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MUSIC

Movies

Doug Ford’s twisted mentality 11

Ontario election: Six ridings to watch 12

Timber Timbre kick off Massey Hall series 44

What’s hot at Inside Out 58

thinkfree may 22-28 2014 • issue 1687 vol. 33 nO. 38 more Online DAILY @ nowtoronto.com 32 independent years

5 Ns for Farmer’s Daughter brunch page 31

class action education feature page 27

Julie Tepperman and Amy Keating grin and bare it at new East End stage crawl page 48

05/14

BONUS GLOSSY SECTION CONDO SPECIAL The NOW guide to condo living This issue How to make tHe most of your patio, concierge confidential, lake sHore west developments and more 1


2

may 22-28 2014 NOW


NOW may 22-28 2014

3


CONTENTS

TUE MAY 27 8PM • WGT

UNIQUE LIVES AND EXPERIENCES PRESENTS

MARIE OSMOND MON JUN 2 7:30 PM • RTH

48 STAGE: TEASE

48 Private dancers Julie Tepperman and Amy Keating shed their inhibitions in show set at strip club Jilly’s; PLUS: highlights of the inaugural East End Performance Crawl Photo by David Hawe Hair and make up by Matthew Coccia

BOZ SCAGGS

10 NEWSFRONT

THE MEMPHIS TOUR SAT SEP 27 8PM • MH

11 12 13 14

MON SEP 15 8PM • MH

19 DAILY EVENTS 23 LIFE&STYLE

An rbi production

2014-15 SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW ON THE TRAIL OF

BIG CATS

CORAL, FIRE, UNTAMED & ICE David Doubilet, ANTARCTICA

CHASING RIVERS

Underwater Photographer Aquatic Biologist & Photojournalist

Mike Libecki,

Climber & Explorer

Pete McBride,

Cory Richards,

Climber & Photographer

Wildlife Photographer

Take 5 All-natural moisturizers Store of the week MenEssentials Alt health Nature notes; Astrology Ecoholic Water filter facts, breast cancer and toxins, and more

27 CLASS ACTION

27 Continuing education Three diverse professionals describe how business courses expanded their career choices

Photographer & Filmmaker

31 Reviews Farmer’s Daughter, The Goods, Apiecalypse Now 32 Recently reviewed 33 Drink up!

Contact NOW

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23 24 25 26

31 FOOD&DRINK

Jennifer Hayes,

Steve Winter,

DoFo duh Doug Ford’s NIMBY mentality 15 Prison bus This one takes families to visit inmates Ontario election Six races to watch Cawthra Park Should it be renamed? 18 Trans mission Landlord and Tenant Board gets lesson in trans etiquette Brewopoly Beer lobby’s big-buck play

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

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EDITOR/CEO

GENERAL MANAGER

Michael Hollett

Alice Klein

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Editorial

Copy Editing/Proofreading Francie Wyland, Fran Schechter, Julia Hoecke, Katarina Ristic, Lesley McAllister

Interactive Producer Leah Herrera Web/Mobile Developer Adner Francisco

Art

Phone 416-364-1300 X381 or email advertising@nowtoronto.com Director, Display Advertising Sales Gary Olesinski Research Analyst/Sales Operations Manager Rhonda Loubert Senior Marketing Executives Bill Malcolm, Janice Copeland, Barbara Hefler Marketing Representatives Meaghan Brophy, Bonte Minnema, Briony Douglas, Andrew Jacome Marketing Coordinators Joanne Begg, Stacy Reardon, Jane Stockwell

Senior Entertainment Editor Susan G. Cole Senior News Editor Enzo DiMatteo Associate Entertainment Editor/Stage & Film Glenn Sumi Food Editor Steven Davey Music Editor Julia LeConte News Editor Cynthia McQueen Fashion and Design Writer Sabrina Maddeaux Senior Writers Jon Kaplan (Theatre), Norman Wilner (Film) On-line News Writer Ben Spurr Staff News Writer Jonathan Goldsbie Entertainment/Music Contributer Carla Gillis Contributors Elizabeth Bromstein, Andrew Dowler, David Jager, Ellie Kirzner, Sarah Parniak, Wayne Roberts, Adria Vasil Entertainment Administrator Desiree D’Lima

VP, Creative Director Troy Beyer Art Director Stephen Chester Graphic/Web Designer Michelle Wong Photo Coordinator Jeanette Forsythe

Production Director Of Production/IT Greg Lockhart Production Supervisor Sharon Arnott Assistant Production Supervisor Jay Dart Designers Ted Smith, Donna Parrish (Editorial), Clayton Hanmer, Monica Miller Publishing Systems Manager Rudi Garcia Publishing Technology Jason Bartlett

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MAY 22–28

05/14

SUITE LIFE SUPPLEMENT SL2 SL6 SL8 SL10

What I bought Condo buyer loves his patio New by neighbourhood Lakeshore West Concierge confidential How concierges are changing Patio potential How to tart up that balcony

The NOW guide to condo living This issue How to make tHe most of your patio, concierge confidential, lake sHore west developments and more

ONLINE S P R I N G This week’s top five most-read posts on nowtoronto.com

34 MUSIC

34 The Scene Lana Del Rey, Haim, Next Music From Tokyo (pictured), Hozier 36 Club & concert listings 38 Roundup Label Anniversaries 39 Interview Chad VanGaalen 41 Interview MØ 44 Interview Timber Timbre 46 T.O. Notes 47 Album reviews

1. Pity party Veteran journalist Andrew Mitrovica questions the media’s apparent cooperation with the Ford brothers’ latest PR scheme. 2. Ford-free flag-raising This year’s International Day Against Homophobia And Transphobia was a much happier affair than last year’s disaster. 3. Fear of missing out Jonathan Goldsbie describes what it’s like trying to keep up with the Ford circus. (It’s like being him, minus the drugs.) 4. No unity in Trinity The race for TrinSpa between former city councillor Adam Vaughan and NDP favourite Joe Cressy could get ugly. 5. Brain drain In a recent poll, a confounding 63 per cent of respondents said they’d follow Rob Ford’s leadership should a zombie apocalypse hit our fair city.

51 STAGE

51 Theatre interview Dead Metaphor’s Michael Healey (pictured); Awards T.O. Theatre Critics announce winners; Theatre listings 52 Musical interview Flashdance – The Musical’s Tom Hedley; Musical review Stars Of David 54 Comedy listings 55 Dance listings

56 ART

Review Can’t-miss Contact shows Must-see galleries and museums

57 BOOKS

Review An Untamed State Readings

58 MOVIES

72 72 74

Crossword Employment Rentals/real estate

75 87

“Celebs gotta add a ‘no hologram” clause to their wills. #BBMAs”

@JAMILAHLEMIEUX on “Michael Jack-

son’s” performance, which was a hologram, at the Billboard Music Awards.

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your iPad with our slick app. Download free from iTunes! eReader Flip through NOW Magazine on your favourite tablet with our ePub edition.

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Controller Joe Reel Human Resources Manager Beverly Williams Office Manager Brenda Marshall Credit Manager Ray Coules Payables Coordinator Sigcino Moyo Credit Department Richard Seow, Rui Madureira Accounting Assistant Loga Udayakumar Courier Tim McGregor Reception Amy Mech, Janet Hinkle

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“Really? ? Because if I told someone to put together an anti-Semitic Jew costume, they’d have that exact shopping list.”

58 Inside Out Film Fest reviews The Way He Looks (pictured), The Foxy Merkins and Derby Crazy Love come out on top, while The Normal Heart fizzles 60 Cannes Festival Monitoring the buzz from Europe’s glitziest film fest; Reviews 112 Weddings; The Birder; Fading Gigolo; Blended 62 Actor interviews The Love Punch’s Emma Thompson and Pierce Brosnan; Also opening X-Men: Days Of Future Past 63 Playing this week 68 Film times 70 Indie & rep listings Plus Rock And Roll’s Greatest Failure at the Bloor

72 CLASSIFIED

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JULIE AN TEPPERM KEATING AND AMY BARE IT GRIN AND EAST END AT NEW CRAWL STAGE

Shelterfurniture.ca 885 CALEDONIA RD TORONTO 416 783-3333 MON-SAT 10-6 SUN 12-5 NOW MAY 22-28 2014

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May 22 - June 5 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

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Critical Pedagogy And The Citizen Student Symposium

with a talk by social activist Judy Rebick. 9:30 am-4 pm. $50. George Brown College. Pre-register georgebrown.ca/ tommydouglasinstitute.

+last gang records 10th ­anniversary Stacked lineup

marks a decade of indie label awesomeness. MSTRKRFT, Ethan Kath and Purity Ring DJ, and others perform. Guvernment. 10 pm. $25. INK, RT, SS, TM.

La Roux hits the Music Hall, Jun 1

25

FORBIDDEN LOVE A special I­ nside Out screening of the doc classic is followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers, hosted by NOW’s ­Susan G Cole. 4:30 pm. $13. TIFF Bell Lightbox 2. insideout. ca. a god in need of help Sean Dixon’s play about art and ­religious belief closes today at the Tarragon. 2:30 pm. $21$53. 416-531-1827.

Maleficent’s Angelina Jolie is not as mean as you think, May 31

Hawksley Workman finds God, Jun 3

26

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Neoliberalism And Politics: Reflections On The Recent Elections In India Talk by

South Asian scholar Prabhat Patnaik. 7 pm. Free. Beit Zatoun. beitzatoun.org. tom at the farm Xavier Dolan’s psychological mystery screens tonight at the Lightbox as part of the Inside Out Fest. 7:15 pm. $13. ­insideout.ca.

27

Eels Winter Garden Theatre hosts the Los ­Feliz post-grunge group. 8 pm. $29.50-$39.50. RTH. +dead metaphor A great cast stars in George F. Walker’s latest, about a sniper who returns home from a tour of duty in Afghanistan. 8 pm. To Jun 8. $19-$79. Panasonic Theatre. 416-872-1212.

1

2

3

i­ntense site-specific show about an EMS worker closes today. 2 pm. Meet at 149 ­Roncesvalles. $25-$30. ­outsidethemarch.ca. La Roux Brixton’s Elly Jackson brings her synth-pop sounds to the Danforth Music Hall. Doors 7 pm. $20.50-$35.50. RT, SS, TM.

ist in Jupiter One, Of Montreal and Regina Spektor plays the Mod Club. Doors 8 pm. $15. RT, SS, TF. FORBIDDEN CITY Spectacular show of treasures from the Chinese palace are on view at the ROM to Sep 1. $24.50-$27. rom.on.ca.

ley Workman and Christian Barry’s music-filled retelling of a Greek tragedy opens at the Tarragon and runs to Jun 29. 8 pm. $40. 416-531-1827.

vitals Rosamund Small’s

Kishi Bashi Psych-rock violin-

the god that comes Hawks-

the Menzingers/Pup/Lemuria Punk rock takes over

the Opera House. Doors 7 pm, all ages. $17. RT, SS, TF.

Kurt Vile & the Violators

Breezy fuzz rock bill includes transfixing guitarist Steve Gunn as the opener. Phoenix. Doors 8 pm. $25.50. RT, SS, TF. The Walrus Talks Water Lake Ontario Waterkeeper’s Mark Mattson, filmmaker Katarina Soukup, author Chris Wood and others discuss our relationship to water in Canada. 7 pm. $12-$20. Isabel Bader Theatre. walrustalkswatertoronto. eventbrite.ca.

4

standing room only III  omen who have come to W

Canada from South Sudan, Vietnam, Afghanistan and elsewhere share stories and shoes that went with them. 7:30 pm. $30 (benefit for Cdn Civil Liberties Association). Arts & Letters Club. ccla.org. Bike Month Breakfast Bicycle commuters enjoy free pancakes, juice and coffee. 7:30-9 am. Hart House. harthouse.ca.

29

+Kelp Records 20th Anniversary The Acorn, Evening

Hymns, Andy Shauf and others help fete the little label. Horseshoe. Door 8:30 pm. $12. HS, RT, SS, TF.

Movers & Shakers, ­Community Makers Presen­

tations and discussion of the Riverdale community’s history of social action, with Amy Go and others. 7 pm. Free. Ralph Thornton Centre. ­ralphthornton.org.

Jessy Lanza The hotly tipped

Hamilton R&B singer hits the Garrison. Doors 8 pm. $12.50. RT, SS, TF.

Socialism 2014: Capitalism Is

Organized Crime Socialist ­ ction educational conference A with Eva Portillo, Cliff Conner, Claudia Espinoza and other speakers, workshops and more. Today from 4 pm, May 24 from 10 am. Pwyc-$20. OISE, rm 2-212. socialistaction.ca. +Contact Month-long p­ hoto festival is in ­galleries and on billboards around town. ­scotiabankcontactphoto.com.

30

Bike Month Critical Mass Ride Join the monthly critical

mass ride at Bloor and Spadina. Meet at 6 pm, ride at 6:30 pm. Free. facebook.com/ groups/2246288900. The Dirty Nil/Milk Lines A summer all-ages music series kicks off at Double Double Land with rock ’n’ roll bands. Doors 9 pm. $5-$10.

promises to a divided city  udiences address T.O.’s probA lems in this data-driven show. Various times today and May 31, Theatre Centre. $10-$15. 416-538-0988.

5

MUSIC FESTIVAL 8 CONCERTS 5 NIGHTS 20 PREMIERES! 21C FESTIVAL MEDIA SPONSORS 21C TALKS MEDIA PARTNER

FASTER STILL ANAÏS NIN

Thurs. May 22 /2014 Koerner Hall Wallis Giunta | Afiara Quartet | ARC Ensemble | 21C Ensemble Works by: Louis Andriessen | R. Murray Schafer | Christos Hatzis | Brian Current

For Soprano, with Sondra Radvanovsky. Roy Thomson Hall. 8 pm. $33-$145. RTH. And Jun 7.

May 22-28 2014 NOW

Fri. May 23 /2014 Koerner Hall Chilly Gonzales | Uri Caine | Eve Egoyan | Afiara Quartet | Madawaska Quartet | 21C Ensemble Works by: Chilly Gonzales | Uri Caine | Javier Limón | Eve Egoyan & David Rokeby

31

maleficent Angelina Jolie

plays a live-action version of Snow White’s evil and glamorous stepmom. Opening weekend.

Festival Of Social Innovation Celebrate the 10th an-

niversary of the Centre for Social Innovation and its programs. 2-6 pm. Free. CSI Annex. socialinnovation.ca/ festival. Coeur de Pirate Massey Hall Live presents the francophone indie pop star and local singer/ songwriter Bry Webb. $18.94. RTH.

36 36 63 51 54 55 57 57 20

Kishi Bashi plays Mod Club, Jun 2

NIGHT BLOOMS

Sat. May 24 /2014 Koerner Hall Joshua Hopkins | Marc-André Hamelin | Pacifica Quartet Works by: John Cage | Jennifer Higdon | Leo Ornstein

THE 21C MUSIC FESTIVAL IS MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROUS ASSISTANCE OF MICHAEL AND SONJA KOERNER The Afiara String Quartet appearance is generously funded by a gift in honour of R.S. Williams & Sons.

273 BLOOR STREET WEST (BLOOR ST. & AVENUE RD.) TORONTO

6

chilly eve of lemon cane

pepper’s powerful adaptation of the Somerset Maugham novel closes today at the Young Centre. 1:30 and 7:30 pm. $5-$74. 416-866-8666. +Chad VanGaalen Calgary weird-folk-pop hero hits Lee’s. Doors 9 pm. $15. HS, RT, SS, TF. watching glory die Judith Thompson’s play inspired by the death of Ashley Smith, who killed herself in prison, continues at the Berkeley Street Theatre until Jun 1. 8 pm. $18-$42. 416-368-3110.

Hot Tickets Live Music  Movies theatre Comedy Dance Galleries Readings Daily Events  + = feature inside

Toronto Symphony Orchestra The TSO presents Songs

• RTH – Roy Thomson Hall/Glenn Gould/Massey Hall • SC – Sony Centre For The Performing Arts • SS – Soundscapes • TCA – Toronto Centre For The Arts • TM – Ticketmaster • TMA – Ticketmaster Artsline • TW – TicketWeb • UE – Union Events • UR – Rogers UR Music • WT – Want Tickets

24

of human bondage Soul­

More tips

queer bathroom stories

This verbatim theatre show drawn from 100 interviews with LGBTQ North Americans continues at Buddies in Bad Times until Jun 15. 8 pm. $20$25. 416-975-8555.

RCM_NOW_1/3_4c_May8&15_21C__V 14-05-01 12:05 PM Page 1 Ticket Index • CB – Circus Books And Music • HMR – Hits & Misses Records • HS – Horseshoe • LN – Live Nation • MA – Moog Audio • PDR – Play De Record • R9 – Red9ine Tattoos • RCM – Royal Conservatory Of Music • RT – Rotate This

Saturday

NEW BLOCK OF $21 TIX NOW ON SALE! www.performance.rcmusic.ca 416.408.0208


GREAT BEER LIVES

HERE

NOW may 22-28 2014

7


Nash the Slash aka Jeff Plewman.

I met Nash with FM at Sam the Record Man a few years back. He signed my 45 of Dead Man’s Curve. In the 1970s I submitted a drawing to his label, Cutthroat Records. It got sent back with a nice letter I still have. Nash the Slash was one of Canada’s most gifted and unusual artists. He will be missed. Corinne Lynne Osko Toronto

email letters@now toronto.com Nash the Slash: master of disguise Nash the Slash (NOW, May 15-21) was a musical genius who blazed a trail for many contemporary musicians. Although we hadn’t seen each other in about 30 years, it seemed we lived in parallel universes. Whether it was a love of Newfound­ land, classi­cal music and the Horse­ shoe Tavern or an appreciation for the work of David Marsden, Boris Karloff and Douglas Adams, our in­ terests brought us close together even after time had separated us. I remember our shared awe of ex­

periencing the Paupers and Jimi Hen­drix at the CNE Coliseum, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band to­ gether at the Rockpile. Nash the Slash’s mastery of dis­ guise was not confined to his music­ al performances. His credible imper­ son­ations of a caterer, newspaper reporter or construction worker won him free access to rock concerts he didn’t have the money to attend as a high school student. He was so gifted that he could pick up an instrument he had never held before and within five minutes be playing amazing music on it. Jeff Plewman, you will be greatly

Drawing inspiration from Nash

NDP’s Horwath learns Rae lesson missed. I find it sad that you never received the recognition you so richly deserved for your talent, showman­ship and influence on modern music, and for that your loss to us all is that so much more acute. “So long, and thanks for all the fish.” Myron Humeniuk Toronto

Re Andrea Horwath Goes All In (NOW, May 15-21). The Ontario NDP is making nice to Bay Street. Apparently there is $600 million in savings that an NDP gov­ ernment, if elected, will identify through a Ministry of Savings and Ac­ countability. (Ministry of Waste?) Horwath has learned the lesson of the NDP government of Bob Rae. As your article correctly points out, the

“THE AGO HAS OUTDONE ITSELF”

blogTO

BOOKS ON FILM

Andre Dubus III on

Host Eleanor Wachtel and award-winning author Andre Dubus III discuss the Academy Award–nominated adaptation of his hard-hitting novel.

TIFF.NET/BOOKS 416.599.8433 #booksonfilm

The Steven and Michael Latner Families Generously supported by

Al and Malka Green / Tim and Frances Price ONLY AT

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REITM A N SQ UA RE , 3 5 0 K IN G STREE T WEST

Government Partners

PROGRAMMING PARTNER

Organized by the Art Gallery of Ontario in collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. This exhibition was made possible through the generosity of The Henry Moore Foundation and The Estate of Francis Bacon. Image: Installation views of Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Shown in image: Henry Moore, Working Model for UNESCO Reclining Figure , 1957. Plaster. AGO, Gift of Henry Moore, 1973. Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation. Francis Bacon, Lying Figure in a Mirror, 1971. Oil on canvas. Museo de Bellas Artes, Bilbao. ©Estate of Francis Bacon/SODRAC 2014.

8

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Collectivism god for the individual as well

I agree somewhat with letter-writer Chris Michael Burns’s Ayn Rand­ian assertion that “taxation is not con­ sen­sual” and that one should have the freedom “to choose where one’s money goes” (NOW, May 15-21). But isn’t a healthy society more impor­ tant than one’s selfish ideology? Yes, we are individuals. More im­ portantly, we are also a collective of individuals who, in times of need, should act in concert to achieve the needed, beneficial end. When this doesn’t happen, something suffers; and if something suffers long enough, something – usually much worse – happens. Society needs much more com­ passion and thoughtfulness than it does more shortsighted, self-serving rhe­to­ric. Jason Smith Toronto

The downside of rehab for Ford

WATCH. TALK. LEARN.

Lead Supporters

I read your recent piece on the Boko Haram abductions (NOW, May 15-21). I was very disappointed with the under­lying suggestion that the root cause of the kidnappings in Nigeria is the Muslimness of the perpetrators, a xenophobic fear-mongering stereo­ type that has been decried by count­ less commentators and scholars. I greatly enjoy NOW and would like to see it remain a publication that is committed to thoughtful progressive analysis, devoid of clichés and stereo­ types. Fathima Cader

Re Rob Ford on NOW’s cover again (NOW, May 8-14). I’m aware of the dan­ gers of not having information about issues related to the governance of our city. But stop already. Excessive attention reinforces bad behaviour. Just ask anyone who knows children. Elsie Petch Toronto

MONDAY, JUNE 2 7PM

ON NOW! TICKETS AGO.net

Anti-Muslim whiff in Nigeria kidnappings

Ford attention

HOUSE OF SAND AND FOG

Discover how two giants of 20th century British art translated trauma and survival into extraordinary works of creativity.

ONDP is mainly interested in win­ ning elections. Ted Turner Toronto

I can see the political merits of keep­ ing Rob Ford in rehab through the summer (NOW, May 8-14), but doing so would also create some negatives. No matter how devoted his sup­ porters are, there are not enough of them to win. Secondly, if Rob is not out of rehab in 30 days, but in 90 or 120 days, it might cause his seat as in­ cumbent to be vacated. Thirdly, events will unfold with or without him being on the campaign trail. More rats might speak. Clearly, brother Doug can’t be trusted to de­ fend Rob. He loves the limelight while Rob is away. Ian Coutts From nowtoronto.com NOW welcomes reader mail. Address letters to: NOW, Letters to the Editor, 189 Church, Toronto, ON M5B 1Y7. Send e-mail to letters@nowtoronto.com and faxes to 416-364-1166. All correspondence must include your name, address and daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length.


from the archives September 17, 1992

Forbidden Love comes out again

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about women coming out in the 50s and 60s – dangerous times for dykes – screens at this year’s Inside Out Festival. Directors Lynne Fernie and Aerlyn Weissman were on NOW’s cover when the movie played at TIFF (then the Festival Of Festivals) and talked about the pressure – and pleasure – of representing lesbian life when there were so few films around that did so (September 17, 1992, page 28). Since then, that canon has grown dramatically, but Forbidden Love itself was forced to fade. That’s because 15 years after it first appeared, the filmmakers lost the rights to its music and most of the archival footage. This Inside Out screening celebrates not only the digitally remastered version of the doc – available on DVD and for download at nfb.ca – but the renewal of those rights around the world, in perpetuity, except for theatrical releases. Forbidden Love screens at Inside Out on Sunday (May 25), 4:30 pm, at the TIFF Bell Lightbox Cinema 2. I’ll be moderating a panel discussion following the screening, with Fernie, producer Rina Fraticelli and film critic B. Ruby Rich (insideout.ca). For more Inside Out coverage, see page 58. SUSAN G. COLE

Optional soft covers are available separately in blue, red, mint, grey or pink. Pick a colour to match your style. $ 99

iPad not included.

24

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Manulife Centre 55 Bloor St W Toronto, ON 416.967.1122 Limited quantities.

Mon-Wed: 10am-7pm Thu-Fri: 10am-8pm Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: Closed

Two hours free parking in the Manulife Centre, 44 Charles St W (minimum purchase of $25)

baybloorradio.com NOW MAY 22-28 2014

9


newsfront

Michael Hollett EDITOR/PUBLISHER Alice Klein EDITOR/CEO pam stephen general manager Enzo DiMatteo senior news editor Published every thursday by now communications inc 189 Church Street, Toronto, ON., M5B 1Y7 telephone 416-364-1300 fax 416-364-1166 e-mail news@nowtoronto.com ONLINE www.nowtoronto.com

Rouge Paddle Cheol Joon Baek

CPAWS Wildlands League canoed the Rouge River on May 15, ahead of its first annual paddle this summer, part of the group’s campaign to have the area declared a national urban park. Photo essay at nowtoronto.com.

Spotted

What Toronto vigil for the 301 killed in coal mining disaster in Soma, Turkey When Wednesday, May 14, 7 pm, at Yonge-Dundas Square Why Turkey’s parliament refused to investigate safety conditions at the mine two weeks before the explosion.

10

May 22-28 2014 NOW

Ingram Publishing

Tanja-Tiziana Burdi

Cycle Logic

Toronto’s slow progress toward bike-friendliness continued Wednesday, May 14, with the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee’s conditional approval of a pilot project for new physically separated cycle tracks on Richmond West and Adelaide West and filling in gaps b ­ etween Spadina and Borden on existing bikeways on Harbord and Hoskin. Some bike activists argued that the plan doesn’t go far enough. A study shows the lanes on Adelaide and Richmond ­beginning at Bathurst and ending at Sherbourne. But because of construction, the lane on Richmond will only reach York, and the lane on Ade­ laide will only reach Simcoe. Full story at nowtoronto.com.


Online Exclusive

A matter of trust

How a new documentary on the police practice of “carding” counters the idea of Toronto the good.

nowtoronto.com. politics

never stuffy. never meant to be.

R. Jeanette Martin

A�d for th�t You’re welcome.

Doug Ford strikes again

25th Annual Parade the Circle June 14 / University Circle Summer Solstice Music Festival June 21 / The Cleveland Museum of Art

DoFo proves he and his brother really are Tweedledumb and Tweedledumber

Tri-C Jazz Fest June 26-28 / PlayhouseSquare

By ­Cynthia McQueen

T

he irony is thick with this one. Just weeks after his brother supposedly landed in rehab – coincidentally during Mental Health Week – Coun­ cillor Doug Ford insulted anyone with autism and/or a mental health issue. In case you haven’t heard, Council­ lor Ford made obtuse comments last week about the Griffin Centre, which according to its website is a men­tal health agency for youth, adults and their families. It recently opened a residence in his ward on Jeff­coat Drive for children and young adults with developmental disabilities, in­ clud­ing autism. After receiving complaints from residents about police, fire and EMS vehicles blocking the street since the house opened, Doug told the Etobi­ coke Guardian: “My heart goes out to these kids with autism. But no one told me they’d be leaving the house. If it comes down to it, I’ll buy the house myself and sell it.” This is wrong on so many levels, it’s difficult to know where to start. There’s the fact that we’re talking about three young people between the ages of 12 and 21 with unspecified developmen­tal disabilities who moved into the house in mid-March. For people on the autism spec­ trum, routine is key to lower their stress levels. The same can be said for people with developmental disabil­ ities. Change can be a struggle. The fact that there has been police involvement during this transition period is not surprising. Some people

on the autism spectrum self-harm, and some developmentally disabled people cannot control their behav­ iour. The worst possible strategy when dealing with an autistic person or some­one with developmen­tal issues is to make them feel alienated and stigmatized because you don’t under­ stand their disorder. It’s heartbreaking enough for par­ ents to decide they can no longer care for their child, but then to have a city politician say he will buy the group home your child lives in and sell it so he and some of his constituents can continue to be ignorant is enraging. Aside from this being an example of the most deplorable NIMBYism, it’s sad. By Doug’s logic, I could say that my heart goes out to the Fords, but no one told me I’d be living in a city with a crack-smoking, racist, misogynist, homophobic mayor and his enabling city councillor brother. But here we are. Somehow the irony was lost on Ford when he called the Griffin house “an absolute nightmare” while de­ fend­ing himself on CP24 on Sunday, May 18. If Ford were truly concerned about someone “ruining the community” or leaving the house, it should have been his brother, Mayor Rob Ford, be­ fore he became an international em­ barrassment. 3 To help raise funds for the Griffin Centre, attend the Music For Autism series at St. Stephen-in-theFields Church on June 12 at 7:30 pm. For more ­information about autism, visit ­AustismSocietyofCanada.ca.

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Flash Native Files11 NOW May 22-28 2014


✖ ONTARIO ELECTION

6 RIDINGS TO WATCH THE SKINNY – AND DIRTY DETAILS – ON RACES IN HALF A DOZEN KEY TORONTO BATTLEGROUNDS

By ENZO DiMATTEO

Doug Holyday

Jonah Schein

Mitzie Hunter

Monte Kwinter

Rosario Marchese

Laura Albanese

Peter Milczyn

Cristina Martins

Ken Kirupa

Avi Yufest

Han Dong

Paul Ferreira

ETOBICOKE-LAKESHORE It’s the race everyone’s watching to see if PC Doug Holyday’s by-election win back in August was a flash in the pan or the start of something bigger for Tim Hudak’s hordes, who are now polling just behind the NDP in the 416. The PCs won’t have the Ford brothers, Rob and Doug, backing them this time, given Doug’s very public falling out with the party. Holyday couldn’t have won against Liberal Peter Milczyn without them. But that vote was also a protest against the Liberals over the costly gas plant cancellation in neighbouring Mississauga, which was engineered to save key Liberal seats in the 2011 election. Hudak has promised a judicial inquiry into that decision if elected, although it may be hard to square his position with the fact that his own party not only supported the cancellation of the Mississauga plant but also the shuttering of the Oakville gas plant by the Liberals before that. Adding to Hudak’s embarrassment is the fact that his wife, Deb Hutton, a former adviser to Mike Harris, was under contract to TransCanada, the firm contracted to build the Oakville plant, at the time the you-know-what was hitting the fan over its closure.

DAVENPORT Andrew Cash’s surprise win for the federal NDP in Layton’s 2011 orange tide ended more than five decades of Liberal rule federally and provincially in this riding. It also laid the ground for triumph in the provincial runoff that followed, MPP Jonah Schein’s good works with Social Planning Toronto and The Stop Community Food Centre aside. Schein won by 1,400 votes over chief rival Cristina Martins, who was nominated late by the Liberals and never found her stride last time. She’s running again this time with the backing of local councillors Ana Bailão and Cesar Palacio (though the advantage of having the latter’s support is questionable). More importantly, she’s getting attention from Premier Kathleen Wynne’s office – the Libs have targeted the riding – and the high-profile help that goes with that from finance minister Charles Sousa.

SCARBOROUGHGUILDWOOD The PCs’ Ken Kirupa came up 1,200 votes shy of snatching this riding from the Libs in last summer’s by-election after two-term incumbent Margarett Best vacated the seat, reportedly for health reasons. Mitzie Hunter outdistanced Kirupa in a nasty tussle that saw the Grits’ vote share fall by more than 13 per cent over 2011. The wild card in 2013 was the NDP, which had the star power of former Toronto city councillor and one-time mayoral candidate Adam Giambrone. There’s no star power this time. Quite the opposite. There are still bad feelings about Giambrone’s being parachuted in over Amarjeet Kaur Chhabra. That’s left the party with local businessman Shuja Syed, whose profile in the riding consists of remarks made in a 2003 Facebook posting – and with few resources on the ground in a riding where social justice issues dominate and ScarboroughGuildwood should be a natural fit for an NDP figuring to grow its support in have-not suburbs.

YORK CENTRE While an NDP-Liberal dynamic is expected to play out in most ridings up for grabs in Toronto, here it’s the PCs who are threatening to oust Liberal incumbent Monte Kwinter, the oldest and longest-serving MPP of any party and an institution in these parts. His political staying power is nothing short of amazing, but voter fatigue may be setting in. He hasn’t played a major role of any kind in cabinet since 2007 under Dalton McGuinty. Kwinter’s personal popularity has helped him buck a pattern in the riding that, before redistribution, saw it flip back and forth between the Libs and PCs provincially. But muddying the waters for Kwinter against the PCs’ Avi Yufest is the fact that the federal Conservatives now own the riding after Mark Adler dislodged Ken Dryden, who like Kwinter was popular for his constituency work but couldn’t turn back the drift rightward.

TRINITY-SPADINA Pundits have predicted that 14-year NDP incumbent Rosario Marchese would lose this seat almost since he won it. Every election, it seems, is expected to be his last, yet he always wins in the end. Just last week Marchese grabbed the endorsement of city councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, who’s supporting Liberal Adam Vaughan in the federal byelection in the riding. Sarah Thomson (yes, that Sarah Thomson) came within 1,100 votes of winning in 2011; it was the last riding called. If the patently flakey Thomson can come so close, who knows? Blame demographic changes and massive condo developments for fracturing the riding’s historic NDP base. Which explains Marchese’s focus at Queen’s Park in recent years on the Condominium Act and getting rid of the Ontario Municipal Board in city planning decisions. The Liberals have their sights set on Trinity again, running Han Dong. Wynne was in the riding on Victoria Day Monday to announce another goodie: plans to restore mothballed Ontario Place to its former glory. She promised no condo development on the site, which is not the position taken by John Tory, the guy her government commissioned in July 2012 to come up with a plan for the former waterfront park.

YORK SOUTH-WESTON The third time may be the charm for Paul Ferreira. The NDP insider has faced off against incumbent Liberal MPP Laura Albanese three times, winning in a by-election in 2007 and holding the seat for a short time before losing in the general election that followed that same year. Ferreira lost again to Albanese in 2011. Both times, her margin of victory was a few hundred votes. The difference this time? The riding is held federally by NDPer Mike Sullivan, and the improved ground game that comes with that may take Ferreira over the top; he currently serves as Sullivan’s special assistant. Albanese isn’t exactly a household name outside the riding, but her constituency work has paid dividends.

12

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

enzom@nowtoronto.com | @enzodimatteo


cityscape

honour former mayor barbara Hall By JONATHAN GOLDSBIE

The Proposal That Cawthra Square Park, site of the Toronto AIDS Memorial, be renamed after former mayor of Toronto and current head of the Ontario Human Rights Commission Barbara Hall. Last week the Toronto and East York Community Council rubber-stamped Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam’s motion seeking the change, which goes to city council for a final decision in mid-June.

The Park Cawthra Square Park wraps around the 519 Church Street Community Centre half a block north of Wellesley, with Church on the west, Mon­teith on the north and a short residential street called Cawthra Square connecting it to Jarvis in the east. Long a rallying point for Toronto’s queer communities, the park played host to Pride celebrations as far back as 1978. But by 2003, then-councillor Kyle Rae was calling it “the most dangerous park in the downtown” after dark on account of drug dealing and associated issues. It’s currently undergoing a $1.4 million refurbishment thanks to Section 37 funds – cash negotiated from developers of nearby buildings in exchange for more height or den­sity than would otherwise be allowed. These plans were protested last year by a small group of activists concerned that the beautification (involving a net loss of 10 trees) would serve to gentrify the park and further marginalize those who use it as shelter. Whatever it’s called, the park will play host to the annual AIDS candlelight vigil on June 24 and again be transformed into the openair Green Space nightclub from June 26 to 29 for WorldPride.

Who was Cawthra? William Cawthra (1801-1880) was “reputedly Toronto’s richest man in the 1800s,” according to a family history compiled by Friends of the Cawthra Bush and Greater Mississauga Area. “Toronto’s first [permanent] city hall (now the St. Lawrence Market) was mortgaged to him, and when the Jarvises lacked the funds to finish Jarvis Street, they turned to him for assistance.” He was the son of Joseph Cawthra, a landowner and proprietor of a successful general retail business, who passed on his wealth to William when he died. But the younger Cawthra closed the business and concentrated on real estate instead. The Dictionary Of Canadian Biography surmises that the bulk of his income derived from the rents on the properties he owned in what’s now Toronto’s financial district. The source also notes that Cawthra served as an alderman on Toronto’s first city council in 1834 and later as a school trustee, as well as a financial contributor to the construction of the Toronto General Hospital’s infectious-diseases wing.

Why Hall? Hall was the final mayor of the old city of Toronto and the second woman to hold the job. A lawyer called to the Ontario bar in 1980, she had a private practice in Cabbagetown until she was elected in 1985 to represent the area on city council. According to a biographical sketch assembled by mayoral historian Mark Maloney, who supports the park renaming, Hall “forged a close relationship with the then emerging gay and lesbian community, and worked with a group of criminal defence lawyers to found the Right to Privacy Committee following the bathhouse raids in 1981.” While on council, Hall “led initiatives on home­lessness, working with housing advocates

Living former mayors honoured with public spaces named after them David Crombie (1972-1978) David Crombie Park, 131 the Esplanade (between Jarvis and Berkeley), received its name in 1978, just prior to Crombie’s depature from municipal office and before it had even been built. Art Eggleton (1980-91) Art Eggleton Park, 323 Harbord (west of Grace), had its named changed from Harbord Park in 2010 to honour T.O.’s longest-serving ­mayor, who had represented the area as an alderman. June Rowlands (1991-94) June Rowlands Park, 220 Davisville (at Mount Pleasant), was renamed in tribute to Toronto’s first female mayor a decade after she retired from politics. Back when it was still Davisville Park, Rowlands lived just to its south and represented the area on council. Mel Lastman (North York mayor 1972-97, ­Toronto mayor 1998-2003) Mel Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge (at North York Civic Centre), was given its moniker in 1986. To the puzzlement of many, the naming initiative was spearheaded by Howard Moscoe, Lastman’s arch-nemesis on North York council.

Photos By enzo dimatteo

cawthra park may get a hall new name gay village spot named after “Toronto’s richest man” to

for supportive and affordable housing, and housing for AIDS patients,” Maloney writes. “It was also the time when the very first public health budgets for AIDS were being put forward. As an active member of the Board of Health, Barbara championed those efforts, and helped to confront fear and misunderstanding in the community head-on.” She was elected mayor in 1994, and the following July became Toronto’s first chief magistrate to march in Pride. In 1997, Hall ran to become the inaugural mayor of the amalgamated megacity but lost to North York mayor Mel Lastman. She came a distant third behind David Miller and John Tory on her second try in 2003. Since 2005, Hall has been the chief commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, where her priorities have included the ex­pansion of protections to trans individuals.

jonathang@nowtoronto.com | @goldsbie

NOW may 22-28 2014

13


Brewopoly

As the owner of Indie Ale House once We enjoy relative transparency in retold me, Buffalo gas stations have porting election spending. All cambetter beer selection than The Beer paign donations over $100 dollars and Store in Ontario. “Azerbaijan has a their deposit dates are available at Elecbetter fucking liquor system,” says tions Ontario’s real-time reporting Ja­son Fisher, and he’s not exaggeratwebsite. ing. Chinese State Television interHowever, we do have loopholes that viewed him once about our “oppreslet foreign firms buy influence. sive” liquor distribution system. In this province, two of the more Despite polls cunning ways are showing more than in party leader50 per cent of reship campaign spondents want alregulations (or the cohol sold in conlack thereof). venience stores, One loophole another May Twoneglects to set a Four long weekend limit on how has come and gone, much a corporareminding consumtion – any firm in ers that if they want the world that anything from outJason Fisher, conducts business side the foreignowner Indie Ale House in Ontario – can owned brew­opoly, donate to a canditheir only option is the underwhelmdate. The other allows donations to be ing aisles at the LCBO. made up to 20 months after the leaderThe government-protected oligo­ ship vote. poly that is The Beer Store is nearly Here’s how that played out during fully owned by Colorado’s Molson the race to replace outgoing Liberal Coors and Belgian-led Labatt (a divi­ premier Dalton McGuinty: sion of Anheuser-Busch InBev). The media announced that Sandra Why is the government against Pupatello was the front-runner to recompetition for The Beer Store? place McGuinty, based on the fact that In Ontario we like to think we’re she had 27 per cent of confirmed firstmore righteous – that our politicos ballot delegates on January 14, 2013, 12 aren’t quite so easily influenced by days before the leadership convenmo­ney as they are in the U.S. We have tion. The same day, Molson de­posited no American-style Super PACS (polit$5,000 into the former Wind­sor MPP’s ical action committees), and our lobby leadership fund. groups are less aggressive and wellTwo days later, Molson deposited funded on this side of the Great Lakes. the same amount into the campaigns

Deborah Baic/cp images

“Azerbaijan has a better fucking ­liquor ­system.”

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may 22-28 2014 NOW

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the power to reward with taxpayer dollars. In June 2013, for instance, Hoskins’s campaign received $1,500 from the Ontario Small Brewers’ Association. That, coincidentally, was one month to the day before the minister announced a $1.2-million annual extension of the Ontario Microbrewery Strat­egy, which, as you may have guessed, is overseen by the OSBA (operating as Ontario Craft Brewers). Incidentally, the OSBA threw another $5,000 into Hoskins’s campaign in December 2013, more than 10 months after the Toronto MPP’s leadership hopes were flattened on the first ballot. When I attended the Ontario Microbrewery Strategy announcement last July, I asked the minister flat out why the government was so hostile to competition for The Beer Store despite polls showing that the public wants to be able to buy alcohol at convenience stores. His reply acknowledged the need to grow distribution, but primarily through the LCBO. “My understanding is that we’re not currently looking at expansion through retail outlets.... That’s an is– sue the minister of finance was looking closely at,” he says. This, of course, is the same minister of finance who received a total of $15,000 in leadership campaign do­ na­tions from the honchos at The Beer Store.  3 news@nowtoronto.com | @nowtoronto

.375”

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Co-founders Derek Reid and his daughter Jessica outside the F.E.A.T. bus before leaving for Kingston jails.

Justice system

Tom Godfrey

of Gerard Kennedy (whom Forum Research had consistently trumpeted as the favourite among the public generally and declared Liberal supporters in particular) and Eric Hos­kins. Charles Sousa, who like Hoskins would soon become a senior member of cabinet, got his 5 grand one day later. Molson finally made a $5,000 drop into Kathleen Wynne’s campaign on January 21. Labatt took a more prudent approach. The makers of Blue waited until January 23 – just three days before the ballot, when polls were clear and contestants properly vetted – to make a generous $10,000 deposit in Hoskins’s coffers. The Toronto MPP, after being eliminated from the race, threw his support behind Wynne and ultimately became minister of eco­nomic development, trade and em­ployment. One day later, Labatt gave $17,500 to Wynne, the fifth-largest donation to her campaign. Sousa, who became her minister of finance, overseeing the LCBO, received $10,000 from Labatt the next day. Of course, the NDP and Ontario PCs also receive sizable donations from the own­ers of The Beer Store, which is why it’s no surprise that party leader Tim Hudak recently withdrew his plan to liberalize beer sales and deregulate all alcohol distribution. The financing quirk that allows leadership contestants to receive donations long after the fact means that a cabinet minister can have his “failed” bid subsidized by a group he now has

The wheels on this bus are changing lives F.E.A.T. helps families with incarcerated mothers and fathers stay connected By Tom Godfrey

It only costs $35 to make an inmate’s day, thanks to a program called F.E.A.T. Fostering, Empowering, Advocating Together has helped more than 400 families, with 200 children, visit their dads or spouses in prisons since 2012. Sheena regularly takes her two kids to visit their father in Warkworth, Canada’s largest penal institution. “We wouldn’t be able to visit him if it wasn’t for this bus,” she says. “We couldn’t afford the $120 it would cost to take a bus and taxi to get there.” Kids under 18 ride free, and the $35 for adults just

continued on page 17 œ

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may 22-28 2014 NOW


The wheels on this bus are changing lives œcontinued from page 15

Derek Reid, co-founder of F.E.A.T.

news@nowtoronto.com | @nowtoronto

C EN T ENNI A L PA R T NER

3.88" x 7.444" 4C NP

and we now look forward to the visits.” Reid co-founded the program with her father, Derek Reid. They wouldn’t have a relationship if Jessica hadn’t found him three years ago – Derek was unaware that his former university girlfriend was pregnant with his daughter when they broke up more than two decades ago. Jessica found Derek, and they decided to form F.E.A.T. Jessica knew how much it meant to have her father in her life. “Some of the men we see have little to look forward to except for visits from their families,” says Derek. “It really hits home for some of them when they see their children.” For one woman, having more contact with her father when he was ser­ ving 10 years would have made all the difference. Laura says not being able to visit her dad while she was growing up left her traumatized. “It still hurts me to this day that I was not able to see my father on so many special days,” Laura says. “He was away for most of the milestones in my life.” The group is gearing up for increased visits as more inmates are add­ed at the Toronto South Deten-

“Some inmates have little to look forward to except v ­ isits from their family.”

tion Centre in Etobicoke, which will eventually house 1,650 prisoners. The program, which raises money through donations, grants, a gala event and the sale of buttons at an annual motorcycle rally in Port Dover, also offers free mentorship and after-school programming in the Jane and Finch area for children with incarcerated parents. Derek says F.E.A.T. logs about 60,000 kilometres yearly on the bus, which has so far racked up 430,000 kms, and a fundraiser is underway to raise $80,000 for a new bus. From June 7 to 15, Jessica will walk 260 kms from Toronto to the Collins Bay Institution, where she will mark Father’s Day. Donations or pledges can be made at featforchildren.org.  3 Some people in this article asked that their last names not be published to protect the identity of their children and spouses.

Size:

covers the price of gas for the bus that ferries families to fed­eral penitentiaries and provincial jails. The bus also makes runs to the Central East Correctional Centre in Lindsay to visit those held for immigration offences and facing deportation. “A lot of people want to see their loved ones before they get deported,” says program co-founder Jessica Reid. “Its always hard for the families and the kids to see their dads for last time.” The Etobicoke-based grassroots operation is a first in Canada. Reid says the program helps kids overcome the discon­nec­tion from parents and the negative cycle that separation can sometimes breed. “It’s the children of inmates who are facing economic hardship, social stig­ma, isolation and feelings of aban­donment,” she says. F.E.A.T. caters to both male and female inmates, but, Reid says there has been a “lack of demand” to visit female prisoners so far. On any given Saturday, F.E.A.T.’s 24-seat bus picks up families at five Toronto locations and drives to six federal institutions in the Kingston area. On Sun­days families visit their loved ones in provincial jails. The passengers reflect the findings of a report issued last June by Canada’s correctional investigator,

Howard Sapers, showing that some groups are disproportionately overrepresented in federal pen­i­tentiaries, and the number of inmates from these groups is growing at an alarming rate. Sapers’s report notes that in the past 10 years the aboriginal incarcerated pop­ulation increased by 46.4 per cent, while vis­ible minority groups including blacks, Asian and Hispanics increased by almost 75 per cent. “These are disturbing trends that raise important questions about equal­ity and our justice system in Ca­nada,” he writes. On the Saturday before Mother’s Day the bus carries seven kids and 15 women from Toronto on the 264-kilometre trip east on Highway 401. Debbie the driver picks up families in Pickering, Ajax, Whitby and Oshawa before pulling into Kingston around noon. She and Reid are the only paid staff, their wages funded by a grant and donations. Visitors are dropped off at Millhaven, Bath, Collins Bay, Frontenac, Joyceville and Pittsburgh, some of Ca­nada’s most notorious institutions. Robert and his wife, Delcia, are on the bus to visit their son in Bath. Delcia says she’s happy to celebrate Mother’s Day in jail. “This service is inexpensive, and we can keep in contact with him on a regular basis,” Robert says. Steff and her two children have been travelling weekly to visit her hus­band, who will be released in December after serving five years. “My husband’s relationship with the children has greatly improved,” she says. “This time together has made our relationship even stronger,

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5/16/14 4:38 PM


Body politics

Transforming gender norms

One trans woman’s experience at the Landlord and Tenant Board changes­policy By SAIRA PEESKER After coming out as trans, Sophia Banks says her relationship with her landlord got weird. A few months after Banks began living as a woman in 2012, her landlord increased the rent. Banks found two roommates to help out with the rent, but the landlord issued an eviction notice and the roommates left. Banks stayed, maintaining that the eviction was illegal because the landlord hadn’t filed formal notice with the Landlord and Tenant Board. When Banks refused to leave, her landlord took the case to the board. Instead of getting the vindication Banks had hoped for, she lost the case. The fact that the adjudicator kept referring to her as a man made it hard for Banks to believe she’d gotten a fair hearing. “I was begging them: ‘I’m a woman. Please use female pronouns.’ He kept ignoring me and looking away.” She wrote to Parkdale-​High Park MPP Cheri DiNovo. Since DiNovo’s his­toric initiative adding protections for trans people to the Ontario Human Rights Code, discrimination based on gender expression and gender identity has been illegal. In April, the Ontario Human Rights Commission released a policy detailing how those rights should be protected. “Organizations are liable for any discrimination and harassment that happens,” states the policy, which is a guide and legal reference. “They are also liable for not accommodating a trans person’s needs unless it would cause undue hardship.”

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Undue hardship, according to the policy, can be a financial burden or a safety concern, but must be quantifiable and not based on stereotypes. “[Organizations] must deal with com­ plaints, take steps to prevent problems and provide a safe, welcoming environment for trans people,” ac­ cord­ing to the policy. The policy contains sections explaining bias and prejudice, the laws as they stand, best practices around gender-​related language and the case law on the subject. It also includes a checklist for workplaces wishing to be trans-​inclusive. Notably, the policy states that trans people should be able to access gender-​specific services such as wash­rooms based on the gender in which they live. It states that in places where dress codes apply, they should specify the articles of clothing that

www.crowstheatre.com or 416 907 0468 FINAL TWO SHOWS! May 22 & 23

Dreaming of Rob Ford by Mike Daisey

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POSITIVE YOUTH CORRUPTION!

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THE FESTIVAL WITHIN THE FESTIVAL

SOULO Theatre Festival

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“master

Featuring a powerhouse lineup storyteller” of some of North America’s best one-person shows and workshops. THE NEW YORK TIMES Media Sponsor:

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are acceptable, but not which gender must wear which garments. “We wanted our policy to reflect the real barriers that are out there and provide ways of getting rid of them,” says Barbara Hall, chief commissioner at the Ontario Human Rights Commission. “This is pretty close to the most vulnerable commu­ nity out there.” She explains that the Human Rights Code is “quasi-​constitutional,” which means it trumps all other legislation unless specifically stated in law. “You can’t discriminate based on gender identity and gender expression,” says Hall. Psychotherapist Jodee McCaw, who has worked with many trans clients, says constantly having to correct people can take a serious toll on a trans person’s psyche. “Imagine you go through a day where everyone you interact with takes you for the other gender…. Imagine how you would feel at the end of the day. [Then] imagine all your days are like that. It always makes you feel less of a person.” After hearing from Banks about her ordeal, DiNovo sent a sternly​ worded letter to the Landlord and Ten­ant Board. She received a response from Michael Gottheil, executive chair of Social Justice Tribunals Ontario (of which the Landlord and Tenant Board is part), assuring her that the treatment Banks received would not happen again. But it did, when a different mediator involved in her case misgendered her. “[The mediator] said my voice was triggering him,” she says. In a second letter to DiNovo, Gott­ heil wrote that management had spoken with Banks’s adjudicator but had not yet communicated the message to the broader staff. “This was obviously a gap on our part, and for Ms. Banks, a very unfortunate gap, with disturbing consequences.... I sincerely apologize,” he wrote. Gottheil was unavailable for an interview, but according to Kimberley Massingberd, Social Justice Tribunals Ontario’s communications adviser, “We have also used this recent experience to reflect on, and strengthen, our existing training on human rights and inclusion.” Meanwhile, Banks’ landlord maintains she was legally entitled to evict her tenant to move into the unit herself, where she now lives. “The first adjudicator wasn’t aware that [Banks] was transsexual, so [getting her gender right] was confusing the first time around,” says the landlord. “The second time, we talked to a mediator who was trying really hard. But I think it was so difficult because of the way [Banks] presents.” Banks is pleased that drawing attention to her case has affected protocol at the Landlord and Tenant Board, but to allege discrimination in her board ruling, she’d have to begin a formal complaint process. She says she’s not sure she has the energy. “I feel so defeated.” 3 news@nowtoronto.com | @nowtoronto

18

may 22-28 2014 NOW


daily events meetings • benefits How to find a listing

Daily events appear by date, then alphabetically by the name of the event. C indicates Contact events B indicates Bike Month events r indicates kid-friendly events indicates queer-friendly events

5

How to place a listing

All listings are free. Send to: listings@nowtoronto.com, fax to 416-​364-​ 1168 or mail to Daily Events, NOW Magazine, 189 Church, Toronto M5B 1Y7. Include a brief description of the event, including participants, time, price, venue, address and contact phone number (or e-mail or website if no phone available). Listings may be edited for length. Deadline is the Thursday before publication at 5 pm.

Thursday, May 22

Benefits

Cayle Chernin award (Cayle Chernin Award) Presentation to a female in the performing arts, a screening of Goin’ Down The Road and party with cast members. $25-$50. Carlton Cinemas, 50 Carlton. caylecherninaward.ca. Fringe Kitchen Party BBQ Edition (Fringe Festival) Festival fundraiser with urban dancers Jack Your Body, DJ Michelle Williams, food and more. 7 pm. $95. The Hoxton, 69 Bathurst. fringetoronto.com. Still Points In A Turning World: Wade Davis and John Vaillant (PEN Canada) An-

thropologist Davis and author Vaillant discuss storytelling, reportage and bearing witness in the 21st century. 7 pm. $25. Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas W. pencanada.ca. A Taste For Life (National Eating Disorder Information Centre) Live music by Jesse Gold, live art, tapas, an auction and more. 7 pm. $100. Thompson Landry Gallery, 32 Distillery Lane. nedic.ca. Women Of Distinction Awards (YWCA Toronto) Gala celebrating seven Toronto women for the important work they do for women and girls. 5:30 pm. $195. Carlu, 444 Yonge. womenofdistinction.ca.

Events

The ABCs Of Choosing Healthy Body Care Products Seminar. 7 pm. Free. Big Carrot,

348 Danforth. 416-466-2129. Bad Gut Lecture on ulcerative colitis. 7 pm. Free. Pantages Hotel Toronto Centre, 200 Victoria. Pre-register badgut.org/events.

Caravaggio And The Antiquities Of Rome

Lecture by Italian art historian Salvatore Settis. 6:30 pm. Free. Italian Cultural Institute, 496 Huron. 416-921-3802.

Critical Pedagogy And The Citizen Student – A Just Society Is Possible Sympo-

sium with a talk by journalist/social activist Judy Rebick. 9:30 am-4 pm. $50. George Brown College, rm 406, 290 Adelaide E. Preregister ­georgebrown.ca/tommydouglasinstitute. OSAP Info Session Learn about the Ontario Student Assistance Program. 4-5:30 pm. Free. Lillian H Smith Library, 239 College. 416-393-7746.

5Singing Out – Pride. Music. Belonging

Performance by Singing OUT, the city’s largest LGBTQ community chorus. 7 pm. Free. Northern District Library, 40 Orchard View. 416-393-7610, torontopubliclibrary.ca.

listings index

Live music Theatre Comedy

36 51 54

Dance Art galleries Readings

55 57 57

Movie reviews Movie times Rep cinemas

63 68 70

festivals • expos • sports etc.

