.

For their junior and senior years, students may choose from a variety of electives which include the traditional college-preparatory courses and a number of pre-vocational and personal interest subjects.

Note: To insure appropriate placement in science courses, all students must have course selections approved and initialed by their current or previous science teacher. The majority of courses offered within the Science Department qualify as laboratory science courses for college admissions. Starting with the class of 2011, Nauset students are required to fulfill three (3) years of science credit.

• •

9th GRADE All freshmen must take one of the following:

FRESHMEN SCIENCE HONORS SC11 - 1 Credit This is an accelerated, and in-depth college preparatory course which integrates the study of lithosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Topics include surface geology, field studies, experimental design, ecology, taxonomy, evolution and bio-chemistry. This course uses a lab-oriented approach with advanced math skills appropriate to the level of the student. Honor students must be able to work independently and will be expected to be able to problem solve, apply concepts, and to integrate multiple ideas and information at an advanced level. Honor students will be required to complete unit projects independently.

FRESHMEN SCIENCE SC12 - 1 Credit This is a college preparatory science course that integrates the study of the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Topics include surface geology, field studies, experimental design, ecology, taxonomy, evolution and chemistry. This course uses a lab-oriented approach with math skills appropriate to the level of the student.

ENGINEERING / TECHNOLOGY SC12E - 1 Credit This course is a problem solving based program with units in design, construction, fluid systems, thermal systems, electrical systems, communication technology, and manufacturing technology. This course will use traditional instruction, research and individual projects. This course is designed to prepare students for the Engineering/Technology End of Course MCAS exam. This course will be open to all incoming freshmen.

60


SCIENCE SCIENCE ELECTIVES GENERAL SCIENCE N18 - 1 Credit

This course is a project based science course that integrates the study of the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Topics covered include: geology, ecology, taxonomy, classification, basic chemistry and experimental design. Enrollment is based on special education TEAM recommendation and the student's Individualized Education Plan. 10th Grade BIOLOGY HONORS SC21 - 1 Credit An introduction to the molecular study of living things, their structure, functions and relationships to the biotic and abiotic environment. Each concept is supported by multiple lab experiences to re-enforce material presented. Students are expected to be responsible, interactive and motivated learners. A student must have a B+ in Freshmen science to be eligible.

MODERN BIOLOGY YSC2 - 1 Credit A basic introduction to the molecular study of living things, their structure, function and ability to maintain homeostasis in a changing environment. Lab experiences will be used to re-enforce abstract concepts in a concrete format. The course includes units on biochemistry, plant and animal cell biology, genetics, evolution, flow of energy through the living world and survey of human systems.

GENERAL BIOLOGY N65 - 1 Credit

A project based introduction to the study of living things, their structure, function, and ability to maintain homeostasis in a changing environment. Projects and lab experiences will be used to reinforce concepts in a concrete format. Topics include: biochemistry, plant and animal cell biology, genetics, evolution, human systems, and the flow of energy through a living world. Enrollment is based on special education TEAM recommendation and the student's Individualized Education Plan.

ELECTIVES STUDY SKILLS AND TEST PREP SC99 SPRING - ½ Credit This is a one-semester course that includes topics in Chemistry of Life, Structure and Functions of Cells, Genetics, Human Anatomy & Physiology, Evolution and Biodiversity, and Ecology. Students will be expected to complete all assigned exercised and projects for this course. A final grade for the course will be determined using participation, class work, tests, projects and final exam. This course is designed for students who have been identified by previous assessment as needing reinforcement for success in MCAS testing and other standardized tests. This course is an elective and does not replace a science course and is NOT used to satisfy the credit requirements for science at Nauset Regional High School.

61


SCIENCE ELECTIVES CHEMISTRY IS EVERYWHERE…and do I really need to know this stuff?? SC92 - ½ Credit This course will enhance your science literacy by emphasizing the impact that chemistry has on society and everyday life. Throughout the course you will begin to understand how chemistry affects all of us. Does hydrogen peroxide really make Mountain Dew glow? Can you really cause an explosion while cleaning the bathroom? Topics: • Household chemistry: cooking, cleaners, making soap, glue, super balls, caffeine, and /or aspirin. • Chemistry of fire • “Green Chemistry”: oil spill cleanup, biofuels • Chemistry of Biotechnology: transgenic crops and animals, new drugs • Chemistry of Food: Does chocolate really make a person happy?

