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THE SUMMIT The global Cities Changing Diabetes Summit, held in Copenhagen on 16–17 November 2015, brought together an extraordinary group of people around the common cause of finding solutions to the urban diabetes challenge. Participants were leading thinkers and doers from study cities and beyond, and represented a wide variety of expertise from city and health leadership, urban planners and architects, to academics, healthcare and diabetes professionals, and community leaders.

5.39 BILLION

“The rise of diabetes is one of the world’s great health challenges. There are many factors driving that. But among the most significant are city environments and city lifestyles. That’s why cities are the new front-line of the diabetes challenge.”

PRESIDENT AND CEO, LARS REBIEN SØRENSEN, PROF WEIPING JIA, LORD MAYOR FRANK JENSEN

PRESIDENT & CEO, NOVO NORDISK, LARS REBIEN SØRENSEN

2.85 BILLION 2000

Co-hosted by the Lord Mayor of Copenhagen and the global Cities Changing Diabetes partners University College London, Steno Diabetes Center and Novo Nordisk, this unique gathering sought to be a catalyst to deliver real impact and future change on the challenge of urban diabetes across the world.

2035

UN GLOBAL ESTIMATES OF PEOPLE IN URBAN AREAS1

PROF STEPHEN H. LINDER

THE CHALLENGE OF DIABETES IN CITIES The rise of diabetes is one of today’s great health challenges and cities have become the frontline of the fight against the disease. Urban environments are now home to more than half the world’s population, and two thirds of people with diabetes live in urban areas. This calls for action.

In early 2014 Cities Changing Diabetes was launched, and since then Mexico City, Copenhagen, Houston, Shanghai and Tianjin have joined the programme as the first five study cities. These are five important cites with a combined population of almost sixty million people: all of them faced with the challenge of growing health risks to their citizens leading to higher rates of diabetes, and a growing economic burden for society.

1. UNDESA. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. World Urbanization Prospects, the 2014 Revision, Highlights. 2014. 978-92-1-151517-6.

A wide range of speakers and working sessions helped delegates to discuss and share learning on topics such as the rise of the city as an ideal setting for social change, a venue for decisive political action and the potential role of business in catalysing new partnerships and solutions. PROF FINN DIDERICHSEN

MAPPING THE CHALLENGE: RESEARCH FINDINGS To kick-start the Cities Changing Diabetes programme, a study was initiated in the five study cities in order to understand better what drives diabetes in urban environments. This set out to investigate what the risk factors are and what needs to be done differently to tackle this challenge. The research was on the social factors and cultural determinants; and that in itself is significant. To date, the vast majority of diabetes research focuses on biological and medical factors. Yet, for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or living with the disease, the great majority of the problem is socially and culturally mediated.

PROF DAVID NAPIER

DR SIMÓN BARQUERA CERVERA, PROF WEIPING JIA, PROF MA JUN


MEXICO

The initial findings of the research were presented by UCL and local academic leads from each of the five study cities. This represents a combination of quantitative data analysis, and unique qualitative insights through a vulnerability assessment. Some of the findings relate to vulnerability in each of the cities:

“We need to look at the problem or urban diabetes the other way up to focus on the causes which drive diabetes: the social and cultural factors that put people at risk in the first place – before they ever see a clinician. Rather than at the unmet needs of people who already have.”

• In Mexico City, gender roles may contribute to increased

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, NOVO NORDISK, JAKOB RIIS

vulnerability as women neglect their own health to avoid being seen as burdensome. • In Copenhagen, diabetes is often not highest in a

person’s hierarchy of everyday issues, given many other social and health issues such as unemployment, financial difficulties and loneliness.

COPENHAGEN

• In Houston, the traditional notion of disadvantage being

equal to vulnerability is no longer the rule. Vulnerability affects both those with and without financial constraints in different ways. • In Tianjin, people with diabetes point to a wide range

of factors as causes of the condition including poor food choices, overworking, lack of education and environmental factors. • In Shanghai, denying hardship is seen to prevent people

with diabetes from seeking help from friends, family and healthcare professionals.

HOUSTON

EXCHANGING KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERTISE

SHANGHAI

• The projected rises of obesity and diabetes in cities

around the world • Persistence of silos in diabetes care systems • Mobilising and involving citizens in decision-making and

solutions • The role of health care provision and finance in

It was clear that in all five cities social and cultural factors have a significant role in the diabetes epidemic, and a combination of pioneering academic approaches in each city helped to advance a deeper understanding of their role. It is true that every city is different in many specific ways. Yet it also became clear that the insights will be highly relevant to other urban environments and can provide the basis for developing locally applicable solutions elsewhere.