Festivals this week

Carassauga Festival Of Cultures Pavilions represent more than 60 countries through music, dance, food and arts. Throughout Missis­sauga. ­carassauga.com. May 23 to 25 Doc Now Documentary media festival showcasing film, photography and new media by graduating students from Ryerson’s MFA program. d ­ ocnow.ca. May 28 to Jun 28

venues. kofflerarts.org. May 25 to Jun 1

Toronto Korean Film Festival Authentic

Korean cinema in various genres. $5-$10, pass $39. Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas W), Cinecycle (129 Spadina). tkff.ca. May 27 to 31

Doggie do Woofstock comes to​ Woodbine Park.

rToronto Jewish Literary Festival Readings by Nora Gold, Chantal

Ringuet and others plus lectures and book awards. Free or pwyc. Various

Greater Good Gala (Design Hope Toronto)

Live art auction, food, drink and more. Doors 7 pm. $25, adv $20. Burroughes Bldg, 639 Queen W. designhopetoronto.ca. Million Meals Movement (OneXOne & Simple Plan Fdns) Simple Plan, Kardinal Offishall, Magic!, Alyssa Reid and others perform to help end hunger. 11 am-11:30 pm. $49.50-$250 (ticketmaster.ca). Sony Centre, 1 Front E. icangowithout.com.

continuing Contact Exhibitions, public installations, workshops, portfolio reviews, talks and more. Most shows free. Various venues. ­contactphoto.com. To May 31 Sound Art presents performances, installations, radio broadcasts and artist talks. Artscape Wychwood Barns, 601 Christie. ­deepwireless.ca. To May 31 East End Performance Crawl Plays including Mike Daisey’s Dreaming Of Rob Ford, TEASE, storytelling, dance and more. Various prices. Venues on Queen from Broadview to Greenwood. ­crowstheatre.com. To Jun 1 Subtle Technologies Festival exploring participatory culture in art and science through performances, workshops, films, exhibitions and more. $10-$60. Various venues. s­ubtletechnologies.com/­festival. To May 31 Tangled Art + Disability Festival The festival closes with a performance by Les Productions des pieds de mains. ­tangledarts.org. To May 23 21st Century Music Festval Concerts of newly minted music performed by Pacifica Quartet, Marc-­André Hamelin and others. $25-$32. Royal Conservatory of Music Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor W. r­ cmusic.ca. To May 25

Urban gardening festival with talks by horticulturalists, a flower-themed art competition and more. Free. Dupont from Davenport to Spadina. ­dupontbythecastle.ca. May 24 and 25 Inside Out LGBT Film Festival Celebrating queer culture and history on film with screenings, panels, performances, parties and more. $10-$13, 8-ticket voucher $91, galas $22. TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King W. ­insideout.ca. May 22 to Jun 1 SOULO Theatre Festival Festival celebrating solo performers, with Sage Tyrtle, All for One, David Harrell, Sandra Shamas and others, panel discussions and master classes. $15-$20, opening night gala $50. Red Sandcastle Theatre, 922 Queen E. soulo.ca. May 22 to 25

Benefits

dogs features canine sports, doggie fashion shows, pool, vendors and more. Free. Woodbine Park, Coxwell and Lake Shore. ­woofstock.ca. May 24 and 25

Deep Wireless Festival Of Radio & Transmission Art New Adventures in

rThe Dupont Dig Flower Festival

Friday, May 23

rWoofstock The outdoor festival for

Metro Convention Centre, 255 Front W. champsca.com. Exposure Photography show with talks by astronaut Chris Hatfield, portrait photographer Lynn Goldsmith and others, demos and cameras. To May 25. $20. International Centre, 6900 Airport. exposureshow.com.

more with a Museum Confidential theme. 7-11 pm. $12, stu $10. Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park. rom.on.ca/fnl. Hear Well: Age Well Discussion with audiologists Nadia Sandor, Erica Wong and Kayla Edison. 7 pm. Free (photo ID required from nonmembers). West End YMCA, 931 College. westendtalks.wordpress.com.

Injured Worker Information Picket

Friday Night Live @ ROM Live music, DJs,

Picket to oppose the WSIB draft benefits policies and unfair practices. Noon-1 pm. Free. Ministry of Labour, 400 Universty. 416924-6477.

pop-up food, tours of the galleries and

Events

Life Drawing Art Party

All Through The House: A Night Of Feminist Art & Culture Perform-

Dr Sketchy’s drawing party. 8 pm. $10. Round, 152A Augusta. 416451-6346.

ances by artist Rebecca Belmore, the Jubilate Singers and others plus workshops. 8 pm. $15. Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle. berks2014.com/friday-night. Beer-Tasting Rock Party Beer tasting and music by the Marks and Bunny Lapin. 6 pm. $6. Central, 603 Markham. 416-913-4586. Champs Canada Counter-culture trade show, with with seminars on the North American medical cannabis movement, breeder panels, parties, glass-blowing competition and more. To May 25. $15, both days $20.

Making Provocative Histories

Dialogue with artists and scholars including Elizabeth

DAVID MIRVISH PRESENTS the Canadian Rep Theatre production of

a killer

dead metaphor new comedy!

written & directed by

GEORGE F. WALKER

TI C K E

TS

FRO M

19

$

LaCouture, Deepali Dewan and Carol Condé. 10:45 am-12:30 pm. $12, stu $8. Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas W. ago.net.

Socialism 2014: Capitalism Is Organized Crime Socialist Action educational conference with speakers, workshops and more. Today and tomorrow. $5 or pwyc; weekend $20, adv $15. OISE, rm 2-212, 252 Bloor W. ­socialistaction.ca. Toronto In Film Fiona Luck talks about how the city has inspired filmmakers. 2 pm. Free. Don Mills Library, 888 Lawrence E. 416-3955710.

Saturday, May 24

Benefits

rCamp Day For Right To Play (Right to Play) Kids five to 12 can try out a half day of sports camp including soccer, mini putt and rock climbing. 1-4 pm. Donation. Soccerworld Polson Pier, 176 Cherry. sportplay.ca. Giant Book Sale (Bloor Street United Church) More than 3,000 titles in 30 subject sections plus DVDs, CDs and more. 10 am-4 pm. Free. 300 Bloor W. bloorstreetunited.org. Motionball: Marathon Of Sport (Special Olympics Canada) Young professionals and Special Olympics athletes take to the fields. 8 am-4 pm. motionball.com. Songs For Schoolbox (SchoolBOX) Musical performances, food and a silent auction raise funds for education in Central America. 7 pm. $40, adv $35. Hart House Music Room, 7 Hart House Circle. eventbrite.ca. Toronto Timeraiser (local nonprofits) Attendees can find volunteer opportunities with nonprofit agencies and bid on work by local emerging artists. 7 pm. $20. Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W. timeraiser.ca.

Events

rChina Homelands Festival Crafts and storytelling, Chinese brush painting, a film screening and more. 11 am-4:30 pm. Free. Malvern Library, 30 Sewells. 416-396-8698, torontopubliclibrary.ca. Communing With The Spirits? Doubt And Belief In Toronto The Good Heritage Toron-

to walk. Today and tomorrow 10 & 10:30 am, 2 & 2:30 pm. Free/pwyc. Location provided upon registration. Pre-register ­heritagetoronto.org. Day Of Puppetry Performances celebrating all kinds of puppets and puppeters. 10 am-4 pm. Free. Lillian H Smith Library, 239 College. torontopubliclibrary.ca.

Don Valley Urban Forest Trail Clean Up Day Pick up litter while exploring the trail.

Gloves, bags and refreshments supplied. 10 am-1 pm. Free. Meet at ET Seton Park, 71 Thorncliffe Park. mtnbike.sa.utoronto.ca.

Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement Introductory class. 10:30 am-noon. Free. Ralph Thornton Centre, 765 Queen E. Preregister 416-406-0054. rGangways Open Singing pirates, music by Firesound, dockside ship tours, a talk on Toronto’s oldest running ferry by historian Mike Filey and more. Today and tomorrow 10 am-5 pm. Free. Queens Quay Terminal to Harbourfront Centre. toronto.ca/doorsopen.

Gravity: From Falling Apples To Ripples In Space-Time Talk tracing the concept of gravity from the earliest theories to the present. 2 pm. Free. Cedarbrae Library, 545 Markham. torontopubliclibrary.ca.

continued on page 20 œ

NOW ON STAGE UNTIL JUNE 8 416.872.1212 MIRVISH.COM 651 YO NGE STREE T

starring NANCY BEATTY, MICHAEL HEALEY, HALEY McGEE,

C O N TA I N S S T R O N G L A N G U A G E

ERIC PETERSON, NOAH REID & JULIE STEWART

PHOTO OF ORIGINAL CANADIAN COMPANY BY CYLLA VAN TIEDEMANN

NOW may 22-28 2014

19


YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE

big3

THE HEART OF THE CITY

presented by

Boost Bond NOW editors pick a trio of this week’s can’t-miss events

M O N D AY S 1 2 : 3 0 - 1 : 3 0 P M M AY 2 6 - JUN E 16 S E P T E M B E R 8 - 29

LIVE!

Be kind to the bees Cheol Joon Baek

! H IS W E E K S TA R T S T

MAY 2 6 ALYSH A B R IL L A T U E S D AY S A T S U N S E T MINI Canada presents

Support families in need and catch one of the best shows currently on stage when Second City performs Sixteen Scandals as a benefit for Bond Child and Family Development. Bond provides services and programs – including a child’s garden and creative expressions groups – for families in St. James Town and Regent Park. Sixteen Scandals, which takes on everything from the weather to – what else? – the mayor, got a rare 5N review in NOW. See it and do some good Tuesday (May 27), 8 pm. 51 Mercer­. $40. ­bcfdsecondcity2014. eventbrite.com.

JUNE 24 - SEPTEMBER 2

FREE

ADMISSION M OV I E S WIFI • FUN

F R I D AY S 8 : 0 0 - 1 0 : 0 0 P M

J U LY 4 - S E P T E M B E R 5

ADMISSION LIVE MUSIC WIFI • FUN

CONNECT WITH YDS >>>

WARM UP TO 100 IN 1 DAY How do you change the way people interact with their cities? By joining 100 In 1 Day for one big session of civic engagement and community-based interventions. Attend the warm-up for the event at the pre-festival workshop on

events œcontinued from page 19

PRESENTS

FREE

March against Monsanto and help save the bees, May 24.

BEER

GARDEN 4-11PM

@YDSquare

Go to YDSQUARE.CA to see all events.

Intermediate 3D Printing Workshop on de-

signing and engineering a product from scratch. 1-4 pm. $49. Hot Pop Factory, 215 Spadina. Pre-register hotpopfactory.com/ workshops. rIranian Heritage Day Musical and dance performances, Persian art, hands-on crafts, workshops and more. Today and tomorrow 11 am-5 pm. $13, stu $12, child $9. Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park. 416-586-8000, iranianheritageday.com.

5It’s-Not-The-May-Long-Weekend Salsa

Social LGBT dance and mini-beginner salsa lesson. 7 pm. $5. Glad Day Bookshop, 598a Yonge. lgbtdance.com. Layers Of Leaside Heritage Toronto walk. To-

citizen-driven action to see how you can get involved in the project, which features street art, urban gardens, beautification projects, social events and improvements in city infrastructure – on Tuesday (May 27), 6 to 8 pm, at the Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, rm 1-003. Free. 1 ­ 00in1day.ca/­toronto. day and tomorrow 11 am & 1:30 pm. Free/ pwyc. Location provided upon registration. Pre-register heritagetoronto.org.

March Against Monsanto: Requiem For Bees March and rally to protest the use of agri-

cultural neonicotinoid pesticides. 11 am. Free. Queen’s Park, 111 Wellesley W. ­facebook.com/ events/422692497830818.

Mount Pleasant Cemetery: Where Soldiers Rest In Peace Heritage Toronto walk. Today

and tomorrow 2 pm. Free/pwyc. Location provided upon registration. Pre-register ­heritagetoronto.org. Murder At the ROM Scavenger Hunt Murder mystery team scavenger hunt for adults. 10:30 am. $30. Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park. Pre-register urbancapers.com. Music Row North Full-day music seminar on songwriting, record production, demos and more. 9:30 am-5 pm. $50. Trebas Institute, 2340 Dundas W. Pre-register nsaitoronto.com.

EXPLORE TORONTO’S BUILDINGS FREE Knox College

Gibraltar Point Lighthouse

Campbell House Museum

toronto.ca/doorsopen

Chemicals brought to you by the people responsible for Agent Orange blanket monoculture farms across the world, resulting in bee colony decline, environmental degradation and top-soil depletion. The March Against Monsanto on Saturday (May 24) is part of an international effort to support food protection, local farmers, the environment and the bees. Join the protest against the use of bee-killing agricultural neonicotinoid pesticides. 11 am. Free. Queen’s Park, 111 Wellesley West. f­ acebook. com/MillionsAgainstMonsanto­ Toronto. BNorth Scarborough Green Loop Grand Opening Opening of the new 12K route features bike safety checks, a guided ride and more. 1-4 pm. Free. L’Amoreaux Park Rec ­Centre, 2000 McNicoll. facebook.com/ events/640852655970038. rOrigami Workshop for adults and kids over 10. 2-4 pm. Northern District Library, 40 Orchard View. Pre-register origamitoronto.org. Plant Exchange Share your plants, cuttings, seedlings and stories with other gardeners. 11 am-3 pm. Free. Karma Food Co-op, 739 Palmerston. 416-534-1470.

Requiem For Bees: GMO-Free Festival And Farmer’s Market GMO-free farmer’s market

and festival to protest the use of agricultural neonicotinoid pesticides. Noon-6 pm. Free. Christie Pits Park, 750 Bloor W. facebook.com/ events/422692497830818. rSave Our Savannah Family nature walk. 1:30-3 pm. $2. High Park Nature Centre, 440 Parkside. highparknaturecentre.com. CStereographs Portrait session. Noon-4:30 pm. Campbell House Museum, 160 Queen W. scotiabankcontactphoto.com. 5Totally outRIGHT! Four-week leadership program for gay/bi/queer guys 18 to 29. 10 am-5 pm. Free. Pre-register actoronto.org/to. Unfree In Palestine Amnesty International visual tour and narration. 7 pm. Free. Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham. beitzatoun.org. rWorld Fish Migration Day Learn about the zoo’s Atlantic salmon rear and release program. 10 am-3 pm. Free w/ admission. Toronto Zoo, Meadowvale N of 401. 416-392-5929.

Sunday, May 25

Benefits

ALS Plane Pull (ALS Society) Markham Profes-

sional Firefighters charity airplane pull. 8:30 am-4:30 pm. Spectating free. Bombardier Aerospace, 123 Garrat. Pre-register ­alsplanepull.ca. rGreat Strides Walk (Cystic Fibrosis Canada) Fundraising walk through the zoo. 8 am-2 pm. $25. Toronto Zoo, Meadowvale N of 401. Pre-register 416-392-5929.

Leashes By The Lake Dog Walk-A-Thon

(Etobicoke Humane Soc) A walk, dog demos, exhibits, prizes and more. Registration from 11 am, walk starts at noon. $25 min donation/ pledges. Amos Waites Park, 2445 Lake Shore W. etobicokehumanesociety.com. Lions Club Walk For Dog Guides (Lions Fdn of Canada) Fundraiser to train and provide dog

continued on page 22 œ

20

may 22-28 2014 NOW


BIKE MONTH EVENT CALENDAR MAY 26 TO JUNE 26 GEARING UP FOR BIKE MONTH (MAY 24-25) SATURDAY MAY 24 North Scarborough Green Loop Grand Opening Celebrate the grand opening of the new 12 km bike route in Scarborough! 1-4pm, L’Amoreaux Community Recreation Centre, 2000 McNicoll Ave.

www.facebook.com/nsgreenloop

SUNDAY MAY 25 Bike with Mike - Join Councillor Mike Layton to kick off Toronto Bike Month with a celebration of community and cycling. 12-5pm, Christie Pits Park. www.mikelayton.ca/bike-with-mike-2014-sunday-may-25 MONDAY MAY 26

Photo: Marlena Rogowska

25th Annual Bike to Work Day Group Commute & Pancake Breakfast Ride with hundreds of commuters from various start points to Nathan Phillips Square for a celebration and pancake breakfast provided by St. Lawrence Market and Jet Fuel Coffee. Hosted by the City of Toronto and Cycle Toronto. 7-9am, Nathan Phillips Square, Queen St. and Bay St. www.bikemonth.ca/events

City Start Points: 7:00 am Bloor St. W. and High Park Ave. 7:00 am Yonge St. and Lawrence Ave. 7:00 am Danforth Ave. and Woodbine Ave. 7:30 am Bloor St. and Yonge St. Community Start Points: 6:15 am Don Mills Rd. and Lawrence Ave. E., Don Mills Centre 6:30 am Humber River and Waterfront Trail, Thunderbird Bridge 6:45 am Laird Dr. and Eglington Ave. E. 7:15 am Christie St. and St. Clair Ave., Wychwood Barns 7:15 am Waterfront Trail at Kew Garden Park, Beaches 7:30 am Dundas St. E. and Kingston Rd. Bike to York - Celebration breakfast, free bicycle safety checks, and interactive bus & bike rack demonstration. Campus Walk, York University 4700 Keele St. 9am-2pm. www.smartcommutentv.ca Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels - Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4–6pm, 242.5 Queen St. E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca Venez à l’école à vélo! Bike to school day! Collège français students grades 9-12 kick off Bike Month 2014 by cycling to school. 8am–3pm, 100 rue Carlton. www.bikemonth.ca/events TUESDAY MAY 27 Bike Month station powered by McLeish Orlando - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with with McLeish Orlando. 5–8pm, AGO, 317 Dundas St. W. www.bikemonth.ca/events TBN Tuesday Ravine Ride - Black Creek and Back - Bike ride on the trails around Downsview. 10:30am – 1:15pm, meet at Finch Station, west parking lot. www.tbn.ca WEDNESDAY MAY 28 TBN Wednesday Night Ride - Ride around the Beaches and the Don Valley. 6:15-8:30pm, meet at Langley and Broadview Ave. www.tbn.ca

THURSDAY MAY 29 Rosedale United Bike Breakfast - Enjoy a free breakfast in Rosedale as the neighbourhood celebrates Bike Month. 7-9am, Rosedale United Church, 159 Roxborough Dr. MEC Toronto Bike Maintenance 101 - Learn the ABCs of bike maintenance in this hour long free clinic. 6-7pm, 400 King St W. www.mec.ca FRIDAY MAY 30 Bike Month Critical Mass Ride – Join the monthly critical mass ride at Bloor and Spadina. Meet at 6pm, ride at 6:30pm. www.facebook.com/groups/2246288900 TBN Friday Night Rides: Etienne Brule - Ride through the Humber River Trail system. 6:30–8:30pm, meet at Etienne Brule Park parking lot. www.tbn.ca SATURDAY MAY 31 TBN Ride from Victoria Park to Guildwood - Ride along hydro corridors to Scarborough’s Guildwood neighbourhood. 9:30am – 1pm, meet at Victoria Park Station. www.tbn.ca Sweet Pete’s Kids Bike Swap - Life guarantee #4 – Your kid will outgrow their bike! Don’t worry; you can bring that ill-fitting ride to Sweet Pete’s first annual Kids Bike Swap. 10am-6pm, 1204 Bloor St W. www.sweetpetes.com MEC Bikefest - A celebration of all things bicycle – clinics, rides, art, music, and fun! 11am-5pm, Trinity Bellwords Park. www.mec.ca Street Smarts Safe Cycling Workshop – learn how to ride a bike safely during a fun, informative and interactive workshop led by Cycle Toronto. Lillian H. Smith Library. 2-4pm. www.CycleTO.ca/events SUNDAY JUNE 1 Ride for a Dream Launch Event & Ride - Launch and celebration of a bike ride to Montreal to end violence against women by engaging young men in a healthy dialogue. 9am-3pm, Yonge & Dundas Square www.rideforadream.ca MONDAY JUNE 2 McLeish Orlando’s Helmets on Kids - 500 children from the Dundas Junior Public School will be fitted for free bicycle helmets to encourage safe cycling. 2-4pm Dundas Junior Public School, 935 Dundas St E www.mcleishorlando.com TUESDAY JUNE 3 Jarvis Rides to School - Do you go to high school at Jarvis Collegiate? Come by Charlie’s FreeWheels for a pancake breakfast and a group ride to school! 7:30-8:45am, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca Bike Month station - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with our partners. 5-8pm, College/Shaw Library, 766 College St. www.bikemonth.ca/events WEDNESDAY JUNE 4 Bike Month Breakfast at Hart House - Free juice, coffee and cold breakfast hosted by the Hart House Recreational Athletics Committee. 7:30-9am, 7 Hart House Circle. www.harthouse.ca MEC Toronto Bike Maintenance 101 - Learn the ABCs of bike maintenance in this hour long free clinic. 12-1pm, 400 King St W. www.mec.ca THURSDAY JUNE 5 Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels. Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4-6pm, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca FRIDAY JUNE 6 West End Community Garden Tour - Guided bike tour of the community gardens in Toronto’s west end. Hosted by Cycle Toronto Wards 14 & 18. 7-8:30pm, meet at Dufferin Grove Park. www.bikemonth.ca/events SATURDAY JUNE 7 Bike Host Speedmatching - Launch of the 2014 Bike Host program, which matches up newcomers to Canada who are open to cycling, with residents who ride regularly. 10am-1pm, Lillian H. Smith Library, 239 College St. www.culturelink.ca Scarborough Southwest Bike Rodeo - Fun family bike activities: learn new cycling skills, shop the marketplace and get a free bike tune-up. 10am2pm, 25 Mendelssohn St. www.to35cycles.ca Cycle Toronto Bike Valet at Field Trip Music & Arts Festival - free secure bike parking powered by Autoshare at both east and west entrances. Broken Social Scene, Interpol, the Constantines, the Kills & more. Fort York Garrison Common. June 7-8 www.fieldtriplife.com SUNDAY JUNE 8 TBN: Sunday Tourist – Agincourt to Claremont - Ride from McCowan TTC station to destinations east of Scarborough. 10am-4pm, meet at McCowan Station. www.tbn.ca TBN: Sunday Leisure Wheelers – Scarborough: See the Geese - Ride through hydro corridors and the Rouge National Park conservation area. 10am-3pm, meet at Kennedy Station. www.tbn.ca TBN: Sunday Easy Roller – Dim Sum / Tim Sum - Ride up the Humber Trail into Etobicoke and Mississauga. 10am-3pm, meet at Etienne Brule Park parking lot. www.tbn.ca

TBN: Advanced Tourist – Agincourt to Kawartha Lakes Century 215 km ride to Lindsay. Shorter rides at 160 km and 130 km distances. 8:30am4pm, meet at McCowan Station. www.tbn.ca Never too Late to Ride a Bike: Balance and Core Strength Training - Join Whole Self Fitness to learn the foundations of building core strength and balance. For beginners to older adults. 12-1pm, Christie Pits Park. www.wholeself.ca Bike the Park - Bike ride and scavenger hunt for families in High Park. Solve clues and learn about the history of High Park. Hosted by Cycle Toronto Wards 13 & 14. 2-4pm, meet at Grenadier Restaurant www.bikemonth.ca/events MONDAY JUNE 9 Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels - Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4-6pm, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca TUESDAY JUNE 10 Bike Month station powered by Ontario By Bike - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with Ontario By Bike. 5-8pm, Boulton Dr. Parkette at Poplar Plains Rd. www.bikemonth.ca/events WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 The Bicycle Polka Ride - Cycle the streets of west Toronto while listening to polka-inspired music and finish at a pub. Hosted by Cycle Toronto Wards 14 & 18. 7:15-11pm, meet at Dufferin Grove Park www.bikemonth.ca/events THURSDAY JUNE 12 Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels - Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4-6pm, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca MEC Toronto Bike Maintenance 101 - Learn the ABCs of bike maintenance in this hour long free clinic. 6-7pm, 400 King St W. www.mec.ca SATURDAY JUNE 14 Custard Tart Ride - Join Cycle Toronto Ward 18 & Safe Streets 17 for a delicious bike tour of the best Portuguese bakeries in Davenport. 10am12pm, meet at 1554 Dundas St. W. www.bikemonth.ca/events Pedal Pushin’ - Community Centre 55 hosts a family friendly bike scavenger hunt for families through St. John’s Norway Cemetery followed by a BBQ. 10am-12pm. St. John the Baptist Norway Church, 256 Kingston Rd. nancy@centre55.com SUNDAY JUNE 15 Cyclefare at the Leslieville Farmers’ Market - Buy your baguette by bike! Featuring: bike wash, used bike drive for Charlie’s FreeWheels, and tasty treats from two-wheeled food vendors. 9am-2pm, Jonathan Ashbridge Park. www.leslievillemarket.com Bites on Bikes - Cycle through Ward 13’s villages to collect your lunchables for a family friendly picnic at the lake. Hosted by Cycle Toronto Ward 13. 11am-1pm, meet at Grenadier Restaurant parking lot. www.bikemonth.ca/events Father’s Day Bike Tune-Up Dads are invited to fix up their children’s bikes at Charlie’s FreeWheels! 1-4pm, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca Downtown Explorer Tour, Toronto Ride Guide Launch - Visiting the city? See Toronto like a local on this special guided tour by Toronto Bicycle Tours. 1-3:30pm, 275 Dundas St. W. www.ontariobybike.ca & www.torontobicycletours.com TUESDAY JUNE 17 Bike Month station powered by Sweet Pete’s Bike Shop - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with Sweet Pete’s Bike Shop. 5–8pm, Prince Edward Viaduct Parkette at Castle Frank Station. www.bikemonth.ca/events

WEDNESDAY JUNE 18 MEC Toronto Bike Maintenance 101 - Learn the ABCs of bike maintenance in this hour long free clinic. 12-1pm, 400 King St W. www.mec.ca Pedals & Patios - Use your pedals after work and visit a few of the favourite patios in Ward 13. 6pm - 8pm. Hosted by Cycle Toronto Ward 13, location TBD. www.bikemonth.ca/events THURSDAY JUNE 19 Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels - Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4-6pm, 242.5 Queen St E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca FRIDAY JUNE 20 Ladies Army 6 International Women’s Bike Polo Tournament - 32 women & trans bike polo teams from around the world battling for the global championship! Fri 9am-Sun 1pm, Dufferin Grove Park www.bikepolo.to SATURDAY JUNE 21 Cycle for Sight - A fully supported, one-day cycling event in support of the Foundation Fighting Blindness. 7am-6pm, Black Creek Pioneer Village, Jane St. & Steeles Ave. W. www.cycleforsight.ca ECO-WHEELS SHOW 2014 - Presented by CAA South Central Ontario. Come “Look, Touch, Ride” eco-friendly transportation. 11am-7pm, Mel Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge St. www.eco-wheelsshow.com The Beltline and Beyond - Did you know that you can cycle a 16km loop almost entirely off road right in the middle of Toronto? Join Cycle Toronto Midtown to explore this treasure. 1-3:30pm, meet at Ben Nobleman Park. www.janeswalk.org The Junction Summer Solstice Festival - Celebrate the longest day of the year by biking up the West Toronto Railpath to enjoy a day of art, music, bike-tune up, outdoor cinema and more. 12pm-12am, 2859 Dundas St. W. www.thejunctionbia.ca Table & Tech at the Leslieville Tree Festival - Free bike safety checks and info from Ward 30 Bikes members. 12-4pm, Leslie Grove Park. www.bikemonth.ca/events SUNDAY JUNE 22 Evergreen Bike Works Bike Festival - Bike Works will be hosting a Community Bike Festival! 10am-1pm, Evergreen Bick Works. www.evergreen.ca Ward 21 Social Ride - Join us on a family-friendly ride through Ward 21. We will tour smaller streets and laneways to discover hidden gems, and end at Dutch Dreams. 2-4pm, meet at Wynchwood Artscape Barns www.bikemonth.ca/events MONDAY JUNE 23 Drop-in Hours for YOUTH at Charlie’s FreeWheels - Come to Charlie’s to tune-up, change tubes or make adjustments to your bike yourself. 4-6pm, 242.5 Queen St. E. www.charliesfreewheels.ca How Change Happens: making our voices heard at City Hall and Queen’s Park - A CultureLink Bike Host event with lawyer Patrick Brown and Cycle Toronto. Discuss and learn about effective civic engagement. 6:30-8:30pm, Lillian H. Smith Library, 239 College St. www.culturelink.ca TUESDAY JUNE 24 Bike Month station powered by Tangerine - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with Tangerine. 5-8pm, location TBA. www.bikemonth.ca/events WEDNESDAY JUNE 25 Cycle Toronto Bike Month Wrap Party – Join Cycle Toronto for a relaxed night of socializing and good times - everyone welcome. Location to be announced. www.bikemonth.ca/events THURSDAY JUNE 26 MEC Toronto Bike Maintenance 101 - Learn the ABCs of bike maintenance in this hour long free clinic. 6-7pm, 400 King St W. www.mec.ca

EVERY WEEK: MAY 26-JUNE 26

ONGOING 7th Annual Tour de Dufflet - Eat more cake, Ride more bike! Get exercise and something sweet by cycling to all three Dufflet cafes in one day. Every Tues to Sat. 10am-7pm and Sun. 12-5pm. All proceeds go to Cycle Toronto. www.dufflet.com MONDAYS Pedalheads® Bike Camps for Kids! From training wheels to trails, instructional bike safety and skills program for kids 2-12. Various times & locations. www.pedalheads.com TUESDAYS Sweet Pete’s Mountain Bike Group Ride - Bias-free, fun and social mountain bike group ride hosted by Sweet Pete’s Bike Shop. 79pm, Evergreen Brick Works www.sweetpetes.com

Bike Month stations - Drop by the Cycle Toronto tent on your ride home from work for refreshments and goodies we’ll be handing out with our Bike Month partners. Various locations. www.bikemonth.ca/events WEDNESDAYS Sweet Pete’s Group Road Ride - Bias-free, fun and social road bike group ride hosted by Sweet Pete’s Bike Shop. 6- 8pm, 1204 Bloor St W www.sweetpetes.com FRIDAYS Free Coffee Fridays - Ride your bike to the Tangerine Cafe every Friday in Bike Month for a free cup of coffee or tea! 9am–6pm, 221 Yonge St. www.tangerine.ca

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events œcontinued from page 20

guides to people with disabilities. Registration from 10 am, walk starts 11 am. Pledges. JC Saddington Park, 53 Lake (Mississauga). Preregister dogguides.com/purinawalk.html. 5Psychic Brunch (Rainbow Assoc of Canadian Artists) Psychic reading and brunch. 11 am-3 pm. $29. The Flying Beaver Pubaret, 488 Parliament. psychicbrunch.ca. Telling Tales Out Of School (People for Education) Performances by Caroline Rhea, the Darcys and others, auctions and more. 6:30 pm. $125. CBC Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front W. 416-534-0100, peopleforeducation.ca/tt. rWalk With Israel (United Jewish Appeal) Fundraising walk, kick-off party, entertainment and more. 9 am. Donation. Coronation Park, Lake Shore E of Strachan. ­walkwithisrael.com. World Partnership Walk (Aga Khan Fdn) Walk to help end global poverty. 10 am-3 pm. Donation. Metro Hall, David Pecaut Square, 55 John. worldpartnershipwalk.com.

Events

BrBike With Mike Join Councillor Mike Layton at a community cycling celebration. Noon-5 pm. Free. Christie Pits, Bloor and Christie. 416-392-4009, mikelayton.to. Birthday Pop-Up Sunday market featuring

local vendors and DJs. Noon-5 pm. Free. Le Dolci, 1006 Dundas W. 416-262-3400.

5Forbidden Love: The Unashamed Stories Of Lesbian Lives Re-launch of Lynne Fernie

and Aerlyn Weissman’s 1992 film, followed by an artists’ talk with feminist film critic B Ruby Rich and the directors, moderated by NOW Magazine’s Susan G Cole. 4:30 pm. $13. TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King W. insideout.ca. Guild Park: Where Art Meets Nature Heritage Toronto walk. 10 am, noon, 2 & 4 pm. Free/pwyc. Location provided upon registration. Pre-register heritagetoronto.org. The Magic Of Nature Gnostic Cultural Centre talk. 3 pm. Free. North York Central Library, 5120 Yonge. torontopubliclibrary.ca.

Preserving Landscape And Cultural Heritage In Italy: A Long History A New Challenge Lecture by Italian art historian Salvatore

Settis. 11 am. Free. Italian Cultural Institute, 496 Huron. 416-921-3802. Seedling Sunday A seed swap, plants and info on gradening in the city. Free. Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. ­harbourfrontcentre.com. Spring Photographica Fair Antique, classic and modern cameras, images, accessories and more. 10 am-3 pm. $7. Soccer Centre, 7601 Martin Grove. phsc.ca. Sustainable Urban Beekeeping Day Presentations on urban beekeeping for novices. 10 am-5 pm. $20/presentation, 2 for $35, full day $50. Bento Miso, 862 Richmond W. Pre-register bentomiso.com/events.

Need some advice?

Toronto Indie Arts Market Small Press & Literary Festival Books, magazines, comic,

Monday, May 26

ours, prints and key influences in womenswear, menswear and accessories. 6 pm. $60. Toronto Fashion Incubator, 285 Manitoba. fashionincubator.com. True Happiness And How To Attain It Buddhist seminar. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Lillian H Smith Library, 239 College. sgicanada.org.

BBike To Work Day Group Commute & Pancake Breakfast Ride with hundreds of

Tuesday, May 27

zines, chapbooks and more. 10:30 am-4:30 pm. $5. Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen W. ­facebook.com/torontoindieartsmarket.

cyclists to Nathan Phillips Square for a free breakfast. Various start times from 7 am, breakfast 8-9 am. See website for details. bikemonth.ca. David Lynch In Nayman’s Terms Film clips and lecture by critic Adam Nayman. 7 pm. $12, stu $6. Miles Nadal JCC, 750 Spadina. mnjcc. org. Giving Great Head Workshop. 7 pm. $33. Good for Her, 175 Harbord. Pre-register 416588-0900, goodforher.com. Mo Mondays Motivational event that’s a cross between open-mic comedy and TED talks. 5:30-9 pm. $20, adv $10. Hard Rock Café, 279 Yonge. momondays.com/toronto.

Neoliberalism And Politics: Reflections On The Recent Elections In India Talk by South Asian scholar Prabhat Patnaik. 7 pm. Free. Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham. beitzatoun.org.

Opportunity Cost Of Capital And Marxian Values Occupy Economics workshop. 6:308:30 pm. Free. Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil. dix@occupyeconomics.ca. Trend Forecasting Seminar Discover col-

Find out what’s written in the stars, page 25. Rob Brezsny’s Free Will

Astrology

Benefits

Laughing With Bond (Bond Child & Family Development) Benefit performance of the Second City’s latest sketch revue, Sixteen Scandals. 8 pm. $40. Second City, 51 Mercer. bcfdsecondcity2014.eventbrite.com.

Events

Breakthrough Designers Paul Rowan moderates a panel of young designers exploring success and recognition. 7 pm. $15. Bata Shoe Museum, 327 Bloor W. Pre-register 416-9797799, batashoemuseum.ca. Geek Poetry Slam Spoken word competition focusing on all things geeky. 7:30 pm. $5. The Boat, 158 Augusta. torontopoetryslam.com. Housing Co-Op Info Session Get details on Dufferin Grove Housing Co-op. 7 pm. Free. McCormick Community Centre, 66 Sheridan. dufferingrove.com. 100 In 1 Day Pre-festival workshop on citizendriven action for a better city. 6-8 pm. Free. Ted Rogers School of Management, rm 1-003, 55 Dundas W. 100in1day.ca/toronto. CThrough The Body Panel discussion with artist Jin Hua and curators Yan Zhou and Matt Brower. 6 pm. Free. UTAC, 15 King’s College Circle. scotiabankcontactphoto.com.

Wednesday, May 28

Benefits

Gala Dinner (Daughters for Life Fdn) Fundraiser for scholarship awards. 6 pm. $300. Carlu, 444 Yonge. daughtersforlife.com. Kelley Armstrong/Wayne Johnston/Elizabeth Hay/Anne Michaels (World Literacy

Canada) Reading and talking about their work. Doors 6:30 pm. $60. Park Hyatt Toronto, 4 Avenue. 416-977-0008, worldlit.ca.

Events

The Annex Guided ROM walk. 6 pm. Free.

West corner of ROM on Bloor (just west of

Avenue­Road). rom.on.ca. Beerworking Evening of beer education, tasting and networking. 6:30-9 pm. $25. Owl, 20 Camden. picatic.com/ event/13948016042430. Community History Project Talk on producing a family website for the Tollkeeper’s Cottage. 7 pm. $10. Tollkeepr’s Cottage Museum, 750 Davenport. tollkeeperscottage.ca. Costumed Life Drawing Life drawing with a 50-foot-woman theme. 7 pm. $5. Round, 152A Augusta. 416-451-6346. Doc Now Festival Launch The documentary media festival kicks off with a panel discussion on the future of Canadian documentary. 6 pm. Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge. docnow.ca.

From Self Care To Collective Empowerment Workshop on science, spirit and action.

6:30-8:30 pm. $20 or pwyc. Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham. beitzatoun.org. Gardening In The Shade Swansea Horticultural Soc talk. 7:30 pm. Free. Swansea Town Hall, 95 Lavinia. gardenontario.org. 5Generations Of Queer Tour the exhibition with professor Andrea Fatona. 6:30 pm. Free. Onsite @ OCAD University, 230 Richmond W. ocadu.ca/onsite. Last Wednesdays Art-focused events at the galleries and shops happen the last Wed of the month. 5-8 pm. Free. 401 Richmond W. 401richmond.net. Meditation Class for the experienced or for those who can’t sit still. 7 pm. Free. Ralph Thornton Centre, 765 Queen E. ­ ralphthornton.org.

New Music 101: Soundstreams And Spectrum Music Presentation with demos and

performance. 7 pm. Free. Fort York Library, 190 Fort York Blvd. musicgalleryorg. CSam Sciarrino The artist talks about his portrait and wedding photography. 6:30 pm. Free. St Paul’s United Church Cody Hall, 227 Bloor E. scotiabankcontactphoto.com.

Single Dads, Separated Dads, Divorced Dads Q&A and support group meeting. 7 pm. Free. Eastminster United Church, 310 Danforth. 416-861-0626. The Walrus Talks Water Lake Ontario Waterkeeper’s Mark Mattson, filmmaker Katarina Soukup, author Chris Wood and others discuss our relationship to water. 7 pm. $20, stu $12. Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles W. walrustalkswatertoronto.eventbrite.ca.

Why Aren’t Ward And June Cleaver My Parents? Author Pearl Goodman talks about

the immigrant experience, American pop culture and the search for one’s own identity. 2 pm. Free. Barbara Frum Library, 40 Orchard View. 416-395-5440.

upcoming

Thursday, May 29

Benefits

Funny Girls And Dynamic Divas (Sistering) Performances by Debra Di Giovanni, Cheri Maracle, Jane Bunnett and others plus a silent auction. 6:30 pm. $80. Jane Mallett Theatre, 27 Front E. 416-366-7723, sistering. org. Mad Libs Story Battle (Story Planet) Fundraising gala with celebrity judges, craft beer, a silent auction and more. 7-11 pm. $100. Mercer Union, 1286 Bloor W. storyplanet.ca. Menstravaganza At The Revue (Femme Int’l) An evening of menstruation-themed cinema and a panel discussion about periods in global culture. 7 pm. $10. Revue Cinema, 400 Roncesvalles. 416-531-9959.

Events

The Amazing Universe Presentation on alien worlds, cosmic catastrophes and more. 7 pm. Free. Spadina Road Library, 10 Spadina Rd. ­torontopubliclibrary.ca. Coffee & Co-Ops Brewing, Tasting And Learning Seminar with coffee expert Elijah Lederman. 7 pm. Free. Big Carrot, 348 Danforth. 416-466-2129.

Let’s Grow Food: Transplanting And Direct Seeding Workshop. 5:30-8:30 pm. $75 (sliding scale avail). FoodShare, 90 Croatia. Pre-register 416-363-6441 ext 247, angela@ foodshare.net.

Movers & Shakers, Community Makers: Our Activist Neighbourhood Presenta-

tions and discussion of the Riverdale community’s history of social action. 7 pm. Free. Ralph Thornton Centre, 765 Queen E. ­ralphthornton.org.

Silent Partners: Sustainable Architec-

ture Lecture Conservation Council of Ontario presentation by Green-Deck-City architect Loghman Azar. 6-9 pm. Free. Centre for Social Innovation, 215 Spadina. Pre-register 416-533-1635. 

3

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may 22-28 2014 NOW


life&style

5

style notes

take

The week’s news, views and sales BLING ON A BUDGET

Accessories: so cute, but often so expensive. Give your wallet a break and check out local designer Jenny Bird’s sample sale Friday (May 23) from noon to 7 pm and Saturday (May 24) from 10 am to 6 pm at Strada 241 (241 Spadina). Droolworthy necklaces, cuffs, rings, handbags and more at 50 to 70 per cent off retail prices.

1

By SABRINA MADDEAUX

Miraculous moisturizers

Forget goopy chemical-laced creams and sticky synthetic serums. Lighten up your beauty routine for spring with products that boast nature’s best oils.

2

1. Pure + Simple Organic Bringraj Hair Oil with jojoba seed oil, olive oil, coconut oil, grapefruit oil and more ($24.95, 41 Avenue Road, 416-924-6555, and others, pureandsimple.ca)

3

2. Kosmea Purifying Cream Cleanser with Australian avocado oil and sesame oil ($34.99, Abundance Naturally, abundancenaturally.com)

YOGA FOR YUPPIES

3. OGX Coconut Water shampoo with coconut oil ($9.99, Shoppers Drug Mart, 388 King West, 416-597-6550, and others, shoppersdrugmart.ca) 4. Leaves of Trees Orange Blossom Argan Oil ($100 for 100 ml, Innate Wellness, 163 Dupont, 647-340-7575, innatewellness.ca)

DAVID HAWE

Why downward dog in any old studio when you can stretch and strengthen in the luxury of the Ritz-Carlton (181 Wellington West, 416585-2500, ritzcarlton. com/toronto)? WWE Hall-of-Famer Trish Stratus hosts a Stratusphere Yoga pop-up at the hotel until May 31. Top instructors from the Vaughan studio teach the classes designed by Stratus, which feature a combo of strength training and yoga flow. Visit stratussphereyoga.com/ ritz for details and to book a class.

5. Leaves of Trees Grapefruit Tangerine Scrub with argan oil ($11 for 50 ml, 177 Queen East, 647-889-7664, leavesoftrees.com)

INTO THE CLOSET Your closet’s about to receive a massive influx of killer Canadian clothing after you shop the Designer Sample Clearance sale at the Liberty Market Building (171 East Liberty, suite 113). Men and women’s clothing, shoes and accessories from the likes of Andrew Majtenyi, Caitlin Power, Krane Design, Jessica Jensen, Philip Sparks, Sentaler and more await you. The sale runs Thursday (May 22) from 4 to 8 pm, Friday (May 23) from 11 am to 8 pm and Saturday (May 24) from 11 am to 5 pm. Race you there! 3

5

4

wewant…

NIKE SUNSET PRINTED LEGGINGS May kicks off marathon season in Toronto and, whether you can run for days or are crawling toward your first 5K, it never hurts to motivate yourself with some stylish fitness gear. Nike’s been killing it lately with their artsy printed leggings that can go from street to… well, running in the street. These Sunset printed leggings are perfect for training on cool spring days; their stretch fabric and flat seams make them hella comfortable and minimize chafing. $75, Nike Store, 220 Yonge, 416-591-0325, nike.com NOW MAY 22-28 2014

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Michael Watier

store of the week

MenEssentials 412 Danforth, 1-800-833-1055, ­menessentials.ca

When it comes to beauty products, ­retail options for women are almost endless. From big-box behemoths like Sephora to eco-minded boutiques like Queen East’s new Leaves of Trees, there’s almost too

much choice. When it comes to men’s grooming (“beauty” apparently not being a masculine enough term), things get a little more dicey for those wanting to venture beyond the Old Spices and Axes of the world. Enter MenEssentials, a locally owned shop that offers over 1,800 grooming products – none of them the mass brands you see in drugstores.

The Danforth store celebrates its first anniversary this month. Stock that includes international luxury brands like Floris and Penhaligon’s as well as Canadian favourites Elvado, Schaf and Urban Beard has garnered the shop a cult-like following, aided in part by the staff’s enthusiasm for guiding men through the ins and outs of a good grooming regimen. MenEssentials picks: Kogi Naturals Beer Soap ($5) is made in BC and uses Canadian beer as a chief ingredient. Not just a gimmick, the amino acids in beer are actually anti-bacterial and soften skin. Also check out Chiefs for Men Tobacco Man Wash ($35), which smells like sweet honey and sandalwood-scented tobacco, not cheap cigarettes. The wash is perfect for cottage Subscribe season because biodegradable, to it’s the which makes it safe for the septic system and environment. Look for: Schaf Skin Care Cleanse ($22), a locally made, all-natural Newsletter cleanser that’s eco-friendly and e­ffective. The latest in Hours: Tuesday-Wednesday and Sunfashion news, day 10 am to 6 pm, Thursday-Friday views & sales! 10 am to 9 pm, Saturday 10 am to 7 nowtoronto.com/newsletters pm. 3

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alt health

Get smart, love nature Time in green spaces is always a good thing By ELIZABETH BROMSTEIN Going camping this summer? You should. Research shows exposure to nature has a measurable positive impact on mental and physical health. It even makes you nicer and more generous. Is there anything trees can’t do? But what if you bring along your smartphone or some other device? Is the effect negated? Most Canadians are aware of the recent kerfuffle over Parks Canada’s decision to install WiFi in some areas of national parks. The announcement prompted a lot of anger and snide remarks about

people’s inability to restrain themselves from posting selfies on Facebook, suggesting that the combination of parks and digital media is anathema. I’m a bit confounded by the reaction. Those who want to be in nature unencumbered by technology can turn off their toys – and, yes, make their children do so as well – while those who want to live in the current era can do what they like. Also, it makes parks safer. Or am I kidding myself?

What the experts say “In our study of job satisfaction and quality of life, workers who had access to a window or a plant within view of their desks said they had a better quality of life and view of their job. The people with no window or plants were miserable. Females tended to be more drawn to windows, whereas males tended to be more drawn to plants. In our studies in classroom settings, students had better perceptions of the course and the instructor when there were plants and natural light. A survey of gardeners versus non-gardeners found that gardeners had better overall perceptions of quality of life and considered themselves healthier and happier. They also had better attitudes toward and knowledge of nutrition. We underestimate the value of nature and access to nature, how it can make you feel calmer and help deal with stress.” TINA CADE, professor of horticulture, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas “In urban England, we found that living in an area with a high level of green space made a quantifiable improvement in mental health, as measured using a standard scale called the General Health Questionnaire. In a second study we explored how people’s mental health changes if they move to a greener area. People who moved to greener areas had an immediate improvement in mental health that was sustained over the three years we followed them. This has potential implications for urban design policy: green spaces in urban areas may make a significant contribution to mental health, and that is a reason to preserve or increase access to them. The most obvious implication is that it must be good for people to get out into whatever green space is around them.” IAN ALCOCK, researcher, European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK “Because researchers have turned to this topic relatively recently, most of the evidence is correlative, not causal, but it tends to point in one direction: experiences in the natural world appear to offer great benefits to psychological and physical health, and the ability to learn for children and adults. When it comes to national parks and WiFi, I think we need a break from digital communication. Technology-fasting while spending time in the natural

world may be the most effective antidote to the downsides of the digital age. I believe that the more high-tech our lives become, the more nature we need. I have no problem with WiFi at national park centres, major hotels and facilities, but most national park areas should remain WiFi-free. I understand the safety argument, but cellphone coverage is probably adequate for that. We need to weigh other risks – including to our psychological and even physical health from never getting a break from non-stop electronic communications.” RICHARD LOUV, LOUV author, Last Child In The Woods and The Nature Principle, chair emeritus of the Children & Nature Network “Usually when we’re off with our family in a national park, it’s about maintaining and building a certain type of close bonding relationship with very specific people, and these technologies could pull people away from that experience, which is not good. But technology also opens up new opportunities for people to maintain distant relationships while in national parks, and could also instigate new opportunities for some people to use these spaces. Busy parents might feel more comfortable going to a park knowing they have access remotely.” KEITH HAMPTON, associate professor of communication, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey “Exposure to nature has several benefits. One is increased energy. Even a 10-minute walk has been shown to enhance vitality. The effect is increased if you get immersed in nature, looking around, experiencing it. So the smartphone would interfere, because then you are not ‘in’ nature. People appear to be kinder after nature immersion. Participants in our experiments who were shown nature scenes shared more money with others than those shown scenes of human artifacts. Also, people who have been out in nature show a shift toward more compassionate attitudes. The effects are well demonstrated and replicated but not fully understood. However, we know that in nature people are more ‘in touch’ with themselves, including with their values. More generally, nature is calming and tension-reducing.” RICHARD RYAN, professor of psychology, psychiatry and education, University of Rochester, New York

Got a question?

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astrology freewill

05 | 2 2

2014

by Rob Brezsny

ARIES Mar 21 | Apr 19 I believe your persuasive

powers will be stronger than usual in the weeks ahead. The words coming out of your mouth will sound especially interesting. I also suspect that your intelligence will get at least a temporary upgrade. The clarity of your thoughts will intensify. You will see truths you have been blind to in the past. Innovative solutions to long-running dilemmas are likely to occur to you. The only potential snag is that you might neglect to nurture your emotional riches. You could become a bit too dry and hard. But now that I’ve warned you of that possibility, let’s hope you will take steps to ensure it won’t happen.

TAURUS Apr 20 | May 20 If there was a Hall of

Fame for scientists, physicist Isaac Newton (16421727) would have been the charter member. He was like Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry were to rock and roll, like Babe Ruth was to baseball. The theory of gravity and the three laws of motion were his gifts to the world. He made major contributions to mathematics and optics and was a central figure in defining modern science. There is also a legend that he invented the cat door, inspired by his pet felines. Whether or not that’s true, it serves as an excellent metaphor for this horoscope. It’s an excellent time for you to apply your finest talents and highest intelligence to dream up small, mundane but practical innovations.

GEMINI May 21 | Jun 20 During the next 12

months you will have exceptional opportunities to soak up knowledge, add to your skill set and get the training you need to pursue interesting kinds of success in the coming six to eight years. What’s the best way to prepare? Develop an exciting new plan for your future education. To get in the mood, try the following: make a list of your most promising but still unripe potentials; meditate on the subjects that evoke your greatest curiosity; brainstorm about what kinds of experiences would give you more control over your destiny; and study three people you know who have improved their lives by taking aggressive steps to enhance their proficiency.

CANCER Jun 21 | Jul 22 The moon shows us a different phase every 24 hours, which makes it seem changeable. But in fact, not much actually happens on the moon. It has no atmosphere, no weather, no wind, no plant life, no seasons. There is some water, but it’s all frozen. Is there anything like this in your own life, Cancerian? Something that on the surface of things seems to be in constant motion but whose underlying state never actually shifts or develops? According to my analysis, now would be an excellent time for you to revise the way you understand this part of your world and then update your relationship with it. LEO Jul 23 | Aug 22 Have you thought of organizing a crowdfunding campaign to boost your pet project or labour of love? I suggest you get serious about it in the next four weeks. This coming phase of your cycle will be a favourable time to expand your audience, attract new allies and build a buzz. You will have a sixth sense about how to wield your personal charm to serve your long-term goals. More than usual, your selfish interests will dovetail with the greater good – perhaps in unexpected ways.

VIRGO Aug 23 | Sep 22 Years ago I had a Virgo

friend who was a talented singer. She had technical skill, stylistic flair and animal magnetism, making her worthy of being a lead vocalist in almost any great band. And yet when she was asleep and had dreams of performing, she often found herself standing in the shadows, barely visible and singing tentatively while her backup singers hogged the spotlight at centre stage. Moral of the story: some of you Virgos are shy about claiming your full authority. It doesn’t always come easy for you to shine your light and radiate your power. And yet you can most definitely learn to do so. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in this direction.

LIBRA Sep 23 | Oct 22 “There is always an enormous temptation in all of life,” writes Annie Dillard, “to diddle around making itsy-bitsy friends and meals and journeys for itsy-bitsy years on end.... I won’t have it. The world is wider than that in all directions, more dangerous and bitter, more extravagant and bright.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Libra, is to transcend whatever is itsy-bitsy about your life. The alternative? Head toward the frontier and drum up experiences that will thrill your heart and blow your mind. SCORPIO Oct 23 | Nov 21 “We are all searching for

someone whose demons play well with ours,” writes novelist Heidi R. Kling. That’s good advice for you to keep in mind these days, Scorpio. Those little imps and rascals that live within you may get you into bad trouble if they feel bored. But if you arrange for them to have play dates with the imps and rascals of people you trust, they are far more likely to get you into good trouble. They may even provide you with bits of gritty inspiration. What’s that you say? You don’t have any demons? Not true. Everyone has them.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 22 | Dec 21 “When people tell

you who they are, believe them,” writes blogger Maria Popova (Brainpickings.org). “Just as importantly, however, when people try to tell you who you are, don’t believe them.” Those suggestions are especially crucial for you to keep in mind these days. You are entering a phase when your best relationships will be up for review and revision and revitalization. To foster an environment in which intimacy will thrive, you’ve got to be extra receptive, curious, tolerant and tender. That’s all! Not hard, right? A good place to start is to proceed as if your allies know who they are better than you do – even as you ask them to return the favour.

CAPRICORN Dec 22 | Jan 19 “Kludge” (pronounced klooj) is a slang word that refers to a clumsy but effective fix for an engineering problem. It’s a cobbled-together solution that works fine, at least temporarily, even though it is inelegant or seems farfetched. Let’s use this concept in a metaphorical way to apply to you. I’m guessing that you will be a kludge master in the coming days. You will be skilled at making the best of mediocre situations. You may have surprising success at doing things that don’t come naturally, and I bet you will find unexpected ways to correct glitches that no one else has any idea about how to fix. AQUARIUS Jan 20 | Feb 18 I hesitate to compare

you to your fellow Aquarian Kim Jong-il. When he was alive and ruling North Korea, he was an egomaniacal tyrant. You’re definitely not that. But there are certain descriptions of him in his official biography that remind me of the kinds of powers you may soon exhibit. He was called The Great Sun of Life and Highest Incarnation of Revolutionary Comradely Love, for instance. Titles like that might suit you. It is said that he invented the hamburger. He could command rain to fall from the sky. He once shot 11 holes-in-one in a single round of golf, was a master of gliding down waterslides and never had to use a toilet because he produced no waste. You may be able to express comparable feats in the coming weeks. (Do it without falling prey to excessive pride, okay?)

PISCES Feb 19| Mar 20 Even if you had a sensitive,

nurturing mommy when you were growing up, and even if she continues to play an important role in your life, now would be a good time to learn how to mother yourself better. You are finally ready to appreciate how important it is to be your own primary caregiver. And I’m hoping you are no longer resistant to or embarrassed about the idea that part of you is still like a child who needs unconditional love 24/7. So get started! Treat yourself with the expert tenderness that a crafty maternal goddess would provide.

Homework: Name a beautiful thing you were never capable of doing until this past year. freewillastrology.com NOW MAY 22-28 2014

25


ecoholic

When you’re addicted to the planet By ADRIA VASIL

GO WITH THE FLOW: WATER FILTERS

TE S T LAB

Plain unfiltered tap water has the smallest eco footprint. But the Silent Spring Institute just released a report on breast cancer and toxins (see story) that recommended, among other precautions, a good water filter. So what, exactly, qualifies as good?

ecoholic pick

PITCHER/GRANULATED CARBON Your least expensive level of protection. Most rely on granular activated carbon, which is quite effective at getting rid of trace pharmaceuticals in water but not good enough at reducing lead to meet certifier standards. A basic Brita pitcher is certified to reduce “cadmium, chlorine, copper, mercury, taste/odour, zinc.” Mavea is also certified against perc (the dry cleaning chem). Santevia isn’t certified but says it also alkalizes. Only one pitcher in Canada is certified to reduce lead, chromium, chlorine and other heavy metals: ZeroWater. SCORE: NN

DISTILLED This energy-intensive filtration system basically vaporizes water, then ­captures the steam. It’s top-notch at killing bacteria and viruses (useful in rural settings with no municipal water treatment), but it also strips all the beneficial minerals out of water, which explains why the World Health Organization advises against it. It doesn’t remove chlorine or chlorine disinfection by-products like chloroform, hence why distillers often also run water through a c­ arbon block filter. SCORE: NN

nature notes

GREENWASH OF THE WEEK

Scientists call out common chems linked to breast cancer

VASELINE SPRAY & GO

Looking for a quick spritz of moisture before publicly baring your limbs? The green bottle with the aloe leaf may lead you to believe you’re misting yourself with succulents. Flip over to scan the ­ingredient list and, lo and behold, aloe is eighth – ­behind a couple of petrochemicals and just ahead of propyl parabens, which are on the EU’s list of ­endocrine disruptors. On the bright side: ­compressed air does the spritzing rather than an environmentally contentious aerosol.