CAPE COD NATURAL HISTORY Grades 9-12 SC91 - ½ Credit From the beaches and nature trails to its rich culture and history, Cape Cod has fascinated scientists and artists for generations. This course offers a general introduction to the different Cape ecosystems with an emphasis on field skills and interpretation of landscape and cultural history. Using class work, field studies and guest speakers, we will discover the true nature of Cape Cod and its global importance. Students will have the opportunity to design and lead field trips to a variety of destinations. Projects may include photo journals and PowerPoint presentations.

ELECTIVES - GRADES 10 THRU 12 SCIENCE SEMINAR SC62 SPRING - 1 Credit Open to all juniors and seniors. Sophomores may elect this course with a teacher recommendation. This spring semester course provides a great opportunity to explore various science topics of interest. In a project-based learning environment, students will experience the engaging challenge of scientific research as they participate firsthand in the exciting struggle to understand key concepts of a personally-designed project. Students may work alone or in small groups to, among other things: • Do their own myth-busting! • Design and construct a rocket capable of taking pictures of the Nauset campus from several feet high! • Design and build an air hockey table • Learn and apply new lab skill in • Biology, Chemistry and Physics (e.g., working with bacteria to compare different brands of antiseptic, growing huge crystals, or soldering electronic components to make a strobe light). • Using a computer, analyze digital video of a student performing a sports technique to study the physics of motion and improve the technique

62


SCIENCE ELECTIVES MODERN CHEMISTRY / HONORS SC31 - 1 Credit An accelerated laboratory course in pre-college chemistry for the high ability science student. While the course content centers on the Atomic Theory as an explanation for the changes in matter, special emphasis is placed on development of critical thinking skills in applying the scientific method. Enrollment is based on recommendation of previous science teacher.

MODERN CHEMISTRY SC32 - 1 Credit A traditional laboratory course in general chemistry, emphasizing the study of matter and its changes as understood within the framework of the Atomic Theory. Full block laboratory exercises are problem solving in nature and require student participation in experimental design, data reduction, and report preparation. Juniors should note that this course is a pre-requisite for some senior electives.

A.P. CHEMISTRY SC30 - 1 ½ Credits Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in Modern Chemistry and Algebra II and teacher permission. Advanced Placement Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will emphasize the ability to think clearly and express ideas with clarity and logic. Topics such as the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and thermodynamics are presented in considerable depth. All participants are required to take the A.P. Chemistry Test in May. A fee is required for this test.

A.P.PHYSICS SC51 - 1 ½ Credits This algebra-based, college-level course will challenge and fascinate juniors and seniors. (It may be taken instead of or after another physics course.) The universal nature of physics is emphasized as the following topics are studied: • • • • • •

Mechanics Thermodynamics Electricity & Magnetism Optics Electromagnetic Radiation A strong quantitative approach facilitates understanding and helps to relate multiple concepts in preparation for the A.P. Physics B exam in May for which there is a nominal fee.

63


SCIENCE ELECTIVES

A.P. BIOLOGY SC41 - 1½ Credits Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and teacher recommendation Advanced Placement Biology is a college-level course open to students who have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry. It is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college biology course requiring commitment of time and effort on the part of the student. The course is for students interested in pursuing a field in the sciences and/or those students who wish to elect a course that is informative and challenging. The curriculum follows a National standard and students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Biology Examination in May for which there is a nominal fee.

MODERN PHYSICS SC52 - 1 Credit This course is designed to provide college-bound students with an insight into the wide range of physical phenomena that guide our universe and influence our existence. The fundamentals of mechanics and the study of motion are explored and serve as the base from which the other areas of physics are investigated. Among the other areas studied are the properties of matter, the laws of thermal energy, the principles of sound and light, the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Problem-solving strategies are developed and utilized in the classroom and the laboratory.