TIANJIN

The summit was an opportunity to explore specific challenges related to the prevention and management of urban diabetes by drawing on a new combination of people and perspectives. A panel of leaders from the health systems in each city, and from Steno Diabetes Center and Novo Nordisk, discussed the role of leadership in taking on urban diabetes. And throughout the Summit, participants explored an array of different challenges and solutions relating to biomedical and social factors as well as cultural determinants of urban diabetes, such as:

The picture that emerges demonstrates that to change the trajectory of the disease, a clinical response is essential but not enough. The world needs to start to look at the problem differently. That means turning more of the collective resource, effort and imagination towards social factors and cultural determinants which put people at risk before they even get the disease and understand why good outcomes are so hard to achieve.

developing new solutions • Adapting urban environments through new approaches

to urban planning A series of deep dives and interactive sessions on these topics reinforced the idea that there is no one solution to urban diabetes, and that collaboration across sectors and agendas is critical for success. Delegates described their enthusiasm to use the findings of the Rule of Halves analyses and Vulnerability Assessments to address the needs of populations vulnerable to diabetes and its complications in their cities. A key point of discussion was how to work together to most efficiently and effectively take that learning to deliver impact for people in cities around the world.

SPRINGBOARD FOR FUTURE ACTION The Summit marked an important moment to draw together all the activity, energy and learning in the programme to date. Crucially, it provided a springboard to transition to action. This is happening at three levels. DR ROMÁN ROSALES AVILÉS


DR SIMÓN BARQUERA CERVERA

KELLY KLOSE AND JAKOB RIIS

1. COLLABORATIVE ACTION IN STUDY CITIES The five initial partner cities have committed to join with others in the Cities Changing Diabetes programme to move to joint action and create new solutions in their cities. A number of models were shared at the Summit which have proved effective to impact health in cities around the world, including: • City planning interventions – thoughtful use of city

space has the power to change health outcomes. Helle Soholt, CEO of Gehl Architects, shared an example from Times Square in New York City, where the take-up of cycling was encouraged by a simple but transformative act of zoning the space. This involved painting designated pedestrian areas and cycling lanes • Collective action – the power of bringing together

actors across the health system and the wider communities to address a shared challenge. John Kania from FSG presented learnings from Shape Up Somerville, a citywide effort to reduce and prevent childhood obesity in elementary school children in Somerville, Massachusetts. It engaged government officials, educators, businesses, nonprofits, and citizens in collectively defining and delivering wellness and weight gain prevention practices

SCOTT DILLE

• Peer support – building strong peer to peer networks in

communities can change people’s ability to manage their own health and equip them to live with disease. Dr. Edwin Fisher from Peers for Progress shared examples from around the world of how peer supporters have helped dramatically improve daily management of diabetes, strengthen links to clinical care and community resources, and offer social and emotional support

RICHARD FLORIDA

HELLE SØHOLT

MARK WATTS

3. PUTTING URBAN DIABETES ON THE GLOBAL CITIES AND HEALTH AGENDAS

APPROACH TO THE FUTURE OF THE PROGRAMME

The ambition of the programme is to put urban diabetes to the top of the healthcare agenda and put it on the agenda of those designing and managing cities for the future. To support this ambition, the Summit marked an opportunity to set the future direction of the programme:

Before leaving the summit delegates voted on the most important guiding principles for the programme and for future action. These four principles stood out: • Research must focus on the social and cultural

determinants of health The study are coming together in a local coalition to develop action plans for 2016 based on the expertise in that city and shared through the Summit.

2. EXPANDING THE CITY NETWORK Two further important cities – Vancouver and Johannesburg are joining the programme to take on the urban diabetes challenge. They will learn from the work of the programme so far, and contribute further knowledge and expertise to everyone involved in the programme. As a growing network, together these cities have the opportunity make a significant impact and a distinctive contribution to the challenge.

• Novo Nordisk announced a commitment to invest over

20 million USD of expert resource and research funds in Cities Changing Diabetes by 2020 • Cities Changing Diabetes is forging an alliance with

the C40, the foremost network of the world’s leading cities. The collaboration with C40 is an opportunity to strengthen action at the global level by learning from the successes of C40 to build strong mechanisms to share knowledge and best practices amongst existing and new cities, and better understand the shared root causes of climate change and health in urban settings. The two global city networks can exploit these synergies to learn from and reinforce each other The globally-led action will elevate the challenge of urban diabetes to important health and cities agendas, and support learning and action in more and more cities around the world.

• Interventions in the community and outside the clinical

health system • Solutions must be made in partnerships – cross-

disciplinary and across public, private and civil sectors • Health must be integrated into all urban planning and

policies This event helped to set the future direction and build a shared perspective on the challenge, and the programme partners remain resolute in the ambition to lead a global fight to defeat urban diabetes.