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ULTRAVIOLET Zapping untreated water with UV light is another great way to kill off bacteria. In fact, the city of Toronto voted to treat wastewater at Ashbridges Bay with UV a few years ago to eliminate carcinogenic chlorine disinfection byproducts. But to be honest, urban households getting treated tap water needn’t bother getting a system that includes UV. It’s largely a waste of electricity for urban home use, so we’re docking points. SCORE: NN

416.533.4664

www.goodcatch.ca

Are chemicals in our environment ­connected to the rise in non-genetic causes of breast cancer? For lots of us following environmental toxin news, it seems like a no-brainer, but scientists are still trying to firm up the connections. A new study by the Silent Spring Institute and Harvard School of Public Health published in the journal Envi­ronmental Health Perspectives notes that exposure to chemicals that cause mammary gland tumours in rats is common, but “few studies have evaluated potential breast cancer risks in humans.” In the studies that have been done, researchers found that chems that cause tumours in rats are often associated with breast cancer in women. The scientists eventually narrowed the list from 216 chems known to cause breast tumours in rodents to 17 common groups of chemicals that should be “top targets for breast ­cancer prevention.” On the list are substances found in gasoline/diesel fuel, flame retardants,

REVERSE OSMOSIS A long-time fave in the holistic community, since RO systems get rid of a lot of stuff not tackled by carbon filters, like fluoride, arsenic, bacteria and hexavalent chromium (made famous by Erin Brockovich). It also strips mineral content and doesn’t inherently get rid of chlorine or volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Not all RO filters are created equal – some do more than others. (See ewg.org’s water filter guide.) Where it loses points is waste: an RO system dumps three to 20 times more water than what it sends out of the tap. Probe before you buy. SCORE: NNN

CARBON BLOCK These super-condensed carbon filters are the type recommended by the ­Silent Spring breast cancer report (see sidebar). They won’t remove fluoride (gotta combine it with reverse osmosis or alumina for that) or hex chromium, but are great for chlorine, lead, other heavy metals and a long list of VOCs. They don’t take extra energy or water to run, making them inherently greener. Shaklee makes a carbon block pitcher, though it’s certified to reduce less. Quality varies among countertop, faucet-mounted and under-sink versions. (See ewg.org’s filter guide.) SCORE: NNNN

stain-resistant fabrics, paint strippers and (gulp) disinfection by-products of chlorinated drinking water. The list goes on. The study makes it clear that more research is definitely needed. Silent Spring’s goal was to identify high-priority toxins for further research and biomarkers for these toxins in women. While scientists continue to learn more about these chemicals, the authors of this latest study say there’s enough i­ nformation to begin reducing our ­exposures. On that note, here’s the Silent Spring Institute’s list of the most ­effective strategies: • Avoid fuel and exhaust: Turn the engine off instead of idling. Give up gaspowered mowers and leaf blowers. Walk or take transit when you can. Don’t store gasoline in your home. • Quit smoking, and avoid secondhand smoke. • Limit consumption of carcinogens in charred foods and use ventilation fans when cooking. ­­ • Go to perc-free dry cleaners or ask for “wet cleaning.” • Avoid stain-resistant rugs, furniture and fabrics. • Don’t buy furniture with polyure­ thane foam, or ask for foam not treated with flame retardants. • Make sure you’re protected from toxins on the job. Push for good venti-

lation and protective equipment. • Reduce exposure to chemicals in household dust by removing shoes at the door, using a vacuum with a HEPA filter and cleaning with wet rags and mops. • Use a solid carbon block filter for drinking water.

BANS ON TRICLOSAN The same week European scientists published evidence that antibacterial triclosan damages human sperm, ­Minnesota became the first U.S. state to ban the environmental toxin from soaps and cleaners. The ban comes into force in 2017. More cause for celebration: this month Avon announced it would remove triclosan from its products. Procter & Gamble and J&J’s bans kick in over the next year or so. ­Colgate-​Palmolive is removing triclosan from all products except Colgate Total toothpaste. Meanwhile, we’re still waiting for Health Canada to make its final announcement on ­triclosan’s ­toxicity. ecoholic@nowtoronto.com | @ecoholicnation

Get your copy of Adria Vasil’s latest book, Ecoholic Body: Your Ultimate Earth-Friendly Guide To Living Healthy And Looking Good – in bookstores everywhere!


So you want

class action

a career in business

Three diverse professionals recount how they parlayed business courses into surprising careers By KEVIN RITCHIE

Lily Wong Co-founder, Rose Athena

My MBA helped expand my personal skills, but more importantly, it transformed the way I think and helped me see various angles.

Tanja-Tiziana Burdi

Rose Athena is an e-boutique that allows women to design dresses tailored to what they like and to purchase them online, cutting out the middle man. My undergraduate degree is from the University of Waterloo. I studied biochemistry with a specialization in biotechnology. After a few years working in the life sciences field, I did my MBA at the Schulich School of Business at York University, where I specialized in strategy and non-profit management leadership. I was thinking, “Should I do a master’s in science or in a broader area so I can move up to a management level?” After a few chats with those close to me, I decided to do an MBA. Since I came from a science background, it helped expand my interpersonal skills, but more importantly, it transformed the way I think and helped me see various angles. That crosses over as well with science, because in research you always have to think outside the box. I found the entrepreneur class at Schulich particularly interesting. My business started when a high school friend and I were sitting and talking at a Starbucks – very clichéd, I know. It was summer, so we had functions to go to, weddings and other formal events, and couldn’t find dresses we liked in terms of necklines, sleeve length, colours or fabric. When we looked into it, we realized there were no websites for women where they could customize their own dresses, so we decided to start that business ourselves. With an MBA, you become more of a generalist, someone who knows a lot of subjects but may not be an expert in all fields. I learned how to identify the different strengths in those working around me so I’m better able to utilize their talents, as well as increase productivity in my business. People from a science background always have that research mindset. “What’s better that’s out there? What have other people done?” You can try to pull in two different concepts and put them together. A science background helps in terms of being analytical. The biggest challenge on the job is managing time. You often have to meet people and do things for the company outside regular working hours, which can be fun but cuts into your personal time. Your business really has to be something that doesn’t seem like a chore or you won’t have a life. Good entrepreneurs should be flexible about their ideas and what they’re working on. Your goals are always going to be a moving target with different outcomes, so you have to have a plan B. Coming out of an MBA program and often having type-A personalities, entrepreneurs can be very controlling, but you have to be flexible as well as in control.

NOW May 22-28 2014

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CLASS action : Business

Spently

way to customize those receipts with logos, branding, ads and social links – that type of thing – to engage and extend the customer experience. As a technology start-up, I have to wear many different hats, from carrying out the vision and the product to managing my team, handling and raising finances, driving sales and talking

Now I’m pitching to investors and at events, so I’ve carried those hard skills into start-up life. That’s the main difference from MBA programs, which are very theory-based, is that Humber is very hands-on. We had lots of interaction with different entrepreneurs and field trips. The best part about running a startup is creating something from nothing. The highs are extremely high and the lows extremely low. Dealing with those highs and lows has been a great experience for me personally. I don’t think anything can prepare you for that; you just have to go in and do it. But school did prepare me to critically think about things and execute a plan.   3

business program, a double major between environmental studies and business. In high school I took an environmental studies course and instantly knew I wanted to pursue a career in that field. Our teacher talked about how important it is to sell an environmental initiative. There are a lot of schools of thought out there, and people have very different lenses when it comes to the environment and environmental protection – to some it doesn’t matter and to others it does. So it’s very helpful and valuable to

pitch an eco-friendly idea and prove there can be a good business case behind it. Instead of graduating with a BA, I got a bachelor of environmental studies, which I thought would set me apart. The job I have now is a perfect incorporation of environment and business because I’m working a lot with financials. And being able to put together that business case using all the information that I have from a numbers perspective is really important, but so is understanding what opportunities

In the Humber ­program, almost every project ended in a presentation. Now I’m pitching to ­investors and at events, so I’ve carried those hard skills into start-up life.

Nicholas Wiktorczyk Co-founder and CEO, My company, Spently, partners with retail, e-commerce and point-of-sale system companies to give them the ability to send e-receipts and transactional messages they can use as marketing tools. Most companies sending email receipts send them in plain text. They’re not interactive. We give merchants a

see things from different perspectives. That definitely helped in life and in entrepreneurship. After Western I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur, but I didn’t know exactly in what way. I stumbled upon Humber’s twoyear post-grad global business management program. I got into that to refine and broaden the business skills I learned at Western. While at Humber I won a contest for the idea of Spently – it was called Green Receipt at the time – with my co-founder, Vincent Panepinto. The $8,000 we won is not a lot of money for a tech company, but it gave us validation to pursue the idea and develop the technology. Our win was a pleasant surprise. Without that grant, I don’t think Spently would have gotten started. In our first year, we came up with the business plan and brought it to our program coordinator for feedback. He allowed us to pursue our business as part of our internship, so we learned what it takes to interact with the startup community in Toronto. In the Humber program, almost every project ended in a presentation.

to customers. I received my undergrad degree from the University of Western Ontario. I studied business but graduated with a major in philosophy. Balancing business, where you’re learning hard skills, and philosophy, which allows you to think creatively and critically and come up with ideas, allows you to

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Lesley Sovran

My job involves anything that is environmental operations-based at the store level. We take care of all 180 stores across Canada. We look at waste and recycling programs, hazardous materials and anything compliancerelated involving the Ministry of Environment and its requirements within our stores. Our team makes sure the stores are meeting the standard, doing a good job recycling and managing their programs as efficiently as they can. I went to the University of Waterloo, where I took the environment and

continued on page 30 œ


CONTINUE YOUR EDUCATION IN BUSINESS; EVENINGS, WEEKENDS, ON-CAMPUS,ONLINE, ON YOUR TIME.

This program will interest those who wish to acquire the technical, administrative and communication skills needed to succeed in today’s business environment in entry-level positions as receptionist, customer service representative, or administrative/office support service coordinator.

business.humber.ca/ce

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CLASS action : Business

where to study

Lesley Sovran œcontinued from page 28

are out there. My team works closely with our sustainability team, which is great because we can help drive the sustainability mandate of the company. My university education prepared me to walk in those shoes. Through the coop program I was able to get a foot in the door and build a network. I got experience in the public, private and nonprofit sectors, so I had a good idea of the benefits and challenges for each and a sense of ­ where I wanted my career to go. Our government has really diverged from a green economy to one that is very resource-focused. Unless you want to work in oil and gas or mining, which I was not at all interested in, finding a job in the environmental field can be a real challenge. When I came out of university, I was hired right

into one of my old co-op positions, working for Waterfront Toronto on their sustainability team. That was a very planning-focused job; we were looking at green buildings and green communities. I ended up getting a chance to travel for three months, so I backpacked through Asia. I really wanted to do it at that time, but when I came back, searching for a new job was really rough. A volunteer position working with someone teaching a contaminated sites management course led me to Home Depot. I put the volunteer work on my resumé, and those key words “contaminated and hazardous materials” ended up being the reason I got the interview at Home Depot. I did really well in the interview. It’s funny how these little experiences and connections can take you down a completely different path.  3

I have to be able to prove that there’s a good business case ­behind an eco-friendly idea. I work with financials, putting ­together that business case using all the information I have from a numbers perspective.

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CENTENNIAL COLLEGE (Toronto) Business; business administration: $3,558/ year. ­centennialcollege.ca CONESTOGA COLLEGE (Kitchener) Business; business administration – management; business foundations: $3,723/year. ­conestogac.on.ca DEGROOTE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/ MCMASTER­UNIVERSITY (Hamilton) Commerce: $9,290/year (plus fees); master of business administration: $10,407/ year. ­degroote.­mcmaster.ca DURHAM COLLEGE (Oshawa) Business fundamentals; office administration – business administration: $3,633/year; entrepreneurship and small business: $3,683/year. ­durhamcollege.ca FANSHAWE COLLEGE (London/Woodstock) Business; business – finance; business foundations: $1,875/term; entrepreneurship and management: $1,668/ term. ­fanshawec.ca GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE (Toronto) Bachelor of applied business degree: $7,473/year; business administration: $3,386/year; small business entrepreneurship: $3,689/year. g ­ eorgebrown.ca GEORGIAN COLLEGE (Barrie) Business administration; business: $4,058/term; entrepreneurship and small business management: $4,179/term. ­georgiancollege.ca

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IVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO (London) Honours business administration: $7,077-$23,948/year (plus fees); master of business administration: $79,500/program (plus fees). ivey.uwo.ca LAKEHEAD UNIVERSITY (Thunder Bay) Honours bachelor of commerce: $7,430/year; bachelor of administration: $6,578; master of business administration: $17,768/one year. l­akeheadu.ca LOYALIST COLLEGE (Belleville) Business/business administration; business sales and marketing: $3,659/year (plus fees). ­loyalistcollege.com ODETTE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR (Windsor) Business administration (Honours): $4,663/year; master of business admin-

istration: $5,122/year; master of management: $28,000/program (plus fees). ­uwindsor.ca/odette

QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY (Kingston) Commerce: $16,784/year (plus fees); master of business administration: $78,026/program. ­business.­queensu.ca ROTMAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT/ UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO (Toronto) Commerce: $14,280/year (plus fees); master of business administration: $87,532/program (plus fees). ­rotman.­utoronto.ca SCHULICH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/ YORK UNIVERSITY (Toronto) Bachelor of business administration; international bachelor of business administration: $8,429/year (plus fees); master of business administration; master of international business administration; master of public administration; executive MBA: $91,460/ two years. ­schulich.yorku.ca SENECA COLLEGE (Toronto) Business administration: $1,794/semester; business administration – entrepreneurship and small business: $1,789/semester; bachelor of commerce - management: $3,502/semester. ­senecac.on.ca SHERIDAN COLLEGE (Oakville) Business – general: $3,957/year (plus fees); bachelor of business administration – finance; bachelor of business administration – global business management: $7,667/year (plus fees). ­sheridancollege.ca SPROTT SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/ CARLETON UNIVERSITY (Ottawa) Bachelor of commerce: $4,083/term; master of business administration: $15,925/year. sprott.carleton.ca ST. LAWRENCE COLLEGE (Kingston) Bachelor of business administration: $5,864/year (plus fees); business: $3,361/year. ­stlawrencecollege.ca TED ROGERS SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT/RYERSON UNIVERSITY (Toronto) Business management: $5,401/ year; business technology management: $5,739/year; master of business administration; master of management of technology and innovation: $18,162/ year (plus fees). ­ryerson.ca/­ tedrogersschool TELFER SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT/ UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA (Ottawa) Commerce: $3,403/term (plus fees); master of business administration: $23,987/program (plus fees). ­telfer.­uottawa.ca UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH (Guelph) Commerce: $4,360/semester; master of business administration (distance ed): $9,228/semester. ­uoguelph.ca UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO (Waterloo) Accounting and financial management: $3,536/term; environment and business: $3,267/term; master of accounting: $6,954/term; master of business, entrepreneurship and technology: $10,336/term. ­uwaterloo.ca WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY (Waterloo) Honours bachelor of business administration: $5,874/term (plus fees); master of business administration; $8,817/term (plus fees). ­wlu.ca  3


David Laurence

food&drink Eggs-cellent brunch

Chef Léonie Lilla gets creative at the laid-back Farmer’s Daughter By Steven Davey FARMER’S DAUGHTER (1588 Dupont,

ñ

at Franklin, 416-546-0626, @­DupontDaughter) Complete brunches for $35 per person, including tax, tip and a Black Caesar. Average main $13. Open for weekend brunch from 10:30 am, dinner Thursday to Sunday from 5:30 pm. Reservations accepted. Licensed. Access: two steps at door, washrooms in basement. Rating­: NNNNNZ

As the editor of NOW’s brunch guide, I run into my fair share of eggs. From Bennys, frittatas and quiches to scrambled, over easy and sunny side up, I’ve done them all. But none prepared me for the magnificence that is the dish listed on the Farmer’s Daughter’s inaugural brunch carte simply as Ouef Mollet. Picture this: slathered in a nutty

arugula-and-spinach pesto, a softboiled egg of the free-range variety reclines on a bed of grilled housebaked brioche. Rashers of crumbly lamb bacon and stalks of spring asparagus criss-cross the plate, the lot finished with a toss of baby red radish sprouts and a butterless hollandaise that borders on foam. I don’t know what to do first – slowly inhale or upload a snapshot to my Instagram account. Welcome to the laid-back spinoff of Darcy McDonell’s wildly popular Farmhouse Tavern, where Frog Waffles turn out to be southern-fried frog legs over toasted buckwheat waffles drizzled with a delirious reduction of butter, red wine and maple syrup (both $12). “I like the irony of pairing something that’s good for you with some-

thing that isn’t,” says Swiss-born chef Léonie Lilla. She’s worked her way up through the ranks of Auberge du Pom­mier, Rodneys by Bay and Momo­ fuku Daisho since arriving in Canada seven years ago. At dinner, her quirky sense of humour shows up in the Cheek ’n’ Cheek, i.e., ravioli of braised veal cheeks tossed with pickled halibut cheeks ($22), and the substantial surf ’n’ turfinspired burger topped with a fish ’n’ chips-style fillet of battered haddock as well as pickled red slaw and tartar sauce ($18/$17 brunch). You’ll armwrestle over the latter’s fries and house-made ketchup. Chef’s exceptional Croque Madame comes tiered with prosciutto and aged cheddar, on the side a veritable mountain of crisp home fries and a lollo rosso salad in preserved lemon vinai-

grette ($14). Wash it down with a Black Caesar ($10) laced with squid ink and float home on a cloud. Now that I’ve eaten the entire brunch card – except for the yogurt salad ($11), and who orders that? – I’m still hungry to see what else the remarkably talented Lilla can do. What are these $5 desserts advertised on the dinner lineup? “There are lemon Twinkies stuffed with rhubarb and marshmallow jelly, and wild ginger-chocolate ice cream sandwiches,” gushes our enthusiastic server. “But we sold them all last night.” “I’m very adamant that they sell out,” says Lilla a week later. “It guarantees that everything’s fresh every day.” Maybe so, but I still have my heart set on that Twinkie.3

At Farmer’s­ Daughter’s busy brunch, Ouef Mollet (left), frog leg waffles and crispy pig’s head with corn and popcorn grits are a hit; chef, Léonie Lilla holds the croque madame.

stevend@­nowtoronto.com @­stevendaveynow

You Asked. We Delivered.

Delicious is Back . Ñ

CLIENT: JOB NAME: DOCKET #: AD #: PUB:

Rickards Shandy Newspaper P14-0668 RM10020 NOW Magazine

TRIM: SAFETY: BLEED: INSERTION DATE: PPI:

9.833” x 3.639” None None None None

Critics’ Pick NNNNN Rare perfection NNNN Outstanding, almost flawless NNN Recommended, worthy of repeat visits NN Adequate N You’d do better with a TV dinner

Indicates patio

Cyan NOW may 22-28 2014 Magenta Yellow Black

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Tricky tahini salad is on the all-vegan card at The Goods.

Tons of restaurants, crossing cultures, every week Compiled by STEVEN DAVEY

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Michael Hollett .....................................................................................@m_hollett Alice Klein .................................................................................................@aliceklein in support of Susan G. Cole .......................................................................................@susangcole friends of the greenbelt foundation Enzo DiMatteo ..........................................................................@enzodimatteo Norm Wilner ....................................................................................@normwilner Glenn Sumi ............................................................................................@glennsumi Julia LeConte ....................................................................................@julialeconte Steven Davey ...................................................................@stevendaveynow Sarah Parniak ..............................................................................................@s_parns tickets $125 +sc Ben Spurr ..................................................................................................... @benspurr Jonathan Goldsbie ..............................................................................@goldsbie Adria Vasil .................................................................................@ecoholicnation www.brewersplatetoronto.org Sabrina Maddeaux ................................................@SabrinaMaddeaux NOW Promotions ...............................................@NOWTorontoPromo

JUne 4tH • 6:15pm CBC atrium

250 Front st W

live band & auction

WI N tickets at nowtoronto.com/contests

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Steven Davey ...............................@stevendaveynow Sarah Parniak ...........................................................@s_parns Ben Spurr ..................................................................@benspurr Jonathan Goldsbie ..........................................@goldsbie Adria Vasil ............................................. @ecoholicnation Sabrina Maddeaux ............ @SabrinaMaddeaux NOW Promotions ............@NOWTorontoPromo 32

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

brunches for $25 per person, including tax, tip and a coffee. Average main $10. Open Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm. Weekend brunch 9 am to 3 pm. Closed holidays. No reservations. Unlicensed. Access: barrier-free. Rating: NNNN

Café SCULLERY 200 Carlton, at Ontario, 647-748ñ 5000, thescullery.ca, @The_Scullery

Taking a page from Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s modern Middle Eastern playbook, Laura Sestito and Fiona Byrne’s laid-back Cabbagetown café turns traditional sides into mains with spectacular results. An ever-changing carte designed to eat in or take away guarantees no two visits are ever the same. Best: salad combos like creamy green lentils with lean Danish bacon, sour cherries and Gorgonzola in citrus vinaigrette; wild rice and corn with spiced pecans, avocado and marinated feta; prosciutto, fresh fig and mozzarella panini on Ace baguette with mixed greens in pesto; daily specials like chicken with saffron, honey and hazelnuts; old-school cinnamon buns and scones; at weekend brunch, caramelized pecan waffles with spiced apple sausage and jalapeño-infused maple syrup. Complete meals for $20 per person, including, tax, tip and an iced tea. Average main $9. Open Monday, Wednesday to Friday 7 am to 7 pm. Weekend brunch 8 am to 5 pm. Closed Tuesday, some holidays. Reservations accepted. Unlicensed. Access: one step at door, washrooms on same floor. Rating: NNNN

Follow us on Twitter NOW @nowtoronto Contemporary Michael Hollett HAWTHORNE FOOD & DRINK 60 Richmond E, at Church, 647-930ñ @m_hollett 9517, hawthorneto.ca, @hawthorneto

Following the exit of Cowbell’s Mark CuAlice Klein trara, ex-Starfish and Frank chef Martha Wright takes@aliceklein the reins of this under-appreciated bistro in the financial district. A locally sourced seasonal Susan G.carte, Colerock-bottom prices and polished service deserve a @susangcole larger audience. Those standing in line for tables at the very similar Richmond Enzo Station two blocks DiMatteo away, take note. Best: quinoa salad with roasted eggplant, @enzodimatteo Brussels sprouts and edamame in VQA Riesling vinaigrette; Normpan-seared Wilner Lake Erie perch with corn ’n’ crab chowder; chicken @normwilner liver mousse “brûlée” with caramel sauce and stewed blackberries on crostini; Glenn pork Sumi smoky Memphis-style ribs with red cabbage and@glennsumi daikon; to finish, chocolate bread pudding with butterscotch ice cream and chocolate sauce. Complete Julia LeConte dinners for $40 per person (lunches $28), @julialeconte including tax, tip and a glass of VQA wine. Average main $18/$12. Open for lunch Steven Davey Monday to Friday 11 am to 3 pm, and for dinner Tuesday to Saturday 5 to 10 pm. @stevendaveynow Closed Sunday, holidays. Reservations accepted. Licensed. Access: barrier-free. Sarah Parniak Rating: NNNN 3

@s_parns Ben Spurr @benspurr Jonathan Goldsbie @goldsbie Adria Vasil @ecoholicnation Sabrina Maddeaux @SabrinaMaddeaux NOW Promotions @NOWTorontoPromo

STEVEN DAVEY

@emmacountrykitc Ex-Stockyards head cook Rachel Pellett and partner Heather Mee parlay a successful catering business into one of downtown’s busiest weekend brunch spot. The café’s weekday lineup’s not too shabby either, most notably their exemplary retro baked goods. Best: to start, fabulously flaky buttermilk biscuits

spread with whipped citrus butter and jam du jour; at brunch, those same biscuits as eggs Benedict with housesmoked peameal, poached eggs and whipped cream-infused hollandaise, griddled red-skin home fries on the side; the Hangover burger, a sage-spiked patty made of ground pork sausage on a house-baked bun dressed with local cheddar and house-cured bacon sided with skinny thyme-flecked frites; at lunch and brunch, daily quiche with salad, fruit or spuds; classic Cobb salads. Complete

The Goods ain’t bad Vegetarians aren’t the only ones who eat vegetarian food. Some of us think nothing of sinking our incisors into a rare bloody steak one day and a cauliflower cutlet the next. Consider it a yin-yang thing, a way of flushing out the pipes with roughage. The Goods (1255 Dundas West, at Dovercourt, 647-340-4663, thegoodsisgood.ca, @thegoodsisgood, rating: NNN) targets exactly those people with a rotating lineup of health-conscious eats delivered to the downtown core and as far north as the 401. You can also pick up takeout from owner/chefs Lisa LaBute and Cat Parker’s too-cute storefront kitchen. These are not your everyday salads.

So-called King’s Noodles fashioned from zucchini come abundantly tossed with crunchy purple cabbage, cherry tomatoes, pumpkin seeds, peppery arugula and quinoa in a garlicky ginger dressing like some raw vegan take on pasta primavera. A combo named for tough guy Chuck Norris mixes more virtuous quinoa with wild rice, fresh peas, corn kernels, chickpeas and house-sprouted mung beans in a sesame oil vinaigrette to great effect. But how did the super-food elixir known on the menu as the Insteada – raw cacao, maca, chia, cinnamon, cayenne and optional honey ($5) – get its handle? “If you don’t drink coffee but you still want that energy boost, have an Insteada instead,” says a helpful SD LaBute.

peppers with faux Daiya cheese and fake-o Baco bits ($2.25) before deepfrying them to crispy perfection. An Located in the soon-to-be-levelled impossibly rich chocolate Magic Mirvish Village, Apiecalypse Now (589 Square ($3) gets finished with crushed Markham, at Bloor, 416-800-1736, pecans and toasted coconut à la maca@ApiecalypseNow, rating: NNN) has a roon. Her vanilla mission. Dunkaroos Not only is could pass for Jen Bundock’s Oreos on sterfour-monthApiecalypse’s vanilla dunkaroo oids – with old bakery looks dangerous even if it is vegan. sprinkles! – entirely vegwhile her an, but a porpeanut tion of the butter profits help cookies fund a local (both $4) are animal resdead-ringers cue group. She for Crispy also donates a Crunch chocobuck from the sale late bars. In a blindof every meat- and fold test, the buttery dairy-free frozen shepthin crust of her six-inch herd’s pie – a spicy mix of mushblackberry-blueberry pies ($11) could rooms, red peppers and minced TVP pass for the real thing. topped with old-school mashed pota“If I can’t make it using vegan intoes ($14.50) – to the Sea Shepherd’s gredients, it doesn’t leave the kitchen,” direct-action conservation organizasays Bundock. “I don’t want anything tion. SD to taste like a compromise.” She stuffs panko-crusted jalapeño

Activism à la mode

STEVEN DAVEY

Brunch EMMA’S COUNTRY KITCHEN 1108 St Clair W, at Northcliffe, 416ñ 652-3662, emmascountrykitchen.com,


drinkup

By SARAH PARNIAK drinks@nowtoronto.com | @s_parns

WHERE TO DRINK RIGHT NOW!

The Sherry Cobbler

Back in the late 1800s the Sherry Cobbler was America’s most enthusiastically consumed cocktail, but it took a hard fall from its pedestal during Prohibition. Complex and refreshing with a temperate alcohol content, the Cobbler is easy to mix and even easier going down. 3 oz sherry, fino or amontillado (substitute whiskey for something much stronger) ½ ripe orange, cut in four pieces ¼-½ oz simple syrup Muddle orange with other ingredients to release citrus oils. Shake well and pour the whole thing (with ice) into a rocks glass. This is lovely over crushed ice – if you’re willing to put the work in. Throw some seasonal fruit on top (berries, pineapple, more citrus), stick in some straws and have a good time.

Spanish gin tonic: not your average G&T

JILLIAN BOTTING

The Chase’s Spanish G&T boasts Beefeater 24, shiso, Tio Pepe, yuzu, Fever-Tree tonic and grapefruit bitters.

The weather’s slowly warming up, and weekend and post-work plans inevitably involve patio drinks (weather permitting). The supremely quenching G&T, always a summer favourite, has associations with jolly old England. But would you believe me if I told you the Spanish do it best? Spain’s adopted national drink is so well loved that major cities like Madrid and Barcelona are dotted with “gin tonic” temples. (No “and” necessary – it only lengthens your ordering time.) Poured over large cubes in fishbowl chalices, the Spanish version of this typically unostentatious beverage is anything but. The cocktail in the frosty orb – always mixed with good-quality tonic water, which dials down the sweetness and makes all the difference – is peppered with pinches of spices and fresh herbs. Gently crushed mint, pink peppercorns, juniper berries, cinnamon sticks and star anise commonly find their way into your gin copa in España, shaming the humble sliver of citrus mandatory in standard British and North American serves. Tweaking seasonings to complement botanicals in the base spirit makes the G&T refined and customizable. Luckily for us, T.O. bars are gearing up for a sophisticated summer by serving house versions of Spain’s favourite mixed drink. The first in town to offer an entire menu stacked

TASTING NOTES Wise up

Spotted on Bloor just west of Dovercourt, newly minted Wise Bar (1007 Bloor West) serves craft brews to the Bloorcourt ’hood. I’m ecstatic to have a promising new local in an area almost bereft of bars. Update to follow.

Ñ

WHAT WE’RE DRINKING TONIGHT

with Spanish-style G&T’s, Nota Bene (180 Queen West, 416-9776400, notabenerestaurant. com) gets the ginspiration flowing via custom tonics, ice and spirits with complementary seasonings ($17). Gin options range from Canadian brands like Dillon’s and Loyalist to Hendrick’s (Scotland), Tanqueray No. Ten and Sipsmith (UK). At Osteria dei Ganzi (504 Jarvis, 647-348-6520, ganzi.ca), bartender João Machado (originally from Portugal, where gin is also the de rigueur drink), selects seasonings like eucalyptus and juniper berries to amp up house G&T’s (price depends on your choice of spirit). Good thing Ganzi’s shaded patio seats almost 200, because true gin tonic is best enjoyed outdoors. Speaking of terrific patios, the Chase (10 Temperance, 647-348-7000, thechasetoronto.com) is also riding the Spanish G&T train straight into summer. Bar manager Shane Mulvany uses Beefeater 24 infused with red shiso, Tio Pepe fino sherry, yuzu juice, grapefruit bitters and Fever-Tree tonic, finished with a sprinkling of micro-shiso and cilantro for a Spanish G&T with a Japanese twist ($15). Compared to simple British-style G&Ts (with which Mulvany, who used to bartend in London, is well acquainted), he says, “There’s a bit more depth. You’re really trying to highlight specific botanicals in the gin.”

Three winning gins

The juniper juice is more popular than ever The London No. 1

Rating NNN Why A London gin with slightly subdued juniper, new and blue London No. 1 gets its heavenly tint from gardenia flowers. Try in a gin and tonic (obviously) or mix up a turquoise martini (don’t forget the orange bitters). Price 700 ml/$43.60 Availability LCBO 275255; limited supply

ñCitadelle

Rating NNNN Why The summer of Collins is almost upon us, and Citadelle is what you need to stay cool. Traditional juniper marries with lemon rind, grains of paradise and cardamom in this elegant French-made gin. If you’re a gin lover with no Citadelle in your liquor stable, you’d best resolve that issue ASAP. Price 750 ml/$31.90 on sale till May 25 Availability LCBO 275248

Tanqueray Rangpur

Rating NNN Why Though the latest addition to the Tanq family isn’t a typical London gin, Rangpur is redolent of long drinks ’n’ lawn parties. Flavoured with rangpur lime (aka mandarin limes), this super-citrusy liquid mixes well with soda, tonic and limeade. Tanq ’n’ Ting is also a thing. Price 750 ml/$28.40 on sale till May 25 Availability LCBO 358184

Studio opens its doors

After a long, hard battle with licensing, Studio Bar (824 Dundas West, 416-815-7823, facebook.com/ StudioBarToronto) is now officially open. The ambitious 3,000-square-foot space functions by night as a restaurant, bar and music venue for bands and DJs and by day as a café and consignment store for locally prepared indie foodstuffs.

= Critics’ Pick NNNNN = Ambrosial NNNN = Dangerously drinkable NNN = Palate pleaser NN = Sensory snooze N = Tongue trauma

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

33


music

more online

nowtoronto.com/music Audio clips from our interview with Timber Timbre + Searchable upcoming listings

Happy!Mari

NEXT MUSIC FROM TOKYO

NIC POULIOT

at Lee’s Palace, Saturday, May 17.

the scene

Shows that rocked Toronto last week

LANA DEL REY at the Sony Centre, Tuesday, May 13.

Rating: NN Turning the Sony Centre into a sea of floral dresses and flower headbands, fans of American pop singer Lana Del Rey screeched their way through her 70-minute set. I really like Del Rey’s songs individually, but strung all together without any charisma, banter or warmth, the result is an incredible sameness. Waltzing onstage with a cool hair flip and a stiff pageant wave, Del Rey saved her breath for her songs, barely speaking and failing to even introduce her fourpiece band. The Coconut Grove-evoking staging was impressive. Too bad she didn’t make use of any of it, sticking within three paces of the mic for most of the show. All her hits were there: Summertime Sadness, Video Games, Young And Beautiful, Born To Die, and a new one, West Coast, from her forthcoming album, Ultraviolence. She sang them mostly well, except when it seemed that even she couldn’t hear her band over the crowd’s screaming, or when she messed around with Video Games, making it hard to sing along. She redeemed herself with a

34

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

straightforward rendition of National Anthem, but she should’ve done that as an encore. (There wasn’t one.) JULIA LeCONTE

HAIM at Kool Haus, Thurs-

ñday, May 15.

Rating: NNNN Two years after Haim parlayed buzzband status into a major-label deal, the California trio made their long overdue Toronto debut with an expertly choreographed rock show that could not have made a better first impression. Last year’s Days Are Gone album drew gushing comparisons to Fleetwood Mac and catty ones to Wilson Phillips, and after a dramatic entrance to pulsating lights and a slow drum beat, sisters Este, Danielle and Alana Haim (and drummer James Barone) immediately threw their lot in with the former. Opening number Falling established a blazing classic rock template for the ensuing 90 minutes: deep grooves, clap-along breakdowns, extended guitar solos, epic outros and lots and lots of Este’s meme-worthy bass face. The set also included two covers that nodded to disparate influences: a thundering rendition of Fleetwood Mac’s bluesy instrumental Oh Well and a

NAYUTA, KINOKO TEIKOKU, HAPPY!MARI, JIZUE and UCHU CONBINI as part of NEXT MUSIC FROM TOKYO at Lee’s Palace, Saturday, May 17. Rating: NNN

Toronto anaesthesiologist Steven Tanaka outdoes himself year after year with his Next Music From Tokyo series, flying underground Japanese bands to Canada at great personal expense. The five adventurous young acts on this year’s tour sold out the second Toronto show at Lee’s Palace (and the previous night at the Rivoli) and drew exuberant cheers all night long. All of the bands had energy in spades. Happy!Mari, on third, exemplified this best, their winning performance style – stage-diving and mad tambourine-shaking – making up for the grating, sometimes emo-like vocals and frenetic sound. Kinoko Teikoku were slightly more dour (this is all relative), but their tight execution of distorted shoegaze and emotive balladry hit harder than any other band. And while Uchu Conbini’s math-pop opening set and Nayuta’s fascinating approach to vocal harmonies in their closing set were also notable, instrumentalists Jizue stole the show. The four-piece play a kind of highly progressive, dynamic mix of jazz, Latin and post-rock, each member an absolute virtuoso. Too bad they went on second; nothing that came after CARLA GILLIS was quite as head-spinning. straightforward take on XO, the Coldplayest song in Beyoncé’s catalogue. Haim have an effortlessly affable presence that makes them seem more like co-conspirators than rock stars – an image they played up with funny and digressive Valley girl banter. But it was their digressions into shredding like every song was their last that set KEVIN RITCHIE them apart.

HOZIER at the Rivoli,

ñSaturday, May 17.

Rating: NNNNN There are many celebrated Irish singer/ songwriters. And while Andrew Hozier-Byrne (aka Hozier) absolutely nails the storytelling lyricism we’ve come to expect from his countrymen and women, his sonic influences come from Chicago and the Mississippi

Delta. The dynamic is irresistible: his words are irreverent and sometimes blasphemous, but the music itself would sound at home in church. On Saturday, he played four separate guitars and employed a fourperson backing band to achieve his blues/soul/folk sound. The sold-out crowd hollered in approval of songs off both his EPs, but stood in rapture for anything new as well. Mid-set, he performed a few stripped-down tunes solo. Pure blues number To Be Alone – perfect guitar-plucking, perfect reverb on the mic, perfect dramatic lighting – and quiet folky heartbreaker Cherry Wine were highlights. But those songs where he flaunted his gospel and choral chops with the full band were the most impressive. For example, Work Song sounded almost like a spiritual with its low, wounded harmonies – difficult territory to navigate for a white solo artist. But with his two female backing singers (including Alana Henderson, a successful Irish artist in her own right), additional harmonizing by the male band members and dramatic handclaps JL all around, it was spectacular.

= Critics’ Pick NNNNN = Perfect NNNN = Great NNN = Good NN = Bad N = Horrible

Ñ


292 COLLEGE @ SPADINA 416.456.7300 thecage292.com CRIMSON LOUNGE @ THE CAGE 292

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MAGIC @ THE CAGE DINNER & SHOW

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WINPROV IMPROV NIGHT

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NOW may 22-28 2014

35


clubs&concerts hot

tickets

Last Gang Records 10-year Anniversary w/ MSTRKRFT, Ethan Kath and Purity Ring DJ sets, Houratron, Bear Mountain & others Guvernment (132 Queens Quay East), Thursday (May 22) See preview, page 38. You’ve Changed Records Fifth Anniversary Party w/ The Weather Station, Shotgun Jimmie, Richard Laviolette, Marine Dreams, Baby Eagle Horseshoe (370 Queen West), Thursday­(May 22) See preview, page 38. Jessy Lanza, Saint Pepsi Garrison (1197 Dundas West), Friday (May 23) R&B/electro pop.

Timber Timbre, Cold Specks Massey Hall (178 Victoria), Friday (May 23) See preview, page 44. Sunparlour Players, Emilie MOver, Kalle Mattson Adelaide Hall (250 Adelaide West), ­Saturday (May 24) Alt country Torontonians’ LP release. Chad VanGaalen, Cousins Lee’s Palace (529 Bloor West), Saturday (May 24) See preview, page 39. All Toronto’s Parties w/ Darlene Shrugg, Frisch Kind, High World, Abra Cadaver, Castle­vania, Isla Craig, Bong Water and many others

Kensington Market (Bellevue Square, 4 to 8 pm) and Comfort Zone (480 Spadina, 9 pm), Saturday (May 24) Two parties in one day. Mø Wrongbar (1279 Queen West), ­Monday (May 26) See preview, page 41. Eels, Chelsea Wolfe Winter Garden Theatre (189 Yonge), Tuesday (May 27) Old-school alt rock purveyors. Kurt Vile & the Violators, Steve Gunn Phoenix (410 Sherbourne), Wednesday (May 28) Blissful, languid fuzz rock.

21C

Innovative composers making new works are the stars of the Royal Conservatory’s Twenty-First Century Music Festival, happening over five nights at Koerner Hall, Mazzoleni Hall and the Conservatory Theatre. Highlights of the eight concerts (nine if you include both After Hours cabarets) include Friday’s Chilly Eve Of Lemon Cane show, featuring the world premieres of Uri Caine’s Jagged Edges, Javier Limón’s Requiem Flamenco and Chilly Gonzales’s Suite From The Shadow For Chamber Ensemble. Also: the Toronto premiere of Eve Egoyan & David Rokeby’s Surface Tension. But don’t sleep on the other performances. Thursday celebrates R. Murray Schafer’s 80th birthday with works in the vein of Schafer; Saturday’s Night Blooms sees Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Jennifer Higdon’s Dooryard Bloom get its Canadian premiere; on Sunday, the Esprit Orchestra tackle recent music by European masters and new works by Canadians. Sure to be electrifying. To Sunday (May 25) at the Royal Conservatory of Music (273 Bloor West), various times and prices. 416408-0208. ­performance.rcmusic.ca.

Just Announced The Wooden Sky, Edwin Huizinga, Alex Read, Keith Hamm, Britton Riley Salon & Fare

Bison Bovine Sex Club $tba. IE, RT. June 14. DJ Pete Tong Grand Opening Weekend

Well Campbell House Museum Ballroom 8 pm, $20. May 30.

Blowout Party Sound Academy Cabana Poolbar. June 15.

Young Doctors In Love, Blimp Rock, Fitness CD release The Garrison

Viet Cong Silver Dollar. June 19. Deltron 3030 The Event 2 Tour Tattoo

doors 9 pm, $7. May 30.

Toronto Tabla Ensemble, Rattan Bhamrah, Guru Neeraj Prem, Pratibha Dance & Music Academy, Nachdi Jawaani, CMA Chenda Mellam Drums group, Bell Band from Pakistan RUNG Festival (Festival Of Colors) Royal Ontario Museum 10 am to 2:30 pm. rungfestival.com. May 31.

We Were Heads, Les Ex, Alpha Strategy, Wolfcow CD release CineCycle doors 9 pm. June 7.

Shahin Najafi Virgin Mobile Mod Club doors 7 pm, $45-$70. smallworldmusic. com. June 7.

Cults Lee’s Palace doors 8 pm, $21.50. HS, RT, SS, TF. June 8.

Aaron Carter Lee’s Palace doors 8 pm, $25. RT, SS, TF. June 11.

The Notwist

Lee’s Palace doors 8:30 pm, $21.50. HS, RT, SS, TF. June 12.

The Offspring, Bad Religion, Pennywise, the Vandals Summer

Nationals Tour Echo Beach at Molson Amphitheatre $tba. LN. August 7.

Christopher Cross Canadian Nation-

al Exhibition. August 19.

The Watchmen Horseshoe doors 9 pm,

doors 7 pm, $26.50. INK, PDR, RT, SS, TM. July 5.

$27.50. HS, RT, SS, TF. September 19.

Electric Six Horseshoe doors 8:30 pm,

Kasabian Sound Academy doors 7 pm, all

The Fresh & Onlys, the Shilohs

Coheed and Cambria, Thank You Scientist Neverender IKSSE:3 Tour Kool

$20. HS, RT, SS, TF. July 17.

Horseshoe doors 9 pm, $12. HS, RT, SS, TF. July 18.

Macabre Hard Luck Bar $20. IE, RT. August 2.

ages, $25.50-$40. TM. September 30.

Haus doors 7 pm, all ages, $30. LN, RT, SS. October 1.

How to find a listing

Music listings appear by day, then by genre, then alphabetically by venue. Event names are in italics. See Venue Index, online at nowtoronto.com, for venue address and phone number. = Critics’ pick (highly recommended) ñ 5= Queer night

How to place a listing

All listings are free. Send to: music@nowtoronto.com, fax to 416-​364-​1168 or mail to Music, NOW Magazine, 189 Church, Toronto M5B 1Y7. Include artist(s), genre of music, event name (if any), venue name and address, time, ticket price and phone number or website. Deadline is the Thursday before publication at 5 pm. Weekly events must confirm their listing once a month.

Classical

Chilly gonzales

this week

Cher Dressed To Kill Tour Air Canada Centre $46.50. TM. October 4 and 5.

Rachael Yamagata Adelaide Hall doors 7 pm, $20. LN. October 6.

Bastille Air Canada Centre doors 6:30 pm,

$34.50-$42.50. LN, TM. October 15.

The Pretty Reckless Going To Hell Tour Sound Academy doors 6 pm, all ages, $23-$30. LN, RT, SS. October 30. Kodaline, Birds of Tokyo Sound

Academy doors 6 pm, all ages, $25. LN, RT, SS. November 1.

John Fogerty Songs From Creedence

Clearwater Revival 1969 General Motors Centre $tba. LN, TM. November 14

Thursday, May 22 Pop/Rock/Hip-Hop/Soul

Alleycatz The Community Soul Project. Bier Markt Esplanade The Marc Joseph Band (pop/rock) 10 pm.

Cadillac Lounge Tin Pan North Songwriters

Festival Benita Hill, David McLachlan, Michael Lake, Brian Donkers 9:30 pm, Liam Titcomb, Jennifer Noble, Clive Vanderburgh, Victoria Powell 7:30 pm. C’est What Derek Christie, Ditch Horses, Greenway Blvd 9:30 pm. The Danforth Music Hall Ingrid Michaelson, Storyman & the Alternate Routes doors 6:30 pm, all ages. The Garrison Hoshi Furu, Sol Ardour, Mirrelia, J’Nai doors 8 pm. Grossman’s BTH (funk/Afrobeat) 10 pm. Guvernment Last Gang Records Ten Year Anniversary Mstrkrft, Ethan Kath, Purity Ring (DJ sets), Houratron, Electric Youth, Bear Mountain, Rush Midnight, Tre Mission, Kay, Lesure Cruise, Dumatix, Young Guv, Bizzarh 10 pm. See preview, page 38. Horseshoe You’ve Changed Records 5th Anniversary Party The Weather Station, Shotgun Jimmie, Richard Laviolette, Marine Dreams, Baby Eagle. See preview, page 38. Kensington Lodge Jam Derek Mok 7 pm. Lee’s Palace Stan Simon & the Holy Bibles, Ivory Hours, West Hammock. The Local Gest Jeff & Noah 8 pm. Parts & Labour Cruel Hand, Self-Defense Family doors 10 pm, all ages. Rivoli Rob Moir & the Great Lakes, Friday Night Trend, Laurent Bourque, Jeff Richards doors 8 pm. Rockpile Snak the Ripper (hip-hop) doors 8 pm. Silver Dollar Dead Rider, the Hollow Earth, Poppyseed & the Love Explosion doors 9 pm. Southside Johnny’s Skip Tracer (rock/top 40) 9:30 pm. Velvet Underground Aftermath Music Festival God Module, Die Sektor, Mordacious, Encephelon, Wychdoktor, Apriorism (industrial/ synthpop/EBM) 8 pm.

ñ ñ

Folk/Blues/Country/World

Aspetta Caffe Open Mic El Faron 8 pm. Bar Radio Nichol Robertson & His Honky

Tonk Boogaoo Boys (country) 9 pm. Black Swan Tin Pan North Songwriters Festival Blair Packhamj, Roger Beckett, Angela Saini, Smudgie 9:30 pm, Stacey Kaniuk, Dean Stacey, Peter Boyer, Carrie DeMaeyer 7:30 pm. Cameron House Matthew Hornell 10 pm, Corin Raymond 6 pm. Emmet Ray Bar Don’t Worry Darlin w/ Shannon Hoff (folk) 9 pm. Free Times Cafe Anna Gutmanis, Kevin Wong, Bob Cohen, Karen Dinardo, Bryn Scott-Grimes (folk) 8:30 pm. Holy Oak Cafe Chip & the Old Block (old-time) 7:30 pm.

continued on page 38 œ

36

May 22-28 2014 NOW


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NOW may 22-28 2014

37


MSTRKRFT headline Last Gang’s 10th anniversary party, Thursday (May 22)

clubs&concerts œcontinued from page 36

Hugh’s Room Valdy 8:30 pm. Linsmore Tavern Jessica Blake (folk) 9 pm. The Local Sean Conway (roots/rockabilly) 9 pm. Lola Brian Cober (double slide guitar) 9 pm. Lula Lounge Lulaworld Festival Ruben Es-

guerra New Tradition & Vox Sambou 10 pm, Sinal Aberto w/ Luanda Jones & Fred Martins 8 pm. Monarchs Pub Blues Thursdays The Ross Neilson Band 8 pm. Moonshine Café Tin Pan North Songwriters Festival Brian Gladstone, Elora Taylor, John & Sheila Ludgate, Glen Hornblast 9:30 pm, Alfie Smith, Gigi Sisters, Sahaj Shah, Melissa Pigg 7:30 pm. Not My Dog Gunner & Smith (country rock). The Painted Lady Freeman Dre & the Kitchen Party, Elise LeGrow 9 pm. Press Club The Vaudevillian (1920s blues) 9 pm. Relish Bar & Grill Michael Cuddy 7 pm. Supermarket Cuadro Flamenco Triana ­Project (flamenco) doors 8 pm. Toronto Centre for the Arts Canadian Friends Of Israel Guide Dog Center For The Blind Benefit José Feliciano (Latin guitar) 7:30 pm. Tranzac Southern Cross Dissonant Histories (jazz/hip-hop/folk/indie rock/classical) 10 pm, Bluegrass Thursdays Houndstooth (bluegrass/old-time) 7:30 pm. Unicorn Pub Honky Tonk Thursdays. Wise Guys Open Jam Jon Long 10 pm.

ñ

triple whammy birthday jam

Jazz/Classical/Experimental

De Sotos Jam Anthony Abbatangeli (jazz/ blues) 8 pm.

Edward Johnson Building Walter Hall

Three Canadian record labels are gettin’ better with age By SARAH GREENE It’s a big couple of weeks for indepen­dent Canadian record purveyors. You’ve Changed, Last Gang and Kelp are all celebrating milestone anniversaries – quite an achievement, considering the current music-buying climate. We spoke to label heads to learn how to survive – nay, thrive – past your fifth, 10th – even 20th – birthday. FIVE YEARS OLD: You’ve Changed Hometown: Welland Debut release: Shotgun Jimmie: Still Jimmie (March 2009) Anniversary specials: Marine Dreams is launching a new cassette, Lemon Tree, at the party, and vinyl and CDs are just $10 on the website. We spoke to: Steve Lambke, co-founder­, Constantines member, also makes music as Baby Eagle Why did you start You’ve Changed? “Blind enthusiasm. On the way home from [Sackville, New Brunswick, music festival] Sappyfest 2008, we thought anything was possible. And [Welland band] Attack in Black was producing a lot of music, so we said, ‘Let’s just do it!’” What was your first big break? “Daniel, Fred & Julie in December 2009. They recorded it over a day or two, and that album really resonated with people. They started playing shows that were totally magical.” Advice on staying alive? “Keep going, keep making records and do it because you love it. We put out a relatively small number of records a year so that we take on only what we can manage.” The Weather Station, Shotgun Jimmie, Baby Eagle, Richard Laviolette and ­Marine Dreams at the Horseshoe (370 Queen West), Thursday (May 22), 8:30 pm, $15, adv $12. ­youvechangedrecords.com.

TEN YEARS AND COUNTING: Last Gang Hometown: Toronto Inception: Chris Taylor and Donald ­Tarlton first shook hands on the idea of starting up Last Gang at Pop Montreal in 2003. Debut release: Metric: Old World Underground, Where Are You Now? (May 2004) Anniversary specials: Free T-shirt for everyone at the anniversary party. We spoke to: Chris Taylor, co-founder What was your first big break? “Death From Above 1979: You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine. It got a great Pitchfork review in 2004.” Advice on staying alive? “Our international focus helps a lot: if we weren’t selling records in the U.S. and the UK, it would be tougher. Government funding also helps. And you have to pick the right bands – if you look at any indie label, they’ll have their three or four artists who have sold a lot of records. They will make up for other ones who are more of a labour of love. Last Gang Records 10th Anniversary, featuring MSTRKRFT and DJ sets by Ethan Kath of Crystal Castles, Purity Ring, Huoratron, Electric Youth and Bear Mountain at Guvernment (132 Queens Quay East), Thursday (May 22), 9 pm. $26. INK, RT, SS, TM.

*If that isn’t enough indie label anniversary craziness, mark your calendar: Hamilton’s Hidden Pony Records is celebrating its fifth birthday with a show June 20 at the Horseshoe featuring Rah Rah, Royal Tusk, Odds and the Danks as part of NXNE.

38

May 22-28 2014 NOW

TWO DECADES (!) STRONG: Kelp Hometown: Ottawa Inception: Jon Bartlett was just 18 when he started Kelp Records. “I read an article by Dave Clark, who used to play in the Rheos,” he says. “I wrote him a letter, and he wrote me back and said, ‘All you need to have your own label is a name and address, and you go from there.’” Debut release: Jon Bartlett: Cultivate (March 1994). It included a cover of Smashing Pumpkins’ Rocket and Disarm! Anniversary specials: The Kelp 20 reissue series: Andrew Vincent & the ­Pirates: I Love The Modern Way (2003) and Andy Swan: Ottawa (2007) – both on vinyl for the first time. We spoke to: Jon Bartlett, founder, member of Rhume What were your first big breaks? “The Acorn [before they moved to Paper Bag]. And Feist opened for Andrew Vincent at his album launch in 1998, which I still think is so funny.” Advice on staying alive? “It’s a crazy pursuit for crazy people. You have to evolve with the times and figure out what works: the label is becoming a smaller part of the overall picture at Kelp since we’ve grown into management and running events as well.” Kelp Records 20th Anniversary Party: The Acorn & the Kelp Revue (with the Flaps), featuring appearances by Jim Bryson, Andrew Vincent, Chris Page, Evening Hymns, Andy Swan, Rhume, Flecton Big Sky and more at the Horseshoe (370 Queen West), May 29, 8:30 pm. Adv $12. HS, RT, SS, TF.  3

CMC Stepping Stone Competition: Elimination Rounds (classical music). Gate 403 Annie Bonsignore Jazz Band 9 pm, Peter Kauffman Jazz Trio 5 to 8 pm. Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar Mindful ­Martinis Elaine Smookler (cabaret) 6:30 to 9:30 pm. The Jazz Bistro Looking Back Mike Murley Trio 9 pm. Kama Thursdays At Five Bruce Cassidy & ­Canadian Jazz Quartet 5 to 8 pm. Old Mill Inn Home Smith Bar Fern Lindzon (jazz) 7:30 pm. Poetry Jazz Cafe Andrew McAnsh Group 9 pm. Reservoir Lounge Spring Fling Sing! Jacky Bouchard Trio 7 to 9 pm. The Rex Lorne Lofsky Quartet 9:30 pm, Kevin Quain 6:30 pm.

Royal Conservatory of Music Koerner Hall 21C Music Festival: Faster Still ñ Anaïs Nin Afiara String Quartet 8 pm. The Whippoorwill A Little Rambunctious

Michael Louis Johnson (jazz/swing) 10 pm.

Dance Music/DJ/Lounge

Clinton’s Throwback Thursdays (90s) doors

10 pm.

Club 120 T-Girl Party DJ Todd Klinck.5 Dance Cave Different Class (dance/rock/new

wave/Brit Pop).

The Jazz Bistro Cellar Rooftop Patio DJ Leo Love, Peter B 7 to 11 pm.

Media Bar & Lounge Inside Out LGBT Film

Festival Opening Gala Party HotNuts 10 pm. Nocturne Harder, Daddy! A Freq, DJ IRL, Desquamation, Gabbo, DJ Shok, Squishy, Evilize, K-Man, Tricktrax (hardcore/hardstyle/gabber/rave) doors 10 pm. Rivoli Pool Lounge DJ Bunitall (R&B/hip-hop) 9 pm. WAYLA Bar Random Play DJ Dwayne Minard (disco/yacht rock/new wave) 10 pm.