OCEANOGRAPHY SC56 - 1 Credit Students will study ocean characteristics and processes and how they relate to global and local issues. Class work will be supplemented with field work at local aquatic sites. Students will participate in on going research and study in cooperation with other agencies like the Cape Cod National Seashore. Students will learn various lab techniques including beach profiling and GPS. This course is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed both Biology and Chemistry.

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY SC42 - 1 Credit This college prep course comprises a detailed study of major organ systems of the human body with an emphasis on their structure (anatomy) and function. Topics include the skeletal, muscular, nervous, integumentary, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and excretory systems. Related units include the eye and vision, the ear and hearing/equilibrium, food and nutrition, as well as a review of cellular structure, function, and organization. Laboratory experiences will culminate in an opportunity to participate in dissection of mammalian systems. Previous courses in biology and chemistry are essential.

64


SCIENCE ELECTIVES

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES SC55 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Students must have taken Biology and have taken or are taking Chemistry Students will study basic ecology and environmental technology. Students will be involved in field experiences as well as traditional in class labs. Students will participate in an on-going study of local salamander populations. This is a Tech-Prep course which means that students who earn a B- or better will receive 3 college credits in the department of Environmental Technology at Cape Cod Community College.

FORENSIC SCIENCE SC60 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Students must have completed biology and are taking or have taken chemistry. This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific aspect of criminal justice. Students will learn about the many careers in Forensic Science including first responding officers, crime scene technicians and forensic scientists. Warrants, searches, seizures and the fourth amendment will be covered. Along with crime scene processing, evidence collection and preservation, and the processing of collected evidence. Evidence topics include: Fingerprints, Hair and Fibers, Blood typing and splatter, DNA, Entomology, Document Analysis, Psychological Profiling, Tool mark impressions and Arson.

SALTWATER ECOSYSTEMS SC70 - ½ Credit Students will study local marine ecosystems such as the Nauset Marsh, Cape Cod Bay and the outer beach. Students will be involved in field experiences as well as traditional in class labs. Students will work with the Eastham Department of Natural resources in learning about local shellfish aquaculture. Some other topics covered are tides, waves and shoreline change and local fisheries. Students will study both the physical and biological aspects of our local marine habitats. Students will also learn how people affect the marine environment from water pollution to over fishing.

FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS SC75 - ½ Credit Students will study freshwater on Cape Cod. Students will be involved in field experiences as well as traditional in-class labs. Topics include groundwater, Kettle ponds, Vernal pools and rivers, and waste water disposal. Students will study both the physical and biological aspects of these ecosystems. Students will also learn about how people are affecting our freshwater resources on Cape Cod.

BOTANY SC63 - ½ Credit This course provides a basic overview of the seed plants. Students will study aspects of plant growth and behavior. Students will also learn basic horticulture techniques, including hydroponics, by growing and maintaining plants in the classroom and the school greenhouse. Students will also study local plant communities including rare heath-land habitat. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

65


SCIENCE ELECTIVES

SUSTAINABILITY SC90 - ½ Credit This science course is an investigative, hands-on exploration of alternative methods of energy production for a sustainable future. Student projects and presentations will provide valuable insights into today’s cutting-edge alternative energy strategies for a better and cleaner tomorrow. Topics: • • • •

Photovoltaic, Solar Thermal, Wind Energy Waves and ocean currents, Passive solar Hydropower Job opportunities associated with this industry

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY SC64 - ½ Credit Prerequisite: Written application and individual discussion with the class room teacher. This is a course that will work on the criteria necessary for the implementation of renewable energy. Although students will be required to work independently and at times outside of the classroom, students will be directed by their teacher and assisted in their responsibilities during classroom hours.

INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY Grades 11 and 12 SWS 45 - ½ Credit Science

See SWS45 in School Within a School

66


THEATER AND ACTING PROGRAMS

DRAMATIC ACTING TH10 -½ Credit This is a half year course designed as an introduction to the fundamental basics of acting. Students will learn memorization, character development, stage movement, voice projection and play analysis. Students will memorize a monologue and a scene to perform in front of classmates. This is a great class for those interested in getting help for public speaking too!

HONORS ACTING TH11 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Acting I, Audition This class will be focused on performance for a variety of audiences. The first two semesters, the class will be working on a play for the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild Festival Competition. Rehearsals outside of class time will be required for this class. The second half of the year will be focused on performing short plays for local schools and organizations in the area. Students must audition for this class. Auditions will be held before students register for classes this year.

SHAKESPEARE FOR PERFORMANCE AND LITERARY ANALYSIS TH30 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Acting I and Teacher Approval Seniors: This is an English elective This class will concentrate on learning to perform Shakespearean drama. The stance, the voice, the rhythms, the rhymes, and the worlds of Shakespeare’s plays will be studied and performed. Characters, plots and themes will be analyzed and discussed. The class will read plays and perform monologues and scenes along with each of them. The senior English students in the class will, in addition, be assigned an informal and a formal essay for each unit in order to engage in a deeper analysis of each play.

SCREENWRITING, PLAYWRITING, AND CREATIVE WRITING TH40 - ½ Credit Seniors: This is an English elective This is a half year course designed as a writing workshop where students will learn the basic principles of writing screenplays, stage plays and short stories. Then they will use those principles to write their own works. As they work on their writings, they will share them with their classmates and critique one another. Students will then use the critiques to edit their work. The goal will be to have one or two finished works depending on their length.

67


THEATER AND ACTING PROGRAMS 20th & 21st CENTURY AMERICAN PLAYWRIGHTS TH45- ½ Credit – English Elective for Seniors This is a half year course designed as a senior English elective or simply an elective for underclassmen. We will read several plays throughout the semester, including works such as The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, by Edward Albee, The Crucible, by Arthur Miller, Crimes of the Heart, by Beth Henley, ‘night Mother, by Marsha Norman and others. We will be reading, analyzing, writing, watching films and acting. These plays are some of the greatest American plays ever written so the course is bound to be fun!

ADDENDUM - REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE (See below for credits): Rehearsal and Performance is designed as a workshop class where students learn to "put on a play" as they actually do so. The students will be either learning to act in a play or they will be learning to build sets, design lights, create sound or to manage a stage production. This is a "hands on" experience in every sense of the phrase and students will be expected to put energy and effort into making the production successful for the entire group. Course sign up: After audition, the names of those students who make the cast of each play and those who will be involved in the backstage crew will be sent to Guidance Credit: Each play will count as 1/4 credit and lasts one marking period.

68


WORLD LANGUAGE ~FRENCH~ The Foreign Language Department at Nauset Regional High School has moved towards a proficiencybased curriculum which was designed by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Language (ACTFL). This movement conforms to expectations put forward in the National Standards and Massachusetts Framework for Education Reform in the state. Students need to achieve linguistic competence in one or two foreign languages in order to function not only economically, socially, and politically in the international community, but also to enhance local tourism and the economy being created in the region by advanced technologies and telecommunications. A minimum of 3 years of a high school world language sequence is a pre-requisite for students applying to most competitive colleges, but 4-5 years of the same language are recommended for optimum opportunity. Students progress through the various levels depending on their levels of proficiency, teacher recommendations and placement or final exam. In some cases, students may need more time to develop proficiency which may require remaining at a certain level for a second year. Credit may be given upon repeating a course if a full grade improvement is made (10 points). Only one repeat is allowed, including Middle School sequence.

FRENCH I FR12 - 1 Credit This course is for students beginning the study of French. Centered on everyday thematic units of study, it evolves over the year with emphasis on communication. Listening skills, speaking, and, with the acquisition of basic grammar concepts, writing skills will be developed. Students will learn cultural similarities and differences between the US and the Francophone world. The beginning nature of this course and the discipline needed in the process of language acquisition requires dedication and effort on the part of the student. Prospective students can anticipate daily written homework assignments, regular quizzes and at minimum two unit exams per quarter as well as a mid term and final exam.

FRENCH II FR22 – 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course reinforces and expands upon the basic second language skills acquired in French I. Students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and some presentations. Writing skills will be further developed with the acquisition of more grammar concepts, and students will be expected to use their French as much as possible in class. French readings, songs and poetry will be studied. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons.

FRENCH II / HONORS FR22 – 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course is for highly motivated students who have the dedication and discipline to succeed in this fast paced honors French class. The class is taught in French and the students are expected to use the French language in class. Students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and several presentations involving research. French readings, songs and poetry will be studied. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons especially with the wide variety of francophone countries.