Friday, May 23 Pop/Rock/Hip-Hop/Soul

Alleycatz Lady Kane. Baltic Avenue The Big Shiny Tunes Squad

(90s cover band) 10:15 pm. Cadillac Lounge Tin Pan North Songwriters Festival The Lovelocks, Dan McVeigh, Paul Lamarche, Zac Wrixon 9:30 pm, Kate Todd, Paul Malysa, Krista Earle, Don Sawchuk 7:30 pm. Cavern Bar Little Boxer, FourOneSix (folk/ rock) doors 8 pm. The Central ABCs Of Beer The Marks, Bunny Lapin (rock/folk/psych) 6 to 9 pm. The Danforth Music Hall Morcheeba,


Connor Youngblood doors 8 pm. DRAKE HOTEL Strange Talk (synth-pop) doors 8 pm. DUFFY’S TAVERN Great Lakes, UES, ColdFront, the Ocean Cure, Buried by Lakeshore, Invective (pop punk/metalcore/hardcore/metal/ deathcore) doors 7 pm. GARDINER MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART Bistro Music Series Candice Sand (pop/R&B) 6 to 9 pm. THE GARRISON Jessy Lanza, Saint Pepsi (R&B/electro pop) doors 8 pm. HARD LUCK BAR Bane, Take Offense (hardcore/punk) doors 7:30 pm. HARLEM Dan McLean Jr (classic soul) 7:30 pm. HARLEM WEST Mboya Nicholson 7:30 to 11 pm. HOLY OAK CAFE Halls of Devotion (pop) 10 pm. HORSESHOE The Pocket Dwellers, Me & the Royal We, DJ Soul Proprietor doors 9 pm. LEE’S PALACE 20th Anniversary Tour The Planet Smashers doors 9 pm. LINSMORE TAVERN MO Betta (rock) 9 pm. MASSEY HALL Live At Massey Hall Timber Timbre, Cold Specks 8 pm. See preview, page 44. MONARCHS PUB Classic Rock Fridays The Dylan Tree 9 pm. THE OLDE STONE COTTAGE PUB The Marc Joseph Band (pop/rock) 9:30 pm. ORBIT ROOM The Dave Murphy Band (soul/ rock/pop) 10 pm. PHOENIX CONCERT THEATRE Aftermath Music Festival iVardensphere, Ayria, Malhavoc, Gothsicles, Antigen Shift, Promonium Jesters (industrial/synthpop/EBM) 8 pm. THE PISTON Brooklyn Doran, Christian Bridges, Adam Faux 9 pm. PRESS CLUB Committed to Rhyme (rock) 10 pm. RANCHO RELAXO Sworn Enemy, Silence the Messenger, Vernon Howell, A Call for Violence 8 pm. RELISH BAR & GRILL The Danger Bees 9 pm. RIVOLI Falls, Goodnight, Sunrise, the 92 Toronto Blue Jays, the Nursery doors 9 pm. ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM Friday Night Live: Museum Confidential Mason Bach, iDRUM, DJ eFSharp. SILVER DOLLAR Deep Space Cowboys, Dead Broke, the Folk, Nude Dogs 9 pm. THE SISTER The Neverlies 8:30 pm.

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CHAD VANGAALEN FOLK

Calgary artist mines his imagination for latest record By CARLA GILLIS

CHAD VANGAALEN and COUSINS at Lee’s

SONY CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OneXOne Million Meals Challenge Simñ ple Plan, Magic!, Alyssa Reid, Kardinal

Palace (529 Bloor West), Saturday (May 24), doors 9 pm. $15. HS, RT, SS, TF.

SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY’S 40 Sons (rock/R&B) 10 pm. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS Spacecraft 7 (gar-

“Have you always been really tapped into your imagination?” I ask Chad VanGaalen, who is just waking up in a Boston hotel after playing a show to disappointed Bruins fans the night before. “Oh yeah, for sure. It’s completely distracting. Nothing has really changed [since I was a kid]. I’m a man-child.” “Man-child” is often used disparagingly, but in VanGaalen’s case, his travels down the wormhole of his imagination have earned him the most inspiring of careers: revered weirdofolk musician with a willowy voice, tender melodies and disturbing lyrics; music video animator and illustrator to the indie rock stars; producer of experimental albums by Women and others; maker of homemade instruments like a double kalimba; creator of comic series ZOOOSH. Whatever strikes his fancy. The latest project from the Calgary artist’s fertile mind is fifth album Shrink Dust (Flemish Eye), made in concert with a still-in-progress animated sci-fi film called Translated Log Of Inhabitants, his first feature. He’s careful not to allude to Shrink Dust as the film’s soundtrack, however. “They were informing each other as I was recording them alongside each other,” VanGaalen explains. “There are elements of Shrink Dust in Translated Log, and Cosmic Destroyer, the last song on the record, is about the characters in the animation. But it’s not like Spider-Man 3, where there is this epic, two-minute montage of somebody getting his ass kicked while the most

Offishall doors 7 pm, all ages.

age rock) 10 pm. UNICORN PUB Cover Alls 10 pm. WRONGBAR Undercover VI Copper Lassie (country Iron Maiden tribute), Tommy Youngsteen (Tom Petty, Neil Young and Bruce Springsteen covers), the Gillespie Brothers doors 9 pm.

ñ

FOLK/BLUES/COUNTRY/WORLD

BAR RADIO Reynolds Creek 10 pm. BLACK SWAN Tin Pan North Songwriters Festi-

val David Leask, Barbara Lynn Doran, Dayna Shereck, Chase Stevens 9:30 pm, Wendell Ferguson, Shaun Devlin, Tori Hathaway, John Cheesman 7:30 pm. CAMERON HOUSE Chris Culgin 10 pm, Patrick Brealey 8 pm, David Celia 6 pm. CAMERON HOUSE BACK ROOM JBros. DORA KEOGH Root Magic (blues) 9 pm. FREE TIMES CAFE Zack Werner, Augusta Campoli (folk) 8 pm. GROSSMAN’S The Fullerton w/ Neil Chapman 10 pm. HUGH’S ROOM CD release The Arrogant Worms (musical comedy) 8:30 pm. LULA LOUNGE Lulaworld Festival Los Hijos de Tuta & Orquesta Fantasia (salsa/Colombian) doors 7 pm. MOONSHINE CAFÉ Tin Pan North Songwriters Festival Marshall Dane, Peter Light, Billy J White, Nicole Rayy 9:30 pm, Anne Lindsay, David Neale, Colin Brown, Neil Morrissey 7:30 pm. MUSIDEUM Jewish Music Week Evan Malach noon. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS The Foolish Things (folk) 5 pm.

JAZZ/CLASSICAL/EXPERIMENTAL

ARRAY SPACE eVoid Collective Dance Jam

Pierre Mongeon (piano/trumpet) 7:30 pm.

EDWARD JOHNSON BUILDING WALTER HALL

CMC Stepping Stone Competition: Elimination Rounds (classical music). EMMET RAY BAR Croque Monsieur (jazz/ swing) 7 pm. ENWAVE THEATRE Art of Time Ensemble, Branford Marsalis, Andrew Burashko 8 pm. GATE 403 Bartek Kozminski El Mosaico Fla-

ñ

continued on page 40 œ

banging track on the record is playing.” The deaths of his dog Lila and of Women guitarist Chris Reimer (who died in his sleep) also informed the album. The song Lila is a direct tribute to his canine friend, while Reimer’s influence is more nebulous. “I don’t even really feel like I understand what happened with Chris. To this day I feel like that was total bullshit. It was like he got swept away into nowhere land for no good reason, so it’s a total shame,” VanGaalen says. “The first song [Cut Off My Hands] is probably the most direct analysis of what was happening in my mind at the time as far as feeling lost. But with Chris’s presence, I didn’t want it to be this thing that was so obvious. For my own sake, I like to keep that a little more private.” VanGaalen has emerged from the darkness. He jokes easily and gets excited talking about his six-year-old daughter’s critiques of his work. (Too many boring leaves on a branch, she said of a recent illustration, and not enough guy-with-a-shoe-for-a-head.) And despite being 15 or so years into a music career, making sounds still inspires him. “I still love making music. I don’t know about songs. Songs get weirder and weirder as I get older. It’s more of an abstract notion to be, like, here’s a three-and-a-half-minute song. But in terms of making music, just sort of random stuff, I sit down whenever I can and hack away at sounds. I’ll always love that. “I live in a dream world of total insanity,” he laughs. “It’s hard not to be excited about it.” 3 carlag@nowtoronto.com | @carlagillis

PERSEUS

WOLF GANG

JAMES MURPHY (DJ SET)

MAY 24 :: STUDIO BAR

MAY 25 :: THE DRAKE HOTEL

MAY 30 :: THE HOXTIN

LA ROUX

THE PREATURES

THE ORWELLS W/ SKATERS

JUN 1 :: DANFORTH MUSIC HALL

JUN 7 :: THE GARRISON

OCT 11 :: THE MOD CLUB

THE HOXTON MAY 23

ED RUSH & OPTICAL W/ DJ MARKY

JUN 3

GHOST OF A SABER TOOTH TIGER

JUN 6

A-TRAK W/ SALVA

KELIS

JUN 10

BANKS W/ JEROME LOL (LIVE)

JUN 13

KYGO

JUNE 11 :: THE DANFORTH MUSIC HALL

JUN 14

JULIAN JORDAN

UPCOMING

JUN 21

FELIX CARTAL & KRYDER

SEAN LENNON & CHARLOTTE KEMP MUHL

MAY 22

SOPHIE

MAY 31

THE ANGELIC UPSTARTS

THE DRAKE HOTEL

JUN 27

CASHMERE CAT

JUL 19

MIKE HAWKINS

HARD LUCK BAR THE OPERA HOUSE

MAY 31

AUDION: SUBVERTICUL LIVE

JUN 01

PAPA

THE GARRISON

JUL 25

HUDSON MOHAWKE

JUN 09

THE CHAIN GANG OF 1974

THE DRAKE HOTEL

JUL 26

MERCER

JUN 12

YOUNG & SICK

THE DRAKE HOTEL

AUG 01

GESAFELLSTEIN

AUG 02

JAGWAR MA

JUN 20

ZOMBOY W/ COOKIE MONSTA

JUL 05

NOISECONTROLLERS

THE PHOENIX THE MOD CLUB

DANFORTH MUSIC HALL JUN 4

DIE ANTWOORD

JUN 6

FIRST AID KIT W/ WILLY MASON

JUL 5

RICKIE LEE JONES

JUN 11

KELIS

JUL 6

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS

NOV 11

PETER HOOK AND THE LIGHT

CODA MAY 23

JULIO BASHMORE, ADRIATIQUE & SPACE DIMENSION CONTROLLER

MAY 24

TINI & CHAIM

MAY 30

RICARDO VILLALOBOS, DJ SNEAK DOC MARTIN

MAY 24

MARC HOULE (LIVE) & MAX COOPER (LIVE)

Tickets available at ticketweb.ca, Rotate This, Soundscapes and Play De Record. For info visit www.embracepresents.com.

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

39


Queen Elizabeth Theatre Mayssa Karaa,

clubs&concerts œcontinued from page 39

menco Jazz Fusion Band 9 pm, Elizabeth Martins Jazz Trio 5 to 8 pm. Habits Gastropub Kohen Hammond Quartet (jazz) 9 pm. Hirut Fine Ethiopian Cuisine The Daniel Barnes Groove Trio (world/jazz) 8:30 pm. Imperial Pub Jazz Fridays Jazz Generation (big band classics) 5:30 to 7:30 pm. The Jazz Bistro Looking Back Mike Murley Trio 9 pm. Old Mill Inn Home Smith Bar Ross Wooldridge Trio (jazz) 7:30 pm. Poetry Jazz Cafe Patrick Hewan Trio 9:30 pm. The Rex CD release The Jazz Collective 9:45 pm, Sara Dell (vox/solo piano) 6:30 pm, Hogtown Syncopators 4 pm.

Royal Conservatory of Music Koerner Hall 21C Music Festival: Chilly Eve Of

ñ Lemon Cane Uri Caine, Afiara String Quartet,

Adelaide Hall Album release Sunparlour Players, Emilie Mover, Kalle Mattñ son (alt country) 9 pm. Bar Radio The Extra Mile 10 pm. Black Swan Mark Yan & Barry Mulcahy w/

Jesse Alarcon 9 pm.

Adelaide Hall Charlie Darker, DJ Paul David, ASMR, JRSTK (EDM/tech house/house) 9 pm. Church Street Garage Pheromone Friday.5 Club 120 Full Force Fridays DJs Ping, Tongue & Lady Bliss 10 pm.5 CODA Julio Bashmore, Adriatique, Space Dimension Controller, Cosella doors 10 pm. Curzon DJ Mr Stylus (hip-hop/funk/soul/ R&B) 10 pm. Dance Cave Bif Bang Pow DJ Trevor (60s mod Brit pop) 10 pm. Drake One Fifty DJ Dougie Boom doors 9 pm. Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar Just The Tip (Of The Weekend) DJ Max Mohenu 9 pm. Gladstone Hotel Ballroom Gemini: The Party DJs the Hot House Collective (deep & classic house) 10 pm. Guvernment Paul Van Dyk. Handlebar Soul Party The Consciousness ­Explorers Club (funk/breaks/edits/nu-disco/ house) 9 pm. The Hoxton Ed Rush & Optical, DJ Marky, DJ Spinz. Mill Street Brew Pub DJ Humble Mike (soul/ funk/classic hip-hop) 8 pm. The Piston Dutty Choppa Chop, Paul E Lopes (reggae dancehall) 10 pm. Rivoli Pool Lounge DJ Stu (rock & roll). The Savoy Frkn Wknd DJ Caff (R&B/hip-hop/ dancehall) 10 pm.

Saturday, May 24

Jazz/Classical/Experimental

Pop/Rock/Hip-Hop/Soul

tet 6 to 9 pm.

Darlene Shrugg, Frisch Kind, Nature, ñ Abra Cadaver, Wildlife Rodeo, High World

Five Tableaux From Khosro & Shirin Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestra (Iranian ballet/ classical) 8 pm. Church Of St Mary Magdalene Machaut Schola Magdalena (classical vocal) 8 pm. Dovercourt House Frankie 100: Lindy Hop Celebration The George Lake Big Band (jazz/ swing/big band) 7 pm.

Royal Conservatory of Music Conservatory Theatre 21C Music Festival After Hours

10 pm.

Scotiabank Studio Theatre Pia Bouman Studio CD release Ronda Rindone’s Quorum (improvisational music) 7:30 pm.

Tranzac Southern Cross Lina Allemano

(jazz) 7:30 pm.

Dance Music/DJ/Lounge

Alleycatz Lady Kane. Comfort Zone All Toronto’s Parties

(Lido Pimienta & Petra Glynt) doors 8 pm.

Handlebar Connoisseurs of Porn, the Hand-

some Band, Alpha Strategy, Kira Sheppard (noise rock/lo-fi experimental/weirdo pop/ psych) doors 9:30 pm. Horseshoe Evan Dando, Sara Johnston, International Zombies of Love doors 9 pm. Kensington Market Bellevue Square Park and Augusta/Kensington Ave venues. All Toronto’s Parties Isla Craig, Castlevania, Bong Water, Valerie Dour, Elrichman 4 to 8 pm. Lee’s Palace Chad VanGaalen, Cousins doors 9 pm. See preview, page 39. Linsmore Tavern Southern Fried (Lynyrd Skynyrd & Allman Brothers tribute) 9:30 pm. The Local Chris Staig & the Marquee Players (rock & roll) 9 pm. Orbit Room Ride the Tiger (60s & 70s soul/ Motown/stax/R&B) 10 pm. The Painted Lady Music by Salazar 10 pm. Phoenix Concert Theatre Aftermath Music Festival Suicide Commando, FGFC820, Caustic, Displacer, ESA, Volt 9000 (industrial/ synthpop/EBM) 8 pm. Press Club aBabe Saturdays Bison Sound, Darryl Costello, Jacquelyn Tober & the Rose County Ramblers 9:30 pm.

ñ ñ ñ

May 22-28 2014 NOW

Folk/Blues/Country/World

Cadillac Lounge Tin Pan North Songwriters Festival Gala The Good Brothers 9:30 pm, Benita Hill 7:30 pm. Cameron House The River & the Road 10 pm, Joanne Mackell 6 pm. Cameron House Back Room Run for it Marty. Cavern Bar Noon Noon (folk) doors 8 pm. C’est What 14th Annual Bob Dylan Birthday Celebration James Clarke, Adam Faux, Shawn Clarke doors 8:30 pm, The Boxcar Boys (oldtime/folk) doors 2:30 pm. Free Times Cafe The Last Forgiveness 8 pm. Full of Beans Coffee Rebas Open Mic Saturdays Erika Werry 1 to 4 pm. Gate 403 Bill Heffernan (folk/blues) 5 to 8 pm. Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar Bossa Tres (bossa nova/samba/jazz/Latin) 9 pm. Grossman’s Julian Fauth (barrelhouse) 10 pm. Hart House Songs For SchoolBOX Fundraiser 8 pm. Hugh’s Room On A Night Like This: Celebration Of Bob Dylan And His Music Robert Morgan, Wendell Ferguson, George Axon, Hap Roderman & Kevin Howley 8:30 pm. Humble Beginnings Sarah Frances (folk) 12:30 to 2:30 pm. King’s Belly Gary 17’s Showcase & Open Stage 8 pm. Lula Lounge Lulaworld Festival Willie Torres w/ Conjunto Lacalu (salsa) doors 7 pm. Monarchs Pub Toronto Blues Society Birthday Party The Fraser Melvin Band 9 pm. Opera Bob’s Jen Lane, Ole Fashion (alt country) 9 pm. Relish Bar & Grill Hey Lucy 9 pm. Sony Centre for the Performing Arts Joe Bonamassa (blues/rock) 8 pm. Tranzac The Saturday Songwriters Circus Amy Campbell & the Road Less Travelled, Layah Jane & Oliver Johnson 3 to 5 pm. Tranzac Southern Cross Scott B Sympathy (folk) 6:30 pm, Jamzac 3 pm.

Chilly Gonzales, Javier Limon, Eve Egoyan 8 pm.

40

Marcus Nand (Lebanese-American singer/ songwriter and rock flamenco singer/songwriter) doors 7 pm. The Rex Danny Marks (pop) noon. Rivoli John Otway & the Big Band, the BelleRegards doors 8:30 pm. Silver Dollar Double EP release Donalyn, the Sleepovers, Fool Heart, Jesse Landen 9 pm. The Sister Uncle Dad & the Grandbrothers, Tres Bien Ensemble. Sound Academy Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? Mykal Rose & Junior Reid, Exco Levi, Mountain Edge (reggae) doors 10 pm. Southside Johnny’s Kat House (rock/top 40) 10 pm, The Bear Band (rock/blues) 4 to 8 pm. Unicorn Pub Cover Alls 10 pm.

ñ

Chalkers Pub The Kieran Overs Guitar QuarChinese Cultural Centre P.C. Ho Theatre

Edward Johnson Building Walter Hall

CMC Stepping Stone Competition: Elimination Rounds (classical music). Enwave Theatre Art of Time Ensemble, Branford Marsalis, Andrew Burashko 8 pm. Gate 403 Mr Rick’s Tin Pan Jazz Band 9 pm. Glenn Gould Studio The True North: A Canadian Celebration Canadian Men’s Chorus (folk songs/traditional) 8 pm. Grossman’s The Happy Pals (trad jazz) 4:30 to 8 pm. Harlem Jazz Lovers Society (jazz/classic swing/blues) 7:30 pm. Harlem West Madette (jazz) 7:30 pm. The Jazz Bistro Looking Back Mike Murley Trio 9 pm. The Local Gest Sunday Jazz Alana Bridgewater 4:30 pm. Nawlins Jazz Bar The N’Awlins All Star Band w/ Brooke & Duane Blackburn (jazz/blues) 9 pm, Sam Heineman (piano jazz) 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Old Mill Inn Home Smith Bar Duncan Hop-

continued on page 44 œ


MØ POP

Danish singer embraces poploving past on solo debut By JULIA LeCONTE

MØ at Wrongbar (1279 Queen West), Monday (May 26), doors 8 pm. $13. RT, SS, TW.

Most of us grew up coordinating dance routines in our bedrooms. Karen Marie Ørsted (the artist known as MØ) did, too. But that’s also the room where, years later, she recorded the vocals to her debut solo album, No Mythologies To Follow (Chess Club/RCA Victor). “You go into a fancy studio and have all these people around you saying, ‘Start singing now,’ and ‘Use this,’ and ‘One more time.’ I just like to be able to control it and pick the right take myself,” the Danish artist says over the phone from Copenhagen, where she lives. Not that MØ’s album sounds the least bit DIY. With producer Ronni Vindahl (who also works with Robin Hannibal, the Danish producer/songwriter who makes up one half of both Rhye and Quadron), Ørsted achieved a slick pop debut that is both mainstream and not. Her vocals (somewhere between Gwen Stefani and Lana Del Rey) sail over skittery beats and 90s pop-evoking production. The melodies say “radio,” but the beats say “alt hip-hop” or “indie electronic.” The sound – and the lyrics about heartbreak, lust and the sweetness of

youth – may surprise anyone familiar with Ørsted’s former trash punk duo, Mor. But actually, she says, it’s a natural fit. “I started making music when I was seven, and it was cheesy pop. When I became a teenager and got into punk and grunge, of course I tried to hide my secret love of pop, but it’s always been there inside of me, like the punk is still there with me.” Just don’t call it Scandi-pop. “Even though I’m from Scandinavia, I wasn’t really aware that people talk about Scandi music and artists. But as things started to rise with MØ, I heard the word more and more. I guess I have a Scandi sound to some people, but I really haven’t thought about it, and it’s not something I’m striving for. I don’t even know what the Scandi sound is.” It wasn’t ABBA or even Robyn who inspired her pop ambitions. “I was the biggest Spice Girls fan. I cried like a baby when Geri left,” she says. “I was really obsessed.” She’s recorded a sultry, stuttering cover of their Say You’ll Be There, and just over a month ago, MØ got to meet Sporty Spice, her favourite, when the Danish national radio flew Mel C in to present the singer with an award. “I was freaking out,” she says giddily. “I’m still freaking out.” 3 julial@nowtoronto.com | @julialeconte

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

41


fort york

national historic site Club Bonus Series (13 shows) at Horseshoe & Lee's Palace now on sale

WED MAY 28 • PHOENIX • $25.50 ADV

KURT W/ STEVE

VILEGUNN & THE VIOLATORS

MATADOR INDIE

SHARON JONES & THE

Sunday July 6th

DAP KINGS with JAMES HUNTER

FRI JUNE 6 • MASSEY HALL $39.50-$59.50 advance

SATURDAY JUNE 14 • TD ECHO BEACH • $37.50 ADV THE DIGITOUR PRESENTS

DIGIFEST

Saturday July 5th

ALL AGES!

FRI JUNE 6 • MASSEY HALL

$39.50-$59.50 advance FEAT. FIFTH HARMONY, BEFORE YOU EXIT & DOZENS MORE!

WED JULY 2

HORSESHOE $ 20.50 ADV

BORN RUFFIANS W/ ARON D’ALESIO

DEER TICK BLACK JOE

Friday July 4th

SAM CASH & THE ROMANTIC DOGS

THE WEEKS

LEE’S PALACE

THE WILLIE NILE BAND (NYC)

THU JULY 3

LEWIS THE LONDON SOULS

HOLLERADO W/ ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD • BIDINI BAND

SHOVELS & ROPE THE STANFIELDS • CAITLIN ROSE W/

tier TWO single Day

67.50

$

tier TWO single Day VIP

107.50

$

3 Day

149.50

$

3 Day VIP

229.50

$

MASTER VIP

329.50

$

Plus service fees. Tickets on sale at ticketfly.com, Rotate This, Soundscapes & the horseshoe tavern

www.torontourbanrootsfest.com 42

may 22-28 2014 NOW

THE PAPER KITES

MAN MAN JOYCE MANOR W/

THU JULY 3

$24.50 ADV

HORSESHOE $24.50 ADV

FRI JULY 4

LEE’S PALACE

$20.50 ADV

SAT JULY 5

LEE’S PALACE $22.50 ADV

SUN JULY 6

LEE’S PALACE

$17.50 ADV

MON JULY 7

LEE’S PALACE

$22.50 ADV


STAN SIMON

SAT MAY 24

THU MAY 22 & THE HOTEL BIBLES $6.00 @Door

IVORY HOURS

$15.00 Adv

CHAD VANGAALEN

YOU’VE CHANGED RECORDS 5TH ANNIVERSARY!

THU MAY 22 • $15.00 @ Door

THE WEATHER

WITH COUSINS WEST HAMMOCK FRI MAY 23 • $16.50 Adv AGES OF THU FRI MAY 30 • $13.50 Adv MAN MAY 29 KING TUT $6.00

THE PLANET

SMASHERS

ORANGABANG SEED OF NATURE

FRI MAY 30 @ The Cave $10.50 Adv

MEPHISKAPHELES • DIG IT UP

@ Door

MOVING

UNITS CORONADO

SHEEZER

SUN JUN 1 • $15.00 Adv TOMMYGUNN

WORDBURGLAR SLAM 2 RANDOM TASK FORCE SAT MAY 31 • $7.00 Adv

VCW SUPER

LIVE PRO

UGLY WIMPS WRESTLING FRI JUN 6 • $15.00 @Door

FRI JUN 13

SUPER AUDIO LAND 2:

@ The Cave $5.00 @Door

EPIC GAME MUSIC

DAS PIUMAS TEN O’CLOCK PEOPLE

STATION SHOTGUN JIMMIE

DRUNK LIPS

STRAY BULLETS

GOOD ENOUGH FRI JUN 6 @ The Cave $7.00 @Door

BABY EAGLE MARINE DREAMS FREE

ben@collectiveconcerts.com FOR BOOKINGS AT

JUNE 13 •

$ 16.50

adv

MURDER BY DEATH JUNE 23 • 18.50 adv $

THE FILM FRI MAY 30 • $15.00 Adv

THU JUN 5

NICE PETER JUNE 24 • 19.50 adv $

FOXY SHAZAM MAN WITH A MISSION AIR GUITAR CHAMPIONSHIPS JUNE 25 • $ 10.50 adv

JULY 10 • $ 10.00 adv

AUG 2 • $ 20.50 adv

TEMPLES AUG 3 • 20.00 adv

COWBELL

NO OTHER (FROM PHILLY)

OKLAHOMA

UNFINISHED OW BUSINESS EASHRLY SAT JUN 14 • $20.00 Adv

FAT AS FUCK

• THE GARRISON • MAY 23 • $ 12.50 adv

JESSY LANZA SAINT PEPSI JUNE 8 • $ 15.00 adv

• SILVER DOLLAR •

JEZABELS

THE

THU JUN 5 • $11.50

DEAD RIDER

Adv

THE TOASTERS

SARA JOHNSTON

INTERNATIONAL

DJ SOUL PROPRIETOR

THE CROW

SUN K THE TUNGSTEN HUM • AMOS J

ZOMBIES OF LOVE

THU MAY 29 • $12.00 Adv MON KELP RECORDS 20TH JUN 2 ANNIVERSARY PARTY!

THETHEACORN KELP

TURBO STREET

FUNK

FREE

Shoeless Mondays

NEW

FRANCHISE

8 OZ SOUL

THE TEN O’CLOCK PEOPLE

SAT MAY 31 $12.00 Adv

and

TUE JUN 3

Bookie’s New Music Night

No Cover

MOTH TUPPERWARE PINK STR2BIDNIST REMIX PARTY ASMAN JUDE

THE DYING

PARQUET

COURTS ARTS THE UNCUT TYVEK

BUCKNER FREEMAN DRE &

THE KITCHEN PARTY NEW YORK CITY SKA CHARLOTTE CORNFIELD EFFENS • PILE HIGH PROTOMARTYR

TUESDAY JUNE 3

OPERA HOUSE LEMURIA & PUP $17.00 adv

WEDNESDAY JUNE 18 TUES JULY 15 • PHOENIX • $23.50

MON JUNE 16 • HORSESHOE • $20.00 ADV

CLAP YOUR HANDS

• VIRGIN MOD CLUB • JUNE 3 • $ 20.00 adv

• HORSESHOE TAVERN •

POLICA DELTA RAE SAY YEAH JD WILKES STAGNANT POOLS WILLIAM FITZSIMMONS & THE DIRT DAUBERS JUNE 8 • $ 20.00 adv • 19+

JUNE 26 • $ 20.00 adv • SOUL

JUNE 28 • $ 12.00 adv

TYLER JASON HEY OCEAN THE ANTLERS PATRICK SWEANEY RIVAL SONS WARD ISBELL WILD BEASTS OPERA HOUSE • $17.50 ADV

JUNE 27 • $ 22.50 adv

FRI JUNE 13 • HORSESHOE • $17.50 ADV

JUNE 29 • $ 10.50 adv

JULY 3 • $ 22.50 adv

JULY 4 • $ 17.50 adv • TURF

HIGHS • ROSIE JUNE

TUESDAY JUNE 24

TUE JULY 22 • OPERA HOUSE • $22.50 ADV

A GREAT

OBSCURA

DANFORTH MH • $ 24.50-$39.50

SUN JUNE 8 • LEE’S PALACE • $21.50 ADV

CULTS WED JUNE 11 • LEE’S PALACE • $25.00 ADV

AARON THE COURTNEYS MAY 22 • $ 10.00 adv

DANDO OF THE LEMONHEADS

RICHARD

JULY 16 • $ 22.50 adv

THURS JUN 19 • OPERA HOUSE • $24.50

THE STRUMBELLAS WITH LUCIUS

W/ LAURA CANTRELL

POKEY LAFARGE JUDGE 2 HOW TO DRESS WELL

FRI SEP 12 • OPERA HOUSE • $20.50 ADV

SUN OCT 19 • DANFORTH MH • $21.50 ADV

CAMERA

JULY 5 • $ 17.50 adv • TURF

SEP 12 • $ 15.00 adv

WITH

H 0 & STRIFE

• DRAKE HOTEL • $ 12.00

adv

JULY 14 •

$ 10.50

JULY 8 •

$ 15.50

adv • TURF

TWIN FORKS THEMOON HORRORS DUO SELF DEFENSE FAMILY ELECTRIC SIX

WED OCT 29 • SOUND ACADEMY • $25.50 - $39.50 ADV THU OCT 30 • OPERA HOUSE • $22.50 ADV

JULY 23 •

$ 12.50

adv

RUN RIVER NORTH

JULY 17 •

$ 20.00

adv

JULY 18 •

$ 12.00

adv

$ 12.50

adv

THU MAY 22 • PARTS & LABOUR • $12.00 ADV

W/

THE NOTWIST

FRI JUNE 13 & SAT JUNE 14

JULY 6 • $ 10.50 adv • 11PM • TURF

adv

$

LEE’S PALACE $21.50 adv

NOAH GUNDERSON

STREETLIGHT GABRIEL KAHANE WACO BROTHERS JUNE 10 •

MOON MANIFESTO WYTCHES THU JUNE 12

WITH NEW COUNTRY REHAB

JULY 6 • $ 15.50 adv • 7:30PM • TURF

OUGHT JULY 21 • 11.50 adv

MOONFACE BOYCE PAINTED PALMS STREETS OF LAREDO AVENUE JUNE 23 • $ 10.00 adv

DWELLERS ME & THE ROYAL WE

THE BOOM BOOM • CARDINAL CHASE MY KIND OF KARMA THE MARWILLS WED FRI JUN 6 • $13.50 Adv SAT JUN 7 • $6.00 @Door SUN JUN 8 • $14.50 Adv SKYE WALLACE JUN 4 $5.00 ALANNA GURR @Door BROKEN BRICKS

BIG WORLD GROUNDATION JUKEBOX THE GHOST SUN KIL $

Bookie’s New Music Night

No Cover

WHITE THE SHUFFLE DEMONS REVUE MADE VIOLENT

$6.00 @Door

THE MENZINGERS WITH

AND DAHLIA

THOUGHT BENEATH

TUE MAY 27

THE POCKET EVAN PEPPER

Shoeless Mondays WED MAY 28 • $15.00 @ Door MON ELECTICUS MAY 26 DOGWOOD CD RELEASE SHOW

SPRUKE COPY RED LEADER THE CAVE GOLD & YOUTH EARLY SHOW

SAT MAY 24 • $18.50 Adv

FRI MAY 23 • $7.00 @ Door

FRI MAY 23 • HARD LUCK • $16.50 ADV

BLACKBELT • JEALOUS GOD

JOLIE HOLLAND THE FRESH & ONLYS

SUN JUNE 29 • GREAT HALL • $16.50 ADV

JULY 23 •

FRI MAY 23 • DRAKE HOTEL • $10.00 ADV

ORGONE

BANE STRANGE TALK HOSPITALITY SCOTT BIRAM CARTER JUSTIN RUTLEDGE MAY 30 • $ 10.00 adv

THE RIVOLI • $20.00 ADV

AUG 2 •

$ 13.50

(SOUL) adv

JUNE 26 • $ 13.50 adv

TAKE OFFENSE • ANCIENT HEADS

NOW may 22-28 2014

43


clubs&concerts œcontinued from page 40

THURSDAY MAY 22 PRESENTED BY SMOG CITY

HELENA

NEON KNIGHTS SKUGOG FRIDAY MAY 23

BOMBAY NIGHTS BOLLYWOOD PARTY

SATURDAY MAY 24 • 6-10PM

First Annual

ONE SOUND

SINGING COMPETITION MONDAY MAY 25 & TUESDAY MAY 26 Presented by Live Nation

FAILURE

NEXT WEEKEND, MAY 30 & MAY 31

kins Trio (jazz) 7:30 pm. Paintbox Bistro Swing Into Spring Pat LaBarbera Quartet 8 & 9:30 pm, Student Jazz Trios 6:30 to 7:30 pm. Poetry Jazz Cafe Jon Foster Group (experimental jazz) 9:30 pm. The Rex Heavyweights Big Band 9:45 pm, Bacchus Collective 7:30 pm, O Canada the T.J.O. Big Band 3:30 pm.

ñ Royal Conservatory of Music Koerner Hall 21C Music Festival: Night Blooms ñ Marc-André Hamelin, Pacifica Quartet 8 pm. Conservatory of Music Conservatory Theatre 21C Music Festival ñRoyal After Hours 10 pm. St Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church

Inspired: Canadian Women Composers Jubilate Singers (classical) 7:30 pm. Toni Bulloni Jazz Night Sam Broverman & Mark Kieswetter 9 pm.

Dance Music/DJ/Lounge

Cinema Nightclub Sex, Lies & Video DJs Undercover, Mike Toast & Dee Cee. Clinton’s Shake, Rattle, Roll (60s rock/pop/ soul) doors 10 pm. CODA Tini & Chaim doors 10 pm. Cube Social Saturdays DJ Chris La Roque. Dance Cave Full On DJ Pat (alternative) 10 pm. Drake One Fifty Flex Saturdays DJ Cozmic Cat (funk/love) 9 pm. The Garrison Turning Point A Man Called Warwick, Alex Vintage Voudou doors 10 pm. Habits Gastropub DJ TheVinylDen 9 pm. Holy Oak Cafe Killjoy Collective & Iderdown

CHIC A BOOM ROOM: AGE OF ELECTRONICA

722 COLLEGE STREET RCM_NOW_1/10_4C_May15&22_21C__V 14

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MUSIC FESTIVAL 8 CONCERTS 5 NIGHTS 20 PREMIERES!

MAY 21-25/2014 A FESTIVAL OF FRESH NEW SOUNDS AND IDEAS.

SPECIAL OFFER $21 TIX

416.408.0208 44

May 22-28 2014 NOW

Timber timbre folk-blues

Toronto duo go dark, sensual for Hot Dreams  By Benjamin Boles

Timber Timbre with Cold Specks at Massey Hall (178 Massey Hall), Friday (May 23), 8 pm. $18.94. RTH.

The first lines that Taylor Kirk sings on the new Timber Timbre album are like the sonic version of a Rorschach test for the listener’s relationship with race. “I wanna dance, I wanna dance, I wanna dance… with a black woman,” Kirk croons on the first single and title track, Hot Dreams. The phrase sticks out as something deliberate yet motivationally unclear. It doesn’t sound natural coming from anyone but an old man, and serves as a reminder of the not-so-distant past. You assume that Kirk is performing a character. It practically demands that you ask yourself how you feel about it, and why. “Every night when I sing that line there’s a gasp, or a kind of choke, or some kind of reaction from the audience,” says Kirk, who is sensitive and shy in person, as we sip coffee in a Parkdale diner. “It’s received differently every time. In some towns there’s a lot of cheering for that line. In the South in particular, they really liked it, even when the audience was a broad mix of people. It’s very weird.” Timber Timbre albums have often been crafted around the moods and textures of certain genres and eras, with(electronic) 10 pm.

Hot Box Puff Lounge Come Smoke With Us

JDon & Brianrudder, Geneone & Hotrox, IllVibe, Kush MCCloud, Urban Havoc, DJ T Major and others doors 7 pm. The Hoxton Tony Junior. Izakaya Sushi House Dub Connection Sound System (digital reggae/UK steppers) 10 pm. Kool Haus Kill The Zo Kill the Noise, Mat Zo 10 pm. Mill Street Brew Pub DJ Humble Mike (soul/ funk/classic hip-hop) 8 pm. The Piston Disco Night A Digital Needle 10 pm. Rivoli Pool Lounge DJ Plan B (hip-hop/rap/club). The Savoy Mad City (R&B/hip-hop/dancehall) 10 pm. Sneaky Dee’s Shake-A-Tail. Wrongbar Sweet Tears DJs Tyrone Solomon & Dirty Dale.

ñ

Sunday, May 25 Pop/Rock/Hip-Hop/Soul

Aspetta Caffe Luke Vajsar (solo bass) 4 pm. Drake Hotel Wolf Gang 8 pm. Holy Oak Cafe Thom Gill & Ryan Driver

(pop) 9 pm. ñ Kensington Market PS Kensington Freeman

Dre & the Kitchen Party. Linsmore Tavern Pat Perez & John Dickie

out attempting to actually reproduce the formal qualities. The band’s 2009 self-titled album, for instance, was based on the feeling of certain old blues records, while Creep On Creepin’ On borrowed ideas from doo-wop. With Hot Dreams, he’s looking instead to classic soul and setting aside some of the more overtly macabre themes of his previous work. But despite his attempts to bring out the more sensual qualities, Hot Dreams is still indisputably dark. “Creepy is the sexy side of scary, in a way. There’s something subtly scary about it.” The video for Hot Dreams is as creepy and eerie as we’ve come to expect from Timber Timbre, setting the spooky country soul ballad in a particularly depressing strip club. It’s not the first place that comes to mind for Kirk’s music, though he tells me he’s met a dancer at Club Paradise who used music from his last album for her stage show. “I was blown away. To me it was the ultimate compliment somehow. In my experiences going to those places, it tends to be really aggressive music that gets played, and not music that I find sensual in any kind of way. The idea that she found it was able to work in that world and be acceptable was kind of exciting for me.” benjaminb@nowtoronto.com | @­benjaminboles

Band (R&B) 3 to 7 pm. Orbit Room Horshack (classic rock hits) 10 pm. The Painted Lady Punk Sunday Sid’s Kids (punk) 8 pm. Phoenix Concert Theatre Aftermath Music Festival Aesthetic Perfection, DeVision, Panic Lift, Surgyn, Glass Apple Bonzai, For All the Emptiness (industrial/synthpop/EBM) 8 pm. The Piston No Parking (funk/soul/reggae) 9 pm. Rivoli Essential Soul, Urban Jive, the Disclaimers doors 7 pm. TRANZAC MAIN HALL EP Launch Party Pins & Needles (Girls Rock Camp band) 2 pm. Virgin Mobile Mod Club One Sound Youth Singing Competition & Benefit For Youth Without Shelter 6 pm.

ñ

Folk/Blues/Country/World

Al Green Theatre Jewish Music Week Vira

Lozinsky & the Emil Aybinder Ensemble 8 pm.

Buddies in Bad Times Theatre Dear Armen

(Armenian music and dance) 8 pm.5 The Cage 292 Jam Phill Hood 10 pm. Cameron House The Double Cuts (western swing) 10 pm, Kristine Schmitt & Her Special Powers 6 pm. C’est What Roam doors 6:30 pm, Cadre (roots/blues) 3 to 5:30 pm. Free Times Cafe Nashville Bound Glen Hornblast, Brian Donkers, Grainne, Jess Janz 8 to 11

pm, Jewish Brunch Buffet The Shpeelers 11 am. Full of Beans Coffee Rebas Full Of Beans ­Sundays Brian Blain 2 to 4 pm. Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar Acoustic Family Bluegrass Brunch 10 am to 1 pm. Grossman’s Open Blues Jam Brian Cober (double slide guitar) 10 pm. Hugh’s Room The Soozimusic Musicparty Soozi Schlanger, Swamperella, Tony Quarrington, Andrea Ramolo, David Baxter, Liam Titcomb, Tannis Slimmons, Judith Cohen & Tamar Ilana 8:30 pm. The Local Los Caballeros del Son (Cuban) 9 pm, Chris Coole (old-time) 5 pm. Lola Jeff G & the Four Heads. Lula Lounge Lulaworld Festival: CD release Dominic Mancuso (Italian, world music) doors 6:30 pm, Sunday Brunch Jorge Maza noon. Press Club G Mark Weston 8:30 pm. Relish Bar & Grill Stir It Up Sundays 9 pm, Liane Fainsinger 7 pm. The Sister Taxi Chain (roots) ­matinee. Southside Johnny’s Open Jam Rebecca Matiesen & Phoenix 9:30 pm. Tranzac Southern Cross Singalong Soiree Gathering Sparks 7:30 to 9:30 pm, Marianne Girard (folk) 5 pm.

ñ

Jazz/Classical/Experimental

Array Space Toronto Improvisers Orchestra

Eugene Martynec (jazz/classical/avant/im-


provised) 2 pm.

Emmet Ray Bar Live And Interactive Adam Teixeira, Derek Gray (jazz) 9 pm.

The Flying Beaver Pubaret Manaret Sarah

Strange & Erin Breen 7:30 pm. Gate 403 Peter Eastmure Jazz Band 9 pm, Mark Yan Jazz Band 5 to 8 pm. Grossman’s New Orleans Connection All Star Jazz Band 4:30 to 9 pm. Habits Gastropub Charcoal Sketch Cabaret (musical theatre) 8 to 11 pm. The Jazz Bistro Cabaret Julie Michels 7 pm, Brunch Cadence 12:30 pm. Morgans on the Danforth Girl’s Night Out East Jam Lisa Particelli (jazz) 2 to 5 pm. Musideum Brownman Ali w/ Dylan Bell (jazz) 8 pm. Pauper’s Pub The Octokats (jazz) 3 pm. Poetry Jazz Cafe Patrick Hewan Trio 2:30 to 5:30 pm. The Rex International Tap Dance Day Allison Toffan’s Toronto Rhythm Initiative 9:30 pm, James Brown Trio 7 pm, Freeway Dixieland 3:30 pm, Excelsior Dixieland Jazz noon. Rosedale Presbyterian Church Recitals At Rosedale: The Seven Deadly Sins 2:30 pm.

Royal Conservatory of Music Mazzoleni Hall 21C Music Festival: Hush!

ñ Marc-André Hamelin (piano) 3 pm. Royal Conservatory of Music Koerner Hall 21C Music Festival: Firebrands ñ Esprit Orchestra 8 pm.

Czech Music Canzona Chamber Players 2 pm. St Michael and All Angels Church Spring Vibrations The Wychwood Clarinet Choir, ­Arnold Faber (vibraphonist) 3:30 pm.

Toronto Centre for the Arts George Weston Recital Hall Brahms Orchestra Toronto, Jonathan Crow (violin) 3 pm.

Dance Music/DJ/Lounge

Fox & Fiddle Danforth Yolo Sundays Industry Night 10 pm. Harlem Word Sound Power: Open Mic & Community Networking Forum DJ Black Lotus. River Gambler Beats Ahoy! Sydney Blu, Addy, Jayforce, Jonathan Rosa, Evan G, ­Fresque, Casualties of Sound, Quim. Sneaky Dee’s Killitorous CD release And After Party DJ Coleman Wallace. Sonic Boom Kensington SlowPitch (turntablism/beats) 3 pm.

ñ

Monday, May 26 Pop/Rock/Hip-Hop/Soul

Gate 403 Cheryl White Rhythm & Blues Band

9 pm.

Horseshoe Shoeless Monday Electicus, Dogwood and Dahlia, Thought Beneath the Film doors 8:30 pm. Kitch Hypnotic Lounge Series Luke Vajsar (solo bass). Orbit Room Jordan John (soul/R&B/funk) 10 pm. The Piston Les Lupes, Illyin Pipes, RLMDL 9 pm.

continued on page 46 œ

St. Andrew by-the-Lake Church The Year Of

THE DAKOTA TAVERN Thu May 22 9 • $15 RON HAWKINS & THE DO GOOD ASSASSINS Fri May 23 10 GRAHAM PLAYFORD AND THE FLYING J’S NEW! Sat May 24 10-2 BLUEGRASS BRUNCH 7 GABRIELLE PAPILLON PM

PM

PM

PM

CD Release with GRAYDON

9PM

JAMES & THE YOUNG NOVELISTS

ROYAL CROWNS

THE OSSINGTON THU 22 FAT LACES Pre-weekend hip hop, soul, chill out dance party... FRI 23

Tue May 27 Wed May 28

DANNY MICHEL & BAND WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

9PM • $10

THE TREASURES 9 THE SPLIT PM

249 OSSINGTON AVE (just north of Dundas) 416-850-4579 · thedakotatavern.com

KILLITOROUS CD RELEASE

ENDING TYRANNY, I EMPIRE, WIDOWMAKER, MAKE HASTE TO MUTINY, FALSIFIER EVERY MON LEGENDS OF KARAOKE

ANOTHER ROUND TRIVIA EVERY WED WHAT’S POPPIN’ FRIDAY AUGUST 1 CRO-MAGS, ENFORCERS, LONG KNIFE, HASSLER, WILD SIDE thu may 22 | drs 8pm | $8 adV/$10 anchorSHOP presents TM

rob moir & ThE GrEaT lakES

SAT 24 IN TOUCH ... All hit dance party blowout... all the stuff you need... SUN 25

with FRiday niGht tRend

LaURent BoURqUe & JeFF RiChaRds

BRASS FACTS TRIVIA

MON 26 Closed for Renovations...

7PM

EVERY SATURDAY SHAKE A TAIL SUNDAY MAY 25

Brown... Spinning hip hop, soul, RnB, dancehall, salsa , grime...

10PM

Mon May 26

SATURDAY MAY 24

AGAINST THE CURRENT ONCE UPON A TIME, KING THE KID

GET BUCK w/ DJ Nino

The city’s best quiz night... pals & prizes...

THE BEAUTIES

FRIDAY MAY 23 LATE

HALFWITS - SUMMER FAMILY REUNION

EVERY WEDNESDAY 7:30PM -9:30PM

NEW! Sun May 25 10-2 BLUEGRASS BRUNCH PM

FRIDAY MAY 23 EARLY

OLD GRAY, FRAMEWORKS, TINY MOVING PARTS + GUESTS

TUE 27 Closed for Renovations... WED 28

DON’T GET BORED OF US AND LEAVE Comedy w/ Tom

Henry & David Dineen Porter...

61 OSSINGTON AVE | 416•850•0161 | theossington.com

Tickets available on www.TicketFly.com fri may 23 | drs 9pm | $7

THURSDAY MAY 22 • 8PM

HOSHI FURU SOL ARDOUR MIRRELIA | J’NAI FRIDAY MAY 23 • 8PM

JESSY LANZA SAINT PEPSI SATURDAY MAY 24 • 10PM

thur may 22

Brooklyn doran ep rel. chriStian BridgeS adam Faux dutty

reggae dancehall party choppa chop Fri may 23 paul e. lopeS

Beam me up

a very Special Sat may 24 diSco party

tWo Four tueSdayS

mercy Flight Joy phillipS gold complex omhouSe Wed BB gunS may 28 petra glynt

tue may 27

Serving great Food • 5:30 - 10:30pm! 416.532.3989 • 937 Bloor Street West www.thepiston.ca

TURNING POINT

SELECTOR: A MAN CALLED WARWICK

SPECIAL GUEST: ALEX VINTAGE VOUDOU THURSDAY MAY 29 • 9PM

THE ROYAL CROWNS CRUMMY STUFF | PUNCHING NUNS FRIDAY MAY 30 • 8PM

YOUNG DOCTORS IN LOVE

CD RELEASE

BLIMP ROCK | FITNESS

JUNE 1 | PAPA

JUNE 7 | THE PREATURES JUNE 9 | MOONFACE JUNE 23 | PAINTED PALMS

JUNE 29 | WHITE LUNG

FallS GooDNiGhT, SUNriSE ThE 92 ToroNTo blUE JayS ThE NUrSEry sat may 24 | drs 8:30pm | $20

UK Cult Legend and Rock & Roll’s Greatest Failure

JohN oTWay returns to canada with The big band! w/ guests ThE bEllErEGarDS sun may 25 | drs 7pm | $8

ESSENTial SoUl UrbaN JivE ThE DiSclaimErS mon may 26 | drs 8:30pm | $5

mc maTT o’briEN

BRyan o’GoRman, Ron spaRKs, Kate davis, eRiC andReWs, miCheLLe shaUGhnessy, eddie deLLa siepe, pat BURtsCheR, ChRis RoBinson, sandRa BattaGLini ZaBRina Chevannes & moRe! alTDoTcomEDyloUNGE.com tue may 27 | drs 8pm | $5

iNDiE NiGhT

GRand FoRmat FoRtniGhts Bohemian GRoove WhisKey epiphany

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anchorSHOP

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presents

carTEr hUlSEy with GrEG mcEvoy hoWiE SUThErlaND

Tickets available on www.TicketFly.com 332 QUEEN ST. W. | 416.596.1908 | rivoli.ca NOW May 22-28 2014

45


œcontinued from page 45

days 9 pm.

THE SISTER Tame Hell, Subject to Change, Quiqui Escamilla.

WRONGBAR Mø (singer/songwriter). See preview, ñ page 41.

SOUND ACADEMY All You Can Eat Tour Steel

JAZZ/CLASSICAL/EXPERIMENTAL

Panther, Future Villains doors 6:30 pm. VIRGIN MOBILE MOD CLUB Tree Of Stars Tour Failure doors 8 pm, all ages. YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE Lunchtime Live! Alysha Brilla 12:30 to 1:30 pm.

FOLK/BLUES/COUNTRY/WORLD

BAR RADIO Manic Monday Songwriter Open Mic Samantha Martin (singer/songwriter) 8 to 11 pm. CAMERON HOUSE Weatherstone 10 pm, Joe Nolan 6 pm. DORA KEOGH Open Stage Julian Taylor, Robert Priest 8 pm. FLATO MARKHAM THEATRE Country Music Association of Ontario Awards The Western Swing Authority, Jason Blaine, the Good Family Band, Marshall Dane, Autumn Hill, Beverley Mahood, Jason McCoy and others 7:30 pm. FREE TIMES CAFE Open Stage Mondays Christian Bridges 7:30 pm. GROSSMAN’S Jam No Band Required 9 pm. THE LOCAL Hamstrung Stringband (bluegrass/ honky-tonk).

T.O. MUSIC NOTES

CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY Music Mondays Duo Agilis (flute, piano) noon to 1 pm. EMMET RAY BAR Olivier Clements Group (jazz) 7 pm. GATE 403 Toby Hughs Jazz Band 5 to 8 pm. THE REX John MacLeod’s Rex Hotel Orchestra 8:30 pm, Peter Hill Quintet 6:30 pm. ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC MAZZOLENI HALL CMC Stepping Stone Competition: SemiFinals (classical).

SEVEN44 GTA Swing Band 7:30 to 10:30 pm. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS Jay Daneley’s

Ethio Jazz Project 7:30 pm.

DANCE MUSIC/DJ/LOUNGE

ALLEYCATZ Salsa Night DJ Frank Bischun 8 pm. DANCE CAVE Manic Mondays DJ Shannon (ret-

ro 70s/80s) 10 pm. REPOSADO Mezcal Mondays DJ Ellis Dean.

ZACH RUITER

clubs&concerts

THE PAINTED LADY Open Mic Monday 10 pm. RELISH BAR & GRILL Stratochief 8 pm. ROXTON Eva Moon (singer/songwriter) 10 pm. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS Open Mic Mon-

Tuesday, May 27

DANCING IN THE STREET

POP/ROCK/HIP-HOP/SOUL

After appearing in a music video for Born Ruffians’ Oh Cecilia, Kathleen Byers – aka Toronto’s dancing crossing guard – was suspended from her post. Apparently, donning the police-issued ensemble outside of the job is a no-no. Byers was also in hot water for singing and dancing on the job, something that’s made her a neighbourhood favourite in Brockton Village for over a decade. Unhappy with her unpaid suspension, Byers quit her job. But last Sunday, May 18, about 100 Torontonians joined her to dance in the street for her last hurrah. She’s since reconsidered leaving, hiring a lawyer to help her cause. As far as we’re concerned, the dancing queen should be reinstated ASAP.

DRAKE HOTEL Double CD launch Ann Vriend,

AVICII FANS OVERDO IT Twenty-nine concertgoers were hospitalized on Saturday, May 17, during Swedish DJ/producer Avicii’s sold-out Rogers Centre show – so many that the venue’s on-site medics were overwhelmed and had to involve EMS. According to reports, 10 were taken to hospital before the progressive house DJ’s 11 pm set had even begun. An officer on duty said that number of incidents is unusual. The vast majority fell ill as a result of excessive alcohol consumption.

FORT YORK & GARRISON COMMON • TORONTO

SATURDAY JUNE 7

INTERPOL

THE KILLS • HALF MOON RUN LORD HURON • KEVIN DREW • SHAD AUSTRA • A TRIBE CALLED RED THE DARCYS • VANCE JOY REUBEN AND THE DARK MEGAN BONNELL • MAYLEE TODD

SUNDAY JUNE 8

BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE CONSTANTINES CHVRCHES • WASHED OUT

GORD DOWNIE, THE SADIES • HYDRA FUCKED UP • DO MAKE SAY THINK BADBADNOTGOOD • LOWELL RIVER TIBER • ZAKI IBRAHIM

Eh440 (power pop/retro soul) 8 pm. GATE 403 Danny Marks & Alec Fraser Duo 9 pm. THE GROOVE BAR Acoustic show Daniella Watters 7 pm. GROSSMAN’S Nicola Vaughan (pop rock) 9:30 pm. HORSESHOE Dave Bookman’s Nu Music Nite Pepper the Crow, Sun K, the Tungsten Hum, Amos J doors 8:30 pm. MONARCHS PUB Showcase Tuesdays Kate Todd 9 pm. ORBIT ROOM The Sattalites (reggae) 10 pm. THE PAINTED LADY aBabe Music Showcase Kristen Bussandri, Melanie Brulee 9 pm. THE PISTON Mercy Flight, Gold Complex, Joy Phillips 9 pm. RIVOLI Indie Night Grand Format, Fortnights, Bohemian Groove, Whiskey Epiphany doors 8 pm. VIRGIN MOBILE MOD CLUB Tree Of Stars Tour Failure doors 8 pm, all ages.

WINTER GARDEN THEATRE Chelsea Wolfe 8 pm. ñEels,

FOLK/BLUES/COUNTRY/WORLD

CAMERON HOUSE Sinners Choir 10 pm, Noel Johnson 6 pm.

THE DUKE LIVE.COM Open Jam Frank Wilks

8:30 pm.

FREE TIMES CAFE Saro Nova (singer/songwriter)

8 pm.

HUGH’S ROOM Discoveries Ewen Farncombe,

Daniel Mendez, Emma Phillips, Nicole Rayy 8:30 pm. IZAKAYA SUSHI HOUSE Drummers In Exile 8:30 pm. THE LOCAL Rhonda Stakich (singer/songwriter) 9 pm. PRESS CLUB Toast n’ Jam Open Mic Ron Leary 10 pm. RELISH BAR & GRILL Jordan Glick Usual Suspects 7 pm. TRANZAC TIKI ROOM Toronto Folk Singers Club 8 pm.

JAZZ/CLASSICAL/EXPERIMENTAL

FOUR SEASONS CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS RICHARD BRADSHAW AMPHITHEATRE

Tickets available at Livenation.com, all Ticketmaster outlets, Rotate This and Soundscapes. All dates, acts and ticket prices subject to change without notice. Ticket prices subject to applicable fees.

WIN tickets at nowtoronto.com/contests

46

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

Internation Donné Roberts Band noon to 1 pm. GATE 403 Abbey Sholzberg Jazz Trio 5 to 8 pm. THE JAZZ BISTRO Danny B 8 pm. RASPUTIN VODKA BAR Linda Carone (vintage jazz & blues) 7:30 to 9:30 pm. THE REX David Rubel 9:30 pm, Allison Au Trio 6:30 pm.

ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC MAZZOLENI HALL CMC Stepping Stone Competition: Semi-

Finals (classical). TONI BULLONI Jazz Night Pam Hyatt & Peter Hill 8 pm. TRINITY ST. PAUL’S CHURCH A Poet’s Love Talisker Players, Alexander Dobson (baritone) 8 pm.

rock) 8:30 pm.

DANCE MUSIC/DJ/LOUNGE

Preito’s Proverb Trio, Mustafa the Poet doors 7 pm. THE QUEEN’S LEGS Open Mic Skip Pickering 9:30 pm. RASPUTIN VODKA BAR Acoustic Jam/Open Mic Taylor Abrahamse (singer/songwriter) 9:30 pm. TRANZAC TIKI ROOM Comhaltas Irish Slow Session 7:30 pm. UNICORN PUB Open Jam B-Sides 10 pm.

ALLEYCATZ Bachata Night DJ Frank Bischun

8:30 pm.

BLOKE & 4TH Swank DJ Geoff Brown. GOSSIP RESTAURANT Latin Nights DJ Alejo (salsa/bachata/kizomba/merengue/reggaeton).

REPOSADO Alien Radio DJ Gord C. TOBY’S FAMOUS All Dressed Tuesdays DJ Caff

(funk/soul/new Jack swing/rock/reggae) 10 pm.

Wednesday, May 28 POP/ROCK/HIP-HOP/SOUL

ALLEYCATZ Electric Soul Circus. GROSSMAN’S Bruce Domoney 9:30 pm. THE JAZZ BISTRO The Soul Nannies 8 pm. THE LOADED DOG Tommy Rocker (rock) 9 pm. MOLSON AMPHITHEATRE Jack Johnson,

Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros 6 pm. ñ ORBIT ROOM LMT Connection (funk/R&B) 10 pm.

THE PAINTED LADY RockJazz Jam Wayne Cass, Great Bob Scott, Richard Underhill, Wayne Pellarin 9 pm. PHOENIX CONCERT THEATRE Kurt Vile & the Violators, Steve Gunn doors 8 pm. THE PISTON Double Cassette release show BB Guns, Petra Glynt, Omhouse 9 pm. PRESS CLUB The Shelters, Elephant’s Gerald, Mighty Big Word, Nagasaki 10 pm. RIVOLI Carter Hulsey, Greg McEvoy, Howie Sutherland doors 8:30 pm. SEVEN44 Uptown Island Lindo P, Korexion, Tony Anthony, Nadera, Skibu, Kisco, DJs Su Pa Natty, Dougy Fresh, DJ Vincy and others 7 pm. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS Lotus Wight 10 pm. UNICORN PUB Open Jam 10 pm.

ñ ñ

FOLK/BLUES/COUNTRY/WORLD

ASPETTA CAFFE Open Jam El Faron. CAMERON HOUSE Jen Lane, John Antoniuk 6

pm, Whitney Rose 10 pm. EMMET RAY BAR Peter Boyd, Noah Zacharin (blues/country/folk/roots) 9 pm. FREE TIMES CAFE Mirabel Palmer-Elliot, Chloe Elliot 8 pm. GATE 403 Blues Night Julian Fauth 9 pm. HUGH’S ROOM CD release More Please! (folk

JOHNNY JACKSON Jam Matt Cooke (folk/pop) 9 pm.

THE LOCAL Whitebrow (spooky folk). LOLA Wednesday’s Child Open Stage 8 pm. LULA LOUNGE Lulaworld Festival Dafnis

JAZZ/CLASSICAL/EXPERIMENTAL

ALLEYCATZ Carlo Berardinucci Band (swing/ jazz) 8:30 pm. CHALKERS PUB Girls Night Out: Lisa Particelli’s GNOJAZZ Jam Session 8 pm. GALLERY 345 John Cage String Quartets Quator Bozzini 8 pm. GATE 403 Leigh Graham Jazz Duo 5 to 8 pm. HORSESHOE CD release party Turbo Street Funk, the Shuffle Demons doors 8:30 pm. THE JAZZ BISTRO Bill McBirnie, Louis Simao Trio 8 pm. MEZZETTA Andrew Boniwell, Mark Cashion 9 & 10:15 pm. MONARCHS PUB Jazz Wednesdays The Michael Danckert Quartette 8 pm. NAWLINS JAZZ BAR Jim Heineman Trio (jazz) 7 to 11 pm. ONLY CAFÉ Lazersuzan (groove-based jazz meditations) 8 pm. RELISH BAR & GRILL The BTB’s (instrumental jazz/funk/fusion) 7:30 pm. THE REX Buddy Aquilina 9:30 pm, Amanda Tosoff Trio 6:30 pm. TRANZAC SOUTHERN CROSS Trevor Giancola (jazz) 7:30 pm. TRINITY ST. PAUL’S CHURCH A Poet’s Love Talisker Players, Alexander Dobson (baritone) 8 pm.

DANCE MUSIC/DJ/LOUNGE

BOVINE SEX CLUB Pussy Whipped Wednesdays DJ Recklezz (dance party) 10 pm.

BRASSAII Les Nuits DJ Undercover, Mike Toast

(top 40/R&B/hip-hop/dance). CLUB 120 Open Mic Comedy Show DJ Todd Klinck doors 8 pm.5 CRAWFORD Connected Reggae Party.

3


album reviews trades lines with a computer over a glitchy techno beat. Lead single Do It Again provides the ultra-catchy, sexually charged dance-floor track we’ve come to expect from the singer, and Every Little Thing is a melancholy slower burner that earns a spot on the aforementioned short list. Top track: Do It Again Röyksopp & Robyn play Echo Beach August 25. JULIA LeCONTE

heartbreaking voice and a knack for killer guitar melodies. Top track: Oxen Hope SAMANTHA EDWARDS

PRINCESS NOKIA Metallic Butter-

album of the week VAN ETTEN ñSHARON NNNNN

Are We There (Jagjaguwar) Rating: Sharon Van Etten is one of the finest singer/songwriters of our time, with a completely realized sound – sombre but uplifting, minimal yet epic – and a darkly emotive voice completely her own. The Brooklyn musician exhales her lyrics as if she’s carrying the heaviest of loads and is about to collapse under the weight of it. Of her four albums, she’s never released a stinker, but there was a sense of stasis to 2012’s Tramp. On her newest, the songs move and climb, melody makes a greater appearance, and

Pop/Rock DREAMS ñMARINE NNNN

Lemon Tree (You’ve Changed) Rating: Lemon Tree, the third album in four years from Ian Kehoe’s Marine Dreams, is more mellow, delicate-sounding and electronic than its predecessor, last year’s great, power-poppy Corner Of The Eye. The former Attack in Black man is evidently comfortable in the studio, and getting more so with each release. Corner Of The Eye highlighted themes of love, but Lemon Tree focuses instead on reminiscing – there’s even a song called Remembering. Kehoe’s acoustic 12-string, coupled with vintagey drum machine parts, layers of keyboards and what sounds like backup singer Tamara Lindeman’s flute, lend the songs a nostalgic, dreamy, summery gleam. It’s a toss-up which song’s best: hooky Constant Love is clearly the single, yet country-tinged Flowers For Healing has the most clearly articulated, beautifully bittersweet melody and meaning. Top track: Flowers For Healing Marine Dreams play the Horseshoe Thursday (May 22). SARAH GREENE

Hip-hop THE ROOTS ...And Then You Shoot Your Cousin (Def Jam/Universal) Rating: NNN Morality brushes up against capitalist dreams on the 11th LP from hip-hop’s preeminent live band, an album as bleak and anti-pop as they come. Following last year’s Elvis Costello collaboration and 2010’s sprawling and conceptual Undun, the Roots offer a scathing assessment of contemporary hip-hop. It’s another conceptual effort that rips the facade off glamorized drug and strip club culture to examine the fraught motivations behind them. Typically fiery emcee Black Thought is a

the whole effect is excellently immediate. She leaves behind her guitar more often in favour of piano, most notably on Our Love, opting for a sparse, sexy electronic dance beat, and Tarifa, boosted by warm horns and organs. Van Etten’s poetic lyrics continue to focus on navigating the complexities of love, but they hit harder and heavier. Take the song I Love You But I’m Lost, whose title says it all. On second-last song I Know, meanwhile, she turns in the performance of a lifetime. She gives everything, and it’s impossible to be unmoved. Top track: Our Love CARLA GILLIS solemn and almost peripheral presence among grinding rhythms, restless strings, untamed percussion, guest MCs, soul singers and wholesale samples of Nina Simone and experimental French composer Michel Chion. The cumulative effect of these jumbled voices deprives listeners of an easily graspable emotional centre – a move that mirrors the lack of moral grounding the Roots are critiquing. The half-hour run time makes the relentlessly cerebral approach more palatable, though the ending feels a bit too tidy: the band suddenly turns optimistic on bouncy R&B closer Tomorrow. Top track: Understand The Roots play David Pecaut Square June 7 as part of Luminato. KEVIN RITCHIE

Electronic & ROBYN ñRÖYKSOPP NNNN

Do It Again (Arts & Crafts) Rating: The Girl And The Robot from Norwegian electro duo Röyksopp’s Junior album and None Of Dem from Swedish pop star Robyn’s Body Talk Pt. 1 were both excellent collaborations, the former an outstanding synth-pop gem that belongs with Dancing On My Own and Call Your Girlfriend on the short list of all-time great Robyn songs that make women feel understood. So this debut joint EP from the Scandinavian power dance team is giddily anticipated. The 35-minute project is bookended by 10-minute jams that flaunt Röyksopp’s deft orchestration. On dramatic opener Monument, Robyn is regal and deliberate over a simple electronic bass line, until a muffled jazz saxophone creeps in unexpectedly midway through. The closer, on the other hand, is a Robynless, almost eerie ambient soundscape that calls to mind recent Boards of Canada. But it’s the middle songs that are most immediately enjoyable. On Sayit, Robyn

= Critics’ Pick NNNNN = Perfect NNNN = Great NNN = Good NN = Bad N = Horrible

Ñ

fly (independent) Rating: NNN Princess Nokia is 21-year-old Harlem native Destiny Frasqueri, a fast-talking, selfstyled postmodern anime superhero whose music floats in an ethereal space between the digital world’s glistening futurism and the realities of life in New York City. On her self-released debut album, Frasqueri and producer OWWWLS blend an array of styles and BPMs encompassing drum ’n’ bass, ambient, scratchy trip-hop and West African rhythms into an enjoyably daydreamy aesthetic. Like Mykki Blanco, Janelle Monáe and M.I.A., Princess Nokia is attempting to invent an original style. Her approach is genre-agnostic, and she moves fluidly between singing and rapping. But individually, the songs – especially those borrowing from 90s genres, like Dragons (drum ’n’ bass) and Biohazard Butterfly (trip-hop) – revel more in convention than reinvention. What shines brightest is Princess Nokia’s fun and unapologetically nerdy love of anime and fantasy, and the confidence with which she delivers her overall vision. Top track: Dragons KR

MR. SCRUFF Friendly Bacteria (Ninja Tune) Rating: NNN Veteran Manchester DJ/producer Mr. Scruff (aka Andy Carthy) is known for his wildly eclectic DJ sets and the massive success of his 1999 hit Get A Move On, but his albums have been a touch inconsistent and often stray into the goofy. So it was a promising sign when word spread that his fifth would feature no silly tunes about fish and focus on tighter songs that rely less on samples. Many producers of his era lost the plot when trends shifted away from flipping sample loops, but Carthy’s done a good job keeping the warmth by pairing live instrumentation with electronic textures. The vocal collaborations work especially well and give much of the album left-field soul. Too bad that so many of the instrumental tracks are pleasant but forgettable downtempo jams that dilute the impact of the highlights. Top track: Stereo Breath (feat. Denis Jones) BENJAMIN BOLES

Avant-world

ñTANYA TAGAQNNNN

Animism (Six Shooter) Rating: Except for the comparatively straightforward first track, which provides three and a half minutes of English-language singing before digressing into screams and howls, there are no lyrics on Tanya Tagaq’s third album that most listeners will understand. Animism is based in traditional Inuk throat singing, but Tagaq obliterates any boundaries in that genre or any other as she grunts, pants, whines and bawls. Sometimes the vocals are uncomfort-

Win TickeTs! collective concerts presents

Folk

sharon Jones & The Dap-kings

MIRAH Changing Light (Abso-

ñ

lute Magnitude) Rating: NNNN In her nearly 20-year career, Mirah’s latest album was one of the toughest to write. In the five years since her previous release, she broke up with her long-time girlfriend and uprooted from long-time home Portland for New York. This period of transition is reflected on Changing Light, on which Mirah experiments with new sounds and effects, partially thanks to tUnE-yArDs co-producer Eli Crews. Mirah has dubbed this her breakup record, and it goes through the phases of a relationship’s end: sadness, anger, confusion, forgiveness. Satiny ballad Turned The Heat Off is rife with sultry strings, Fleetfoot Ghost is just a squeaky guitar and winsome vocals, and the album highlight, slow burner Oxen Hope, uses vintage synths and vocoder to chilling effect. While clearly her most varied album to date, it still sounds decidedly Mirah: DIY folk singer/songwriter of the 90s with that

able (that goes away after a couple of listens), and sometimes, like on Caribou or Rabbit, they’re crystal clear and beautiful. The instrumentation is just as amorphous. Jesse Zubot’s violin is an ominous barometer of conflict in this tale, but also sounds like a wounded wolf here or a screeching eagle there. With Zubot, who is also the producer, Tagaq combines her wicked noises with electronic beats, experimental strings and feverish percussion – like the urgent industrial rock drum injection two and a half minutes into Umingmak – making for one of the most arresting albums of the year. It also includes northern field recordings, but you can’t tell where – the whole thing sounds like a northern field recording. There are a hundred ways to interpret these tracks politically, but sometimes you don’t have to guess, as on the painful final track, Fracking, where Tagaq wails over fraught strings. It sounds like death. Then there are the more intimate questions about self. She’s not asking you to examine ideas about your own humanness, animalness, sexuality or feminine identity (not in English, anyway), and yet you do. Top track: Umingmak Tanya Tagaq plays David Pecaut Square as part of Luminato on June 10. JL

Friday June 6

Doors: 7 pm Massey Hall All Ages $39.50-59.50 masseyhall.com O n s ale n ow. C h e c k o u t c o l l e c t i ve c o n c e r t s .c o m f o r m o r e inf o.

parqueT courTs

Sunday, June 8

Doors: 8 pm The Horseshoe Tavern 19+ RT/SS $14.50

Visit nowtoronto.com/contests to enter! One entry per household.

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

47


DAVID HAWE

Julie Tepperman (left) and Amy Keating play with issues of intimacy, community and human connection in Tease, performed at Jilly’s.

48

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW


JULIE TEPPERMAN AND AMY KEATING GET INTIMATE AND INTERACTIVE IN ONE-ON-ONE SHOW AT EAST-END PERFORMANCE CRAWL By GLENN SUMI

istoric strip club Jilly’s was bought by TEASE created and performed developers last week. But thanks to inby Amy Keating, Julie Tepperdependent theatre, you’ll get one last man, Jeff Ho, Andrew Moodie, peak – and a couple of quick encounters Jessica Moss and Sabryn Rock. – before the poles come down. Part of Crow’s Theatre’s East End Seven-actor, site-specific show Tease, Performance Crawl. Opens Friday part of Crow’s Theatre’s inaugural East (May 23) and runs to May 31, WedEnd Performance Crawl (see sidebar, nesday-Sunday at 11:25 am, noon page 50), takes over the VIP lounge of and 1 pm. $15. Jilly’s (meet at 696 the famous club. Queen East). 416-907-0468, Julie Tepperman and Amy Keating, crowstheatre.com. two of the project’s creators, say Tease isn’t about strippers – or Jilly’s, for that matter, although the club’s grungy appearance will definitely add to the ambience. (They won’t be adding any special lights or sets to the place.) There may be elements of stripping in the show, but audiences shouldn’t expect lap dances or nudity. “People go to strip clubs for intimacy, for connection, for love, to be turned on, for any number of reasons,” says Keating, “and we’re trying to play with those things. We want to crack open the experience you might get at a strip club.” Each show has room for five audience members, so get your tickets fast. Each person gets one-on-one time with five “dancers” (including Tepperman and Keating) at separate stations. You may

witness a monologue, have a discussion, see a bit of dance – anything’s possible. There are bouncers and bodyguards, too – some actors, some real. “We’re playing with the idea of making someone feel like they’re the most important person in the room and fulfilling a fantasy they might have without actually knowing what that is in advance,” says Tepperman, a member of Convergence Theatre, whose Gladstone Variations remains one of the most memorable site-specific shows in recent history. “It’s almost like a first and only date. We know the length of time is five minutes. The challenge is to be as present as we can be with whoever happens to be sitting across from us. There’s structure to the encounter, but we can improvise within that depending on the energy between us.” The pair have done research, paid for lap dances to talk with performers and pretended they were checking out clubs for a bachelor party “for Amy’s fiancé.” Of course, the show isn’t really about stripping. One of its themes is how to make a real connection in a world where we’re so detached from one another. “This is an age when everyone can find some sort of ‘connection’ – I’m putting that word in quotes – online, or in chat rooms, chat roulette, porn, in your own home or on your phone,” says Keating, part of Outside the March, the company behind the award-winning Terminus and Mr. Marmalade. “People go to strip clubs for some sort of human connection. Whether they get it is up for debate. I’ve heard stories that sometimes the strippers don’t dance, they’ll just sit and chat or hold hands, because it’s hard enough to find that in the normal world.” Keating took some women’s studies classes at university, and is interested in sex work and the third-wave feminist view that women who do sex work aren’t victims.

continued on page 50 œ

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

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TEASE

DAVID HAWE

œcontinued from page 49

“They have a choice and agency,” she says. “I say that knowing that there’s a grey area and everything is not as simple as that – and that I’m speaking as a privileged white woman.” Coincidentally, the two see a connection between the stripper’s world and that of live theatre. “People said the proliferation of porn and the internet would kill strip clubs, but that’s not happening,” says Tepperman. “Similarly, why do people leave their homes to sit in a theatre when it’s so much easier and probably cheaper to watch stuff on Netflix? Ultimately, people crave a live experience, be it one-on-one or in a group. That element of community is a very human craving.” Because it’s a theatre festival, the two know they’re bound to end up performing opposite people they know – friends, loved ones, critics, colleagues. Tepperman says she’s considering asking certain people not to come. But Keating is looking forward to that challenge.

“I think the fact that we’ll be doing it 15 times a day is going to bring something out in us – I’m hoping it’s a certain vulnerability,” says Keating. “I’m excited by the idea that someone I know might come in, and I’ll have to kick it up a notch. If they’re a close friend, a critic or a director, I’m going to have to be really authentic. It’ll be an exciting challenge. We’re asking ourselves to be vulnerable,

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May 15 to June 1, 2014 Berkeley Street Theatre Upstairs 26 Berkeley Street, Toronto Tickets online: www.canadianrep.ca Phone: 416.368.3110

and I think that’s ultimately what everyone wants, from theatre and other humans in general.” Tepperman reconsiders, and says she shouldn’t prejudge what she will feel like. “There might be strangers who make me really uncomfortable, and maybe I’ll be comfortable with people I know because the ice has already been broken,” she says. “We’ll constantly be challenging our own boundaries.” During the process, the performers have had to confront their own issues about body image and trust. “It’s a closet of a space; there’s darkness, music, a lot of things overpowering the senses,” says Tepperman. “I feel less in the spotlight than if I were on a big proscenium stage. And therefore I’ll probably be able to go to places in the improv that I might not go to in an ordinary play.” And besides, laughs Tepperman, unlike higher-end clubs like the Brass Rail, Jilly’s has a reputation for not having your perfect under-25 model bodies. “So I won’t be worried about being perfectly shaved or groomed.” Both artists say they’ve been inspired by the UK-based performance company Punchdrunk, whose interactive show Sleep No More has been running in New York City for years and whose The Drowned Man is a hit in London. In those shows, performers occasionally take one member of the audience into a room to have an experience that only they share. It happened to Tepperman when she saw Sleep No More. “It was so sexy,” she says about that one-on-one. “He lifted his mask off, hugged me and stroked my face. He was crying and I was crying by the end of it. It makes me remember how respectful we have to be of people’s vulnerabilities. I wanted to roleplay, but I didn’t want to freak him out, so I didn’t know how far to go. I felt like I wanted to cry and hug him. “It felt so special that nobody, except maybe a stage manager peeking in the room, knew except the two of us. He must do it a 100 times and wouldn’t remember me, but he made an impact on me in that moment. That sort of thing stimulates us with this experiment.” Part of the fascination of working on this project has been learning about the strip club as institution. There are tips about behaviour etiquette, tipping, safety. “And everyone relies on each other,” says Keating. “From the bouncer to the stripper to the DJ to the waiter, they rely on every other worker to make money. Like a restaurant. “Or,” she says, smiling, “like a theatre company.” 3 glenns@nowtoronto.com | @glennsumi

MORE ONLINE

Interview clips at nowtoronto.com

50

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

EASTERN PROMISES

Beginning this week, theatre no longer belongs exclusively to the west end. For a week and a half, Crow’s Theatre’s East End Performance Crawl takes over the Leslieville/Riverside neighbourhood. Besides Tease, here are some other mustsee shows. For tickets go to crowstheatre.com.

Mike Daisey

DREAMING OF ROB FORD

Leading North American monologist Mike Daisey made headlines when it was revealed that he’d made up some of Apple exposé The Agony And Ecstasy Of Steve Jobs. Now he’s taking on someone closer to home: our own cracksmoking mayor. Daisey’s shows always end up being as much about him as they are about his subjects, so expect him to deconstruct our ideas about fame and humour. Who knows? Maybe RoFo will come out of rehab to watch. To Friday (May 23) at the Big Picture Cinema (1035 Gerrard East)

Johnny O’Callaghan

WHO’S YOUR DADDY?

Uganda is a political hot spot these days. Here, Johnny O’Callaghan tells his true story about being a suicidal, out-of-work actor who meets and tries to adopt a threeyear-old African boy he’s told is an AIDS orphan. Friday (May 23) to June 1, the Loft Apartment (10 Hastings)

Tracey Erin Smith

SOULO THEATRE FESTIVAL T.J. Dawe

MEDICINE

T.J. Dawe’s monologues have made him a Fringe circuit superstar. He didn’t do a Toronto Fringe show last year, but he’s reviving his 2012 hit, his most personal yet, about his experiences at a spiritual retreat led by Gabor Maté involving group therapy, shamans and a drug called ayahuasca. May 29 to June 1 at the Loft Apartment (10 Hastings) Emelia Symington Fedy

Fringe Toronto audiences are familiar with the work of Tracey Erin Smith, who’s encouraged scores of people – from all walks of life – to use their experiences to create solo shows. This festivalwithin-a-festival includes shows by everyone from Nicaraguanborn lesbian stand-up comic Martha Chaves to well-known clowns Rachelle Elie and Sébastien Heins, as well as a talk by theatre veteran Linda Griffiths. Thursday to Sunday (May 22 to 25), Red Sandcastle Theatre (922 Queen East)

THREE MINUTE THERAPY

If trying to see everything at the festival is making you anxious, take three minutes out of your busy theatre day to talk to Vancouver-based professional advice giver Emelia Symington Fedy, who dispenses wise counsel – for free. Tuesday (May 27), at the Arts GS Market (1114 Queen East)


stage

more online nowtoronto.com/stage Audio clips from cover interview with TEASE’S JULIE TEPPERMAN AND AMY KEATING • Reviews of EAST END PERFORMANCE FEST SHOWS • Audio clips from interview with TOM HEDLEY • and more Fully searchable listings with venue maps nowtoronto.com/stage/listings

THEATRE PREVIEW

Post-war laughs

theatre listings

George F. Walker’s play about a young vet looks at class conflicts By JORDAN BIMM “Through all of George’s work there is a kind of anger about working-class George F. Walker, with Nancy Beatty, Mipeople getting stuck – a lack of social chael Healey, Haley McGee and Noah Reid. mobility,” says Michael Healey, who Presented by Canadian Rep Theatre at the plays Dean’s social worker, Oliver, who Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge). In previews, must break the bad news that good opens Friday (May 23) and runs to June 8, jobs are hard to find, especially for Tuesday-Saturday 8 pm, Sunday 7 pm, veterans. matinees Saturday-Sunday 2 pm (no even“Who gets sent off to war? It’s mosting show May 25). $19-$75. 416-872-1212, ly young people and people of a cermirvish.com. tain class,” says Healey. “George looks at what happens Wars are easy to get into but difficult when these people get exploited in to get out of. this particular way. The skills that George F. Walker’s new comedy ap- Dean learns as a sniper – patience and plies this observation not only to nadetachment – don’t just go away when tions but to people, giving it his signahe gets back home. They just get exture gritty street-level treatment. ploited in a different way.” Dean (Noah Reid), a As with Walker’s best-known plays, young sniper the humour in this comedy comes recently back from a very dark place. from Afghan“George’s anger doesn’t have to istan, is trytravel very far before it becomes ing to readjust funny,” says Healey, who’s also actto the challened in the playwright’s Better Livges of civilian ing and The End Of Civilization. life. Unem“That’s always been his strong ployed, and fasuit – he doesn’t have to abandon cing a bleak his rage to find the humour. In economic situafact, as an actor, you just have to go tion, he falls back deeper into it to find the absurdon his military ities. You access his humour not training to make when you go for laughs, but ends meet. when you go as far into the anger as you can.” Healey says he hopes that audiences will walk away Michael Healey says thinking Dead Metaphor focuses on the eternal question of the deeply social cost of war. about the

DEAD METAPHOR written and directed by

Critics’ choice A revival of Tony Kushner’s epic gay fantastia Angels In America and a production of the verbatim musical London Road are among the big winners of this year’s Toronto Theatre Critics’ Awards. Now in their fourth year, the awards, which cover productions that played here from June 2013 to May 16, 2014, were chosen by a jury of critics representing the Globe, Star, Post, NOW and the Grid. They’ll be presented at a ceremony at the Spoke Club on June 2.

stage@nowtoronto.com | @jordanbimm

Theatre listings are comprehensive and appear alphabetically by title. Opening plays begin this week, Previewing shows preview this week, One-Nighters are one-offs, and Continuing shows have already opened. Reviews are by Glenn Sumi (GS) and Jon Kaplan (JK). The rating system is as follows: NNNNN Standing ovation NNNN Sustained applause NNN Recommended, memorable scenes NN Seriously flawed N Get out the hook

ñ= Critics’ pick (highly recommended) How to place a listing

All listings are free. Send to: stage@nowtoronto.com, fax to 416-364-1168 or mail to Theatre, NOW Magazine, 189 Church, Toronto M5B 1Y7. Include title, author, producer, brief synopsis, times, range of ticket prices (include stu/srs discounts and PWYC days), venue name and address and box office/ info phone number. Listings may be edited for space. Deadline is the Thursday before publication at 5 pm.

Opening THE ART OF TRADITIONAL HEAD-TYING by

Kanika Ambrose (East End Performance Crawl). A woman returns to Dominica 20 years after immigrating to Canada in this solo show. Opens May 23 and runs to May 29, see website for schedule. $15. Ralph Thornton Centre, 765 Queen E. crowstheatre.com. THE BALLAD OF THE YOUNG OFFENDER by Patrick John Constello (East End Performance Crawl). This show looks at the xenophobia, racism and fear-mongering that followed the birth of rock and roll. Opens May 23 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. Sidemart Theatrical Grocery, 1362 Queen E. crowstheatre.com. DEAD METAPHOR by George F Walker (Mirvish/Canadian Rep). A soldier back from Afghanistan settles for a job with a crusading politician in this dark comedy (see story, this page). Previews to May 22. Opens May 23 and runs to Jun 8, Tue-Sat 8 pm, Sun 7 pm (no show May 25), mat Sat-Sun 2 pm. $19$79. Panasonic Theatre, 651 Yonge. 416-8721212, mirvish.com. FACE VALUE: LESLIEVILLE by Tracey Hoyt (East End Performance Crawl). Improv artist Hoyt explores some unforgettable Leslieville characters. Opens May 22 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. Pentimento Art

ñ

BEST DIRECTOR OF A PLAY: Albert Schultz, Of Human Bondage (Soulpepper)

BEST DIRECTOR OF A MUSICAL: Jackie Maxwell, London Road (Canadian Stage)

BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY: Damien Atkins, Angels In America (Soulpepper)

BEST ACTOR IN A MUSICAL: Ramin Karimloo, Les Misérables (Mirvish)

BEST ACTRESS IN A PLAY: Carly Street, Venus In Fur (Canadian Stage) BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A PLAY: Ian D. Clark, Cock (Studio 180)

BEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL: Chilina Kennedy, The Little Mermaid (Ross Petty Productions)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A PLAY: Nancy Palk, Angels In America (Soulpepper)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL: James Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin (Mirvish)

BEST INTERNATIONAL PLAY: Passion Play

BEST DESIGN: Lorenzo Savoini (sets, lighting), Erika Connor (costumes), Mike Ross (sound), Of Human Bondage (Soulpepper)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL: Lana Carillo, The Little Mermaid (Ross Petty Productions)

BEST PRODUCTION OF A PLAY (tie): Lungs (Tarragon); Angels In America (Soulpepper)

BEST PRODUCTION OF A MUSICAL: London Road (Canadian Stage)

SPECIAL CITATION: VideoCabaret, for its outstanding body of work

BEST CANADIAN PLAY: Needles And Opium, by Robert Lepage

51

psychological and structural challenges faced by veterans. “The play really focuses on the eternal question of the social cost of war, and what responsibility a society has to those people that are sent away to fight when they come back.” The Toronto premiere, which concludes Ken Gass’s inaugural Canadian Rep Theatre season in conjunction with Mirvish Productions, also prompts a recollection of two recent skirmishes in the local theatre scene: Gass’s surprise firing from Factory Theatre in 2013 and Healey’s dismissal from the Tarragon over his treatment of Prime Minister Stephen Harper in his play Proud. While Healey once supported a boycott of Factory over the board’s treatment of Gass, he now says that fight is over. “The boycott was about trying to get the board to walk back its decision, and that failed. So as far as I’m concerned, the boycott is over. I’ve since expressed my desire to see the Factory as an institution remain and thrive,” he says. “It would be awesome if a few of its board members were gone – but that’s no longer my fight. I’m now entirely committed to the Factory thriving.” After Dead Metaphor, Healey plans to return to writing. Building on the success of his controversial assessment of the current PM, he’s in the early stages of work on a play about Joe Clark’s brief stint in the top job back in 1979 and 80. “I’m doubling down on my desire to examine uninteresting, uncharismatic Conservative politicians.” 3

How to find a listing

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

GLENN SUMI

Gallery, 1164 Queen E. crowstheatre.com. FLASHDANCE – THE MUSICAL by Tom Hedley, Robbie Roth and Robert Cary (Mirvish). In this stage adaptation of the 1983 film, a welder dreams of becoming a professional dancer (see story, page 52). Previews May 27. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 8, Tue-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat 2 pm, see website for Sun and other times. $36-$130. Ed Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria. 416-872-1212, mirvish.com. FREEWAY STRANGLER by Christian Canterbury (The Box Studio/Straeon Filmworks Inc). Four Hollywood actors pursue love and fame while a serial killer terrorizes L.A. Opens May 22 and runs to Jun 8, Thu-Sun 8 pm. $20. 89 Niagara. brownpapertickets.com/ event/688046. THE GLORIOUS ONES by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty (The Civic Light-Opera Co). This musical follows a comedia dell’arte troupe in 17th century Italy. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 15, Wed 7 pm, Thu-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat-Sun 2 pm. $28. Zion Cultural Centre, 1650 Finch E. 416-755-1717, musictheatretoronto.com. IN CASE WE DISAPPEAR by Vanessa Smythe (East End Performance Crawl). Smythe performs her part spoken-word, part stand-up musical solo show. Opens May 24 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. The Purple Purl, 1162 Queen E. crowstheatre.com.

THE LAST SEVEN STEPS OF BARTHOLOMEW S.

by Daniele Bartolini (Bata Shoe Museum). A mysterious voyager brings change to the places he visits and individuals he encounters. May 24-25, Sat-Sun 7 pm. $50, rush $20. 327 Bloor W. 416-979-7799, batashoemuseum.ca. LEGALLY BLONDE: THE MUSICAL by Laurence O’Keefe, Nell Benjamin and Heather Hach (Mainstage Theatre Company). A sorority girl makes it to law school in this musical based on the 2001 film. May 22-25, Thu-Sat 7:30 pm, mat Sat-Sun 1:30 pm. $30, stu $20. Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson. 416-5047529, mainstagetheatre.com. OCCUPY ME by Bronwyn Steinberg (East End Performance Crawl). An anxious zen seeker grapples with the Occupy movement and seeks nirvana in India. Opens May 27 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. The Flying Yogi, 245 Carlaw. crowstheatre. com. PALEONCOLOGY by Kira Hall (Moon Dinosaur Theatre). A woman deals with her brother’s terminal illness by taking up a hobby. May 24-25, Sat-Sun 8 pm, mat Sun 2 pm. $10, mat pwyc. Videofag, 187 Augusta. kirahall.com. THE PARLIAMENTARIANS by Phil Rickaby (Red Sandcastle Theatre). The new Prime Miniscontinued on page 52 œ

Damien Atkins, pictured here with Michelle Monteith, took acting honours for Angels In America. NOW MAY 22-28 2014

51


SOULO THEATRE FESTIVAL (SoulOTheatre). Performances of oneñ person shows by Rachelle Eli, Martha Chaves,

theatre listings Writer Tom Hedley and actor Sydney Morton take their passion and make it happen.

œcontinued from page 51

ter’s weekend tryst with a call girl is ruined when a political opponent shows up at the hotel. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 1, WedSat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $20. 922 Queen E. 416845-9411, redsandcastletheatre.com. RALPH + LINA by Michele Smith, Dan Watson and Christina Serra (Edge of the Woods Theatre). Two Italian lovers struggle to stay together in the face of WWII, forced immigration and old age. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 1, Wed-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $20, stu $16. Chaffey Hall, 24 Chaffey Township Rd, Huntsville. edgeofthewoodstheatre.com. SHINE CABARET (Crowning Monkey). Comedy, poetry, music, clowns and more with Anton Man Ming Chan, Suzi Marks, Christel Bartelse and others. May 23-24, Fri-Sat 8:10 pm. $15$20. DANZoN Studio, 2480 Dundas W. mikosobreira@hotmail.com.

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Sage Tyrtle, Sébastien Heins and others, plus panels and workshops. May 22-25, see website for times. $15, opening night $50; panels/workshops $20. Red Sandcastle Theatre, 922 Queen E. soulo.ca. TEASE by Amy Keating, Julie Tepperman and others (East End Performance Crawl). Viewer and performer share an intimate encounter in this site-specific event limited to five people per show (see cover story, page 48). Opens May 23 and runs to May 31, see website for schedule. $15. Jilly’s, meet at 696 Queen E. crowstheatre.com. THROUGH THE GAZE OF A NAVEL by Emelia Symington Fedy (East End Performance Crawl). A self-proclaimed self-help guru takes the audience on a journey in this part theatre event, part yoga class. Opens May 24 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. Yogathletix, 911 Queen E. crowstheatre.com.

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MUSICAL PREVIEW

No Flash in the pan Writer’s career has spanned film, publishing and now theatre By GLENN SUMI FLASHDANCE – THE MUSICAL by Robbie Roth, Robert Cary and Tom Hedley. Presented by Mirvish at the Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria). Previews Tuesday (May 27), opens Wednesday (May 28) and runs to June 8, Tuesday-Saturday 8 pm, matinee Saturday 2 pm plus some Sundays. $36$130. 416-872-1212.

Thanks to Tom Hedley, the word “Flashdance” is part of pop culture history, complete with the indelible image of Jennifer Beals’s spotlit, arched body getting splashed with a bucket of water. The Canadian-raised Hedley wrote the screenplay for that iconic 80s movie and has now written the book for the new musical version. He coined the word that launched the sale of a million leg warmers. “I wanted a term that captured a complete aesthetic and style,” he says in the lobby of the Ed Mirvish Theatre, where the musical opens next week before heading to Broadway.

“The idea was that in a flash you could see the moment when fashion, dance and music all came together to create an image. That’s flashdance. And that was what we were after.” Coincidentally, it was visiting a now long-shuttered club called Gimlets down the street (at Victoria and Lombard) that gave him the idea for the screenplay in the first place. “My painter friends hung out there to watch bodies move,” he says. “These women put on modern burlesque acts. They invited me, and I was enthralled.” Having grown up partly in Hamilton, he was also familiar with the steel business. “A couple of teenage girls I knew were pipefitters, and there was something very sexy about a woman doing a man’s job,” he says with an oldschool grin. “To survive in that world you had to be better than the men. So to put that together with this club where they were trying to do art in a neighbourhood that doesn’t respond

PRESENTS

PHARMAKON MONTREAL’S LES PRODUCTIONS DES PIEDS DES MAINS MAY 23, 8PM GEORGE IGNATIEFF THEATRE 15 DEVONSHIRE PLACE

to art… well, it just felt like a great stage for all of these elements.” Hedley was as shocked as anyone when the film became a huge hit. Critics dismissed it as a series of music videos, but that was the point. “The movie coincided with the rise of MTV,” he says. “You couldn’t get a musical done back then. So the intention was to use the music video’s vocabulary to tell a story.” Over the years, between film and publishing (he was a producer on the Oscar-winning film Iris), Hedley’s turned down offers to write a Flashdance sequel. “What would you do?” he says, laughing. “She has an affair with Baryshnikov and dumps the guy in the mill? It was too cheesy to even contemplate.” But he did like the idea of fleshing out the story for the stage, complete with new music. “I wanted to make the love story work and make the emotional continuity of the music part of the narrative,” he says. “That meant new music, new lyrics and a choreographer who knows how to tell a story in dance.” Now based in Manhattan and Connecticut, Hedley has had several careers, including magazine editor here and in New York, where he was the youngest- ever editor of Esquire, working with greats like Norman Mailer and Gore Vidal. “That was the golden period in magazine journalism,” he says. “It’s gone, of course. There were no celebrities back then, only stars. Celebrities attempt to make themselves into a consumer product. It’s about branding, publicity, self-aggrandizement and selling something in five different ways. “That makes sense from a financial point of view,” he says, “but it’s not art.” 3 glenns@nowtoronto.com | @glennsumi

For tickets and info visit: www.tangledarts.org 52

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

Ñ

= Critics’ Pick

NNNNN = Standing ovation

MORE ONLINE

Interview clips at nowtoronto.com

NNNN = Sustained applause

Epstein (left), Baker, Lamond and Horner deliver top-notch work in flawed show.

MUSICAL REVIEW

Dull Stars STARS OF DAVID conceived by Aaron Harnick and Abigail Pogrebin (Harold Green Jewish Theatre/Angelwalk). At the Toronto Centre For The Arts Studio Theatre (5040 Yonge). Runs to June 1. $25-$65. 416-7330545, hgjewishtheatre.com. See Continuing, page 55. Rating: NN

The Harold Green Jewish Theatre’s latest offering, Stars Of David: A New Musical, begins by posing the question, “What does it mean to be Jewish?” For nearly 90 minutes, it explores some heavy themes of identity, but an overabundance of frivolous song-anddance numbers and an unvarying scenic structure may send your attention shuffling off to Buffalo by the midway mark. The show is based on Abigail Pogrebin’s 2005 book in which she interviewed prominent American Jews about legacy, religious observance and traditions. For the stage version, she teamed up with Aaron Harnick (Sheldon’s nephew), enlisting Broadway composers and lyricists to create songs based on the interviews. They added some monologues and turned it into a concert-like production. For each song, an actor embodies someone famous, and musical numbers receive top-notch performances by Darrin Baker, Will Lamond, Lisa Horner and Gabi Epstein. Epstein in particular gets to display her versatile voice in Pogrebin and Tom Kitt’s affecting song about a teenage Ruth Bader Ginsberg getting excluded

NNN = Recommended, memorable scenes

from minyan prayers following her mother’s death. Epstein also earns the night’s heartiest applause by channelling Fran Drescher in an upbeat anthem by Amanda Green. The show’s best songs authentically represent the celebrities they’re written about. David Shire and Richard Maltby Jr.’s tribute to writer Aaron Sorkin toys with language and humour, while Michael Friedman���s Horrible Seders embodies the rhythm of Tony Kushner’s voice. The worst songs traffic in cliché, including the bland opener about Andy Cohen’s bar mitzvah teacher. Pacing poses obstacles, too. Pogrebin is a former 60 Minutes producer, and during slow sections you practically hear the ticking of that infamous stopwatch. Alternating between monologues and musical numbers, the show feels segmented. Director Avery Saltzman’s staging becomes repetitive, but the use of vintage video footage does help break things up. An oversized gilded frame anchors Scott Penner’s set, and crystal chandeliers provide an authentic touch of Bubbe’s house. Musical director Mark Camilleri ensures the actors’ voices receive amazing support; musicians sound rich and fuller in number than the actual four. This musical is emphatically Jewish and unequivocally American. Younger audiences may not relate to Michael Feinstein, Gloria Steinem and Edgar Bronfman’s representations of Judaism. And isn’t it time we stop looking to the rich and famous to define our DEBBIE FEIN-GOLDBACH beliefs?

NN = Seriously flawed

N = Get out the hook


Toronto Festival Of Clowns (Adam Lazarus/Dave McKay). Clowns, bouffons ñ and physical theatre performers include 2 Man No Show, Guayoyo Creative Collective, Foo Productions, Morro & Jasp and others. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15, pass $65-$115. Pia Bouman Studio, 6 Noble, and Brockton Collective, 442 Dufferin. ­torontofestivalofclowns.com. Who’s Your Daddy? by Johnny O’Callaghan (East End Performance Crawl). A film shoot in Africa leads to an adoption in Uganda for a single, down-andout actor. Opens May 23 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. Loft Apt, 10 Hastings. ­crowstheatre.com.

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–Toronto Star

T HI S JUNE

ON STAgE JUNE 11

TWElVE ANgRY MEN REgINAlD ROSE

Fringe Kitchen Party: BBQ Edition

(Toronto Fringe Festival). This funder for ñ the festival is hosted by chef Matty Mathe-

son and features dinner, a dance performance, DJ party and more. May 22 at 7 pm. $95. The Hoxton, 69 Bathurst. 416-966-1062, fringetoronto.com. The Harolds (Harold Awards). The 20th annual awards for Toronto theatre artists are presented. May 26 at 7:30 pm. $10-$15. Cadillac Lounge, 1296 Queen W. ­haroldawards.com. Mindful Martinis (Elaine Smookler). Performer Smookler presents music and stories to help you stop and breathe. May 22 at 6:30 pm. $15-$20. Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen W. eventbrite.com/e/11283875375. Puppet Allsorts: The Night Of Shorts (Toronto Puppetry Collective). An adult puppet show is presented. May 26 at 7 pm. $15-$20. 3030 Dundas West. puppetallsorts.com. The Rise & Fall Of Khamai Leon by Bruce Hunter (RealSpace Theatre). This interactive dinner-theatre show features a spy/romance story set in a private tennis club in the 60s. May 24, dinner 8 pm, show 9 pm. $125. Queen’s Club, 568 Dupont. queensclubevent. eventbrite.ca. Three Minute Therapy (East End Performance Crawl). Emelia Symington Fedy offers advice help alongside an egg timer. May 27, from noon to 3 pm. Free. Arts Market, 1114 Queen E. crowstheatre.com. A Touch Of Light by Patricia O’Donoan (Toronto Puppetry Collective/Train Theater). This all-ages puppet show tells the life story of Louis Braille. May 24 at 3 and 8 pm. $15$20. Alliance Française, 24 Spadina. ­puppetallsorts.com. Umrao Yasmin, A New Beginning by Yasmin Virani (Tpark Entertainment). Virani performs her solo show about faith, love and art, inspired by a Bollywood film. May 23 at 7 pm. $25. Dancemakers Centre for Creation, 9 Trinity, ste 313. ­y viraniboxoffice.blogspot.ca.

The fate of a young man accused of murdering his father lies in the hands of twelve strangers.

ñ

Avenue Q by Robert Lopez, Jeff Marx and Jeff

Whitty (Lower Ossington Theatre). A college grad moves to NYC and copes with grown-up problems in this adult musical puppet play. Runs to Jun 1, Thu-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat 2 pm, Sun 4 pm. $49-$59. 100A Ossington. 416915-6747, lowerossingtontheatre.com. Bingo! by Daniel MacIvor (Factory Theatre). MacIvor’s latest is a cute and funny highschool reunion story aimed at the 50-plus crowd. Lubricated with alcohol, two groups of old friends discuss whether their best years are behind them, leading to emotional revelations. Runs to Jun 1, Tue-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $30-$45, Sun pwyc. 125 Bathurst. 416-5049971, ­factorytheatre.ca. NNN (Jordan Bimm) Contractions by Mike Bartlett (Red One Theatre Collective). A ruthless office manager grills an employee about a policy breach in this dark comedy. Runs to May 25, Thu-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $20. The Storefront Theatre, 955 Bloor W. redonetheatre.com. Don Quichotte by Jules Massenet (Canadian Opera Company). Massenet’s sweet-toned if ineffectual opera about Cervantes’s aging, wannabe knight isn’t performed much; it’s essentially a star vehicle for a bass. The great Ferruccio Furlanetto and a fine supporting cast make the most of their roles in this uneven production, which gets a confusing, muddled staging (a real horse and mule sad-

PARTNER PRESENTATION RUSSEll WINKElAAR

ON STAgE JUNE 27

bORNE

RARE Theatre Company JUDITH THOMPSON

RE TURN ENgAgEMENT

ON S TAgE JUNE 12

RAqUEl DUFF Y

p hotos: C y l l a von t i e de m a n n

Continuing

p hoto: joh n gu n dy

Alleycatz, 2409 Yonge. theatre20.com. Confessions Of A Fairy’s Daughter by Alison Wearing (Eden Mills Writers’ Festival/the Bookshelf). Wearing performs her musical show about growing up with a gay dad. May 23 at 8 pm. $12-$18. Ebar, 41 Quebec, Guelph. ticketbreak.com/event_details/7408.

W H A T ’S

Nine performers who use wheelchairs tell their stories in their own words.

p hotos: C y l l a von t i e de m a n n

One-Nighters The Company We Keep (Theatre 20). The cast of Theatre 20’s production of ñ Company perform. May 25 at 7 pm. $25.

“THE FINEST PIECE OF THEATRE ANY TORONTO COMPANY HAS MOUNTED IN MANY, MANY YEARS”

CAbARET MURRAY MClAUCHlAN

ANgElS IN AMERICA

PART I: MIllENNIUM APPROACHES, PART II: PERESTROIKA TONY KUSHNER Soulpepper’s acclaimed produciton of Kushner’s epic masterpiece returns for a limited run. Marathon performances available!

416 866 8666 SOUlPEPPER.CA 2 0 14 l e a d s p on sor s

bOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW!

WEEKlY CAbARET SERIES MAY 24: MURRAY MClAUCHlAN MAY 31: JUDITH lANDER JUNE 7: MElODEON: MUSIC FOR SIlENT FRENCH FIlMS

JUNE 14: SONg/bOOK SERIES: STREETS JUNE 21: SONg/bOOK SERIES: A lIFE IN MUSIC

8:30PM – TICKETS STARTINg AT $10

g ov e r n m e n t s u p p ort

i l l u s t r at ion : t h e h e a ds of s tat e

continued on page 55 œ

NOW may 22-28 2014

53


comedy listings How to find a listing

Comedy listings appear chronologically, and alphabetically by title or venue.

ñ= Critics’ pick (highly recommended) How to place a listing

All listings are free. Send to: stage@nowtoronto.com, fax 416-​364-​1168 or mail to Comedy, NOW Magazine, 189 Church, Toronto M5B 1Y7. Include title, producer, comics, brief synopsis, days and times, range of ticket prices, venue name and address and box office/ info phone number/website. Listings may be edited for space. Deadline is the Thursday before publication at 5 pm.

Thursday, May 22 ABSOLUTE COMEDY presents headliner Steve

Burr, Ralph Tetta and host Dave Merheje. To May 25, Thu 8:30 pm, Fri 9 pm, Sat 8 & 10:45 pm, Sun 8 pm. $10-$15. 2335 Yonge. 416-4867700, ­absolutecomedy.ca. BRYAN CALLEN Yuk Yuk’s presents comic/ actor in a live show. To May 22, Thu 8 pm. $35. 224 Richmond W. 416-967-6425, ­yukyuks.com.

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COMICAL: TWO-YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW Comedy Bar presents stand-up w/ ñ headliner Jeff Leeson, Dave Merheje, Ben Min-

er, Rob Mailloux, host Michael Flamank and others. 9:30 pm. $8-$10. 945 Bloor W. ­comedybar.ca. KITCH KOMEDY presents a weekly pro/am show w/ host Dean Young. 9 pm. Free. Kitch, 229 Geary. k­ itchbar.com. LAUGH SABBATH Comedy Bar presents Nick Flanagan, Brian Ward, Christopher Allin, host Sara Hennessey and others. 9:30 pm. $5. 945 Bloor W. ­laughsabbath.com. SHAKESPEARE FORGIVE US VI We Happy Few presents an improvised play in the style of the Bard plus stand-up by Jamie O’Connor and live music. 8 pm. $5. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416-551-6540, ­comedybar.ca. SIXTEEN SCANDALS Second City’s funniest revue in ages draws on our anxiety

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THEATRESPORTS Bad Dog Theatre presents the improv competition w/ Ashley ñ Comeau, Carmine Lucarelli, Rob Baker, Alice

Stand-up Christina Walkinshaw headlines at Yuk Yuk’s through​ May 23​ and 24.

about the schizophrenic weather, our cracksmoking mayor and the urban/suburban split in surprising and inventive ways. Director Chris Earle has a great ear and sharp sense of drama and he knows how to get the best from his stellar cast, who shine – especially in two contrasting sketches about young dudes (played by the women) and middle-aged women (played by the men). Don’t miss it. To Jun 29, Tue-Thu 8 pm, Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 pm, Sun 7:30 pm. $25-$29. 51 Mercer. 416-3430011, s­ econdcity.com. NNNNN (GS)

Moran and others. To Jun 21, Saturdays 8 pm. $12, stu $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416551-6540, ­baddogtheatre.com. West End Girls present Aisha Alfa, Heather Gold, Daniela Saioni & others. 7 pm. $10-$15. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. ­westendgirls.ca. Yuk Yuk’s See Fri 23.

Sunday, May 25 Absolute Comedy See Thu 22. BONSPIEL! THEATRE TURNS ONE... AND STRIPS FOR YOU! Bonspiel! Theatre pre-

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sents a three-act comedy cabaret w/ guests Melissa Jane Shaw and Chelsea Manders. 9 pm. $10. No One Writes to the Colonel, 460 College. ­bonspieltheatre.com. HAPPY HOUR COMEDY: GIVE ME MY SPOT EinStein presents contestants competing for a spot on Yuk Yuk’s Tuesday Night Show. 8 pm. Free. 229 College. ­ein-stein.ca. MAD LAUGHS AND A SONG Madison Avenue Pub presents a weekly open mic comedy show and karaoke contest. 8 pm. Free. 14 Madison. ­madisonavenuepub.com.

Friday, May 23 Absolute Comedy See Thu 22. CATCH 23 Comedy Bar presents a weekly im-

prov pit fight. 8 pm. $10. 945 Bloor W. 416551-6540, ­comedybar.ca. FUNNYMAN FRIDAYS FunnyMan Inc presents the monthly show. 8 pm. $15-$20. Richmond Hill Centre for the Performing Arts, 10268 Yonge. ­funnyman.ca. THE MARY-JANES OF COMEDY Comedy Bar presents headliner Precious Chong, Jess Beaulieu, Candice Gregoris, Emleigh Wolfe and host Lianne Mauladin. 10 pm. $10. 945 Bloor W. ­maryjanesofcomedy.com. MISSED CONNECTIONS Kliffer Entertainment presents an improvised saga based on the Craigslist personals section followed by a dance party. 10:30 pm. $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416-551-6540, ­comedybar.ca. Sixteen Scandals See Thu 22. THROW DOWN Bad Dog Theatre Repertory Plaers present performers challenged by the audience and by each other to perform feats of improv mastery. To May 30, Fridays 8 pm. $12, stu $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416551-6540, ­baddogtheatre.com. TOP SHELF COMEDY presents The Main Event, a weekly pro headliner and others. 9:30 pm. $5. St Louis Bar & Grill, 1963 Queen E. 416-6377427.

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TORONTO COMEDY ALL STARS: NOOB NIGHT

Danish Anwar presents stand-up by emerging comics. Proceeds benefit a friend fighting cancer. 8:30 pm. $12-$15. Underground Cafe, 670

Queen E. ­torontocomedyallstars.com. YUK YUK’S presents Christina Walkinshaw. To May 24, Fri 9 pm, Sat 8 & 10:30 pm. $22. 224 Richmond W. ­yukyuks.com.

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Saturday, May 24

NUBIAN DISCIPLES ALL BLACK COMEDY REVUE­Yuk Yuk’s Downtown presents ñ the monthly show w/ Anthony Engelbrecht,

Absolute Comedy See Thu 22. CARLA COLLINS: SELFIE CENTRED The Flying

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Beaver Pubaret presents the actor/comic in a live show. 7 & 9 pm. $20-$25. 488 Parliament. 647-347-6567, p ­ ubaret.com. CHICKA BOOM Free Times Café presents all-female comedy w/ Amanda Brooke Perrin, the Templeton Philharmonic, Kristen Rasmussen, Jess Bryson, Liz Johnston, Laura Anne Harris, Natalie Norman and hosts Laura Bailey & Jess Beaulieu. 8 pm. Pwyc (proceeds to 416 Drop-In Centre for Women). 320 College. 416-967-1078. COMEDY UNCOVERED: LIVE! Comedy Bar presents stand-up and improv w/ headliner Trixx, Eddie Della Siepe, Daniel Bierne & Becky Johnson and host Brian Ward. 9 pm. $10-$12. 945 Bloor W. c­ omedybar.ca. FRO ONE NIGHT ONLY: BLACKS VS JEWS Ai Sha Alfa & Adrienne Fish present a stand-up competition w/ Kate Davis and others. 9:30 pm. $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416-551-6540, ­comedybar.ca. NICK FLANAGAN ALBUM TAPING Underground Comedy Club presents Flanagan w/ Pat Thornton, Megan Petit, Kev Sheeler and host Boyd Banks. 8:30 pm. $10 adv. 670 Queen E. 416450-9125, ­puffmama.ca. RED ROCKET COMEDY presents a weekly show w/ host Joel West and guests. 8 pm. Free. Red Rocket Coffee, 1364 Danforth. 416-406-0880, ­redrocketcoffee.com. S&P IMPROV Comedy Bar presents Cam Algie, Kevin Whalen, Matt Folliott and Isaac Kessler in a longform improv show. 11 pm. $5. 945 Bloor W. 416-551-6540, ­comedybar.ca. Sixteen Scandals See Thu 22. SLINGS AND ERRORS The Ensemble presents an improvised comedy in the style of Shakespeare w/ Carly Heffernan, Jordan Markowski and others. 3 pm. $10. Second City, 51 Mercer. 416-343-0011, s­ econdcity.com.

Kweku, Kirby Darius, Crystal Ferrier, headliner John Avery, host Kenny Robinson and others. 8:30 pm. $20. 224 Richmond W. 416-9676425, ­yukyuks.com. Sixteen Scandals See Thu 22. SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE The Sketchersons present a weekly sketch and live music show. 9 pm. $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. ­comedybar.ca.

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Monday, May 26 ALTDOT COMEDY LOUNGE Rivoli presents Matt O’Brien, Andrew Johnston, Zabrina Chevannes, Bryan O’Gorman, Chris Robinson, Eddie Della Siepe, Michelle Shaughnessy, Ron Sparks, MC Sara Hennessey & others. 9 pm. $5. 332 Queen W. ­altdotcomedylounge.com. THE BEST OF THE SECOND CITY presents classic and original sketch and improvisation. 8 pm. $14. Second City, 51 Mercer. ­secondcity.com. CHEAP LAUGHS MONDAY PJ O’Briens Irish Pub presents a weekly open mic w/ Russell Roy and guests. 9:30 pm. Free. 39 Colborne. 416815-7562. IMPERIAL COMEDY SHOW Imperial Pub presents a weekly show. 9:30 pm. Free. 54 Dundas E. 416-977-4667, imperialcomedy.com. OFFICE PUB COMEDY presents 12 pros and amateurs each week w/ hosts Cassandra Sansosti and Blayne Smith. 8 pm. Free. The Office Pub, 117 John. 416-977-1900. 200% VODKA Black Swan presents a weekly show by the BSC Rep Company. 8 pm. Pwyc. 154 Danforth, 2nd floor. 416-903-5388, ­blackswancomedy.com.