69


WORLD LANGUAGE ~FRENCH~ FRENCH III FR32 - 1 Credit Prerequisites: Recommend C minimum in French II This course reinforces and expands upon the second language skills acquired in French II. The class will be taught in French and the students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and some presentations in French. Writing skills will be further developed with the expansion of grammar skills to include all tenses. French readings, songs and poetry will be studied. Some aspects of French history will be studied through authentic text and film. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons with the emphasis on topics of interest in France today, such as unemployment, immigration policies, etc.

FRENCH III / HONORS FR31 - 1 Credit Prerequisites: Recommend B+ minimum in French II Honors The student can understand and communicate in several tenses at a higher level of proficiency, can produce lengthier communications and work more independently. Vocabulary development, cultural topics, reading, writing and speaking are augmented and special projects will be assigned.

FRENCH IV FR42 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend C in French III Concentration is on the development of oral and reading skills and longer compositions. Students should be able to understand the main idea contained in native speaker’s speech. There is a greater emphasis on cultural understanding. Role play and communicative activities are stressed. Some literary works are explored. Skills from French III are further developed.

FRENCH IV / HONORS FR41 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommended A- in French III Honors The student can understand and communicate at an intermediate level of proficiency, produce lengthier communications, and work more independently and more in-depth in all skill areas. Some literary works are included. This course is Part I of the Advanced Placement Program. There is an intense grammar review, as well as challenging listening, and speaking practice in preparation for the AP exam which is given at the end of level French V AP. This is an HONORS level course ad will require dedication and great effort. The entire class is conducted in French.

FRENCH V FR52 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend C+ in French IV An exploration of a variety of genres concentrating on more intensive reading and writing in French is the focus. Stress is on oral presentations based on research, cultural components and discussion. We continue to work on developing language skills and vocabulary. There is intense grammar practice as students apply old and new concepts. Students are expected to speak French in class.

70


WORLD LANGUAGE ~FRENCH~ A.P. FRENCH V FR50 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend B in French IV HONORS This course includes advanced grammar practices, exploring a variety of genres of literature, with emphasis on intensive reading and writing. History and discussion are integral parts of the course. This is Part II of the AP Program and follows the Advanced Placement curriculum. All skills are reinforced to advanced level. All students take the A.P. Exam. A fee is required for the exam. Throughout the school year, there will be continued intensive periods of preparation for the AP exam which practice the skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students are required to speak French at all times.

71


WORLD LANGUAGE ~SPANISH~ SPANISH SPANISH I SP12 - 1 Credit This course is for students beginning the study of Spanish. Centered on everyday thematic units of study, it evolves over the year with major emphasis on communication, both oral and written, and is rounded out by the inclusion of appropriate grammar forms and the exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons. The beginning nature of this course and the discipline needed in the process of language acquisition requires dedication and effort on the part of the student. Prospective students can anticipate daily written homework assignments, regular quizzes and at minimum, two unit exams per term, as well as a mid year and final exam.

SPANISH II SP22 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course continues the cultural thematic approach of Spanish I with more advanced vocabulary and grammar structures and a faster pace. Understanding and communicating at a higher level of proficiency, the student can produce lengthier assignments with success in conversation, composition, and reading. Students will develop a command of the present, preterite and present progressive tenses and of more advanced grammatical structures. Thematic units of study include movies, the environment, parties, food, school, daily routines, sports, and clothing. Language study at this level requires an increase in effort and disciplined self-study. Participation and commitment to the language are essential.

SPANISH II HONORS SP21 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend A- minimum in Spanish 1, Teacher Recommendation, and successful completion of summer work handed out on Step Up Day. (This course is for all students who complete the Middle School 7th and 8th grade program with very high grades.) Students in Spanish 2 honors will understand and communicate at a higher level of proficiency, produce lengthier assignments and work more independently in all skill areas. Students will speak, read, and write in the present, preterite, imperfect, future and all progressive tenses. The imperative will also be applied. A very large amount of content is covered due to an extremely fast pace. Students should be prepared to significantly increase their self-study, risk taking, and participation. Students must be dedicated to the study of Spanish and the time commitment that it takes to actively participate in this course. Students will have daily homework assignments and verb assessments, frequent quizzes, and several chapter exams per term.

72


WORLD LANGUAGE ~SPANISH~ SPANISH III SP32 - 1 Credit This course continues the cultural thematic approach of Spanish II with more advanced vocabulary and grammar structures and a much faster pace. Understanding and communicating at a higher level of proficiency, the student can produce lengthier assignments with success in conversation, composition, and reading. Students will develop a command of the present, preterite, present progressive, imperfect, imperfect progressive, imperative, future and present subjunctive tenses and of more advanced grammatical structures. Thematic units of study include childhood, celebrations, luxuries and necessities, shopping, accidents, movies, professions, travel, food, and the environment. Language study at this level requires an increase in effort and disciplined self-study. Participation and commitment to the language are essential to succeed at this level.

SPANISH III / HONORS SP31 - 1 Credit| Prerequisite: Recommend A- minimum in Spanish 2H, Teacher Recommendation This course includes practice in conversation, composition, reading and listening skills. There is a review of grammar and advanced grammar. The subjunctive mood is a key component to this level. Vocabulary development is through thematic units of study. The major thematic units will be city, country and art. Students will immerse themselves with the culture of Mexico as we undertake a major unit of review and recycling with “La Catrina”. A high level of proficiency, be it written or oral, is expected. Students are independently motivated to delve beyond the surface.

SPANISH IV SP42 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course includes practice in conversation, composition, reading and listening skills. There is a review of grammar and advanced grammar. The subjunctive mood is a key component to this level. Vocabulary development is through thematic units of study. The major thematic units will be city, country and art. Students will immerse themselves with the culture of Mexico as we undertake a major unit of review and recycling with “La Catrina”.

SPANISH IV / HONORS SP41 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in Spanish III Honors This course focuses in depth on the acquisition of the Spanish language and is primarily ORAL in emphasis and scope. It builds upon the work of all previous years in Spanish. It evolves over the year with major emphasis on COMMUNICATION, rounded out by intensive grammar review and the exploration of cultural topics. This course also contains the AP Prep component. The emphasis of this preparation is on Spanish Language and the taking of the test. The core of the preparation will take place in the regular periods as required and as is practicable. These sections of preparation will be woven into the established curriculum. The review of, and preparation for the exam is done in an evolving diagnostic mode based on the specific needs of the students in the class. The AP Exam will be taken at the end of the 2 year sequence in Sp5 AP. This is an HONORS level course and will require dedication and great effort.

73


WORLD LANGUAGE ~SPANISH~ SPANISH V SP52 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course consists of various interdisciplinary units. Recycling and review is a key component of this class with new concepts introduced via authentic realia. Hispanic / Spanish culture is explored in depth via reading, film, children’s literature and CDs. Thematic units consists of but is not limited to the following: Cuba, Legends, La Catrina 2, Violence, Immigration, Don Quijote.

A.P. SPANISH V SP50 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in Spanish IV Honors This course continues to focus in depth on the acquisition of the Spanish language, exploring a variety of genres, from classic literature and poetry to modern cinema. Discussion, analysis, commentary, and review of grammar are integral parts of this course. Throughout the school year in Spanish 5 AP there will be continued intensive periods of preparation specifically for the AP exam. These sections of preparation will be woven into the established curriculum. The review of, and preparation for the exam continues in an evolving diagnostic mode based on the specific needs of the students in the class. Early in the academic year, all students are re-exposed to the format of the exam and the language processes required as presented in Spanish 4 Honors. From that point on, their needs are catered to in all of the specific areas depending on each individual, in order to enable each of them to acquire a level of familiarity, comfort, and practice in the exam process.

74


WORLD LANGUAGE ~GERMAN~ GERMAN I GE12 - 1 Credit At the very beginning of the year, the focus will be on listening and speaking. Once a sense of the basic sounds in German is established, reading and writing skills will be developed in stages. In general, students will progress from vocabulary acquisition to vocabulary application (first in sentences, thenwhere appropriate- in integrated essays, dialogues or narratives). As new grammar is introduced, the expectation will be to incorporate it in sentences and in larger integrated assessments. By the end of the year, students will be able to communicate in three tenses. Units and subunits will concentrate on basic themes (family, free time, school, etc.) Throughout the year, students will become aware of differences and similarities between their own culture and that of German-speaking countries. There will be frequent opportunities to observe and analyze how German words are formed.