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Tuesday, May 27

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COMEDY COVE Blair Streeter presents Dom Paré and Nitish Sakhuja, followed ñ by Jeff E’s Olde Fashioned Open Mic. 9 pm.

Pwyc. Maple Leaf House, 2749 Lake Shore W. 416-255-2558. THE FIRESTARTER Fox & Fiddle presents weekly pros and lotto spots w/ host Kyle Andrews. 8:30 pm. Free. 280 Bloor W. 416-966-4369. IMPROV DROP-IN BSC presents a weekly class and show. 6 pm. $5. Black Swan, 154 Danforth, 2nd floor. 416-903-5388. LAUGHING WITH BOND Bond Child & Family Development present a fundraising performance of the Second City’s Sixteen Scandals sketch revue. 8 pm. $40. Second City, 51 Mercer. ­bcfdsecondcity2014.eventbrite.com. LES IMPROBABLES present competitive improv en français featuring the tournament semi finals. 7:30 pm. $5. Supermarket, 268 Augusta. ­ligueimprotoronto@gmail.com. LESBIAN ROAD TRIP COMEDY HOUR Danz ­Altvater hosts a night of stand-up w/ Karen Mitton, Marco Bernardi, Adrienne Fish, Susan Fischer, Paul Hutcheson and Sarah Simpson. 8:30 pm. Pwyc. Lipstick & Dynamite, 992 Queen W. 416-535-4554. Sixteen Scandals See Thu 22. THE SKIN OF MY NUTS presents a weekly open mic w/ host Vandad Kardar. 9:30 pm. Free. Sonic Espresso Bar, 60 Cecil. facebook.com/ skinofmynuts. TUESDAY HEADLINER SERIES COMEDY Imperial Pub presents host Danny Polishchuk and guests. 9:30 pm. Free. 54 Dundas E. 416-9774667, ­imperialcomedy.com. WHEEL OF IMPROV Natasha Boomer presents the weekly non-competitive competitive games game-show. 9:30 pm. $5. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. c­ omedybar.ca. YUK YUK’S DOWNTOWN presents the Humber School of Comedy at 7:30 pm, Launching Pad for new stand-ups at 9:30 pm, every Tue. $4/ show. 224 Richmond W. y­ ukyuks.com.

Wednesday, May 28 ABSOLUTE COMEDY presents Pro-Am Night w/

headliner Derick Lengwenus, Big Mo, Dave Sokolowski, Jack Dani, Jamie O’Connor, Kelly Fanson, Matt Gass and host Perry Perlmutar. 8:30 pm. $6. 2335 Yonge. 416-486-7700, ­absolutecomedy.ca. THE CARNEGIE HALL SHOW The National Theatre of the World presents the improv variety show w/ Naomi Snieckus, Matt Baram & Chris Gibbs plus guests Gavin Crawford, Sandy Jobin-Bevans and Chelsea Manders. 8 pm. $18-$20, stu $10. Drake ­Hotel, 1150 Queen W, Underground. ­brownpapertickets.com. CHUCKLE CO. PRESENTS weekly stand-up. 9:30 pm. $5. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. chuckleco. com. CONSENSUAL SNACKS Baltic Avenue presents a comedic variety show dedicated to stringed cheese w/ host Cassie Moes. 7:30 pm. $5 (incl cheese). 875 Bloor W. 647-898-5324, ­facebook. com/events/465789183566166. ELEPHANT EMPIRE Comedy Bar presents the sketch troupe w/ Hannah Spear, Andrew Gardner, Matt Lemche and Peter Stevens, performing fast-paced sketch and a one-act play. 8 pm. $8. 945 Bloor W. ­comedybar.ca. MAGIC OVEN COMEDY presents weekly standup. 8 pm. Free. Magic Oven, 347 Keele. 416604-0202, facebook.com/MagicOvenKeele. 120 WEDNESDAYS OPEN MIC Club 120 presents stand-up, sketch & improv w/ TS comedian Mandy Goodhandy and others. 9 pm. Free. 120 Church. c­ lub120.ca.

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Photo by Cassandra silver

OUTRAGEOUS! WITH ROBERT KELLER – MILFS OF MAY EDITION Yuk Yuk’s preñ sents a queer stand-up show w/ Precious

Cast: Hallie Burt, tyson James, CHy ryan spain direCtor: megan Watson dramaturg: JuditH rudakoff sCenograPhiC designer: Cory sinCennes buddies in bad times theatre 12 alexander street, toronto may 31–June 15, 2014 tues–sat @ 8Pm sun @ 2:30Pm buddiesinbadtimes.Com www.yorku.Ca/sheila/index.html GRAPHIC DESIGN

DARRYLMABEY.COM

SKINQUICKSAND an

double bill

“WOW” – The Straits Times “INTENSE”- The New York Times “PRIAPIC”- Toronto Star

8pm May 21-24

12 Alexander St

tix/info- buddiesinbadtimes.com or 416-975-8555

AFFILIATE EVENT

54

may 22-28 2014 NOW

Ñ

= Critics’ Pick

nnnnn = You’ll pee your pants

nnnn = Major snortage

nnn = Coupla guffaws

Chong, Laurie Elliott, Shelley Kidwell, Melissa Story, host Keller and others. 8 pm. $15. 224 Richmond W. 416-967-6425, ­yukyuks.com. SIREN’S COMEDY Celt’s Pub presents open-mic stand-up w/ host Jay Freeborn and headliner Chad Gibson. 8:30 pm. Free. 2872 Dundas W. 416-767-3339. Sixteen Scandals See Thu 22. SPIRITS COMEDY Spirits Bar & Grill presents one of T.O.’s longest-running weekly comedy nights. 9 pm. Free. 642 Church. 416-967-0001. TEAM WILDCATS! Bad Dog Theatre presents an unscripted comedy about a high school baseball team. To Jun 4, Wednesdays 8 pm. $12, stu $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416-5516540, ­baddogtheatre.com. TOP SHELF COMEDY presents The Spotlight, a weekly night of top comics. 9 pm. $5. W ­ AYLA Bar, 996 Queen E. 416-901-5570. TORONTO COMEDY CAVERN presents a weekly show w/ host Adam Jamal. 8:30 pm. Free. Cavern Bar, 76 Church. 416-971-4440. THE VIDEO GAME SHOW Bad Dog Theatre Epic Wednesdays presents improv inspired by classic and current console games. 8 pm. $12, stu $10. Comedy Bar, 945 Bloor W. 416-551-6540, ­baddogtheatre.com. 3

nn = More tequila, please

n = Was that a pin dropping?


œcontinued from page 53

dle up next to enormous symbolic books and ink pots). Runs to May 24, Thu 7:30 pm, Sat 4:30 pm. $12-$332. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen W. 416-3638231, coc.ca. NNN (GS) DREAMING OF ROB FORD by Mike Daisey (Crow’s Theatre/East End Performance Crawl). Daisey performs his solo show about how we construct fame, who we’re really laughing at and what it means to play the fool. To May 23, Thu-Fri 8 pm. $40. Big Picture Cinema, 1035 Gerrard E. crowstheatre.com. EAST END PERFORMANCE CRAWL (Crow’s Theatre). Theatrical fest featuring Bronwyn Steinberg’s Occupy Me, the Soulo Festival, storytelling and more. Runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule and prices. Various venues on Queen East. crowstheatre.com. A GOD IN NEED OF HELP by Sean Dixon (Tarragon Theatre). In 1606, a mercenary and the men in his charge transport a painting from Venice to Prague. Afterwards, they must explain a miracle that they observed on their trip – religious and civil authorities want the truth. Dixon’s play about the relationship between faith, art and the gods is strong, though the first act lacks an emotional underpinning that surfaces in the second. Runs to May 25, Thu-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat-Sun 2:30 pm. $21-$53, 8 pm, ltd rush $13. 30 Bridgman. 416-5311827, tarragontheatre.com. NNNN (JK) HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH by John Cameron Mitchell (Lower Ossington Theatre). An East German transgender rocker moves to the U.S. to start a band and find love. Runs to Jun 7, Thu-Fri 8 pm, Sat 8 and 11 pm. $49. 100A Ossington. lowerossingtontheatre.com. THE LAST CONFESSION by Roger Crane (Mirvish). Crane’s play about a real-life mysterious death in the Vatican is an awkward patchwork of genres, including religious history and detective story. But solid performances by Richard O’Callaghan, as Pope John Paul I, and David Suchet, as the cardinal who helped get him elected, help pass the time. Runs to Jun 1, Tue-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat-Sun and Wed 2 pm. $35-$119. Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King W. 416-872-1212, mirvish.com. NN (GS) THE LION KING by Elton John, Tim Rice and Roger Allers (Mirvish). More than 15 years after its debut, Julie Taymor’s musical – based on the Disney animated film – continues to roar, thanks to its mix of jaw-dropping stagecraft, stirring music and archetypal story. The performers in this touring production are generally excellent – especially Brown Lindiwe Mkhize’s baboon Rafiki – but the real stars are the puppets and masks, which give this very modern show an oldschool feel. There’s no CGI trickery here, just imagination and wonder. Runs to Jun 15, TueSat 7:30 pm, mat Sun 1 pm, Sat 1:30 pm (see website for more dates/exceptions). $35$155. Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King W. 416-872-1212, mirvish.com. NNNN (GS) LOVE AND HUMAN REMAINS by Brad Fraser (Witchboy Theatre). Frustrated young adults look for sex and love while a serial killer roams the city. Runs to Jun 7, Tue-Sat 8 pm. $20. Unit 102 Theatre, 376 Dufferin. witchboytheatre.com. MAGIC @ THE CAGE (Abracadabaret). Magicians, mind readers and mystery entertainers perform weekly magic and comedy. Weekly, Sun and Tue 7 pm. $15-$20. The Cage 292, 292 College. abracadabaret.com/cage. MAY ONE ACTS (Sterling Studio Theatre). This festival focuses on a different playwright each week. Week 3: (to May 25): John Patrick Shanley. Runs to May 25, Tue-Sun 8 pm, mat Sat-Sun 2 pm. $20, mat pwyc. 163 Sterling. sterlingstudiotheatre.com. OF HUMAN BONDAGE by Vern Thiessen (Soulpepper). Thiessen’s adaptation of Maugham’s classic about an art-loving med student who’s obsessed with a woman gets a fine production under Albert Schultz. Gregory Prest captures the young man’s self-deprecation, need and passion, while Michelle Monteith gives the unpredictable Mildred a quicksilver personality. Not everything works, but you’re guaranteed a memorable evening. Runs to May 24, see website for schedule. $29-$74, rush $5-$23. Young Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Lane. 416866-8666, soulpepper.ca. NNNN (JK) PINKALICIOUS by Elizabeth Kann, Victoria Kann and John Gregor (Vital Theatre). A girl turns pink after eating too many cupcakes in this family musical. Runs to May 25, Sun 1 pm. $30-$40. Lower Ossington Theatre, 100A Ossington. 416-915-6747, pinkaliciousthemusical.com/toronto. RENT by Jonathan Larson (Lower Ossington Theatre). NYC artists struggle to make ends

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meet in the shadow of the AIDS epidemic in this musical. Runs to Jun 8, Thu-Sat 8 pm, mat Sat 2 pm, Sun 4 pm. $49-$59. 100A Ossington. 416-915-6747, lowerossingtontheatre.com. THE ROAD TO MECCA by Athol Fugard (Soulpepper). Fugard’s lovely, simple ode to nonconformity among white people in apartheidera South Africa gets an underwhelming production, with uneven performances and a design that doesn’t leave much to the imagination. Runs to May 28, Mon-Sat 8 pm, mat Wed and Sat 2 pm. $29-$74, rush $5-$23. Young Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Lane. 416-866-8666, soulpepper. ca. NN (GS) live band and see previews of upcoming works at this weekly show. Mondays 10 pm. Free. Statler’s, 487 Church. 416-922-0487. STARS OF DAVID based on a book by Abigail Pogrebin (Harold Green Jewish Theatre/ Angelwalk Theatre). The book about Jewish identity based on interviews with Leonard Nimoy, Gloria Steinem and others is adapted to a musical production (see review, page 52). Runs to Jun 1, Tue-Thu and Sat 8 pm, Sun 7 pm, mat Thu 1 pm, Sun 2 pm. $25-$65. Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge, Studio Theatre. 416-733-0545, hgjewishtheatre.com. NN (Debbie Fein-Goldbach) VITALS by Rosamund Small (Outside the March/Theatre Passe Muraille). This interactive, site-specific show takes us into the world and mind of Anna, an EMS worker who starts to crack under the pressure of her job. The exciting staging by director Mitchell Cushman never stops offering up unexpected twists and turns both in the venue and in Anna’s life. Runs to Jun 1, Tue-Sun 7:30 pm, mat Sat-Sun 2 pm. $25-$30. Starts at Roncesvalles & Garden Aves, 149 Roncesvalles. 416-5047529, outsidethemarch.ca. NNNN (JK) WATCHING GLORY DIE by Judith Thompson (Canadian Rep Theatre). Thompson performs in her solo show about three women linked by shared helplessness in the face of tragedy. Runs to Jun 1, Tue-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $30-$42. Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley, Upstairs. 416-368-3110, canadianrep.ca. 3

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MORE ONLINE

Complete listings at nowtoronto.com

dance listings Opening BASED ON ACTUAL UNRELATED EVENTS East

End Performance Crawl presenst a solo work by Meagan O’Shea about the relationship between home/less/ness in the body. Opens May 22 and runs to Jun 1, see website for schedule. $15. Kryart Studio, 980 Queen E (enter from Carlaw). crowstheatre.com.

A CELEBRATION OF CHRISTOPHER HOUSE’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY Toronto Dance Theñ atre presents a tribute to its artistic director

with performance excerpts and an onstage conversation with House and arts writer Paula Citron. May 26 at 8 pm. $50. Winchester Street Theatre, 80 Winchester. tdt.org. CONVERSATION coexisDance presents a multimedia work created and performed by Olivia C Davies. Dance by Colin Anthony, performed by Jessica Houghton, opens the show. May 23 at 8 pm. $15-$20. Majlis Arts Garden, 163 Walnut. coexisdance.wordpress.com. CUADRO FLAMENCO Triana Project presents live flamenco dance and music. May 22 at 8:30 pm. $15. Supermarket, 268 Augusta.

trianaproject.com. DEAR ARMEN Saboteur Productions presents dance, spoken word, erotic performance and music inspired by the life of Armenian poet/ dancer Armen Ohanian. May 25 at 8 pm. $15$25. Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander. deararmen.com.

FIVE TABLEAUX FROM KHOSRO AND SHIRIN

Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestra presents a concert featuring a short ballet based on a Persian legend plus excerpts from classic ballets, performed by YOU dance artists of the National Ballet of Canada. Opens May 24 at 8 pm. $27-$52. P.C. Ho Theatre, 5183 Sheppard E. 416-879-5566, cathedralbluffs.com. LEGACY II: BRINGING IT HOME Collective of Black Artists presents a retrospective of its traditional and contemporary African dance works. May 22-25, Thu-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $20-$35. Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas E, COBA Studio. cobalegacy2014.eventbrite.ca. ON DISPLAY Toronto Dance Theatre presents 10 solos created by non-choreographers who work in theatre and visual art, including Sook-Yin Lee and Brendan Healy.

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ñ ñ

Continuing ELVIS AND THE MAN IN BLACK Coleman Lemieux & Compagnie presents a ñ double bill featuring James Kudelka’s The

Man In Black and the world premiere of Laurence Lemieux’s Looking For Elvis. Runs to May 31, Wed-Sat 8 pm. $20, May 22 gala $100. The Citadel, 304 Parliament. 416-3648011, colemanlemieux.com. SPRING SHOWCASE 2014 Canada’s National Ballet School presents students performing new works by Robert Binet and Demis Volpi plus Act III of The Sleeping Beauty. Runs to May 24, Thu-Sat 7:30 pm, mat Sat 2 pm. $50, stu/srs $30. Betty Oliphant Theatre, 404 Jarvis. 416-964-5148, nbs-enb.ca. 3

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Funny Girls & Dynamic Divas 12th Annual

n for a s u Join ning of eve plitting s side ter, and . c h laug iful musi t beau

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= Critics’ Pick

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SINGULAR SENSATION: A MUSIC THEATRE OPEN MIC (Jennifer Walls). Sing showtunes with a

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Paul Charbonneau (front) and Roney Lewis get close in Skin/Quicksand.

Opens May 22, runs to May 31, Wed-Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $26, stu/srs $20, Sun pwyc. Winchester Street Theatre, 80 Winchester. tdt.org. PHARMAKON Tangled Arts Festival presents Les Productions des Pieds des Mains performing dance by Menka Nagrani that looks at the line between normal and abnormal. May 23 at 8 pm. $25, stu/PWD $20. George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire. tangledarts.org. PHYSICAL THINKING The National Ballet of Canada presents works by Jerome Robbins, Marco Goecke and William Forsythe that highlight the physical and intellectual rigour of ballet. Opens May 28 and runs to Jun 1, Wed-Sat 7:30 pm, mat Sat-Sun 2 pm. $25$244. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen W. 416-345-9595, national.ballet.ca. SERIES 8:08 presents works-in-progress by Julia Aplin, Michael Caldwell and Christy Stoeten. May 24 at 8:08 pm. $10. Pia Bouman School, 6 Noble. series808.ca. SKIN/QUICKSAND inDANCE presents two works by Hari Krishnan that create mashups of sexuality, gender and identity. May 22-24, Thu-Sat 8 pm. $20-$37. Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander. 416975-8555, indance.ca. SPRING RITES Ballet Creole and Harbourfront NextSteps present a fusion of music by Haydn, Mozart and Schubert with jazz, contemporary and Afro-Caribbean dance by Patrick Parson and Gabby Kamino. May 22-24, Thu-Sat 8 pm. $20-$45. Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000, harbourfrontcentre.com.

Elvira Kurt Debra Di Giovanni Jackie Richardson Jane Bunnett featuring Eliana Cuevas

Barbra Lica Cheri Maracle

Thursday May 29, 2014 Reception: 5:30 pm Show: 7:30 pm Jane Mallett Theatre, 27 Front St E. For Tickets - Sistering (416) 926-9762 ext. 243 or Jane Mallett Theatre (416)366-7723

NNNNN = Standing ovation

ON DISPLAY MAY 22-24 & 28-31, 2014 | MAY 25 PWYC Winchester Street Theatre, 80 Winchester Street Tickets: $20-26 | Call 416.967.1365 | tdt.org Ten solos created for TDT by some of the most dynamic theatre and visual artists in Toronto

www.sistering.org NNNN = Sustained applause

NNN = Recommended, memorable scenes

NN = Seriously flawed

N = Get out the hook

NOW MAY 22-28 2014

Photography: Omer Yukseker Design: lightupthesky.ca

theatre listings

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contact photography must-see EXHIBITS in THE MAMMOTH PHOTO FESTIVAL How I got the shot

Contacting Toronto 2014: Drowning World Queen’s Park subway station (plus videos on subway platform screens throughout the TTC) To May 31 UK-based South African photojournalist Gideon Mendel has found a dramatic way to document climate change. Photographing people in flooded homes has become an ongoing project and obsession, taking him to nine countries. His stark images demonstrate how rising water leaves rich and poor in the same boat. In countries like Nigeria, he offered subjects a small fee, but some refused the money, wanting the world to bear witness. In Somerset, UK, he forged a link with Shirley Armitage, accompanying her by boat to her low-lying farm. Shocked by the damage, she enlisted Mendel to help salvage her waterlogged family snapshots. “I’ve found myself increasingly entering into this sort of collaboration,” he says. “Rather than finding subjects in their homes, I make the journey with them. “The moment of making the portraits is crucial, and I see it as a collaborative process.” Mendel is seeking “a particular quality to the direct gaze at the camera. The pose is that of a conventional domestic portrait, but the flooded extreme environment is disconcerting and challenging for the viewer.” He’s happy to display them in public installations. “I want my images and videos to have a life where they can work as both art and activism, to work fran schechter powerfully in the world.” 

Sakorn Ponsiri, Bangkok, November 2011, by Gideon Mendel

Julie Jenkinson Ice Age Scotty

BIGGIE in his Jeep, 1996,by Ernie Paniccioli, part of 40 Years: an Exhibition of Hip Hop Portraits

40 Years: An Exhibition Of Hip Hop Portraits

Verso Gallery (1160 Queen West, 416-533-6362) To June 1 This photographic fable stars 11 rare Japanese celluloid toys. According to the backstory, these little dogs, on route to an international toy conference in Moscow, boarded a JAL flight from Tokyo that crashed in the ­Arctic. Jenkinson photographs their dream­like adventures and encounters in a whimsical Arctic of styrofoam icebergs. Her enigmatic, occasionally haunting images pay homage to the ima­gination and to unusual and beautiful DJ toy design. 

Gladstone Hotel (1214 Queen West, 416-531-4635) To May 31 Hip-hop, the mighty global culture that sprang from the weedy concrete of the 70s South Bronx, gets a handsome retrospective here. Che Kothari, a Toronto event photographer and highly regarded portraitist, co-curates this extensive collection, including his own work along­side that of 12 others. Staged and candid portraits from the early days of DJ Kool Herc through Tupac and Biggie to the present reign of Jay Z, Drake and Lil Wayne attempt to cover artists from the East Coast, West Coast and in between. Impossible to get everyone, of course, but close enough to make a DAVID JAGER thoroughly enjoyable historical portrait. Not to be missed. 

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may 22-28 2014 NOW

scotty 2014, by Julie Jenkinson


books HOSTAGE TALE

Brutal debut

MUST-SEE SHOWS C = Contact photography show ARTSCAPE YOUNGPLACE Installation:

Francesca Dasso, May 27-Jun 1 (docnow.ca). 180 Shaw. 416-530-2787. CBAU-XI PHOTO Virginia Mak, to May 31. 324 Dundas W. 416-977-0400. CHRISTOPHER CUTTS Panya Clark Espinal, to May 31. 21 Morrow. 416-5325566. CCOOL HAND OF A GIRL Photos: Frances Darwin and Katerina Shaverova, to May 31. 2804 Dundas W. 416-8321076. CGALLERY 44 Photos: Sheree Hovsepian and Jérôme Nadeau, to Jun 7. 401 Richmond W. 416-979-3941. CKATZMAN CONTEMPORARY Photos: Wyn Geleynse, to May 31. 86 Miller. 416-504-9515. CMETRO HALL Photos: Richard Renaldi, to Jun 1. 55 John. 416-397-9887. MKG127 Painting: Monica Tap, to May 31. 1445 Dundas W. 647-435-7682. OPEN STUDIO Prints (Inside Out): Shaan Syed and Roula Partheniou, May 23Jun 21, artist talk/reception 6-9 pm May 23. 401 Richmond W. 416-5048238. RED HEAD Jack Butler, May 28-Jun 21, reception 6-9 pm May 28. 401 Richmond W. 416-504-5654. CTORONTO IMAGE WORKS Photos: Steven Beckly, to May 31. 80 Spadina. 416-703-1999. WARC Simone Jones, Jenn E Norton and Sarah Kernohan, May 24-Jun 21, reception 3-6 pm May 24. 401 Richmond W #122. 416-977-0097.

AN UNTAMED STATE by Roxane Gay

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(Black Cat), 367 pages, $19.95 paper. Rating: NNNN

Roxane Gay’s debut novel is not for the faint of heart, but this story of a wealthy woman kidnapped and sexually tortured in Haiti is bold and insightful. Stick with it. On her way to the beach with her loving husband and infant child, Mireille, daughter of one of Haiti’s richest industrialists, is taken for ransom. But her father thinks negotiating with kidnappers is a sign of weakness and leaves her prey to the thugs who have taken her. As she waits inside her one-room

AGO Francis Bacon and Henry Moore, to Jul 20 ($25, srs $21.50, stu $16.50). C Scott McFarland, to Aug 10. $19.50, srs $16, stu $11, free Wed 6-8:30 pm (special exhibits excluded). 317 Dundas W. 416-979-6648. CJUSTINA M. BARNICKE Rebecca Belmore, to Aug 9, performance 8-11 pm May 23, talk 2-3 pm May 25. 7 Hart House. 416-978-8398. CMOCCA In Character: Self-Portrait Of The Artist As Another; Material Self: Performing The Other Within, to Jun 1. Jim Naughten, to Aug 18. 952 Queen W. 416-395-0067. CPOWER PLANT Pictures From Paradise: Contemporary Caribbean Photography, to May 25. 231 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4949. ROM The Forbidden City: Inside The Court Of China’s Emperors, to Sep 1 ($27, stu/srs $24.50). C Michael Awad, to Sep 28. $16, stu/ srs $14.50; Fri 4:30-8:30 pm $10, stu/srs $9. 100 Queen’s Park. 416-586-8000. CRYERSON IMAGE CENTRE Stan Douglas, Zanele Muholi, to Jun 1. 33 Gould. 416-9795164. TEXTILE MUSEUM From Geisha To Diva: The Kimonos Of Ichimaru, to May 25. Ying Gao, to Sep 1. $15, srs $10, stu $6; pwyc Wed 5-8 pm. 55 Centre. 416-599-5321. CU OF T ART CENTRE Through The Body: LensBased Works By Contemporary Chinese Women Artists; Archiving Public Sex, to Jun 28, Through The Body panel 7-9 pm May 27. 15 King’s College Circle. 416-978-1838.

cage, starving and desperate, she recalls her privileged childhood, her professional life as a lawyer and her relationship with her husband, Michael. Her tedium is broken by a series of brutal rapes. Like I said, tough stuff. Gay’s expert at conveying the slow process of a bright, fierce woman losing her sense of self – typical of this soul-crushing experience – and plainly has a deep understanding of sexual trauma, post-traumatic distress and its impact on those around the survivor. The characters are believable at every turn: the farm-bred Michael trying to make sense of Haiti’s deep class divide, his empathetic mother,

READINGS THIS WEEK

JOSEPH MAVIGLIA Launching his book Critics

Thursday, May 22 ELSPETH CAMERON Reading from her biography Aunt Winnie. 2 pm. Free. Northern District Library, 40 Orchard View. 416-393-7610. FORENSICS AND FICTION Margaret Cannon talks about the latest crime fiction. 2 pm. Free. Deer Park Library, 40 St Clair E. 416-393-7657.

KERRY FREEK AND ROBERT WILLIAM SANDFORD

Launching their book Flood Forecast: Climate Risk And Resiliency In Canada. 6 pm. Free. Ben McNally Books, 366 Bay. 416-361-0032.

Friday, May 23 LYNN GOLDSMITH Signing copies of Rock & Roll Stories. 4 pm. Free. Analogue Gallery, 673 Queen W. courtney@analoguegallery.com.

Saturday, May 24

THIS WEEK IN THE MUSEUMS

IN PERSON

MONICA KULLING/QIN LENG/CHRISTINE BALDACCHINO Reading. 2 pm. Free. Another Story Bookshop, 315 Roncesvalles. 416-462-1104.

WRITERS FROM THE UNDERGROUND Readings

by David Bezmozgis, Wayson Choy, Karen Connelly, Anthony De Sa and others. 11 am-4 pm. Free. Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen E. diasporadialogues.com.

Sunday, May 25 DRAFT 9.6 Readings by bill bissett, Diana Fitz-

gerald Bryden, Jacob Scheier and others. 3 pm. Free. Black Swan, 154 Danforth. 416-4334170, draftreadings@gmail.com. GHALIB ISLAM Launch party for Fire In The Unnameable Alley. 6 pm. Free. Double Double Land, 209 Augusta. doubledoubleland.com.

Who Know Jack: Urban Myths, Media And Rock & Roll. 4 pm. Free. Supermarket, 268 Augusta. 416-840-0501. LYNN THOMSON Reading. 2 pm. Free. Intergalactic Travel Authority, 1165 Bloor W. storyplanet.ca.

TORONTO INDIE ARTS MARKET SMALL PRESS & LITERARY FESTIVAL Books, magazines, comics,

zines, chapbooks and more. 10:30 am-4:30 pm. $5. Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen W. facebook.com/torontoindieartsmarket. ADRIENNE WEISS Launching her poetry collection There Are No Solid Gold Dancers Anymore. 7:30 pm. Free. Monarch Tavern, 12 Clinton. 416-531-5833.

Monday, May 26 TERRY FALLIS Reading from his novel No Relation. 7 pm. Free. Reference Library, 789 Yonge. torontopubliclibrary.ca. CHARLES MONTGOMERY Talking about his book Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design. 6:45 pm. $5. CSI Annex, 720 Bathurst. eventbrite.ca.

Lorraine, and Mireille herself, who plays hard to get when she first meets Michael but is no position to play that game with her captors. There are a few missteps. We learn in the first paragraph that Mireille held hostage for only 13 days – maybe so readers will muster the courage to keep reading, but it still gives away something huge very early on. And the last 30 pages contain some coincidences that are hard to believe. But Gay is a writer to watch SUSAN G. COLE for sure. susanc@nowtoronto.com | @susangcole

Fondue with a party. 6 pm. Free. 2nd floor, 461 King W. rsvpcanada@randomhouse.com. SHAB-E-SHE’R POETRY NIGHT Open stage with Vanessa McGowan and Josh Smith. 7 pm. $5. Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham. beitzatoun.org.

Terry Fallis has moved out of his comfort zone. His first three novels were all wry takes on political life – with a focus on Parliament Hill or at least his experience there. In No Relation ($22.95, Douglas Gibson), his protagonist is an ad copy writer who loses his job and his girlfriend on the same day and faces pressure from his dad to join the family clothing business. Look for Fallis’s trademark humour in a story about a guy saddled with the name Earnest Hemmingway. Fallis reads at the Reference Library on Monday (May 26, see Readings, this page) and does a Lunch + Learn event at the Gardiner Museum on May 29. SGC

about their work. Doors 6:30 pm. $60 (World Literacy benefit). Park Hyatt Toronto, 4 Avenue Rd. 416-977-0008, worldlit.ca.

PLUM JOHNSON/LYNN THOMSON/PRISCILA UPPAL/STUART WOODS Reading. 7:30 pm. $10,

Wednesday, May 28 PHLIP ARIMA/ALEC BUTLER/ROBERT SHOUB

Launching new books. 7:30 pm. Free. District Oven, 842 College. quattrobooks.ca.

KELLEY ARMSTRONG/WAYNE JOHNSTON/ANNE MICHAELS/ELIZABETH HAY Reading and talking

stu/yth free. Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. KATHY PAGE Reading from her story collection Paradise And Elsewhere. 7 pm. Free. North York Central Library, 5120 Yonge. torontopubliclibrary.ca. books@nowtoronto.com

CONTESTS

WIN nowtoronto.com/contests

Tuesday, May 27

THIS WEEK

THEATRE

TWELVE ANGRY MEN

CRIME WRITERS Readings by Caro Soles, Mag-

gie Downey, Nate Hendley and others. 6:30 pm. Free. Kennedy-Eglinton Library, 2380 Eglinton E. torontopubliclibrary.ca. KATHY PAGE Reading from her novel Paradise + Elsewhere. 7 pm. Free. Barbara Frum Library, 20 Covington. 416-395-5440. DAVID SAX Launching The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy For Cupcakes But Fed Up With

Win tickets to see Twelve Angry Men at Young Centre for the Performing Arts on June 16th!

MUSIC

LA ROUX

Win tickets to see La Roux at Danforth Music Hall on June 1st!

Wednesday, May 28 7:30pm 235 Queens Quay West Toronto

Box Office/Info: 416-973-4000 ifoa.org

FILM

READING/ROUND TABLE

Plum Johnson (Canada), They Left Us Everything Lynn Thomson (Canada), Birding With Yeats Priscila Uppal (Canada), Projection: Encounters with My Runaway Mother $10/FREE for supporters, students & youth

NXNE

Win a pair of wristbands for NXNE Film, June 13-15! Sign up and get contests delivered directly to your inbox every Wednesday! Become a Clique member and receive access to our exclusive contests.

MORE ONLINE

Complete art listings at nowtoronto.com/art/listings

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= Critics’ Pick NNNNN = Can’t live without it NNNN = Riveting NNN = Worthy NN = Remainder bin here we come

Follow us for updates N = Doorstop material

@nowtorontopromo NOW MAY 22-28 2014

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movies

more online

nowtoronto.com/movies More INSIDE OUT FILM FESTIVAL REVIEWS • More reports from CANNES FILM FESTIVAL • THE ROAD WARRIOR at the Lightbox • and more Life’s a beach for The Foxy Merkins’ Jackie Monahan (left) and Lisa Haas.

Ghilherme Lobo makes a splash in sensitive opening gala The Way He Looks.

Matt Bomer (left) and Mark Ruffalo stall in The Normal Heart.

FILM FESTIVAL REVIEWS

Queer hits and misses Here’s our roundup of the best (and the rest) from the Inside Out Film Fest INSIDE OUT: TORONTO LGBT FILM FESTIVAL from Thursday (May 22) to June 1 at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. $10-$13, galas $22$30. See Indie & Rep Film, page 70, 416599-TIFF, and insideout.ca.

Good looking THE WAY HE LOOKS (Daniel Ribeiro, Brazil). 95 minutes. Thursday (May 22), 8 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1. Rating: NNNN

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This year’s fest opener is a warm and sensitive coming-of-age picture about Leo (Ghilherme Lobo), a blind teen in São Paulo who’s trying to establish his independence from his over-protective parents. His bestie, the witty, perceptive Giovana (Tess Amorim), walks him home from class every day, but their relationship changes when the handsome, curly-haired Gabriel (Fabio Audi) transfers to their school. First-time director Daniel Ribeiro handles the material gracefully, getting spontaneous, layered and believable performances from the young actors and never tipping his hand about where the plot’s headed. He’s also got a great eye, investing a scene involving a hoodie and another in which Leo teaches Gabriel how to read Braille with complex emotions. And the score, which includes music by Arvo Pärt and Belle and Sebastian, feels like a separate character. It’s a GLENN SUMI perfect date movie.

Endless days 52 TUESDAYS (Sophie Hyde, Australia). 114 minutes. June 1, 7:30 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1. Rating: NN

52 Tuesdays, the festival’s closing gala, is an earnest film about an important

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subject, but it’s hamstrung by a tedious gimmick and a script that doesn’t know where it’s going. In the opening minutes, 16-year-old Aussie Billie (Tilda Cobham-Hervey) learns that her mother, Jane (Del Herbert-Jane), is transitioning to become James. It’s decided that during the process, Billie will live with her dad and visit James for a few hours every Tuesday. But things don’t go as planned. As seen in 52 sequences, James experiences side effects during treatment, and both Billie and James keep secrets from each other. Director Sophie Hyde shot the film on actual consecutive Tuesdays with non-professional actors, and that gives the film some authenticity. And the issues around the transition are illuminating. But there are huge gaps in plausibility, especially in a subplot involving Billie’s extracurricular activities with friends. And while Cobham-Hervey is certainly a find, she comes across like a supermodel slumming in an indie film, GS not a real teen.

Tru’s truth TRU LOVE (Kate Johnston, Shauna MacDonald, Canada). 87 minutes. Saturday (May 24), 7:30 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1. Rating: NNN

When commitment-phobe Tru (codirector Shauna MacDonald) meets Alice (Kate Trotter) – the mom of Suzanne (Christine Horne), one of her one-night stands – she’s shocked to discover herself falling for the older woman. The film has a seriously soapy quality, and the scenes between Alice and the ghost of her ex-husband get in the way. And why would conflicted Su-

zanne set up Alice’s introduction to Tru in the first place? But MacDonald is absolutely winning as the title character and makes you care about what happens. SUSAN G.COLE

Tame Treut OF GIRLS AND HORSES (Monika Treut, Germany). 82 minutes. May 29, 9:45 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 2. Rating: NNN

Seeks Same. Madeleine Olnek deploys her unique style – playful and off-the-wall – in this story of lesbian hookers Margaret (Lisa Haas) and Jo (Jackie Monahan), who trick by day and live in the Port Authority bus terminal by night. Olnek’s obviously having a blast making the endearing Margaret a sex object for horny housewives. But it’s the wonderfully wide-eyed Haas – who was a riot as the Space Alien – SGC who makes this pic so appealing.

In this latest entry from iconic director Monika Treut, teenage troublemaker Alex (Ceci Chuh) is sent to a horse farm near Hamburg operated by Nina DERBY CRAZY LOVE (Maya Gallus, (Vanida Karun) to straighten out. Justine Pimlott, Canada). 68 minThe film is beautifully shot, and Gerutes. June 1, 5:15 pm. TIFF Bell Lightbox 2. man veteran Treut has big fun Rating: NNNN using horseback riding as an erotic metaphor. Don’t This high-energy doc by expect much action local filmmakers – either narrative or Maya Gallus and sexual – though. Justine Pimlott The girls do a lot follows the of playing in the Montreal New hay, and a sex Skids, a gritty scene between roller derby team Nina and her girlattempting to friend is so saniachieve worldtized it hurts. class status. Derby Crazy Love is What happened The players, all of fast, fun and smart. to the audacious dirthem unpaid, are courector who knocked us ageous in their commitout with Seduction: The ment, and great camera work Cruel Woman almost 30 years ago? I gives a real sense of how physically deSGC miss her. manding the sport is. Though in its

High rollers

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Foxy fun THE FOXY MERKINS (Madeleine Olnek, U.S.). 90 minutes. May 31, 6:45 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1. Rating: NNNN

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Here’s another irresistible no-budget pic from the woman who brought you Codependent Lesbian Space Alien

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earliest incarnation roller derby came off as the equivalent of men’s staged wrestling, it’s serious business these days. The doc is light on analysis of how class plays into the sport, but the filmmakers take deep pleasure in the ways roller derby women subvert gender stereotypes. SGC Fast, fun and smart.

Heart attack THE NORMAL HEART (Ryan Murphy, U.S.). 128 minutes. Friday (May 23), 9 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1. Rating: NN Larry Kramer’s 1985 play The Normal Heart, about New York gays terrified by a growing plague they could not understand, was written for its community, absolutely in the moment – so much so that the set included numbers representing the death toll that grew greater with every performance. The film is a look back, made for the mainstream, and it trips up from its first moment. Ned Weeks (Mark Ruffalo) is at a Fire Island party where body-beautiful guys are hooking up like crazy. Later he witnesses a gay cluster-hump in a public park. Weeks is plainly not into either, and the sequence turns into an exercise in blame-laying so egregious as to make you wonder what gay director Ryan Murphy and adaptor Kramer were thinking. Ruffalo, as the enraged writer trying to draw attention to the AIDS epidemic, has all the passion required, and the rest of the cast, including Taylor Kitsch, Jim Parsons and Jonathan Groff as volunteers at Gay Men’s Health Crisis, pull their weight. But the characters are thin, largely because the play’s major speeches representing their points of view are cut to ribbons. Even Weeks’s famous monologue about why he’s proud to be gay is eviscerated. The only still-intact theatrical high point is that of the lone doctor treating AIDS patients, desperate for funding. She even gets an extra, totally unnecessary scene where she tries to get out of her wheelchair. That’s what happens when Julia SGC Roberts plays a role.

= Critic’s Pick NNNNN = Best of the fest NNNN = Excellent NNN = Entertaining NN = Snore N = Who programs this crap?


Exploring: never stop Single Tablet Regimens (one pill, once a day) are a step forward in HIV treatment. Explore more at exploreHIV.ca

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7/25/13 2014 1:54 PM NOW may 22-28 59

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PRODUCTION CHECKLIST


Timbuktu shows freedom in the face of jihadi repression.

Winter Sleep’s exterior shots are spectacular, and so is the film.

SEE MORE CANNES REPORTS AT

NOWTORONTO.COM/MOVIES

Timothy Spall could cop a best-actor win for Mr. Turner.

FILM FESTIVAL REPORT

The buzz from Cannes Latest by Cronenberg and Ceylan are getting major fest love By PAUL ENNIS CANNES FILM FESTIVAL to May 25. festival-cannes.com. CANNES, France – The Cannes Festival wears its contrasts and apparent contradictions like a badge of honour. Last Sunday morning, May 18, Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mel Gibson, Harrison Ford, Jason Statham, Wesley Snipes, Dolph Lundgren, Kelsey Grammer and Antonio Banderas rolled down the Croisette in two tanks on their way to a press conference to promote The Expendables 3. It was a publicist’s dream come true and manna from heaven for the fans who live to see their celluloid heroes in the flesh. Two days earlier, at the opening of the Directors’ Fortnight sidebar, the French Directors Guild bestowed its annual Golden Coach award on Alain Resnais, who died in March. His muse and wife, Sabine Azéma, stood prominently on the stage of the packed theatre soaking up the audience’s affection, her hand tightly held by Resnais’s alter ego, André Dussollier, her co-star in most of the master’s films over the last 30 years. It’s that collision of art and commerce that defines Cannes. Attending the first screening of David Cronenberg’s Maps To The Stars is as important as an invitation to the Vanity Fair party at the

DOCUMENTARY

Married lives 112 WEDDINGS (Doug Block). 93 minutes. Opens Friday (May 23) at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema. See Times, page 68. Rating: NNN

For nearly 20 years, filmmaker Doug Block supplemented his income by making wedding videos. Now he’s tracked down some of his former clients to see how their romances have fared. The results are hardly surprising: children radically affect a relationship, as do illness, moving and employment. Some

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exclusive Hôtel du Cap. And all of it flows directly out of the films selected for competition and the nine-member jury, headed by Jane Campion, that will decide their fate. Campion, the only female director ever to win the Palme d’Or, hinted at what direction the prizes may take when she disclosed at the jury’s opening press conference, “I’ve always appreciated films with a personal vision, with a unique way of seeing the world.” As I write, more than half the competition titles have been shown, and as usual the outcome is anyone’s guess. The press may know what it likes, and it’s not shy about trumpeting favourites, but ultimately the jury decides. Right now, Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Winter Sleep is the critics’ consensus leader. At more than three hours, this multi-layered, carefully crafted, engaging series of conversations revolves around a retired stage actor who operates a hotel in Cappadocia, where the buildings are set right into the rocky landscape, making the exterior shots a spectacular counterpoint to the rich dialogue. Two of the three Canadian films have now screened. Cronenberg is justifiably getting raves for a deft comic touch that illuminates novelist Bruce Wagner’s caustic Hollywood satire. Atom Egoyan’s The Captive flamed out in

couples trust him enough to open up, while others say more with their body language than with words. A number have divorced. Block’s narration isn’t very inspired, but he made a good decision to follow two pairs who are about to be married, one a young couple and another whose commitment ceremony he filmed years before who now want to legally tie the knot. Both of these stories add a sense of momentum and drama to a documentary that occasionally feels episodic. GLENN SUMI Sometimes it isn’t all “happily ever after,” folks.

the face of withering criticism of old tropes and an implausible plot. Ironically, Egoyan’s direction has seldom been better, but his artistry couldn’t overcome some preposterous twists that undermined the strong creep factor permeating this story of pedophilia. Other films with widespread critical backing include Mr. Turner, Mike Leigh’s rich portrait of British landscape painter J.M.W. Turner, which uses light ingeniously to illustrate the sources of Turner’s inspiration. Timothy Spall brings the artist to life with a wide variety of grunts, nods, smiles and scowls. (It could be just what it takes to win him best-actor honours.) Tommy Lee Jones’s compelling The Homesman looks at the harsh conditions frontier women endured at the edge of what passed for civilization in the mid-19th-century American West. Director Jones plays an irascible reprobate transformed in the course of an unlikely mission across the Nebraska territory. As the credits rolled at the end of Bennett Miller’s highly watchable Foxcatcher, Steve Carell’s name drew a wave of cheers, but it’s the subtext of this tale of vast wealth run amok that is the real star. Young Italian filmmaker Alice Rohr wacher’s The Wonders could strike Campion’s fancy. Its freshness and naturalism seems to come right

out of the head of its teenage protagonist, the eldest of four daughters of a Tuscan farming couple, who wants to take the farm’s honey production into the unlikely arena of a reality television contest. Damián Szifron’s unheralded Wild Tales begins with a hilarious sketch built on coincidence that had the press in convulsions, then ramps up the surrealism in its remaining episodes, concluding with an extreme wedding party of which Buñuel would have been proud. Two films by acknowledged masters – Naomi Kawase’s Still The Water, an emotional ode to the interconnectedness of parents and children, and the Dardenne brothers’ Two Days, One Night, with its revelatory, naturalistic performance by Marion Cotillard – will surely rate jury consideration. For me, days after Timbuktu was first screened, Abderrahmane Sissako’s humanism in the face of jihadi repression still resonates powerfully. By taking us wholly into the lives of his well-developed characters, ordinary people of northern Mali who want nothing more than to make music, play soccer and, for the women, to feel the breeze on their hands without being forced to wear gloves at all times, Sissako stands up for free will everywhere. 3 movies@nowtoronto.com

Mark Rendall (left) and Tom Cavanagh star in a film that never takes wing.

COMEDY

Birder bungled THE BIRDER (Ted Bezaire). 85 minutes. Opens Friday (May 23). For venues and times, see Movies, page 63. Rating: NN

The Birder starts off with a burst of absurdity and exaggerated emotion that

Ñ

makes me think of Wes Anderson’s Rushmore – if that movie had centred on one of Max Fischer’s teachers. But as it keeps going, that comparison seems wildly off the mark. The Birder is no Rushmore. It’s a pleasant but insubstantial comedy starring Ed’s Tom Cavanagh as an awkward high school biology teacher and

birding enthusiast who embarks on a half-assed campaign to win back his wife (Allana Harkin) with the help of an equally hapless former student (Algonquin’s Mark Rendall). Cavanagh commits fully, and director Ted Bezaire, who also co-wrote and co-edited, stages some visually striking images. Speaking of which, producers take note: cinematographer Arthur E. Cooper, production designer Taavo Soodor and art director Jessica Cook are all very talented, and you should hire them. Ultimately, though, The Birder falls victim to its inconsistent tone: both Cavanagh and Rendall are playing cartoonish characters, but no one else is. You also get the sense that there just wasn’t enough material here for a feature film, but someone insisted on NORMAN WILNER making one anyway.

= Critic’s Pick NNNNN = Top ten of the year NNNN = Honourable mention NNN = Entertaining NN = Mediocre N = Bomb


WHAT’S ON

THIS WEEK

SERVING ONTARIO BEER & WINE!

MAY 23–29, 2014 506 Bloor St. W. @ Bathurst, Toronto

THE TRUTH ABOUT HAPPILY EVER AFTER

TORONTO PREMIERE!

THREES SHOW ! ONLY

112 WEDDINGS After more than 20 years shooting wedding videos, award-winning filmmaker Doug Block tracks down some of the most memorable couples in this funny, moving and revealing look at love.

FRI, MAY 23–30, select times

“STRIKING!” – THE GLOBE AND MAIL

PETE SEEGER: A SONG AND A STONE This rare doc features unforgettable concert footage and archival videos of the late Pete Seeger with his family and friends, from the late 60s to the early 70s.

FRI, MAY 23–29, select dates and times

ALSO ON LIVE TH I E S T WAY! W T O

THREES SHOW ! ONLY

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER Discover Vivian Maier, a career nanny whose cache of 100,000 photographs earned her a posthumous reputation as one of America’s most accomplished street photographers.

THU, MAY 29–JUNE 1, select dates and times

FINAL ! SHOW

ROCK AND ROLL’S GREATEST MISTAKEN FOR STRANGERS FAILURE: OTWAY THE MOVIE Official Selection, Hot Docs 2013

After one hit and a chaotic career, UK rocker John Otway becomes a cult superstar.

THU, MAY 22 & 25, 6:30 PM

TICKETS & FULL SCHEDULE WWW.BLOORCINEMA.COM

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The lead singer of The National invites his younger brother to film their biggest tour yet.

MON, MAY 26, 8:45 PM

@thebloorcinema NOW may 22-28 2014

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Dramedy

Woody lite FADING GIGOLO (John Turturro). 98 minutes. Opens Friday (May 23). For venues and times, see Movies, page 63. Rating­: NN

If you buy the idea that Sharon Stone and Sofía Vergara couldn’t get a threesome together without paying the male third party, then you might go for John Turturro’s pic about a male prostitute. But the rest of us know an elaborate male fantasy when we see it. Fading Gigolo stars Woody Allen as Murray, an antiquarian bookstore owner forced to close shop who becomes part-time flower arranger Fioravante’s (Turturro) pimp in order to facilitate that threesome. Turns out Fioravante is good at his new job. The film is plainly an homage to

actor interviews

Allen himself. It’s a got a jazz-based soundtrack, it seeks, and occasionally succeeds to replicate his offbeat ­Jewish humour – the piece is set in Brooklyn close to an Orthodox Jewish enclave – and Allen plays another ­endearing schlemiel. And what would a paean to the Woodster be without a bit of an ick factor? Turturro delivers with a borderline offensive set-up between working boy Fioravante and an Orthodox Jewish widow (Vanessa Paradis) who’s being shadowed by a forelocked security guard (Liev Schreiber) from her own community. At one point Murray is hauled in front of Orthodox elders on charges of violating Jewish law. What ­authority would they have over a Jew outside their own community, and why is there no payoff? It’s ridiculous, but so is the entire SUSAN G. COLE film. 

Michael Watier

Emma Thompson & Pierce Brosnan

A classy couple Two of Britain’s finest muscle up for a comic caper pic By GLENN SUMI THE LOVE PUNCH written and directed by Joel Hopkins, with Emma Thompson, Pierce Brosnan, Celia Imrie and Timothy Spall. An eOne release. 94 minutes. Opens Friday (May 23). For venues and times, see Movies, page 63.

Emma Thompson wants to do action roles. The woman who’s made a career playing utterly proper, upstanding characters – often in period dress – is telling this to a table full of journalists before the world premiere of The Love Punch at TIFF. “I talked to Sean Penn recently, and he’d just finished one. He said he was covered in bruises, that he had bruises on his bruises,” she says in her typical blithe manner. “I want that! I want to get all ripped like Linda Hamilton in T2 and have muscles on my nose.” Ironic, because her Love Punch costar, Pierce Brosnan, who’s seated next to her, has executed his fair share of action sequences as James Bond. The two play a divorced couple who get caught up in a comic Côte d’Azur caper after they discover they’ve been swindled out of their life savings by a sleazy French con man. “I’m largely known for being in a certain genre of film,” adds Brosnan, “and it was great to be able to turn it on its head, inside out and back to front.” This is the first time the two have

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May 22-28 2014 NOW

worked together, and they have nothing but good things to say about the process. “He’s the most graceful man on the screen,” she says. “He’s the Rudolf Nureyev of movement.” Brosnan, meanwhile, says Thompson is an amazing actor who covers the gamut of emotions and characterizations. Neither considers The Love Punch aimed at the same greying demographic that made films like The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel a huge hit. “You can’t think like that,” says Thompson. “It might not work or [that audience] might not like it; other people might prefer it. I hope my 13-year-old daughter will get just as much of a kick out of it as my 80-year-old mum, and everyone in between. Otherwise, what’s the point?” Not that she’s happy with all the films marketed toward adolescent boys, like the Transformers movies. “Unfortunately, a lot of films made for 17- or 18-year-old boys are really empty,” she says. “I see a lot of them because I have nephews. I watch them and think, ‘God help us. If that’s what we’re offering our kids, then what are we saying about how we value them?’” If The Love Punch is successful, would they consider doing a sequel? “Yes,” says Thompson. “But I’d want more action in it. Including a training montage. I love those.”  3 glenns@nowtoronto.com | @glennsumi

review THE LOVE PUNCH (Joel Hopkins) Rating: NN The recent spate of aging baby boomer dramedies – e.g., The Best Exotic Marigold Quartet – has likely encouraged this frothy hybrid romantic ­comedy-heist picture. Thankfully, the actors can sell just about anything. Emma Thompson and Pierce Brosnan play divorced Brits who reunite to get payback from the slimy French businessman who scammed them out of their life savings. This involves flying down to the Côte d’Azur, impersonating Texans to crash a wedding and attempting to steal a $10 million diamond. The script is ludicrous, full of plot holes and unfunny jokes about physical ailments, and Joel Hopkins’s direction feels laboured. (His Last Chance Harvey, also with Thompson, was much more graceful.) But the two leads, along with Celia Imrie and Timothy Spall as their best friends, seem up for anything, and their enthusiasm carries the picture along. Look for two amusing running gags, one involving a character’s exciting past, the GS other involving Skype.

Ñ

John Turturro (left) and Woody Allen fail to hook us in.

family comedy

Blended crap BLENDED (Frank Coraci). 117 minutes. Opens Friday (May 23). For venues and times, see Movies, page 63. Rating­: N Adam Sandler can be a fine comic when he gives a shit. Most of the time, it seems like he doesn’t. Buried within the steaming pile that is Blended – Sandler’s latest dump into theatres as star and ­producer – is an actor who can nail the unassuming zinger, throw some beautiful tantrums and play sensitive characters who use humour as a defence mechanism. You see glimmers of this side of Sandler, small moments that actually allow him to spark off his Wedding Singer co-star Drew Barrymore. The two play single

parents who, ­having already suffered a bad blind date with each other, are now saddled together with their broods on a South African safari – a ridiculous scenario that ­requires the crappy screenplay to perform back flips in terms of plot machinations. Instead of building on Sandler’s knack for intimate comedy, the movie surrounds him with horny rhinos, wild ostrich rodeos and a slew of ­supporting players like Shaquille O’Neal and Kevin Nealon, whose mere presence is ­supposed to signal comedy ­despite the absence of actual jokes. Sandler would rather fall off an ostrich, get knocked down by a parachute or give someone else the spotlight than actually be funny, as if even he lacks confidence in his talThat’s right, Drew ents to carry a and Adam. You movie.  should be upset.

RADHEYAN SIMONPILLAI

also opening X-Men: Days Of Future Past (D: Bryan Singer, 131 min) Godzilla demolished all box office competition last week, so let’s see if the latest in the X-Men franchise will fly high with audiences. Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Hugh Jackman, Michael Fass­bender, James M ­ cAvoy and Jennifer Lawrence star in this tale about travelling back in time to change history for h ­ umans and mutants. Opens Friday (May 23). Screened after press time – see review May 23 at ­ nowtoronto.com/movies.

Michael Fassbender channels Ian McKellen in time-travelling X-Men pic.

= Critic’s Pick nnnnn = Top ten of the year nnnn = Honourable mention nnn = Entertaining nn = Mediocre n = Bomb


A BLAZINGLY BRILLIANT PIECE OF FILMMAKING

.

THE PLAYLIST

FLOODS YOUR SENSES WITH SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY “

The revelatory Marine Vacth has a big secret in Young & Beautiful.

.

ROLLING STONE

CHALLENGES OUR CONVENTIONAL

Playing this week How to find a listing

Movie listings are comprehensive and organized alphabetically. Listings include name of film, director’s name in brackets, a review, running time and a rating. Reviews are by Norman Wilner (NW), Susan G. Cole (SGC), Glenn Sumi (GS) and Radheyan Simonpillai (RS) unless otherwise specified. The rating system is as follows: NNNNN Top 10 of the year NNNN Honourable mention NNN Entertaining NN Mediocre N Bomb

ñ= Critics’ pick (highly recommended)

Movie theatres are listed at the end and can be cross-referenced to our film times on page 68.