GERMAN II GE22 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Though students will continue to develop the four strands of communication (listening, reading, speaking and writing), the greatest shift from the previous level will be in the creation of more complex essays and narratives. Creativity and entertainment value will be encouraged and rewarded. Increasingly advanced grammatical structures will be incorporated into each new task list. Students will be able to apply at least four tenses and manipulate compound sentences with word order that differs from that of English. Units and subunits will concentrate on more diverse and culturally specific themes. Some samples of authentic German literature will be read and discussed and sometimes illustrated. Morphology of German words will continue to be examined.

GERMAN III GE32 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Using the same text as in German II, students will continue to deepen their cultural knowledge and expand their communication skills. Their progress will culminate in a final assessment in which they apply higher thinking skills (such as evaluating and presenting arguments pro and con, or presenting a utopian vision). As in previous levels, each summative communication task will require incorporation of newly learned structural skills. Creativity and entertainment value will continue to be encouraged and rewarded. By the end of the course, most of the grammatical structures needed for advanced communication will have been introduced, practiced and applied. Literary samples (poetry, short stories, philosophical essays and dramatic scenes) will be read, discussed and sometimes illustrated.

GERMAN IV HONORS GE41 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation The primary focus of this course will be a survey of German literature from the late 18th century to the 20th century. The approach will be chronological, so as to make connections with history, the other arts and developments in our own culture. A variety of genres will be represented and authors and works will be selected on the basis of standing in contrast with what is familiar and conventional. While continuing to foster communications skills (especially advanced reading strategies and critical writing and discussion), the course will have the tacit goal of broadening the students’ view of the world and experience. Grammar will be reviewed as needed and literature topics will, as time allows, alternate with dramatic performance tasks in a practical setting.

75


WORLD LANGUAGE ~LATIN~ LATIN I LT12 - 1 Credit Latin I is an introductory course stressing fundamental Latin, its influence upon English, as well as the history and culture of ancient Rome.

LATIN II LT22 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend C- in Latin I Latin II concentrates on more advanced grammar and ability to read connected passages of prose written by Latin authors, with further study of history and culture. The Latin influence on English is further latin explored.

LATIN III / IV LT32 / LT42 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Recommend C- in Latin II Latin III continues advanced work in grammar, translation and advanced reading passages written by Latin authors.

76


WORLD LANGUAGE ~AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE~ AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I ASL1 - 1 Credit ASL is a visual/spatial language with its own grammar and syntax rules. It is used to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States and is a major part of their cultural heritage. This is a one-year course designed to develop expressive and receptive ASL skills and communication strategies. Students will study the language, grammar and cultural behaviors. They will also be introduced to the history of the deaf as well as the history of American Sign Language.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II ASL2 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B- average in ASL I. B- minimum in Middle School ASL classes and on placement examination. This is a one-year course designed to further develop expressive and receptive ASL skills and communication strategies. Students are able to understand instructions given in ASL and to communicate effectively in ASL. Students will continue the study of the language, grammar and cultural behaviors. They will continue the study of the history of the deaf as well as the history of American Sign Language and deaf culture.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III ASL3 - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B- average minimum in ASL II This is a one-year course designed to further improve receptive and expressive communication skills in ASL. Students will explore more complex language models of the language. They will explore the comparison of English and ASL and conceptual interpretations. Students will study deaf culture, deaf history and literary works of deaf authors.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE HONORS ASLH - 1 Credit Prerequisite: B- average minimum in ASL III This is a one-year course designed for the student who is capable of comprehending class instruction presented in ASL with no verbal reinforcement. The class is designed to further improve receptive and expressive communication skills in ASL and apply complex language. The students will compare English and ASL language structures and conceptual interpretations. Students will study and discuss deaf culture, history and literary works of deaf authors.

77

NRHS Program of Studies  

Listing of courses and their descriptions

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you