ñAi Weiwei: The Fake Case

(Andreas Johnsen) picks up exactly where ­Alison Klayman’s Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry ended, with the Chinese artist and activist released from detention after 81 days in the spring of 2011. Danish director Johnsen follows Ai as he weathers the next stage of his persecution by the ­Chinese government, a legal assault on his studio. The strangeness of the situation brings out Ai’s puckish wit. He works around the restrictions placed upon him by designing art in secret and openly videotaping the security agents assigned to intimidate him. It’s a fine study of a man trying to joke his way out of hell. Some subtitles. 79 min. NNNN (NW) Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (Marc

Webb) delivers virtually everything its ­predecessor did, in more or less the same order. It even starts at the same point as Amazing 1, expanding on the events of the night young Peter Parker’s doomed parents left him in the care of Uncle Ben and Aunt May, and it ends with a mopey Peter urged to make the most of his life by a handy speech recorded earlier in the story. In the middle, there’s jumping, fighting and web-swinging as our hero battles super-villains created by the nefarious ­Oscorp (Jamie Foxx’s scene-chewing Electro and Dane DeHaan’s calculating Harry Osborn). Andrew Garfield brings radically different physicalities to the paralyzed, self-doubting Peter Parker and his highflying alter-ego, and Emma Stone’s plucky

NOTIONS OF HUMAN IDENTITY

.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Gwen Stacy is basically Emma Stone infused with the proportionate adorability of a dozen golden retriever puppies. And Sally Field continues to be an affecting Aunt May. The plot about Peter’s dad and his super-secret research is unnecessary, and the need to set up more projects starts to weigh the picture down by the end. 142 min. NNN (NW) 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Humber Cinemas, Queens­ way, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, Scotiabank Theatre, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Varsity

Bears (Alastair Fothergill, Keith Scholey) takes gorgeous wildlife photography of Alaskan brown bears and edits it into a fictionalized, ridiculously anthropomorphic narrative about a mother and her cubs avoiding perils while foraging for seafood in the Arctic wilderness. That said, few things are more adorable than brown bear cubs falling asleep next to their mother. 77 min. NNN (NW) Canada Square Belle (Amma Asante) spins the life of Dido Elizabeth Belle, daughter of an 18th century British naval officer and an African slave, into a historical biopic that aspires to more complexity than its lavish costume-drama packaging will allow. Gugu Mbatha-Raw is a strong lead as a young woman brought up among gentry while forever kept at a remove from them; Tom Wilkinson is nicely stuffy as the uncle who’s raised her, and Sarah Gadon is terrific as his more privileged daughter. But while Misan Sagay’s script is rife with intriguing subtext, the text itself is a little simplistic, with stilted dialogue and broader-than-necessary supporting performances by Miranda Richardson and Tom ­Felton as Dido’s social-climbing antagonists. Those elements work against Asante’s goal of an accessible, mass-audience drama that shows how the story’s real issues of race and gender are still (sadly) entirely relevant today. 104 min. NNN (NW) Varsity, Yonge & Dundas 24 The Birder (Ted Bezaire) 85 min. See r­ eview, page 60. NN (NW) Opens May 23 at Carlton Cinema

Blended (Frank Coraci) 117 min. See ­review, page 62. N (RS)

continued on page 64 œ

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œcontinued from page 63

Opens May 23 at Carlton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Docks Lakeview Drive-In, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Humber Cinemas, Queensway, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Yonge & Dundas 24

BLUE RUIN (Jeremy Saulnier) is an

ñ

all-American revenge story that explores the consequences of getting caught in the tit-for-tat algebra of retribution. Macon Blair stars as Dwight, introduced as a scruffy itinerant living out of his beatup blue car. Careful to parcel out information, Saulnier reveals that a criminal recently released from prison killed someone close to Dwight. When he returns to his Virginia hometown, his payback plan is instantly complicated when friends and family are dragged into an expanding network of murder and vengeance. 90 min. NNNN (John Semley) Carlton Cinema

BRICK MANSIONS (Camille Delamarre) is a remake of the 2004 French action film District B13, with David Belle, a founder of parkour, reprising his role. He ricochets through windows and rooftops, sustaining the impact of massive leaps and bouncing further as if the earth were his trampoline. That’s all in the first five minutes. The rest of this dim-witted movie, full of bad acting and writing, is like wind resistance to Belle’s aerodynamics. 90 min. NN (RS) 401 & Morningside, Canada Square, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Scotiabank Theatre, SilverCity Yorkdale AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER ñCAPTAIN

(Anthony Russo, Joe Russo) is a super-powered riff on Three Days Of The Condor, with Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) branded an enemy of the people and forced to work with friends old (Scarlett Johansson’s Natasha Romanoff, Cobie Smulders’s Maria Hill) and new (Anthony Mackie’s Sam Wilson) to clear his name and save the world from a conspiracy that dates back to the Second World War. No, it won’t make any sense if you haven’t seen the first Captain America and The Avengers (at least). But it has a charismatic hero, inspired action choreography and Robert Redford. Also, it’s really funny. Some subtitles. 136 min. NNNN

(NW) 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, Canada Square, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Queensway, Rainbow Woodbine, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Yonge & Dundas 24

DIVERGENT (Neil Burger) is the latest attempt to launch the next Hunger Games, and the first to nakedly mimic that franchise with another post-apocalyptic tale of a young woman (Shailene Woodley) fighting to save her people from an elaborate political conspiracy. Problem is, it takes nearly two hours to get going, wasting all its time on dull-witted worldbuilding and endless training sequences. 140 min. NN (NW) Canada Square, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Scotiabank Theatre

ñDOM HEMINGWAY

(Richard Shepard) features Jude Law in a ferocious, balls-out performance as the eponymous safecracker who’s released from prison after 12 years and goes looking for the money that’s owed him. The film’s filled with bold colours, big, clear chapter titles and a couple of marvellously fun set pieces. The supporting actors don’t have much to do, but Law is feckin’ brilliant. 94 min. NNNN (GS) Carlton Cinema, Kingsway Theatre

ñTHE FACE OF LOVE

(Arie Posin) is an absorbing, affecting tale of grief and love. Annette Bening and Ed Harris are superb as a widow who meets and falls in love with a man who looks freakishly like her dead husband. 92 min. NNNN (GS) Canada Square

FADING GIGOLO (John Turturro) 98 min. See review, page 62. NN (SGC) Opens May 23 at Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Queensway, Varsity FED UP (Stephanie Soechtig) is so intent on selling its thesis – that sugar is terrible for you, and it’s in everything – that it becomes hectoring and exhausting. The fact that America’s heavily sugared processedfood diet has produced to an epidemic of morbidly obese children (prone to type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and other ills) is certainly important, but anyone who’s bought a ticket to this movie already knows processed foods are bad and

Flick Finder

NOW picks your kind of movie ACTION

FOREIGN

DOC

COMEDY

GODZILLA

IDA

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER

NEIGHBORS

Gareth Edwards’s blockbuster remake of the kaiju classic demolished last weekend’s box office. Even with the return of those X-Men this week, it’s bound to do the same. See it in IMAX 3D.

64

Centring on a novitiate nun whose aunt tells her she’s Jewish, this complex Polish drama tackles themes of faith, hypocrisy and wartime accountability with lots of subtlety.

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

This absorbing doc looks at the enigmatic artist, who was a nanny, compulsive hoarder and took thousands of brilliant photographs yet never showed them.

This better-thanits-premisesounds comedy stars Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne as new parents who move in next door to a frat house and butt heads with its leader (Zac Efron).

fresh foods are better. Director Soechtig goes all in on simplistic messaging, cutesy animated graphs and repeated comparisons of today’s sugar industry to the tobacco conglomerates that pushed back against scientific reality for decades. I agree with everything Fed Up is saying, and I still wanted to walk out. 92 min. NN (NW) Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Varsity

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (John

ñ

Maloof, Charlie Siskel) sifts through some of the 100,000 photographs shot by nanny and compulsive hoarder Vivian Maier to construct a compelling portrait of an artist who refused to be seen. Unknown to the world until co-director Maloof happened to acquire her negatives at auction, Maier’s raw, poetic street photography portrays a distinctive view of the everyday. Here the photographs are not just art but bread crumbs leading to an enigmatic personality. In interviews, some who (barely) knew her describe Maier as Mary Poppins-like while others report a nastier side that includes physical abuse. Maybe the biggest mystery of all is why she took so many photos and then hid them from sight; since the negatives were never processed, even Maier never saw her own work. The consistently intriguing doc reveals facets of a woman who was eccentric, abrasive, soulful and mentally unhinged. Maier may still be an enigma, but the film does a remarkable job of developing those riddles into a fascinating picture. 83 min. NNNN (RS) Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, Kingsway Theatre, Regent Theatre, TIFF Bell Lightbox

FOR NO GOOD REASON (Charlie Paul) pos-

itions itself as a documentary about Ralph Steadman, the British illustrator (and NOW cover artist) whose instantly recognizable style was the perfect accompaniment to Hunter S. Thompson’s gonzo journalism in the glory days of Rolling Stone magazine. But director Paul and ostensible host Johnny Depp spend far too much time pumping the genial artist for stories of Thompson’s demented crusades (illustrated by animated versions of Steadman’s drawings, often narrated by Depp as Thompson), paying not nearly enough attention to the man in front of them. A

sequence in which Steadman makes a lovely drawing of his dog – defining musculature through splotches of ink, creating personality in sharp little lines – is a fascinating window into his process. The film could have done with more of that and fewer video clips of Thompson acting out. 90 min. NNN (NW) Canada Square

FOXFIRE: CONFESSIONS OF A GIRL GANG

plex motivations for even the simplest of gestures, and writer/director Puenzo plays out the tension as long as she can, and no further. Like a finely rendered short story, The German Doctor forgoes jolts for a long, unpleasant shiver of understanding. Subtitled. 90 min. NNNN (NW) Carlton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Kingsway Theatre, Yonge & Dundas 24

(Laurent Cantet) is an overlong but mostly GODZILLA (Gareth Edwards) finally satisfying and detail-rich adaptation of gives the King of the Monsters a Joyce Carol Oates’s novel about young summer movie worthy of his stature, takwomen in 1950s upstate New York rising ing guidance not just from Jaws and Jurasup against bullying males of all ages. Dirsic Park but from Close Encounters Of The ector Cantet (The Class) Third Kind as well. This does a fine job building is a movie that values character and tension wonder as much as EXPANDED REVIEWS even when the story horror. Bryan Cranston, nowtoronto.com gets away from him, and Juliette Binoche, Ken the film deals with perWatanabe and others iod-appropriate depictions play various puny humans sent scurrying of sexism and racism quite wonderfully. At by the advent of giant monsters in a world the very least, it’s much better than the unaccustomed to them. Monsters director 1996 film version starring Angelina Jolie. Edwards shifts between micro and macro 143 min. NNN (Andrew Parker) views to let us revel in the spectacle of TIFF Bell Lightbox monster action – or teases us with the promise of same before pivoting away to THE GALAPAGOS AFFAIR: SATAN CAME TO EDEN (Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine) whisks another aspect of the story. This Godzilla builds on the framework of the best reus back to the remote island of Floreana in cent kaiju movies, The Host and Clover1930s, when a handful of European eccenfield, using their sense of scale and dread trics attempted to escape civilization. The to craft an experience even larger and story, which climaxes with apparent more powerful. While struggling to give murder, is captivating, but the execution their gargantuan hero agency and a persuffers from an excessively leisurely pace, sonality, previous Godzilla movies failed to over-used stills and mostly superfluous create characters in whom the audience interviews with the subjects’ descendants. could invest; this one does both. And it’s 120 min. NNN (Jose Teodoro) so damn satisfying, especially in IMAX 3D. Kingsway Theatre 123 min. NNNNN (NW) THE GERMAN DOCTOR (Lucía 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, CarlPuenzo) is an appropriately creepy ton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress what-if drama about an encounter beWalk, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scartween a 12-year-old girl (Florencia Bado) borough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Docks and fugitive Nazi Josef Mengele (Àlex Lakeview Drive-In, Eglinton Town Centre, Brendemühl) in Patagonia circa 1960. The Grande - Steeles, Humber Cinemas, Queenstone is less Ira Levin and more Thomas way, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Harris; there’s no ticking clock or desperPromenade, Rainbow Woodbine, SilverCity ate pursuit, but more of a sense of young Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity YorkLilith’s growing awareness that something dale, Yonge & Dundas 24 about the gentleman who’s taken up resiTHE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (Wes dence in the modest hotel inherited by her Anderson) finds director/co-writer parents is deeply wrong. Spanish actor Anderson building a magnificent playBrendemühl is excellent at implying comhouse, populating it with actors he knows

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more online

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distances and what happens when one partner evolves more quickly than the other. In the end, it’s a movie as beholden to Annie Hall as it is to 2001, and don’t think that isn’t the strangest sentence I’ve written this year. 125 min. NNNN (NW) Yonge & Dundas 24

Ida (Pawel Pawlikowski) follows

ñ

novitiate nun and orphan Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska) as she meets her aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza) for the first time. Anna’s real name is Ida and she is Jewish, her aunt tells her, so the two set out for the small town where Wanda believes Ida’s parents were killed, picking up a hitchhiking musician (Dawid Ogrodnik) who gives Anna her first taste of what can happen outside the nunnery walls. Anna is pure and unworldly, Wanda a hard-drinking, cynical Communist judge – and Pawlikowski’s cast the film accordingly, eliciting a luminously wide-eyed performance from first-timer Trzebuchowska and a world-weary turn from veteran Kulesza. He’s shot in crisp black-and-white, and the Dogme-influenced soundtrack makes the most of every creaking convent door. It’s never clear why Wanda contacts the ­convent after nearly two decades, but the film tackles the complex issues of faith, hypocrisy and wartime accountability with nuance – and it’s drop-dead gorgeous. Subtitled. 80 min. NNNN (SGC) Carlton Cinema, Kingsway Theatre, TIFF Bell Lightbox

Under The Skin’s Scarlett ­Johansson is devastating as a predatory alien who learns what it means to be human.

and trusts – among them Ralph Fiennes, Adrien Brody, Bill Murray, Tilda Swinton, Jeff Goldblum and Edward Norton – and running riot. And when moments of ­genuine emotion pierce that perfectly constructed artifice, they hit as powerfully as ever. 100 min. NNNN (NW) Eglinton Town Centre, Humber Cinemas, Queensway, Rainbow Market Square, ­Varsity, Yonge & Dundas 24

Heaven Is for Real (Randall Wallace) is a terrible movie and a cynical attempt to fleece Christian moviegoers out of their money. No one involved seems to believe in this horrendously hokey tale of a preacher (Greg Kinnear) dealing with his son’s post-appendicitis tale of seeing heaven. From the script and performances to the direction and cinematography, it’s a rare example of a film that gets nothing right. 99 min. N (Andrew Parker) 401 & Morningside, Coliseum Mississauga, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Queensway, Rainbow Woodbine, Yonge & Dundas 24

ñHer

(Spike Jonze) is essentially a story about how technology can ­facilitate a relationship over impossible

Joe (David Gordon Green) takes place in a

small Texas town where a troubled alcoholic (Nicolas Cage) who manages a ­deforestation crew reluctantly takes an abused young boy (Tye Sheridan) under his wing. Tensions build, boiling points are reached – you know the deal. Director Green’s time in Hollywood has calcified his storytelling sense. Joe has a plot to play out from A to B to C, and it does so in a rigidly schematic manner, with clear good guys and bad guys and innocent children to be rescued from the monsters. It’s Sling Blade without the subtlety, or Mud (which also featured Sheridan as a resourceful teen bonding with a troubled man) without the texture. That said, Cage’s commitment to his role – and his

insistence on playing it in a minor key – pulls things along admirably. 121 min. NNN (NW) Carlton Cinema

Le Week-End (Roger Michell) is being mar-

keted as a frothy middle-aged romance, but it’s really a drama about an English couple (Jim Broadbent, Lindsay Duncan) unhappily marking their 30th anniversary in Paris. It feels like a stage play that’s been awkwardly translated to the screen and certainly can’t compete with last year’s Before Midnight. 93 min. NN (NW) Kingsway Theatre, Regent Theatre

ñThe LEGO Movie

(Phil Lord, Chris­ topher Miller) is sweet, funny, preposterously complex and uniquely ridiculous. Kids will be thrilled by the non-stop activity and insane creative leaps, while grown-ups will also appreciate those leaps – especially one toward the end – and delight in how the voice actors are enjoying themselves as much as the audience. 100 min. NNNN (NW) Yonge & Dundas 24

ñLocke

(Steven Knight) is an intense character study unfolding more or less in real time about a construction foreman (Tom Hardy) who puts his personal and professional lives at risk to make an impromptu drive from Birmingham to London. With nothing but Hardy stuck ­behind the wheel of a car talking to a speakerphone, writer-director Steven Knight has made a brooding consideration of the price of having a moral code. It’s amazing what a high-wire act that turns out to be. Co-stars like Olivia Colman (Broadchurch) and Ruth Wilson (Luther) make considerable impressions given that they’re heard only as disembodied voices. Knight’s carefully calibrated script provides rock-solid motivations for Hardy’s character; you could quibble that the method by which that exposition is ­delivered is a bit gimmicky, but it doesn’t diminish what Knight and Hardy have achieved. This is a remarkable cinematic

experiment. 85 min. NNNN (NW) Varsity

The Love Punch (Joel Hopkins) 94 min.

See interview and review, page 62. NN (GS) Opens May 23 at Yonge & Dundas 24

ñThe Lunchbox

(Ritesh Batra) is built around the fanciful conceit of a mistaken lunch delivery that paves the way for two strangers to exchange handwritten letters via their meals. Ila (Nimrat Kaur) prepares home-cooked lunches for her neglectful husband, which are sent through Mumbai’s dabbawalla delivery system to the wrong recipient, Mr. Fer­ nandes (Irrfan Khan), a standoffish ­accountant who’s ready to hide away in retirement. A sense of their personal lives is conveyed by suggestion, like the scents of the ingredients in a satisfying dish. There’s romance, comedy and melodrama, but Batra deploys them gently, building a moving, sincere film around his characters. It’s an assured, affecting picture of loneliness and longing amidst modern Mumbai’s hustle and bustle. 105 min. NNNN (RS) Carlton Cinema, Yonge & Dundas 24

The Metropolitan Opera: Werther Encore is a high-def broadcast of the Met’s new production of the Massenet opera, starring Jonas Kaufmann in the title role. 195 min. May 24, noon, and May 26, 6:30 pm, at Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Mississauga, Eglinton Town Centre (no May 26 show), Queensway, Scotiabank Theatre, SilverCity Yonge

ñMillion Dollar Arm

(Craig Gilles­ pie) is what happens when you put a Disney summer picture in the hands of genuinely talented craftspeople: it manages to tick every box in the sports-movie playbook while still feeling halfway intelligent and even surprising. Jon Hamm is effortlessly winning as an L.A. sports

agent who hits on a scheme to recruit baseball talent from India; Life Of Pi’s Suraj Sharma and Slumdog Millionaire’s Madhur Mittal are likeable and vulnerable as the young men he brings back to train as pitchers, and Lake Bell spikes her scenes as Hamm’s love interest with charm and unpredictable timing. But the real talent is behind the camera: screenwriter Tom ­McCarthy (Win Win) and director Gillespie (Lars And The Real Girl) go above and beyond the requirements of their true-life fantasy to deliver a proper movie experience. Some subtitles. 124 min. NNNN (NW) 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, Carlton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Queensway, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, Scotiabank Theatre, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Yonge & Dundas 24

ñMistaken for Strangers

(Tom Berninger) is billed as a documentary about the National, but it’s really a study of brothers Matt (the band frontman) and Tom Berninger’s fractured relationship. It cleverly deconstructs their emotional ­dynamic, though you might have trouble believing director Tom did the deconstructing himself. 75 min. NNNN (NW) Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, Kingsway Theatre

Moms’ Night Out (Andrew and Jon

E­ rwin) is a slapstick comedy about an overworked mother whose evening off turns into a zany, life-affirming adventure. It could be something out of the Judd ­Apatow factory but is actually a Christian movie on the sly, sneaking in the faith ­before you catch on to the absence of f-bombs and lewd sexual innuendo. If you’re expecting The Hangover, this one comes with a virgin twist. The Christian agenda here is far more welcoming and less assaultive than previous attempts of its kind, but the movie has more practical problems than the gentle sermon buried between the lines. The ladies’ night starts off charmingly but soon disintegrates into an over-the-top, asinine search for a missing baby that’s full of strained, antic gags and uncommonly polite bikers and alcoholics, all of whom are God’s children, because that would be the point. I was sincerely hoping the whole package would work, but somewhere during the foolishness I lost faith. 99 min. NN (RS) Colossus, Eglinton Town Centre, Queens­ way, Yonge & Dundas 24

ñThe Monuments Men

(George Clooney) is a Second World War caper picture in which director/cowriter Clooney and a band of charming character actors portray art experts roaming around Europe to retrieve sculptures and paintings seized by the Nazis from Jewish collectors. The earnest and clever script makes some very good points about the importance of art while telling an involving story about characters we come to adore. Some subtitles. 118 min. NNNN (NW) Mt Pleasant

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MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (Rob Minkoff) yanks the 2D, hand-drawn time-travelling cartoon from the 60s into the new era of 3D animation. The genius dog and his adopted son visit textbook figures like Marie Antoinette, King Tut and Leonardo Da Vinci while giving history a zany spin. The father-son story is a strained framework for their lighthearted, rib-tickling episodic adventures, which retain the cartoons’ fun and humour. 92 min. NNN (RS) Kingsway Theatre

very talented actors in two stories separated by four decades. Jeremy Irons has a few nice scenes with Martina Gedeck as an optometrist with whom his character becomes friendly, but that’s hardly a reason to endure the rest of it. 111 min. NN (NW) Kingsway Theatre

ñNOAH

(Darren Aronofsky) has rock monsters, a villain, a barbarian army and all sorts of other stuff that wasn’t in the original text. But what director and co-writer Aronofsky has done, in a surprisNATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: THE CURIOUS ingly textured and mature way, is acknowINCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME ENCORE is a broadcast from London of this ledge that the story is in fact only a story. He plays it absolutely straight; even a hint adaptation of Mark Haddon’s bestselling of irony would bring the whole thing novel about an autistic boy who searches down in a heap. That’s why casting Russell for the killer of his neighbour’s dog. 165 Crowe as Noah makes sense; he’s immune min. to irony, and can’t help but engage fully May 22, 7 pm, at Cineplex Cinemas Empwith the role of a patriarch wrestling with ress Walk, Coliseum Scarborough, Courtney concepts and responPark 16, Queensway, Silversibilities well beyond City Yonge, Yonge & his pay grade. After the Dundas 24 (also May 24 EXPANDED REVIEWS Flood, Aronofsky shuts and 26 screenings) nowtoronto.com out the spectacle to NEIGHBORS focus, intensely, on the (Nicholas Stoller) people in the boat: stars Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne as new Noah, his wife (Jennifer Connelly), their parents enmeshed in a prank war with the sons and a young woman (Emma Watson) frat house that’s moved in next door. As who’s become part of their line, sitting in he did in Forgetting Sarah Marshall and silence among sleeping beasts as the Get Him To The Greek, director Stoller screams of the dying filter through the manages to interlace the escalating insanwalls. At that point, Noah essentially beity with surprising emotional intelligence: comes a taut survival drama; it could be Neighbors isn’t just about stolen airbags taking place 6,000 years in the past or and über-keggers; it’s about the leads’ 6,000 years in the future. The point is that desperation to still identify as young and the story is alive and relevant and incool to Zac Efron’s alpha bro and his foltriguing. 138 min. NNNN (NW) lowers. Extra points for the amazing supColossus, Courtney Park 16, Queensway, porting cast, which includes such comedy Yonge & Dundas 24 MVPs as Ike Barinholtz, Carla Gallo, HanNOW: IN THE WINGS ON A WORLD STAGE nibal Buress, Jason Mantzoukas and Lisa (Jeremy Whelehan) delivers exactly what Kudrow. You never know where the next it says on the tin: a look at the travelling laugh will come from. 96 min. NNNN (NW) company Kevin Spacey and Sam Mendes 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, Carlput together to take Shakespeare’s Richard ton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress III around the world in 2011. It’s an hour Walk, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum and a half of rehearsals and cast bonding, Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, with just enough performance footage to Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, make you long for a proper recording of Humber Cinemas, Queensway, Rainbow the production. (Spacey’s take on Richard Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainnow seems like preparation for his charmbow Woodbine, Scotiabank Theatre, Silvering House Of Cards schemer Frank UnderCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity wood.) But moments of real insight into Yorkdale, Yonge & Dundas 24 the cast’s process or a sense of context for NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON (Bille August) is a the play are few and far between. The dreary Euro-pudding that wastes several quick-fire editing and insistently chipper

more online

ñ

NOW

musical score give the whole thing the feel of a commemorative DVD you’d pick up on your way out of the theatre after seeing the show. 93 min. NNN (NW) Yonge & Dundas 24

NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME I (Lars von

Trier) is the sometimes funny, profoundly misogynist story of Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg), who recounts her hypersexual adventures to Seligman (Stellan Skarsgård), who responds to every sordid tale with stunningly cerebral detachment. Von Trier’s considered a groundbreaking taboo-buster, but self-abnegating, oversexed women who go to the depths of degradation are a pornographic staple in old-news works like The Story Of O. Ho hum. 117 min. NN (SGC) TIFF Bell Lightbox

NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME II (Lars von

Trier) See Nymphomaniac: Volume I above. 120 min. NN (SGC) TIFF Bell Lightbox

ñOCULUS

(Mike Flanagan) feels like a creative response to the diminishing returns of the Paranormal Activity series, with adult siblings (Karen Gillan, Brenton Thwaites) bent on scientifically proving that a centuries-old mirror is to blame for

at

the deaths of their parents (Rory Cochrane, Katee Sackhoff) 11 years earlier. It’s cleverly written, and the actors are all much better than they need to be. 105 min. NNNN (NW) Scotiabank Theatre

112 WEDDINGS (Doug Block) 93 min. See

review, page 60. NNN (GS) Opens May 23 at Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

ñONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE

(Jim Jarmusch) is a tale of a vampire couple meeting up in decaying Detroit that has the texture and vibe of every Velvet Underground song ever recorded – but of course that’s also its central metaphor. Adam (Tom Hiddleston) lives like a recluse in a shabby manse, making music he swears he’ll never release; Eve (Tilda Swinton) is his fashion-plate partner, just back from Tangiers. They pick up deliveries of “the good stuff” and swan around in elegant decadence until Eve’s wild-child sister (Mia Wasikowska) gets in from L.A. and fucks up their perfect ennui. It doesn’t explode the vampire genre – I’m not even sure it takes place within the genre. But it’s a deeply pleasurable film, with bonedry wit and languid pacing that recall the Jarmusch of Mystery Train and Dead Man.

The entire cast is having a ball, and Adam’s music is pretty good, too. 123 min. NNNN (NW) Canada Square, Varsity

THE OTHER WOMAN (Nick Cassavetes) is a

strained, phony, overlong comedy about an unlikely alliance between a clumsy housewife (Leslie Mann), the slick lawyer her husband’s been romancing (Cameron Diaz) and a second mistress (Kate Upton). This ostensibly adorable threesome gradually exact their revenge on the ostensibly irresistible sociopath (Nikolaj CosterWaldau) who seduced and deceived them. 109 min. N (José Teodoro) Subscribe to NOW’s 401 & Morningside, Canada Square, Carlton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Queensway, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, SilverCityNewsletter Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Yonge & Restaurant openings, Dundas 24

reviews & foodie news from PARTICLE FEVER Levinson) T.O’s food(Mark & drink scene.

ñ

chronicles the buildup to the maiden nowtoronto.com/ operation of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and the long-belated validation of the newsletters Higgs boson theory. This pop science doc

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NOW’s Susan G. Cole hosts a panel discussion after the screening of the digitally remastered Forbidden Love with filmmaker Lynne Fernie, film critic B. Ruby Rich and producer Rina Fraticelli.

Screens Sunday, May 25, 4:30 pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox 2.

nowtoronto.com 66

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

Newsletter Restaurant openings, reviews & foodie news from T.O’s food & drink scene. nowtoronto.com/ newsletters

Everything Toronto.

Ñ

= Critics’ Pick NNNNN = Top ten of the year NNNN = Honourable mention NNN = Entertaining NN = Mediocre N = Bomb


The Railway Man (Jonathan Teplitzky)

tells the story of British Army officer Eric Lomax (Colin Firth), who was taken prisoner and tortured by the Japanese during WWII. The film begins years later, when the endearing yet damaged Eric meets the nurse (Nicole Kidman) who will become his wife and oversee his recovery. Their romance lasts some minutes; thereafter we’re treated to fumblingly structured flashbacks and Eric’s present-tense journey east to confront – and eventually ­befriend – his chief torturer, a fascinating development barely explored. Firth is betrayed by his character’s paucity of depth, and it’s baffling that Kidman would want to portray a strictly utilitarian character, the tormented hero’s helpmeet, like Ingrid Bergman in Spellbound but without any personality. A stiflingly solemn, disappointing dramatization of an extraordinary story. 108 min. NN (José Teodoro) Canada Square, Carlton Cinema, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Eglinton Town ­Centre

Rio 2 (Carlos Saldanha) looks like a tropical fruit smoothie that won’t stop spinning in the blender. The 3D animated ­sequel about a pack of blue macaws ­dancing their way from Rio de Janeiro to the Amazon jungle presents a relentless rush of bright colours impeccably choreographed to samba, R&B and show tunes. But the busy plot and characters are lost amidst the flash. 101 min. NN (RS) 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, ­Canada Square, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Queensway, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yorkdale, Yonge & Dundas 24 is smart and commendably accessible, but works too hard to milk suspense from the scientists’ anticipation anxiety. 99 min. NNNN (José Teodoro) Kingsway Theatre

RoboCop (José Padilha) appropriates the title of a beloved movie property and a couple of key images and builds a joyless new mechanism around them. The original’s subversive humour and ghoulish central concept rattle around inside the

new body like a ghost. But you need an artist to coax them out, and Padilha’s just a hired gun. Some subtitles. 110 min. NN (NW) Docks Lakeview Drive-In

Shekinah: The Intimate Life of Hasidic Women (Abbey Jack Neidik) looks inside

the lives of teenage women in the ultraOrthodox Jewish Chabad Lubavitch movement. Director Neidik presents the Lubavitchers as beautiful and enlightened (a variation on mindfulness is central to the practice). The film is mostly shot at the seminary in Ste. Agathe, where young women train to become mothers – the school’s energetic head, Chanie Carlebach, has 12 children – and to honour Jewish tradition. In no way isolationist, the school sends them into the wider community to mingle and talk about their values. There’s a telling sequence in which young women in the town confront the Hasidic girls about their attitudes toward gays, which doesn’t stop the trainees from blithely spouting their homophobia. But Neidik doesn’t question the rabbi’s characterization of the sect as feminist. If women are so deeply valued, why do Lubavitchers deny women the highest privilege in the Jewish faith, reading the Torah in synagogue? Because the sexes are separate and profoundly unequal. Some subtitles. 70 min. NNN (SGC) Carlton Cinema

Stage Fright (Jerome Sable) is Meatballs meets Glee meets Phantom Of The Paradise. Ten years after a Broadway diva (Minnie Driver) is butchered on the opening night of The Haunting Of The Opera (get it?), her twin kids (Allie MacDonald and Douglas Smith) are working as cooks at a musical theatre summer camp, where weird things begin happening around a remount of Haunting. Director Sable throws in allusions to everything from Hellraiser to Carrie, and the camp setting (filmed in Parry Sound and North Bay) gives the exterior shots authenticity. The opening third rambles, the tone occasion-

ally feels icky – those prepubescent ­campers aren’t gonna die, are they? – and there’s some problems with lip-synching and looping of songs. But the tunes (cowritten with Eli Batalion, who’s got a cute cameo) are clever, the final reel is filled with lots of gruesome, unpredictable fun, and the killer’s screeching theatre-related bons mots are to die for. 102 min. NNN (GS) Carlton Cinema

Transcendence (Wally Pfister) has a

premise that could be the stuff of grand sci-fi inquiry or the latest iteration of The Lawnmower Man, so it’s a little frustrating to see it settle for the middle ground of a ticking-clock thriller in which scientists debate the ethics of interfacing consciousness with computers and Johnny Depp’s digitized face makes grand statements about upgrading humanity after his assassinated visionary, Will Caster, is uploaded to a supercomputer. Pfister’s directorial debut cross-pollinates everything from Colossus: The Forbin Project to Demon Seed, with maybe a little of James Cameron and Edgar Wright’s post-punk sensibility in there, too. But it doesn’t quite capture the doomed love at the heart of the story: Will’s widow (Rebecca Hall) repeatedly avoids the question of whether that really is her husband who’s taken up residence on her iPad. 117 min. NNN (NW) Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Yonge & Dundas 24

ñUnder the Skin

(Jonathan Glazer) will indeed get under your skin. It’ll also provoke lots of discussion and, likely, disagreements. Scarlett Johansson plays a beautiful alien who drives a white van around the grey, drab roads of Scotland to pick up single men and mysteriously dispense with them. While this sounds like some sci-fi thriller – Species 4! – it’s anything but. Loosely based on Michel Faber’s novel, it deals with big themes like alienation, charity and – hell, why not? – the human condition. One remarkable sequence

manages to look at Glasgow’s citizens as if through the eyes of someone not quite human. The harsh, rugged landscape helps immensely, as does Johansson’s ­restrained performance and Mica Levi’s hypnotic, disturbing score, which will bore its way into your subconscious. This one will haunt you. 108 min. NNNNN (GS) Varsity

X-Men: Days of Future Past (Bryan Singer) 131 min. See Also Opening, page 62. Opens May 23 at 401 & Morningside, Beach Cinemas, Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk, Coliseum Mississauga, Coliseum Scarborough, Colossus, Courtney Park 16, Docks Lakeview Drive-In, Eglinton Town Centre, Grande - Steeles, Humber Cinemas, Queensway, Rainbow Market Square, Rainbow Promenade, Rainbow Woodbine, Scotiabank Theatre, SilverCity Fairview, SilverCity Yonge, SilverCity Yorkdale, Varsity, Yonge & Dundas 24

ñYoung & Beautiful

(François Ozon) is the story of a 17-year-old high school girl who leads a double life as a prostitute – a junior Belle De Jour. It’s baffling work, but that’s its strength. As Isabelle’s (Marine Vacth) hormones surge, she dispenses with her virginity on a seaside vacation like she’s shedding a coat. But it’s never clear why she returns home and starts piling up cash by turning tricks after school. Is it because her dad is absent, or to separate from her caring mom (a superb Géraldine Pailhas)? Does she relish her sexual power? Told in four parts, each representing a season over a year, the movie has some charming grace notes: the loving relationship between Isabelle and her younger brother, a sequence in which her class discusses Rimbaud and a superb final scene featuring the great Charlotte Rampling. But it’s Vacth, luminous yet steely and able to speak volumes with silence, who owns this movie. Subtitled. 95 min. NNNN (SGC) Canada Square, Varsity 3

ñPhilomena

(Stephen Frears) is an odd but effective combination of investigative drama and buddy picture, as a devout, working-class woman (Judi Dench) and a privileged, cynical journalist (Steve Coogan, who also co-wrote and coproduced the film) find common ground in the search for the son she was forced to give up. 98 min. NNNN (NW) Mt Pleasant

The Raid 2 (Gareth Huw Evans) expands

the graphic, visceral action of Evans’s breakout 2011 thriller into a more ambitious riff on Infernal Affairs and The ­Departed, with hero cop Rama (Iko Uwais) ordered to infiltrate an Indonesian crime family to root out corrupt cops or something. It doesn’t really matter; in no time at all Rama’s battling every thug and ­assassin in Jakarta in an epic series of ­battles. As before, Evans builds an entire aesthetic around the hammer scene in Oldboy, with brutal pummellings paying off in gruesome comic punchlines. It’s all about the smashy-smashy, and on that level it certainly delivers. But at two and a half hours, The Raid 2 proves as exhausting an experience as its predecessor. It’s a blunt instrument that just keeps pounding after everything’s turned to powder. Subtitled. 148 min. NNN (NW) Scotiabank Theatre

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THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A) Thu 12:20, 2:40, 5:00 Fri-Wed 7:10, 9:30 MILLION DOLLAR ARM (PG) Thu 4:00, 6:55, 9:40 Fri-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 6:55, 9:40 NEIGHBORS (18A) 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:25 RIO 2 (G) 12:15, 2:35, 5:00 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri, SunMon, Wed 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 Sat, Tue 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35, 11:20

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AI WEIWEI: THE FAKE CASE (PG) Thu 4:00, 9:15 FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (PG) Wed 6:30 MISTAKEN FOR STRANGERS (G) Mon 8:45 112 WEDDINGS (PG) Fri-Sat 4:00, 6:30 Sun 4:00, 9:15 Mon 6:30 Tue 4:00, 9:00 Wed 3:30, 9:15

CARLTON CINEMA (I) 20 CARLTON, 416-494-9371

THE BIRDER Fri-Wed 1:30, 4:00, 7:10, 9:15 BLENDED (PG) Fri-Wed 1:30, 4:05, 6:45, 9:20 BLUE RUIN (14A) Thu 3:50, 9:25 DOM HEMINGWAY (14A) Thu 4:10, 9:05 THE GERMAN DOCTOR (PG) Fri-Wed 1:20, 7:00 GODZILLA (PG) 1:15, 1:35, 3:55, 4:15, 6:30, 6:55, 9:10, 9:30 IDA (PG) 1:45, 6:55 Wed no 6:55 JOE (14A) Thu 1:45, 6:35 LITTLE TERRORS HORROR SHORTS Wed 9:00 THE LUNCHBOX (PG) Thu 1:30 Fri-Tue 1:30, 3:50, 6:50, 9:25 Wed 1:30, 3:50, 9:25 MILLION DOLLAR ARM (PG) 1:25, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20 NEIGHBORS (18A) Thu 1:50 4:05 6:45 9:00 Fri-Wed 1:50, 4:25, 6:45, 9:00 THE OTHER WOMAN 4:10, 9:35 Thu 1:45 mat, 6:55 THE RAILWAY MAN (14A) Thu 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:25 FriTue 4:00, 9:25 Wed 4:00 SHEKINAH: THE INTIMATE LIFE OF HASIDIC WOMEN Thu 1:40, 7:05 STAGE FRIGHT Thu 4:20, 9:15

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MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

259 RICHMOND ST W, 416-368-5600

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 3D (PG) Thu 2:50, 3:10, 6:00, 6:30, 9:10, 9:40 Fri, Sun 1:25, 4:30, 7:55, 11:05 Sat 4:10, 7:15, 10:20 Mon 1:15, 4:20 Tue-Wed 2:40, 6:00, 9:10 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG) Thu 1:00, 4:00, 7:20, 10:20 Fri, Sun-Mon 12:45, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 Sat 10:45, 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:50 Tue-Wed 12:50, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 (PG) Thu 1:50, 2:20, 5:10, 8:20 BRICK MANSIONS (PG) Thu 1:25, 3:45, 6:20, 8:40 DIVERGENT (PG) Thu 12:55, 3:55, 7:00, 10:00 Fri, Sun 12:45, 4:00, 7:25, 10:40 Sat 1:05, 4:20, 7:25, 10:40 MonWed 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: WERTHER ENCORE Sat 12:00 Mon 6:30 MILLION DOLLAR ARM (PG) Thu 1:10, 3:20, 4:10, 6:10, 7:10, 9:25, 10:10 Fri, Sun 1:15, 4:20, 7:25, 10:20 Sat 11:15, 2:05, 4:55, 7:55, 10:50 Mon 12:45, 3:30, 6:20, 9:20 Tue-Wed 12:40, 3:30, 6:20, 9:20 NEIGHBORS (18A) Thu 12:45, 2:00, 3:00, 4:35, 5:30, 7:30, 8:00, 9:50, 10:20 Fri, Sun 12:55, 2:15, 3:20, 4:55, 5:50, 7:35, 8:30, 10:00, 10:55 Sat 11:40, 12:40, 2:15, 3:15, 4:55, 5:45, 7:25, 8:20, 10:00, 11:00 Mon 2:15, 2:55, 4:45, 5:15, 7:20, 8:10, 9:40, 10:30 Tue-Wed 12:55, 2:15, 3:15, 4:45, 5:40, 7:20, 8:10, 9:40, 10:30 OCULUS (14A) Thu 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:10 Fri, Sun 2:50, 5:30, 8:05, 10:40 Sat 12:15, 2:40, 5:15, 8:00, 10:30 Mon 1:45, 4:10, 10:20 Tue-Wed 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:10 THE RAID 2 (18A) Thu 3:35, 6:50, 10:05 Fri, Sun 12:35, 3:50, 7:10, 10:30 Sat 11:45, 3:05, 6:25, 9:50 Mon 2:45, 10:15 Tue 12:30, 3:40, 7:10, 10:20 Wed 12:30, 3:40, 10:20 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A) Thu 1:40, 4:20, 6:35, 9:00 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (PG) Fri, Sun 12:35, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50 Sat 12:55, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10 Mon 1:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:30, 7:00, 9:30, 10:00 Tue 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Wed 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 7:10, 9:30 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri, Sun 1:05, 1:35, 2:05, 2:35, 3:05, 4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 5:40, 6:10, 7:15, 7:45, 8:15, 8:45, 9:15, 10:30, 11:00 Sat 11:00, 11:25, 11:55, 12:25, 1:20, 1:55, 2:25, 2:55, 3:25, 4:25, 5:00, 5:30, 6:05, 6:35, 7:35, 8:05, 8:40, 9:10, 9:40, 10:40, 11:10 Mon 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 10:30 Tue 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 10:30 Wed 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:50, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 10:30

TIFF BELL LIGHTBOX (I) 350 KING ST W, 416-599-8433

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (PG) Thu 12:30, 2:30, 6:45, 9:30 Fri-Sun 12:00, 2:00, 6:45, 9:00 Mon 6:45, 9:50 Tue 12:00, 2:00, 5:30, 9:30 Wed 12:00, 2:00, 7:00, 9:00 FOXFIRE: CONFESSIONS OF A GIRL GANG (14A) Thu-Sun, Tue 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:20 Mon 9:20 Wed 12:30, 4:00 IDA (PG) Thu 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 7:10, 9:10 Fri 12:30, 2:30, 5:00, 7:10, 9:10 Sat-Sun 12:30, 2:30, 4:45, 7:10, 9:10 Mon 7:10, 9:10 Tue 12:05, 2:05, 3:30, 7:30, 9:10 Wed 12:05, 2:05, 5:00, 7:10, 9:15 NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME I (R) Thu 12:45, 6:00 Fri 12:45 Sat 4:00

NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME II (R) Thu 3:30, 8:45 Fri 3:30 Sun 4:00

VARSITY (CE)

55 BLOOR ST W, 416-961-6304 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 3D (PG) Thu 3:45 7:00 9:45 Fri-Wed 3:45, 7:05, 9:40 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 (PG) 12:30 BELLE (PG) Thu 1:30 4:10 6:50 9:30 Fri-Wed 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25 FADING GIGOLO (14A) Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:00, 10:35 FED UP (G) Thu 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:55, 10:20 Fri-Tue 12:35, 3:00, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10 Wed 3:00, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10 THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A) Thu 2:10 4:35 7:15 10:10 Fri-Wed 2:05, 4:35, 7:15, 10:15 LOCKE (14A) Thu 1:10, 3:25, 5:45, 7:50, 10:05 Fri-Tue 12:50, 3:05, 5:15, 7:35, 9:50 Wed 12:50, 3:05, 9:50 ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE (14A) Thu 12:35, 6:25, 9:20 UNDER THE SKIN Thu 1:45, 3:30, 4:20, 6:55, 9:35 Fri-Wed 1:20, 4:00, 6:35, 9:10 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 3D (PG) Fri-Mon, Wed 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30 Tue 1:05, 4:15, 7:25, 10:35 YOUNG & BEAUTIFUL Thu 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20

VIP SCREENINGS

BELLE (PG) Thu 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:50 Fri-Sun 1:00, 3:30, 6:05, 8:40 Mon-Wed 1:15, 3:45, 6:20, 8:55 FADING GIGOLO (14A) Fri-Sun 12:00, 2:35, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 Mon-Wed 12:50, 2:55, 5:15, 7:40, 10:00 FED UP (G) Thu 2:00, 4:15, 6:40, 9:00 LOCKE (14A) Thu 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:45 Fri-Sun 12:10, 2:10, 4:30, 6:30, 9:00 Mon-Wed 2:10, 4:25, 6:30, 9:00 UNDER THE SKIN Thu 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 9:10 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 3D (PG) Fri-Wed 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:45

YONGE & DUNDAS 24 (CE) 10 DUNDAS ST E, 416-335-5323

ABERDEEN (18A) Thu 12:40, 3:40, 6:05, 8:20, 10:40 BELLE (PG) Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:40 BLENDED (PG) Thu 7:00, 10:00 Fri-Wed 1:30, 2:25, 4:15, 5:15, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45, 10:45 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG) 3:15, 6:55, 10:25 Thu 12:15 mat DISTRICT 9 (14A) Thu 10:00 THE FATAL ENCOUNTER Fri-Wed 1:05, 4:05, 7:15, 10:20 THE GERMAN DOCTOR (PG) Thu 1:15, 3:35, 5:50, 8:05, 10:20 GODZILLA (PG) Thu 3:00, 7:00 Fri, Mon-Wed 2:30, 3:00, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 10:00 Sat-Sun 12:00, 2:30, 3:00, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 10:00 GODZILLA 3D (PG) Thu 1:50, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 4:50, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 7:50, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 10:45 Fri, Tue 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:50, 6:00, 7:30, 7:50, 9:00, 11:00, 11:15 SatSun 12:30, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:50, 6:00, 7:30, 7:50, 9:00, 11:00, 11:15 Mon, Wed 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:50, 6:00, 7:30, 7:50, 9:00, 10:50, 11:00 GODZILLA: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG) Thu 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 Fri-Tue 1:00, 3:55, 6:40, 10:15 Wed 12:20, 3:10, 10:15 THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A) Thu-Sun, Tue 1:55, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 Mon 1:55, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50 Wed 12:10, 2:50, 10:05 HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) 1:45, 4:35, 7:05 Thu 9:40 HER (14A) Thu, Tue 1:30 Fri 1:00, 10:00 Sat 10:00 Mon 7:30 Wed 4:30 KOCHADAIIYAAN (14A) Fri-Wed 1:40, 4:40, 7:20, 10:10 LEGENDS OF OZ: DOROTHY’S RETURN (G) Thu 2:05 SatSun 4:00 LEGENDS OF OZ: DOROTHY’S RETURN 3D (G) Thu 4:35 THE LEGO MOVIE 3D (G) 1:25, 3:50 THE LOVE PUNCH (PG) Fri-Wed 12:35, 3:45, 6:05, 8:35, 10:55 THE LUNCHBOX (PG) Thu 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05 Fri-Wed 7:40, 10:15 MILLION DOLLAR ARM (PG) Thu 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Fri-Sun, Tue 12:25, 4:00, 6:50, 10:00 Mon, Wed 12:25, 4:00, 6:50, 9:55 MOMS’ NIGHT OUT (PG) Thu 5:20, 7:45, 10:10 Fri-Wed 9:40 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE

DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME ENCORE Thu 7:00 Sat 12:30 Mon 4:00 NEIGHBORS (18A) Thu 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:45 Fri, Tue 5:00, 8:00, 11:15 Sat-Sun 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:15 Mon, Wed 2:45, 5:30, 10:30 NOAH (14A) Thu 6:15, 9:15 NOW: IN THE WINGS ON A WORLD STAGE (14A) Thu 4:30 THE OTHER WOMAN Thu 12:50, 3:25, 4:55, 5:55, 7:25, 8:25, 9:55 Fri-Wed 12:50, 3:25, 5:55, 8:25, 11:00 PREDATOR Sun 12:45, 9:30 Mon 10:30 Tue 7:30 Wed 7:30, 10:30 RIO 2 (G) Thu 12:00 Fri, Mon-Wed 12:05 Sat-Sun 11:55 RIO 2 3D (G) Thu 2:20, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15 Fri, Mon-Wed 2:35, 5:05 Sat-Sun 2:20, 5:05 TRANSCENDENCE (PG) 7:35, 10:35 Thu 1:40 mat, 4:40 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 3D (PG) Fri-Sun, Tue 2:30, 3:30, 6:00, 7:00, 9:30, 10:30 Mon 2:30, 3:30, 7:00, 10:45 Wed 2:30, 3:30, 6:00, 7:00, 9:30, 10:45

Midtown CANADA SQUARE (CE) 2200 YONGE ST, 416-646-0444

BEARS (G) Thu 3:50, 6:00 Fri 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 Sat-Sun 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 Mon-Wed 4:20, 6:20 BRICK MANSIONS (PG) Thu 4:10, 6:20 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG) Sat 12:10 Sun 1:30 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG) Fri 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 Sat 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 Sun 4:30, 7:30 MonWed 4:10, 7:10 DIVERGENT (PG) Thu 3:40, 6:40 Fri 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Sat 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:30 Sun 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 Mon-Wed 3:50, 7:00 THE FACE OF LOVE (PG) Thu 4:50, 7:10 FOR NO GOOD REASON (14A) Thu 4:40, 7:00 LEGENDS OF OZ: DOROTHY’S RETURN 3D (G) Thu 4:30, 6:50 ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE (14A) Fri 3:50, 6:40, 9:25 Sat 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 Sun 12:30, 3:20, 6:10, 9:00 MonWed 3:45, 6:25 THE OTHER WOMAN Fri 4:00, 6:40, 9:10 Sat 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sun 12:40, 3:10, 6:00, 8:30 Mon-Wed 4:00, 6:40 THE RAILWAY MAN (14A) Thu 4:25, 7:00 Fri 4:10, 6:50, 9:20 Sat 1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20 Sun 12:20, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Mon-Wed 4:40, 7:10 RIO 2 (G) Sat 12:30 Sun 12:10 RIO 2 3D (G) Thu, Mon-Wed 4:00, 6:30 Fri 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sat 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Sun 2:40, 5:10, 7:50 YOUNG & BEAUTIFUL Fri 3:45, 6:10, 8:30 Sat 1:10, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 Sun 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:20 Mon-Wed 4:30, 6:50

MT PLEASANT (I)

675 MT PLEASANT RD, 416-489-8484 THE MONUMENTS MEN (PG) Fri 8:55 Sat 9:10 Sun, Wed 7:00 PHILOMENA (PG) Thu-Sat, Tue 7:00 Sun 4:30

REGENT THEATRE (I) 551 MT PLEASANT RD, 416-480-9884

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (PG) Thu, Sun 7:00 Fri-Sat 4:30 LE WEEK-END (14A) Fri-Sat, Tue 7:00 Sun 4:30

SILVERCITY YONGE (CE) 2300 YONGE ST, 416-544-1236

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:30, 3:50, 7:00, 10:15 Fri, Sun, Tue 3:15, 6:30, 9:55 Sat 3:20, 6:35, 9:50 Mon 3:15, 9:55 Wed 3:30, 10:10 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 (PG) 12:00 Thu 3:10 mat, 9:30 BLENDED (PG) Fri, Sun, Tue 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:05 Sat 10:55, 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:30 Mon 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:55 Wed 4:05, 7:10, 10:00 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG) Thu 12:10, 3:20, 6:40 GODZILLA (PG) Thu 2:00, 4:50, 9:45 Fri, Sun, Tue 12:30,

3:30 Sat 10:55, 1:45 Mon 12:30, 3:25 Wed 12:20, 3:20 GODZILLA 3D (PG) Thu 12:00, 12:40, 2:50, 3:30, 6:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:00 Fri 1:20, 4:20, 6:40, 7:25, 9:45, 10:30 Sat 1:05, 4:05, 4:40, 7:05, 7:40, 10:05, 10:40 Sun, Tue-Wed 1:20, 4:20, 6:40, 7:20, 9:40, 10:30 Mon 1:20, 4:20, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:20 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: WERTHER ENCORE Sat 12:00 Mon 6:30 MILLION DOLLAR ARM (PG) Thu 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10 Fri 1:50, 4:50, 7:55, 10:50 Sat 11:10, 2:05, 5:10, 8:05, 10:55 Sun, Tue 12:50, 3:40, 6:50, 9:50 Mon 12:50, 3:40, 6:50, 9:45 Wed 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME ENCORE Thu 7:00 NEIGHBORS (18A) Thu 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 9:55 Fri 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 8:15, 10:45 Sat 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 8:15, 10:45 Sun, Tue 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25 Mon 12:20, 2:50, 10:40 Wed 12:10, 2:30, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25 THE OTHER WOMAN Thu 12:20, 3:00, 6:50, 10:15 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (PG) Fri 12:00, 3:05, 6:20, 9:35 Sat 11:50, 3:00, 6:10, 9:20 Sun, Tue 12:00, 3:05, 6:20, 9:30 Mon 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 Wed 12:00, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri 12:40, 1:35, 3:50, 4:40, 7:00, 7:45, 10:15, 10:50 Sat 11:00, 12:20, 1:55, 3:40, 4:55, 6:50, 7:55, 10:15, 10:55 Sun 12:40, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 10:15, 10:35 Mon 12:00, 1:30, 3:05, 4:30, 6:40, 7:30, 10:15, 10:30 Tue 12:40, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 10:15, 10:30 Wed 12:30, 1:30, 2:45, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 10:15, 10:30

Metro

West End HUMBER CINEMAS (I) 2442 BLOOR ST. WEST, 416-769-2442

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 (PG) Thu 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 BLENDED (PG) 4:20, 6:50, 9:40 Sat-Sun, Tue 1:15 mat GODZILLA (PG) Thu 4:15, 7:15, 9:55 Fri, Wed 4:10, 7:10, 9:30 Sat-Tue 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:30 THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A) Thu 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 NEIGHBORS (18A) Thu 4:00, 7:00, 9:15 Fri, Wed 4:30, 6:40, 9:00 Sat-Tue 1:45, 4:30, 6:40, 9:00 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (PG) Fri, Wed 4:00, 7:00, 9:50 Sat-Tue 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:50

KINGSWAY THEATRE (I) 3030 BLOOR ST W, 416-232-1939

DOM HEMINGWAY (14A) Thu 4:00, 10:30 Fri 11:30, 10:30 Sat 10:30 Mon-Wed 11:30 FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (PG) Thu 2:10 7:30 Fri-Wed 2:25, 7:30 THE GALAPAGOS AFFAIR: SATAN CAME TO EDEN (G) Thu 5:25 Fri, Sun, Tue 12:25 THE GERMAN DOCTOR (PG) Fri-Wed 5:45 GOD’S NOT DEAD (PG) Fri-Wed 3:45 IDA (PG) Thu 2:30, 7:30 Fri-Wed 1:00, 7:30, 9:00 LE WEEK-END (14A) Thu 3:45 8:55 Fri-Wed 4:00, 8:55 MISTAKEN FOR STRANGERS (G) Thu 9:00 Fri-Sat 10:30 MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Thu 12:45 Sat-Sun 11:15 NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON (14A) 5:40 PARTICLE FEVER Thu 12:20 Sat, Mon, Wed 12:25

QUEENSWAY (CE)

1025 THE QUEENSWAY, QEW & ISLINGTON, 416-503-0424 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:40, 2:45, 4:10, 6:45, 7:20, 10:35 Fri 3:30, 7:00, 10:25 Sat-Sun 3:40, 7:10, 10:30 Mon-Tue 3:40, 6:55, 10:15 Wed 3:40, 7:00, 10:15 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 (PG) Thu 3:00, 6:30, 9:45 Fri 12:20 Mon-Wed 12:30 BLENDED (PG) Thu 7:35, 10:15 Fri 1:40, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15 Sat 12:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20 Sun 1:40, 4:30, 7:30, 10:15 MonTue 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05 Wed 4:20, 7:20, 10:05 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG) Thu 12:30 Fri 3:00, 6:40, 9:50 Sat-Sun 3:10, 6:30, 9:40 Mon 3:30, 10:00 Tue 3:30, 6:40, 9:50 Wed 3:30, 9:40 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG) Thu 3:25, 6:40, 9:55 FADING GIGOLO (14A) Fri 1:20, 3:50, 6:10, 8:40, 11:00 Sat 12:15, 2:50, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45 Sun 12:25, 2:50, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45 Mon-Wed 12:35, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:25 GODZILLA (PG) Thu 12:50, 3:45, 6:50, 9:50 Fri 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00 Sat 12:00, 3:00, 6:20, 9:20 Sun 12:05, 3:00, 6:20, 9:20 Mon-Wed 12:30, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 GODZILLA 3D (PG) Thu 1:30, 3:10, 3:15, 4:30, 4:45, 6:10, 6:30, 7:30, 8:00, 9:10, 9:45, 10:20 Fri 1:10, 2:10, 3:50, 4:20, 5:20, 7:10, 7:30, 8:30, 10:30, 10:40 Sat 12:40, 12:50, 1:35, 3:50, 4:40, 7:00, 7:10, 7:40, 10:00, 10:30, 10:40 Sun 12:00, 12:50, 1:30, 3:20, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:00, 7:40, 9:50, 10:00, 10:40 Mon-Wed 1:10, 2:00, 3:20, 4:10, 5:00, 6:30, 7:10, 8:20, 9:50, 10:10 THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A) Thu 1:20, 3:55, 6:25,


9:00 Fri 10:45 Sat-Sun 10:55 Mon 9:30 Tue-Wed 9:10 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 2:20, 5:00 Fri 12:25 Sat 12:10 Sun 12:30 Mon-Tue 1:00 Wed 12:50 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 1:10, 3:35 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 The Metropolitan Opera: Werther Encore Sat 12:00 Mon 6:30 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:15, 6:20, 9:30, 10:10 Fri 1:50, 2:35, 4:50, 6:10, 8:00, 9:30, 10:55 Sat 12:45, 2:45, 3:45, 6:10, 6:40, 9:30, 9:45 Sun 12:10, 1:30, 3:45, 5:00, 6:40, 8:30, 9:45 Mon-Tue 12:55, 2:00, 3:55, 5:10, 7:00, 8:30, 9:55 Wed 12:55, 2:00, 3:55, 5:10, 6:40, 8:30, 10:00 Moms’ Night Out (PG) Thu 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 10:00 National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Encore Thu 7:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:40, 2:40, 4:15, 4:20, 5:20, 7:10, 7:15, 8:00, 9:40, 10:00, 10:35 Fri 12:10, 12:40, 2:30, 3:00, 3:10, 5:10, 5:50, 6:10, 7:40, 8:20, 9:00, 10:10, 10:50 Sat 11:50, 12:20, 12:40, 2:40, 3:00, 3:20, 5:20, 6:00, 6:10, 7:50, 8:30, 9:00, 10:20, 11:00 Sun 12:00, 12:40, 2:40, 2:50, 3:20, 5:20, 5:40, 6:00, 7:50, 8:30, 10:20, 11:00 Mon-Wed 12:40, 1:40, 2:50, 3:10, 4:00, 5:40, 6:30, 8:10, 8:30, 9:00, 10:35 Noah (14A) Thu 9:20 The Other Woman Thu 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:25 Fri 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10, 10:55 Sat 11:30, 2:20, 5:10, 8:10, 10:50 Sun 11:50, 2:20, 5:10, 8:10, 10:50 Mon-Wed 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20 Predator Sun 12:45 Wed 7:30 Rio 2 (G) Thu 2:30 Fri 2:20 Sat 11:40 Sun 12:00 Mon-Wed 12:45 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 5:10, 7:50 Fri 5:00, 8:05 Sat-Sun 2:30, 5:30, 8:20 Mon 3:25, 6:40 Tue-Wed 3:25, 6:10 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Thu 10:15 Fri 12:50, 3:20, 4:00, 6:40, 7:10, 10:00, 10:20 Sat 12:00, 1:00, 3:20, 4:10, 6:40, 7:20, 10:00, 10:25 Sun 1:00, 2:00, 4:10, 6:00, 7:20, 9:20, 10:25 Mon-Tue 12:50, 2:30, 3:50, 6:00, 6:50, 9:15, 9:50 Wed 2:30, 3:50, 6:00, 6:50, 9:15, 9:50 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:30 Fri 12:10, 1:30, 3:20, 4:20, 4:40, 6:30, 7:40, 7:50, 9:40, 11:00 Sat 11:00, 12:20, 1:00, 1:55, 3:30, 4:20, 4:55, 6:50, 7:40, 8:00, 9:55, 11:00, 11:05 Sun 11:45, 12:20, 12:30, 1:50, 3:30, 3:40, 4:55, 6:50, 7:00, 8:00, 9:55, 10:20, 11:00 Mon-Wed 1:30, 2:10, 3:40, 4:30, 5:20, 7:00, 7:30, 8:30, 10:15, 10:30

Rainbow Woodbine (I)

Woodbine Centre, 500 Rexdale Blvd, 416-213-1998 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 12:45 3:40 6:40 9:40 Fri-Wed 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 9:35 Blended (PG) Thu 7:00, 9:30 Fri-Tue 1:00, 4:00, 6:55, 9:30 Wed 4:00, 6:55, 9:30 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 6:30, 9:25 Godzilla (PG) Thu 12:50, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 Fri-Wed 12:55, 3:50, 6:35, 9:25 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 1:05, 3:55 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 1:10, 4:10 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 12:55, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45 Fri-Wed 1:05, 3:55, 6:30, 9:15 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:30 Fri-Wed 1:10, 4:10, 7:00, 9:20 The Other Woman Thu 6:55 Fri-Wed 7:05, 9:45 Rio 2 (G) 1:15, 4:05 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri-Wed 12:50, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40

East End Beach Cinemas (AA) 1651 Queen St E, 416-699-1327

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 7:00, 10:20 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) 7:00, 10:10 Fri 3:30 mat Sat-Sun 12:00, 3:30 mat Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 6:30, 9:30 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 7:15, 10:30 Fri 4:15, 7:15, 10:00 SatSun 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00 Mon-Wed 7:15, 10:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 6:45, 9:45 Fri 3:00, 6:30, 9:15 Sat-Sun 12:15, 3:00, 6:30, 9:15 Mon-Wed 6:30, 9:15 Neighbors (18A) Thu 7:45, 10:10 Fri 4:45, 7:45, 10:20 Sat-Sun 2:00, 4:45, 7:45, 10:20 Mon-Wed 7:45, 10:20 Rio 2 (G) Thu 7:30 Sat-Sun 11:45 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri 3:45 Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:45 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30 Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30 Mon-Wed 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30

North York Cineplex Cinemas Empress Walk (CE) 5095 Yonge St., 416-847-0087

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 3:50, 7:10, 10:15 Fri-Sat 7:15, 10:25 Sun, Tue 7:10, 10:25 Wed 10:25 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Fri 4:10 Sun 12:50, 4:10 Tue 3:40 Wed 3:20 Blended (PG) Fri 5:10, 8:00, 10:45 Sat 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 10:45 Sun 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 Mon-Wed 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 Fading Gigolo (14A) 5:05, 7:35, 10:05 Fri, Sun 2:35 mat Sat 12:10, 2:35 mat Fed Up (G) Thu 3:35, 6:40, 9:40 The German Doctor (PG) Thu 4:10, 6:35, 9:10 Godzilla (PG) Thu 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Fri, Mon-Wed 3:15, 6:20, 9:20 Sat-Sun 12:25, 3:15, 6:20, 9:20

Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 4:00, 7:00 Fri, Mon-Wed 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Sat-Sun 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Godzilla: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG) Thu 4:30, 7:30, 10:20 Fri 4:50, 7:50, 10:50 Sat 1:50, 4:50, 7:50, 10:50 Sun 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:30 Mon-Wed 4:40, 7:40, 10:30 The Metropolitan Opera: Werther Encore Sat 12:00 Mon 6:30 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 3:45, 6:50, 9:50 Fri, MonWed 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Encore Thu 7:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 5:00, 7:40, 10:10 Fri, Tue-Wed 5:20, 7:45, 10:15 Sat-Sun 2:50, 5:20, 7:45, 10:15 Mon 4:05, 10:15 The Other Woman Thu 4:40, 7:20, 10:05 The Railway Man (14A) Thu 3:40 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) 3:50 Sat-Sun 12:40 mat X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri 4:30, 6:50, 7:35, 9:50, 10:40 Sat 1:25, 4:30, 6:50, 7:35, 9:50, 10:40 Sun 1:05, 4:10, 6:50, 7:15, 9:50, 10:20 Mon-Wed 4:10, 6:50, 7:15, 9:50, 10:20

SilverCity Fairview (CE)

Fairview Mall, 1800 Sheppard Ave E, 416-644-7746 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:45, 3:50, 7:05, 10:10 Fri-Sat 3:55, 7:10, 10:20 Sun-Wed 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 3:15, 6:30, 9:40 Fri-Sat 12:50 Sun-Wed 12:40 Blended (PG) Fri 1:35, 4:35, 7:20, 10:10 Sat 11:05, 1:35, 4:35, 7:20, 10:10 Sun-Tue 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 9:50 Wed 3:35, 7:05, 9:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 12:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 3:45, 6:50 Godzilla (PG) Thu-Sat 1:00, 4:00 Sun-Wed 12:45, 3:45 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 1:15, 4:15, 7:00, 7:15, 9:55, 10:00 Fri 1:50, 4:50, 7:00, 7:45, 10:00, 10:40 Sat 11:10, 1:50, 4:50, 7:00, 7:45, 10:00, 10:40 Sun-Wed 1:30, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:40, 10:20 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 12:45, 1:20, 4:10, 7:20, 10:05 Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:45, 7:40, 10:35 Sun-Tue 1:00, 4:00, 7:10, 10:05 Wed 4:00, 7:10, 10:05 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 9:50 Fri 2:25, 5:00, 7:50, 10:15 Sat 11:20, 2:25, 5:00, 7:50, 10:15 Sun-Wed 1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55 The Other Woman Thu 1:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 Fri-Sat 7:15, 9:50 Sun-Tue 7:25, 10:00 Wed 10:00 Rio 2 (G) Thu 12:55 Fri 1:55 Sat 11:25 Sun-Wed 1:40 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 3:30, 6:45, 9:15 Fri 4:40 Sat 1:55, 4:40 Sun-Wed 4:20 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri 12:40, 3:40 Sat 11:30, 12:40, 3:40 Sun-Wed 12:30, 3:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:15 Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30 Sun-Wed 1:10, 4:15, 6:30, 7:15, 9:30, 10:15

SilverCity Yorkdale (CE) 3401 Dufferin St, 416-787-2052

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:45, 3:55, 7:10, 10:30 Fri-Wed 3:50, 7:10, 10:30 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 2:30, 9:50 FriWed 12:30 Blended (PG) 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Sat 11:10 mat Brick Mansions (PG) Thu 9:25 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 12:45 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 3:45, 6:50 Godzilla (PG) Thu 2:40, 6:10, 9:10 Fri-Sun 1:00, 4:00 Mon-Wed 12:40, 3:40 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 12:50, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 6:50, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30 Fri, Sun 1:50, 4:50, 7:00, 7:50, 10:05, 10:50 Sat 11:00, 1:50, 4:50, 7:00, 7:50, 10:05, 10:50 Mon-Wed 1:20, 4:20, 6:40, 7:20, 9:40, 10:20 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 FriWed 12:45, 3:45, 6:50, 9:50 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:25, 4:00, 7:15, 10:25 Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:45 Mon-Wed 2:00, 5:00, 7:45, 10:25 The Other Woman Thu 1:45, 4:50, 7:40, 10:25 Fri-Sun 2:00, 4:45, 7:40, 10:25 Mon-Wed 1:45, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15 Rio 2 (G) Thu 1:00 Fri-Wed 12:50 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 3:45, 6:45 Fri-Wed 3:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri-Sun 12:40, 3:50 Mon-Wed 12:30, 3:40 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri, Sun 1:35, 4:40, 6:30, 7:00, 7:45, 9:35, 10:10, 10:50 Sat 11:00, 1:55, 4:55, 6:30, 7:00, 7:55, 9:35, 10:10, 10:55 Mon-Wed 1:30, 4:30, 6:20, 6:50, 7:30, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30

Scarborough 401 & Morningside (CE) 785 Milner Ave, Scarborough, 416-281-2226

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 5:05, 8:10 Brick Mansions (PG) Thu 5:50, 8:25 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 5:25, 8:20 Godzilla (PG) Thu 5:00, 7:45 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 5:30, 8:15 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 5:40, 8:05 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 5:15, 7:35 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 5:10, 8:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 6:00, 8:25 The Other Woman Thu 5:20, 7:50 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 5:00, 7:40 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Fri, Tue 4:30, 7:30,

10:30 Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 Sun 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Mon 5:20, 8:20

Coliseum Scarborough (CE) Scarborough Town Centre, 416-290-5217

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:25, 3:45, 7:05, 10:25 Fri-Wed 4:00, 7:20, 10:40 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 2:45, 7:00, 10:30 Fri-Wed 12:40 Blended (PG) Thu 7:20, 10:15 Fri-Wed 1:25, 4:20, 7:10, 10:10 Brick Mansions (PG) Thu 2:15, 4:45 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 1:00 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 4:05, 7:10, 10:15 Fri-Wed 6:45, 10:05 Divergent (PG) Thu 12:35, 3:45, 10:20 Godzilla (PG) Thu 12:30, 3:25, 6:25, 9:25 Fri-Wed 1:15 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 12:50, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 6:50, 7:30, 9:50 Fri-Sun 1:30, 4:15, 4:35, 7:15, 7:40, 10:20, 10:45 MonWed 1:35, 4:15, 4:35, 7:15, 7:40, 10:20, 10:45 Kochadaiiyaan (14A) Fri-Wed 12:55, 3:45, 6:40, 10:00 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10 FriWed 12:50, 3:50, 6:55, 9:55 National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Encore Thu 7:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 2:30, 5:00, 7:35, 10:00 Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 Mon, Wed 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:25 Tue 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:25 The Other Woman Thu 1:20, 4:00, 6:55, 10:05 Fri-Sun 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:35 Mon-Wed 2:00, 4:45, 7:35, 10:35 Rio 2 (G) Thu-Fri, Sun-Wed 1:10 Sat 11:10 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 3:55, 6:45, 9:30 Fri, Sun-Wed 4:05 Sat 1:10, 4:05 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri-Wed 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, 10:15 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:30 Fri, Sun 12:15, 1:35, 3:25, 4:40, 6:35, 7:45, 9:45, 10:50 Sat 11:00, 12:15, 1:55, 3:25, 4:55, 6:35, 7:55, 9:45, 10:55 Mon, Wed 1:30, 3:25, 4:30, 6:35, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30 Tue 12:15, 1:30, 3:25, 4:30, 6:35, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30

Eglinton Town Centre (CE) 1901 Eglinton Ave E, 416-752-4494

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 3:40, 6:55, 10:10 Fri 4:00, 7:20, 10:35 Sat-Sun 4:25, 7:45, 11:00 MonWed 3:50, 7:05, 10:30 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 3:00, 6:15, 9:35 Fri 12:45 Sat 1:00 Sun 1:05 Blended (PG) Thu 7:25, 10:20 Fri 1:45, 4:35, 7:30, 10:25 Sat 1:45, 4:35, 7:30, 10:20 Sun 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:50, 10:35 Mon-Wed 4:35, 7:25, 10:20 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Fri-Sun 4:20, 7:25, 10:30 Mon-Tue 3:45, 6:50, 9:55 Wed 6:50, 9:55 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 4:05, 7:10, 10:20 Godzilla (PG) Thu 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 Fri 12:50, 3:45, 6:40, 9:40 Sat-Sun 12:35, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 Mon-Wed 3:45, 6:40, 9:40 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 2:30, 4:20, 5:30, 7:20, 8:30, 10:30 Fri 1:20, 1:40, 4:05, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:10, 10:45 Sat 1:15, 1:40, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:10, 10:45 Sun 1:00, 1:40, 4:00, 4:40, 7:00, 7:40, 10:00, 10:45 Mon-Wed 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:00, 10:15 The Grand Budapest Hotel (14A) Thu 4:00, 6:35, 9:10 Fri 2:00, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 Sat-Sun 4:10, 6:45, 9:15 Mon-Wed 4:45, 7:10, 9:45 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 4:50 Fri 2:50, 5:20, 7:50 Sat-Sun 11:40, 2:10, 4:45, 7:15 Mon-Tue 5:00, 7:35 Wed 5:00 Kochadaiiyaan (14A) Fri 1:00, 3:55, 6:50, 9:55 Sat 1:10, 4:05, 7:00, 10:00 Sun 1:15, 4:05, 7:00, 10:00 Mon-Wed 3:55, 6:45, 9:50 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 4:35, 7:00, 9:35 Fri 1:30 Sat-Sun 11:10, 1:35 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 The Metropolitan Opera: Werther Encore Sat 12:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 2:20, 3:50, 6:50, 10:00 Fri 12:50, 3:50, 6:55, 10:05 Sat 12:50, 3:55, 6:55, 9:55 Sun 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 8:00, 10:55 Mon-Wed 4:05, 7:10, 10:10 Moms’ Night Out (PG) Thu 2:40, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40 Fri, Wed 10:15 Sat-Sun 9:50 Mon-Tue 10:05 Neighbors (18A) Thu 2:25, 4:45, 5:25, 7:15, 7:55, 9:45, 10:25 Fri-Sun 12:55, 3:20, 5:45, 8:15, 10:50 Mon-Wed 5:25, 7:50, 10:25 The Other Woman Thu 5:20, 9:50 Fri 2:35, 5:15, 8:00, 10:40 Sat 11:50, 2:35, 5:15, 8:00, 10:40 Sun 12:15, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Tue 4:55, 7:40, 10:20 Wed 3:55, 7:35, 10:05 Predator Sun 12:45 Wed 7:30 The Railway Man (14A) Thu 7:45 Rio 2 (G) Fri 1:50 Sat-Sun 11:20, 1:55 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 5:15, 7:50 Fri-Sun 4:30, 7:05, 9:45 MonWed 4:10, 6:55, 9:30 Transcendence (PG) Thu 4:55, 10:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri 1:05, 4:10, 7:15, 10:20 Sat-Sun 1:10, 4:15, 7:20, 10:25 Mon-Wed 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:15 Fri 12:40, 1:35, 3:40, 4:40, 6:45, 7:45, 9:50, 10:50 Sat-Sun 11:00, 12:40, 1:55, 3:45, 4:55, 6:50, 7:55, 9:55, 10:55 MonWed 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:40, 10:30

Woodside Cinemas (I) 1571 Sandhurst Circle, 416-299-3456

2 States (PG) Thu 7:30 Fri-Wed 4:30, 7:30 Heropanti Fri-Wed 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Thirumanam Enum Nikkah Thu 7:00, 10:00 Vallavanukku Pullum Aayudham Thu 7:00, 10:00 Fri-Wed 4:00, 7:15, 10:30

GTA Regions Mississauga

Coliseum Mississauga (CE) Square One, 309 Rathburn Rd W, 905-275-3456

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 12:35, 3:50, 7:10, 10:30 Fri-Sun 3:30, 7:05, 10:30 Mon-Wed 3:35, 7:05, 10:20 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 2:00, 5:20, 8:50 Fri, Sun-Wed 12:20 Sat 12:05 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 12:20 Fri 12:15, 3:20, 6:30, 9:40 Sat-Sun 3:20, 6:30, 9:40 MonTue 12:15, 3:20, 6:35, 9:50 Wed 12:15, 3:20, 9:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 3:40, 7:05, 10:20 Divergent (PG) Thu 12:15, 3:20, 6:35, 9:50 Godzilla (PG) Thu 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:05 Fri 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 Sat 11:15, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 Sun 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 Mon-Tue 2:45, 5:45, 9:00 Wed 5:45, 9:00 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30 Fri-Sun 12:50, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Mon-Wed 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 Godzilla: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG) Thu 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 Fri, Sun 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:55 Sat 11:00, 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:55 Mon-Wed 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:30 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 12:45, 3:10, 6:40, 9:40 Kochadaiiyaan (14A) Fri-Sun 1:10, 4:20, 7:35, 10:40 Mon-Wed 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 1:40 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return 3D (G) Thu 4:20, 6:55 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 The Metropolitan Opera: Werther Encore Sat 12:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:10, 2:20, 4:10, 4:50, 6:50, 7:40, 9:45, 10:25 Fri-Sun 12:40, 2:00, 3:05, 4:30, 5:40, 7:25, 8:15, 10:10, 11:00 Mon-Wed 12:40, 1:45, 3:10, 4:20, 6:50, 7:25, 9:25, 10:10 The Other Woman Thu 1:20, 4:40, 7:25, 10:10 Fri 2:45, 5:20, 8:05, 11:00 Sat 11:45, 2:45, 5:20, 8:05, 11:00 Sun 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 8:05, 11:00 Mon-Wed 1:20, 4:15, 7:45, 10:25 Predator Sun 12:45 Wed 7:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri 1:00, 3:10, 4:10, 6:15, 7:15, 9:20, 10:20 Sat 11:30, 12:15, 3:10, 4:10, 6:15, 7:15, 9:20, 10:20 Sun 12:00, 12:15, 3:10, 4:10, 6:15, 7:15, 9:20, 10:20 Mon-Tue 1:00, 2:30, 4:00, 5:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 Wed 2:30, 4:00, 5:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri-Sun 12:30, 1:30, 3:40, 4:40, 6:45, 7:45, 9:50, 10:50 Mon-Wed 12:30, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:30

Courtney Park 16 (CE)

110 Courtney Park E at Hurontario, 416-335-5323 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30 Fri-Sat 6:45, 10:10 Sun-Wed 6:45, 9:55 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 Fri, Mon-Wed 3:35 Sat-Sun 12:25, 3:35 Blended (PG) Thu 7:00, 9:40 Fri-Sat 1:50, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20 Sun-Wed 1:50, 4:30, 7:25, 10:05 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Thu 1:10, 4:00, 6:55, 9:55 Fri 3:25, 6:40, 10:05 Sat 12:15, 3:25, 6:40, 10:05 Sun 12:15, 3:25, 6:40, 9:50 Mon-Wed 3:25, 6:40, 9:50 Focus on the Family Presents: Irreplaceable (PG) Wed 7:30 Godzilla (PG) 1:00, 3:45 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 1:30, 4:15, 6:30, 7:00, 9:45, 10:10 Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:15, 6:30, 7:00, 9:30, 10:00 Sun-Wed 1:30, 4:15, 6:30, 7:00, 9:15, 9:45 Godzilla: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG) Thu, Sun-Wed 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Fri-Sat 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:30 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 1:05, 2:30, 5:00 Fri, MonWed 2:25, 4:50 Sat-Sun 11:55, 2:25, 4:50 Jatt James Bond (PG) Thu 3:20, 10:05 Kochadaiiyaan (14A) Fri-Sat 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:40 SunWed 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Thu 2:10 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return 3D (G) Thu 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 1:15, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00 Fri-Sat 1:35, 4:35, 7:20, 10:25 Sun-Wed 1:35, 4:35, 7:20, 10:10 National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Encore Thu 7:00 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:05, 1:45, 3:25, 4:05, 5:45, 7:35, 8:05, 9:55, 10:25 Fri-Sat 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 7:15, 8:00, 9:50, 10:35 Sun-Wed 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 7:15, 8:00, 9:35, 10:20 Noah (14A) Thu 3:30 The Other Woman Thu 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20 Fri-Sat 1:05, 4:05, 6:50, 9:40 Sun-Wed 1:05, 4:05, 6:50, 9:25 Rio 2 (G) Thu 2:25 Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55 Sun-Tue 1:25, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40 Wed 1:00, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 5:05, 7:40 Romeo Ranjha (PG) Thu 1:20, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15 Fri 3:30, 6:20, 9:35 Sat 12:40, 3:30, 6:20, 9:35 Sun 12:40, 3:30, 6:20, 9:20 Mon-Tue 3:30, 6:20, 9:20 Wed 3:30, 10:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:40, 7:35, 10:45 Sun-Wed 1:45, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri 1:15, 3:40, 4:10, 6:35, 7:05, 9:45, 10:15 Sat 12:45, 1:15, 3:40, 4:10, 6:35, 7:05, 9:45, 10:15 Sun 12:45, 1:15, 3:40, 4:10, 6:35, 7:05, 9:30, 10:00 Mon-Wed 1:15, 3:40, 4:10, 6:35, 7:05, 9:30, 10:00

North Colossus (CE) Hwy 400 & 7, 905-851-1001

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 3:55, 4:25,

6:55, 7:25, 9:55, 10:25 Fri-Sun 12:50, 4:00, 7:25, 10:45 Mon-Wed 4:25, 7:20, 10:20 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Fri 12:00, 3:00, 6:35, 9:45 Sat-Sun 11:35, 3:00, 6:35, 9:45 Mon-Wed 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 Blended (PG) Fri, Sun 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Sat 11:10, 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Mon-Wed 4:45, 7:25, 10:10 Brick Mansions (PG) Thu 4:35, 10:10 Fri-Sun 10:30 MonWed 9:40 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Fri-Sun 7:35, 10:35 Mon-Wed 6:50, 9:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 7:30, 10:25 Divergent (PG) Thu 9:20 Godzilla (PG) Thu 5:30, 8:30 Fri-Sun 12:40, 3:35, 6:40, 10:05 Mon-Wed 3:50, 6:40, 9:25 Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:00, 10:30 Fri 12:10, 1:40, 3:05, 4:35, 6:10, 7:50, 9:35, 11:00 Sat-Sun 11:15, 12:10, 2:10, 3:05, 5:05, 6:10, 8:00, 9:35, 11:00 MonWed 4:50, 5:45, 7:40, 9:00, 10:25 Godzilla: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG) Thu 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Fri-Sun 1:10, 4:05, 7:20, 10:25 Mon-Wed 4:20, 7:10, 9:55 Heaven Is for Real (PG) Thu 5:10, 7:35, 10:05 Fri-Sat 12:25, 2:55, 5:20, 8:10 Sun 2:55, 5:20, 8:10 Mon-Wed 4:35, 6:55 Kochadaiiyaan (14A) Fri-Sun 12:20, 3:50, 7:00, 9:40 Mon-Wed 3:55, 7:00, 9:50 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (G) Fri-Sun 12:15, 2:40, 5:10 Tue-Wed 4:15 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return 3D (G) Thu 4:15, 6:50 March Of The Penguins Sat 11:00 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 3:35, 7:20, 10:30 Fri-Sun 1:15, 4:15, 7:05, 10:00 Mon-Wed 4:10, 7:15, 10:05 Moms’ Night Out (PG) Thu 4:40, 7:15, 9:45 Neighbors (18A) Thu 3:35, 4:45, 5:50, 7:10, 8:05, 9:25, 10:20 Fri 12:45, 2:20, 3:15, 4:50, 5:45, 7:10, 8:15, 9:55, 10:40 Sat 11:45, 12:45, 2:20, 3:15, 4:50, 5:45, 7:10, 8:15, 9:55, 10:40 Sun 11:50, 12:45, 3:15, 4:50, 5:45, 7:10, 8:15, 9:55, 10:40 Mon 3:35, 4:40, 7:05, 7:50, 9:35, 10:15 Tue 4:40, 5:30, 7:05, 7:50, 9:35, 10:15 Wed 4:40, 5:10, 6:35, 7:05, 9:35, 10:15 Noah (14A) Thu 3:45, 6:45, 9:50 The Other Woman Thu 4:20, 5:00, 7:05, 7:40, 9:35, 10:15 Fri 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:00, 10:55 Sat-Sun 11:55, 2:50, 5:25, 8:20, 10:55 Mon-Wed 5:00, 7:35, 10:15 Predator Sun 12:45 Wed 7:30 Rio 2 (G) Fri-Sun 12:00 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 3:50, 6:25 Fri-Sun 2:30, 5:00, 7:40, 10:10 Mon-Tue 3:40, 6:20, 8:50 Wed 3:40, 8:50 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri-Sun 12:05, 12:35, 3:10, 3:40, 6:15, 6:45, 9:20, 9:50 Mon-Wed 3:30, 5:15, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri 1:05, 1:35, 4:10, 4:40, 7:15, 7:45, 10:20, 10:50 Sat-Sun 11:00, 1:05, 1:55, 4:10, 4:55, 7:15, 7:55, 10:20, 10:55 Mon-Wed 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30

Rainbow Promenade (I)

Promenade Mall, Hwy 7 & Bathurst, 416-494-9371 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 Blended (PG) Thu 7:00, 9:35 Fri-Sun, Tue-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:35 Mon 4:00, 7:00, 9:35 Godzilla (PG) 12:45, 3:45, 6:55, 9:45 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 12:55 3:50 6:50 9:35 FriWed 12:55, 3:50, 6:50, 9:30 Neighbors (18A) Thu 1:10 4:10 7:05 9:45 Fri-Wed 1:10, 4:10, 7:05, 9:25 The Other Woman Thu 12:50, 4:00, 6:45 Rio 2 (G) Thu 1:00, 4:05 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Thu 10:00 Fri-Wed 12:50, 3:55, 6:45, 9:45

West Grande - Steeles (CE) Hwy 410 & Steeles, 905-455-1590

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 3D (PG) Thu 7:05, 10:20 Fri, Tue 3:30, 6:40, 10:00 Sat-Sun 3:20, 6:40, 10:00 Mon, Wed 6:45, 10:00 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG) Thu 6:45, 10:00 SatSun 12:00 Blended (PG) Fri, Tue 4:10, 7:05, 9:50 Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 9:50 Mon, Wed 7:05, 9:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG) Fri-Wed 6:55, 10:10 Captain America: The Winter Soldier 3D (PG) Thu 7:10, 10:15 Godzilla (PG) 3:40 Sat-Sun 12:40 mat Godzilla 3D (PG) Thu 6:45, 7:20, 9:40 Fri, Tue 4:20, 6:50, 7:20, 9:50, 10:20 Sat-Sun 1:10, 4:20, 6:50, 7:20, 9:50, 10:20 Mon, Wed 6:50, 7:20, 9:50, 10:20 Million Dollar Arm (PG) Thu 7:15, 10:10 Fri, Tue 4:15, 7:10, 10:10 Sat-Sun 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 10:10 Mon, Wed 7:10, 10:10 Neighbors (18A) Thu, Mon, Wed 7:45, 10:15 Fri, Tue 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 Sat-Sun 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 The Other Woman Thu, Mon, Wed 7:25, 10:05 Fri, Tue 4:50, 7:25, 10:05 Sat-Sun 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10:05 Rio 2 (G) Fri, Tue 3:35 Sat-Sun 12:35, 3:10 Rio 2 3D (G) Thu 6:50, 9:35 Transcendence (PG) Thu 7:00, 9:55 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG) Fri, Tue 3:30 Sat-Sun 12:10, 3:25 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG) Thu 10:20 Fri, Tue 4:10, 6:45, 7:15, 9:45, 10:20 Sat-Sun 12:55, 4:10, 6:45, 7:15, 9:45, 10:20 Mon, Wed 6:45, 7:15, 9:45, 10:20 3

NOW may 22-28 2014

69


indie&rep film complete festivals, independent and

repertory schedules

How to find a listing

Repertory cinema listings are comprehensive and appear alphabetically by venue, then by date. Other films are listed by date.

John ­Otway, at ­Cannes with his fans, knows how to chase fame.

ñ= Critics’ pick (highly recommended) =How to place a listing

All listings are free. Send to: movies@nowtoronto.com, fax to 416-3641168 or mail to Rep Cinemas, NOW Magazine, 189 Church, Toronto M5B 1Y7. Include film title, year of release, names of director(s), ­language and subtitle info, venue, address, time, cost and advance ticket sales if any, phone number for reservations/info or ­website address. Deadline is the Thursday ­before publication at 5 pm.

festivals

He keeps on rockin’

inside out toronto lgbt film festival

tiff bell lightbox, reitman square, 350 king w, insideout.ca

THU 22-JUNE 1 – Festival dedicated to telling

LGBT stories on screen. $13, stu/srs $10, 8-ticket pass $91, gala screenings $22, stu/ srs $17. thu 22 – Opening night: The Way He Looks (2014) D: Daniel Ribeiro. 8 pm. fri 23 – Youth matinee program: Teenage Dream including Before Words(2013) D: Diego Carvalho Sá, Caged (2013) D: Lazlo Tonk, and others. 1 pm. Salvation Army (2013) D: Abdellah Taïa. 6:30 pm. Mixed Shorts: Focus On ­L atin America program ­including The Cross-Eyed (2013) D: Juliana Vicente, The Best Friend (2013) D: Allan ­Deberton, and others. 7:15 pm. The Normal Heart (2014) D: Ryan Murphy. 9 pm. Who’s Afraid Of Vagina Wolf? (2013) D: Anna Margarita Albelo. 9:30 pm. sat 24 – Free family screening – Shorts For Shorties program: The Boy With Chocolate Fingers (2011) D: Chris Palmer, Wini & George (2013) D: Benjamin Monie, and others. 12:30 pm. Matt Shepard Is A Friend Of Mine (2013) D: Michele Josue. 1:30 pm. Lesbian Shorts – Building A Herstory program: Extrasystole (2013) D: Alice Douard, Living In The Overlap (2013) D: Cindy Hill and Mary Dalton. 2:30 pm. Gay Shorts – ­Secrets And Guys program Brace (2013) D: Sophy Holland, Safe Word (2014) D: Todd Lillethun, and others. 4 pm. Kate Bornstein Is A Queer & Pleasant Danger (2013) D: Sam Feder. 5 pm. Seek (2013) D: Eric Henry. 7 pm. Women’s Gala: Tru Love (2013) D: Kate Johnston and Shauna MacDonald. 7:30 pm. Something Must Break (2014) D: Ester ­Martin Bergs­mark. 9:30 pm. Cupcakes (2013) D: Eytan Fox. 10 pm. sun 25 – The Last One (2013) D: Nadine Lico­ stie. Noon. Mixed Shorts program – World’s Best Docs: Lavender Hill: A Love Story (2013) D: Austin Bunn, Families Are Forever (2013) D: Vivian Kleiman, and others. 1:45 pm. ­Kidnapped For Christ (2014) D: Kate Logan. 2:15 pm. The 10 Year Plan (2014) D: JC ­Calciano. 4 pm. Forbidden Love: The Unashamed Stories Of Lesbian Lives (1992) D: Aerlyn Weissman and Lynn Fernie. 4:30 pm. Eastern Boys (2013) D: Robin Campilo. 6:30 pm. Everybody’s Got Somebody... But Me (2012) D: Raúl Fuentes. 7:15 pm. Lesbian Shorts – Bound (By Love) program: Neighbours (2012) D: Eli Navarro, Good Place (2014) D: Gina Bucci, Dyke Central: Taboo (2014) D: Florencia Manovil, and others. 9:30 pm. The Third One (2013) D: Rodrigo Guerrero. 9:45 pm. mon 26 –Out In The Line-Up (2014) D: Ian Thomson. 5:15 pm. Masculinity/Femininity (2013) D: Russell Sheaffer. 5:30 pm. Tom At The Farm (2013) D: Xavier Dolan. 7:15 pm. Lesbian Shorts – The Night Is Young program: The Night Is Ours (2013) D: Aubree Bernier-Clarke, Yolo (2013) D: Marie Grahtø Sørensen, and others. 7:30 pm. Drunktown’s Finest (2014) D: Sydney Freeland. 9:30 pm. Gay Shorts program – Hook, Line And Grindr: Grind (2013) D: Zachary Halley, Ronnie­& I (2013) D: Guy Shalem, and others. 9:45 pm.

ñ

70

may 22-28 2014 NOW

ROCK AND ROLL’S GREATEST ­FAILURE: OTWAY THE MOVIE (Steve Barker) Rating: NNN John Otway was never a rock star. But he’s always tried to be. The eccentric English singer/ songwriter started out as a punk and evolved into more of a giddy peripheral rocker, beloved by fans and fellow musicians but never quite able to turn his stage cred tue 27 – Folsom Forever (2014) D: Mike Skiff. 5:15 pm. Mixed Shorts – Black Boxes program: Bounty (2013) D: Finbarr Wilbrink, The Lives Of LaMott Atkins (2013) D: Robert Philipson, The Return (2013) D: Yohann Kouam, and others. 5:30 pm. Last Summer (2013) D: Mark Thiedeman. 7:15 pm. Ever (2014) D: Josh Beck. 7:45 pm. Centrepiece Gala: Love Is Strange (2014) D: Ira Sachs. 9:30 pm. wed 28 – I Always Said Yes: The Many Lives Of Wakefield Poole (2013) D: Jim Tushinski. 5:15 pm. Mixed Shorts – Scared (Not So) Straight program: The Last Time I Saw Richard (2013) D: Nicholas Verso, Holiday (2013) D: Alexander Siqueira, and others. 5:30 pm. Sneak preview: Regarding Susan Sontag (2014) D: Nancy D Kates. 7:15 pm. Land Of Storms (2014) D: Ádám Császi. 7:30 pm. Open Up To Me (2013) D: Simo Halinen. 9:30 pm. Gay Shorts – Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda program: Stay (2013) D: Brandon Zuck, Nomansland (2013) D: ­Karsten Geisnaes, and others. 9:45 pm.

toronto korean film ­festival

art gallery of ontario, jackman hall, 317 Dundas W (AGO); cinecycle, 129 Spadina (CC). tkff.ca

tue 27-may 31 – Festival featuring authentic Korean cinema and supporting Korean filmmakers. $5-$10, festival pass $39. tue 27 – Korean Classics: Aimless Bullet (1961) D: Hyeon-Mok Yoo. 7:30 pm (CC). wed 28 – Zainichi (Korean Residents In Japan) shorts including Galapagos (2013) D: Dalya Lee, Matou (2010) D: Yeong-I, and others. 7:30 pm (CC).

Cinemas big picture cinema gerrard 1035 gerrard e. ­bigpicturecinema.com

thu 22-wed 28 – Check website for schedule.

BLOOR hot docs Cinema

506 Bloor W. 416-637-3123. ­bloorcinema.com

into proper success. Instead, he’s carved a uniquely self-effacing niche for himself, inviting his ever-indulgent followers to help him goof around on various projects: pushing a single up the charts for his 50th birthday, trying to charter a plane for a world tour, or recording a call-and-response cover of The House Of The Rising Sun at Abbey Road. For his 60th birthday in 2012, he decided he wanted a movie, and the Thu 22 – Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case (2013) D: Anreas Johnsen. 4 & 9:15 pm. ñ Rock And Roll’s Greatest Failure: 4 & Otway

The Movie. Intro and Q&A w/ Otway. 6:30 pm. fri 23 – 112 Weddings (2014) D: Doug Block. 4 & 6:30 pm. Pete Seeger: A Song And A Stone (1972) D: Robert Elfstrom. 8:45 pm. sat 24 – 112 Weddings. 6:30 pm. Pete Seeger: A Song And A Stone. 8:45 pm. sun 25 – 112 Weddings. 4 & 9:15 pm. Rock And Roll’s Greatest Failure: Otway The ­Movie. 6:30 pm. mon 26 – 112 Weddings. 6:30 pm. Mistaken For Strangers (2013) D: Tom Berninger. 8:45 pm. tue 27 – 112 Weddings. 4 & 9 pm. Films Changing The World: A Small Act (2010) D: Jennifer Arnold. 6:30 pm. Free. wed 28 – 112 Weddings. 3:30 & 9:15 pm. Finding Vivian Maier (2013) D: John Maloof. 6 pm.

Camera Bar

1028 Queen W. 416-530-0011. camerabar.ca

sat 24 – Saint Ralph (2004) D: Michael McGowan. 3 pm.

cinematheque tiff bell ­lightbox

result is this picture, which screens twice this week on either side of Otway’s gigs at the Rivoli Saturday night (May 24). The documentary is aimed directly at Otway’s fiercely loyal fan base, who’ll likely swarm the Bloor to catch both it and the acoustic sets he’s slated to perform afterward. On that level, it’ll be exactly what they want to see: a career overview of the charming, accessible artist they’ve supported and abetted for decades. You’d have to be a dick to point out that no one could be as naive as Otway appears to be and survive in the British music industry for decades, even on the fringes. And you’d definitely be a dick were you to note that the last movement of Otway The Movie can be read as a cautionary tale about what happens when chasing the spotlight takes precedence over making art. So I won’t be a dick. And Bunsen Burner is pretty damn fun, after all. Screens Thursday (May 22) and Sunday (May 25) at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema. See listings, this page. 

Norman Wilner

Draft Day. 9:15 pm. sun 25 – Muppets Most Wanted. 2 pm. Draft Day. 4:15 & 9:15 pm. Lunchbox. 7 pm. mon 26 – Lunchbox. 7 pm. The Face Of Love (2014) D: Arie Posin. 9:15 pm. tue 27-wed 28 – Closed.

GRAHAM SPRY THEATRE

CBC Museum, CBC Broadcast Centre, 250 Front W, 416-205-5574. cbc.ca

thu 22-wed 28 – Continuous screenings ­Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Free.

Thu 22-fri 23 & mon 26-wed 28 – Highlights

of current programming.

ontario science centre 770 Don Mills. 416-696-3127. ­ontariosciencecentre.ca

thu 22-fri 23 – Great White Shark. 11 am. Flight Of The Butterflies. Noon. The H ­ uman Body. 1 pm. Jerusalem. 2 pm. sat 24-sun 25 – Flight Of The Butterflies. 11 am. Great White Shark. 1 & 3 pm. Jerusalem. Noon & 4 pm. Under The Sea. 2 pm. mon 26-wed 28 – Great White Shark. 11 am. Flight Of The Butterflies. Noon. The ­Human Body. 1 pm. Jerusalem. 2 pm.

reg hartt’s ­cineforum

reitman square, 350 king w. 416-599-8433, tiff.net

463 Bathurst. 416-603-6643.

Thu 22-sun 25 – Check website for schedule. mon 26 – Mad Max 2: The Road Warrier

thu 22 – A Serious Man (2009) D: Joel and

(1981) D: George Miller. Introduced by author Terry Hayes, who co-wrote his new book I Am Pilgrim with Miller. 7 pm. tue 27-wed 28 – Check website for schedule.

Fox Theatre

2236 Queen E. 416-691-7330. f­ oxtheatre.ca

Thu 22 – Lars Von Trier X 2: Nymphomaniac Part 1 (2014). 7 pm. Nymphomaniac Part 2 (2014). 9:15 pm. Fri 23 – The Lunchbox (2014) D: Ritesh Batra. 7 pm. Draft Day (2014) D: Ivan Reitman. 9:15 pm. sat 24 – Muppets Most Wanted (2014) D: James Bobin. 2 pm. Lunchbox. 4:15 & 7 pm.

Ñ

Ethan Coen. 7 pm. The Godfather 3 (1990) D: Francis Ford Coppola. 9 pm. sat 24 – The Sex & Violence Cartoon Festival. 7 pm. Reg Hartt: What I Learned From LSD (2014) D: Reg Hartt. 9 pm. sun 25 – Classics Of The Silent Screen Four: Hollywood: A Celebration Of The American Silent Film – Volume Three: Hollywood (1980) D: Kevin Brownlow. 1 pm. Home Sweet Home (1914) D: DW Griffith. 2 pm. Male And Female (1919) D: Cecil B Demille. 3 pm. My Lady Of Whims (1925) D: Dallas M Fitzgerald. 5 pm. Where The North Begins (1923) D: Chester M Franklin. 6 pm. Torrent (1926) D: Monta Bell. 7 pm. mon 26 – Korean Horror: Whispering Corridors (1998) D: Park Ki-hyeong. 5 pm. Thirst

(2009) D: Park Chan-wook. 7 pm. Blood And Roses (1960) D: Roger Vadim. 9 pm. tue 27 – The Wachowski Brothers X 3: The Matrix (1999). 5 pm. The Matrix Reloaded (2003). 7:30 pm. The Matrix Revolutions (2003). 10 pm. wed 28 – King Kong Vs Godzilla (1962) D: Ishiro Honda. 5 pm. Battle Royale (2000) D: Kinji Fukasaku. 7 pm. Battle Royale II: ­Requiem (2003) D: Kenta and Kenji Fukasaku. 9 pm.

revue CInema 400 Roncesvalles. 416-531-9959. ­revuecinema.ca.

Thu 22 – Epicure’s Revue: The Gleaners And I

(2001) D: Agnès Varda. 6:30 pm. Cult Classics: The Warriors (1979) D: Walter Hill. 9:30 pm. Fri 23 – Finding Vivian Maier (2014) D; John Maloof and Charlie Siskel. 7 pm. Draft Day (2014) D: Ivan Reitman. 9 pm. sat 24 – Mr Peabody And Sherman 3D (2014) D: Rob Minkoff. 2 pm. Finding Vivian Maier. 4 & 7 pm. Draft Day. 9 pm. sun 25 – Mr Peabody And Sherman 3D. 1 pm. Casa Salvador Allende Cultural Society and the Ontario Mapuche Support Group present Even The Rain (2011) D: Iciar Bollain. Spanish w/ s-t. 3 pm. $10. mon 26 – Finding Vivian Maier. 7 pm. Draft Day. 9 pm. tue 27 – Draft Day. 7 pm. Finding Vivian Maier. 9:15 pm. wed 28 – Finding Vivian Maier. 1 & 9:30 pm.

ñ

the royal 608 College. 416-466-4400. theroyal.to

Thu 22 – World Goth Night X 2: The Craft

(1996) D: Andrew Fleming. 7 pm. The ­Hunger (1983) D: Tony Scott. 9:30 pm. fri 23 – Bad Words (2013) D: Jason Bateman. 7 pm. Enemy (2013) D: Denis Villeneuve. 9 pm. Late Night Fridays: The Human Centipede (2009) D: Tom Six. 11:30 pm. sat 24 – The Nut Job (2014) D: Jimmy Hayward. 2 pm. Autonomy (2013) D: Filipe Tavares. 4 pm. Bad Words. 7 pm. Enemy. 9 pm. sun 25 – Coraline (2009) D: Henry Selick. 2 pm. Bad Words. 4 pm. Enemy. 7 pm. mon 26 – Closed. tue 27 – Check website for schedule. wed 28 – Bad Words. 9:15 pm.

other films

thu 22-wed 28 – The CN Tower presents Legends Of Flight 3D. Continuous screenings daily 10 am-9 pm. 301 Front W. ­cntower.ca. Casa Loma presents The P­ ellatt Newsreel (2006) D: Barbra Cooper, a film and permanent exhibit on the history of Casa Loma and Henry Pellatt. Daily screenings 10 am4:30 pm. Included w/ admission. 1 ­Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171, ­casaloma.org. The Hockey Hall of Fame presents Stanley’s Game Seven 3D, a film of Stanley Cup history. Plays daily at the top and half past each hour. Mon-Sat 9:30 am-6 pm, Sun 10 am-6 pm. Included w/ admission. Brookfield Place, 30 Yonge. hhof.com. thu 22 –  The Cayle Chernin Award Presentation and Fundraiser presents a screening of the digitally enhanced version of Goin’ Down The Road (1970) D: Donald Shebib. 6 pm. $25-$50 (gettickets.ca). Carlton Cinema, 20 Carlton. ­caylecherninaward. ca. mon 26 –  Bad Movie Night Toronto presents Deadly Prey (1987) D: David A Prior. 7:30 pm. Free. Clinton’s, 693 Bloor W. 416884-8323, ­explodingzebra.com/badmovieto. wed 28 – Pleasure Dome and the Art Gallery of Ontario present videos by artist Mike Kelley. Early Works: Banana Man (1983), Fresh Acconci (1995), Superman Recites From “The Bell Jar” And Other Works By Sylvia Plath (1999). 6 pm, Day Is Done, Part 1 (2005-06). 8 pm. $12, stu $8. AGO, Jackman Hall, 317 Dundas W. ­pdome.org.  3

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= Critics’ Pick nnnnn = Top ten of the year nnNn = Honourable mention nnn = Entertaining nn = Mediocre n = Bomb


POWER BALL 5 JUNE 2014

Get your tickets to Toronto’s original art party Lounge access with artists, 7-9 PM $300 Party access, 9 PM-1 AM $150 Members of The Power Plant $165 The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery

Tickets and more info thepowerplant.org

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NOW may 22-28 2014

71


Classifieds 416 364 3444 {

DEADLINES > Tuesday at 6pm Adult Classifieds ~ Monday at 6pm

nowtoronto.com/classifieds

Make It Rain — IT’LL BE YOUR DOWNFALL By Matt Jones ©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

31 33 34 35 37 39 40 42 44 45 46 48 49 51 52 56

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solution in next week’s classifieds

Classified

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS! Buy a recruitment ad in NOW Classifieds and receive a Contact your NOW Classified Sales Rep @ 416.364.3444 nowtoronto.com/classifieds FREE posting on TorontoJobs.ca – The Greater Toronto Area’s leading recruitment source. 72

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

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Employment

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ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS NEW ADS UPDATED 24/7

help wanted

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Canadian Office Support Corporation, 36 Tolton Dr, Brampton, ON L6V 2R1, needs full time Electrical Engineering Technician (NOC2241) to handle printing press motors, system drivers and motor controls, 5+ y. experience in printing industry, factory trained in Komori, Mitsubishi or Roland , speak s English, German and Spanish, $26.50/hour, + pen. benefits. Apply mail, FAX: 905-499-5224 or at sales@printequipment.ca Location: Mississauga Status: Full-time

help wanted

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nowtoronto.com/classifieds

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research studies

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please call 416-535-8501 x 36012

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RESEARCH SUBJECTS NEEDED

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NOW MAY 22-28 2014

73


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for rent - general Heart of Leslieville

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VOLUNTEER TORONTO CONNECTS PEOPLE TO THOUSANDS OF VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AND PROVIDES SUPPORT TO TORONTO’S NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS. FIND THESE AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES AT VOLUNTEERTORONTO.CA

The Arthritis Society is looking for 200 volunteers for their Walk to Fight Arthritis at Evergreen Brickworks on Sunday, June 8, 2014 where hundreds of people in Toronto will come together to raise funds for the fight against arthritis. Age 14+. Visit www. WalkToFightArthritis.ca and register to volunteer at the Toronto site. For queries, contact Marie: mjohn@on.arthritis.ca

Classifieds 74

MAY 22-28 2014 NOW

The Redwood, a shelter for women and children fleeing abuse, is looking for Volunteer Coordination Assistants to help with recruiting and screening volunteers and data entry. Applications from women from diverse communities are strongly encouraged. Dundas/ Bloor. If you’re mature, creative, reliable and able to volunteer 2 hours a week, contact Evelynn: volunteer@theredwood.com

everything goes. in print & online. 416 364 3444 • nowtoronto.com/classifieds

Ronald McDonald House Toronto is looking for volunteers to provide a friendly environment in their Family Room at SickKids for families seeking medical care for their seriously ill children. If you’re a good listener, are able to put people at ease and can commit to one 3 hour shift a week for 6 months (Mon-Sun, 9am-9pm), contact Tyler: tdemers@rmhtoronto.org BROUGHT TO YOU BY

St. Felix Centre provides nutritious meals every weekday to up to 140 people who are on a low-income, many of whom don’t have stable housing. Volunteers are needed to help with food prep, serving and clean up. Lunch is Mon – Fri, 9am - 1pm and Dinner is Mon – Thu, 3 - 7pm. Volunteer once a week and help make a difference. Queen/Augusta. Apply at www.stfelixcentre.ca/volunteer.php




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Savage Love By Dan Savage

Guy wants to sit to pee I am a genetic male with recurrent questions about my gender identity. Straddling desires to maintain my stature in the professional world, keep my wife at my side and become who I feel like I am, I have experimented with cross-dressing, chastity, antiandrogens and, prior to all that, steroids. While the matrimonial veto has been enacted for some feminine expressions, my wife and I have reached a middle ground where I can pursue sexual and aesthetic androgyny. I have started wearing unisex clothes, stepped up cardio to sculpt a more feminine shape and am getting hair removal done. My question: I want to keep my sex drive and sexual organs intact, but I want to urinate like a woman, with no choice but to sit. There are bodymodification communities out there that showcase this type of procedure (urethral reroute/relocation), but I don’t know where to start when it comes to tracking down someone to do it for me. Ideally, a legitimate urologist should do this type of work, but even with my gender-amorphous desires in play, I’m not sure I can put together a justification strong enough for a doctor. Any advice? Do you know any piercers who have done this kind of work?  Seeking Insights That Take  Erotic Rerouting Seriously “Most urologists aren’t qualified to do this, let alone piercers – although I know there are aggressive ‘body modifiers’ out there. I wind up cleaning up their messes,” said Dr. Keith D. Newman, a urologist and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. “So my main piece of advice for SITTERS is to have a urologist do this, preferably someone who has experience with this surgery.” The procedure you’re curious about – creating a new pee hole on your taint, behind your balls, which would leave you with no choice but to sit when you pee – is known as a perineal ­urethrostomy. “It’s one of the numerous steps involved in total gender-reassignment surgery, should the full male-to-female conversion ever be opted for,” said Dr. Newman. “As such, doing this one thing probably won’t preclude further anatomical reassignment in the future. On the other hand, SITTERS has to consider that there are potential complications and consequences that will arise from this altered anatomy.” And the biggest consequence is a heightened risk of urinary tract infections due to your shortened urethra, SITTERS. The urethra, of course, is the tube that runs from our bladders, where urine is stored, to our pee holes. Women’s are shorter, making it easier for bacteria and other bugs to get up into the bladder and cause infections. But urinary tract infections aren’t your only worry. “Any artificial ­orifice has a certain incidence of stricture,” said Dr. Newman. “So the opening might need ­frequent dilations or more surgery if this complication arises.” By “stricture,” Dr. Newman means “your new pee hole could shrink, narrow and start to close up.” And by “frequent dilations,” Dr. Newman means “you could wind up shoving steel rods up your urethra to stretch your new hole back open – frequently.” And there’s more! “There may be less than full diversion of urine (some may still come out the end of the penis) unless the urethra distal to the new opening is closed,” said Dr. Newman. “If it is closed, then we run into issues of what is called a ‘mucous fistula,’ and the urethra beyond the diversion might need to be irrigated from time to time. Similarly, urinary dermatitis may occur – that’s diaper rash – so perineal care and good ­hygiene will be a must.” Assuming you’re still interested in relocating your pee hole after reading all that, SITTERS, how do you go about finding a urologist who’ll perform this surgery? You make appointments with qualified urologists, tell them what you want, and risk being turned away. “I believe that enough justification for the surgery

exists; others may not,” said Dr. Newman. “But it’s the insurance company that will need convincing. Many institutions (most faith-based, but not always) do not allow any surgery for sexual reassignment in adults, so those waters will have to be navigated. And it sounds as if SITTERS is not yet convinced of the validity of this request, so counselling might be helpful.” One final note… “Ejaculation will occur through that new hole in a somewhat non-directable way – which could be fun or not,” said Dr. Newman. In other words, SITTERS, after you have this done, you’ll not only be peeing sitting down, you’ll also be coming all over the back of your sack.

Diaper fetishist wonders I’m a 24-year-old gay male in a  three-year relationship with a man I love with all my heart. I also have a diaper fetish. I told him about it once, nearly two years ago, but have not brought it up since. Recently I have gone out to buy diapers. I don’t use the diapers for pee or poop, but I enjoy the feeling of wearing them. I have talked to other diaper lovers (DL) online, but I have never gotten the courage to meet up and experiment. I recently started talking with a guy who lives a few miles away who is also a DL. I don’t want to cheat on my boyfriend, but I would like to indulge my fetish at least once in my life. If there is no sex during the fetish play, would that be cheating? There would be no kissing or anything. I would just change his diaper and powder him, and he would be doing the same to me and whatnot. I don’t have anyone I can talk to about this and would love to hear your advice.  Diapered Dilemma

Here’s what Good Dan would tell you: Go and tell your boyfriend that you love him, remind him about the conversation you had two years ago about your diaper fetish, and ask if he would be up for exploring this aspect of your sexuality with you. If so, great! No need to see that other guy. But if not, DD, ask your boyfriend how he would feel about you getting together with someone who shares your kink – not for sex, just for diapering and powdering and whatnot. If he doesn’t mind, great! If he does mind, well, then you need to think about whether staying in this relationship is wise… because sooner or later, you’re going to cheat on him. And if you don’t want to be the kind of person who cheats on his boyfriend, you’ll have to find one who shares your kink or is willing to share you. Here’s what Bad Dan would tell you: Seeing as you’re only 24, and seeing as you’ve been in this relationship for three years, and seeing as you’ve never engaged in any diaper play… sneaking off to play with that other DL might

help clarify things. Either you’ll learn that diaper play is something you can’t live without (which will prompt you to force the issue with your boyfriend, i.e., he either plays with you or gives you permission to play with others) or you’ll realize that diapered reality is a lot less sexy than diaper fantasies and your kink will evaporate (highly unlikely). Good Dan thinks you should take his advice, DD, because Good Dan is an annoying prick who thinks he’s right about everything. But Bad Dan thinks you should know that Actual Dan took his advice back when he was your age – about exploring his sexuality generally, not about exploring diapers specifically – and it helped clarify things for Actual Dan.

On the Lovecast, Dan gets a second-opinion assist from Slate’s Dear Prudence: savagelovecast.com.

mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter

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