WELCOME SESSION Lord Mayor Frank Jensen, City of Copenhagen

• Cities should care about health because it is

fundamental to the wellbeing of cities

Watch a four minutes interview with Frank Jensen

• Healthy lifestyles makes cities more efficient and

Lars Rebien Sørensen, President & CEO, Novo Nordisk

productive • Change happens at the city level, much faster than at

Watch the Cities Changing Diabetes summit film

the national level Watch the full session • Copenhagen sat out to become a bike cycling city.

Today 63% of all inhabitants bike to work or school and only 1/3 households own a car • Despite living comparatively active lives, diabetes poses

a risk to Copenhageners with currently 25,000 people having diabetes today. This will rise if no action is taken • The challenge is complex and closely linked to

education and income • City leaders can’t solve the problem alone – solutions

must be found in partnerships, as we are doing with the Cities Changing Diabetes programme • The programme provides a window on important work

on the challenge by other cities • Our hope is to expand the conversations and look to

new ways for finding solutions

LARS REBIEN SØRENSEN AND FRANK JENSEN


PROF DAVID NAPIER

PROF STEPHEN H. LINDER

DR SIMÓN BARQUERA CERVERA

PROF WEIPING JIA

PROF FINN DIDERICHSEN

PROF MA JUN

THE CHALLENGE OF DIABETES IN CITIES Prof David Napier, Professor of Medical Anthropology at University College London & Director of the UCL Centre for Applied Global Citizenship With contributions from:

UNDERSTANDING VULNERABILITY:

PRESENTING THE STUDY RESULTS FROM THE FIVE CITIES

Vulnerability is created through a mixture of biomedical and social factors and cultural determinants.

Dr. Simon Barquera, local academic lead in Mexico City, presented the diabetes challenge and the emerging issues of vulnerability. E.g. gender culture and dependence of woman on their husbands for healthcare, and lack of trust in public health services.

Cultural determinants are shared conventions and understandings that reduce or heighten vulnerability. These are varied, complex and locally very diverse. Cultural determinants across the five study cities: Agency and opportunity: Are changes in my life feasible? • Traditions and conventions: How do food traditions shape my life?

Dr Simón Barquera Cervera, Director, Nutrition Policy and Program Research at National Institute of Public Health, Mexico Prof Finn Diderichsen, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen

• Views of health and illness: Is diabetes my biggest problem? • Self and other: To whom am I comparing my own health? • Change and transition: How do I adapt when my environment changes?

Social factors are structural and formal elements that reduce or heighten vulnerability. These are complex and locally diverse

Prof Ma Jun, Public Health School, Tianjin Medical University Prof Weiping Jia, Director, Shanghai Institute of Diabetes

Prof. Stephen Linder, local academic lead in Houston, presented four profiles of people who may be vulnerable to developing diabetes and the related social and cultural factors. E.g. adherence to food traditions carries meaning beyond nutrition and diet. Prof. Ma Jun, local academic lead in Tianjin, presented the vulnerability assessment study in Tianjin and the emerging key insights into vulnerability. E.g. beliefs and attitudes about diabetes can impact management of the condition. Prof. Weiping Jia, local academic lead in Shanghai, presented the vulnerability assessment in Shanghai and key findings that have emerged so far. E.g. rapid social and economic transition impact life and vulnerability.

Social factors across the five study cities: For the full results see the Cities Changing Diabetes briefing book. • Financial constraints: Do I have financial ability to take care of my health? • Time constraints: Do I have time for healthy living?

Prof Stephen H. Linder, School of Public Health, University of Texas

Prof. Finn Diderichsen, local academic lead in Copenhagen, presented the social inequalities of diabetes in Copenhagen as well as insights into vulnerability. E.g. social and health issues are interlinked, and diabetes is not the highest in the hierarchy of everyday issues.

• Resource constraints: Do I have the resources I need? • Geographical constraints: Do I live in an environment that enables healthy living?

Biomedical factors are physical factors that reduce or heighten vulnerability. These are locally shared.

Watch a five minutes interview with David Napier Watch a five minutes interview with Stephen Linder Meet Iztac from Mexico City Meet Michael from Copenhagen Meet Eve from Houston Meet Chaoyang from Shanghai Watch the full session


DR ROMÁN ROSALES AVILÉS

RICHARD FLORIDA

THE BURDEN OF DIABETES – AN URBAN PERSPECTIVE

HEALTH OF OUR GLOBAL CITIES

Dr Román Rosales Avilés, Vice Minister of Health, Government of Mexico City

• Mexico City recognises the remarkable scale of the

challenge for the city with 1 in 3 children being obese and according to OECD the city has the second highest rate (32.4%) of obesity among adults • Mexico City is taking concerted action in a wider

variety of ways • Some of the stand-out examples and approaches

include Program ‘Muévete’ (Move yourself), Menos sal y más salud (Less salt more health) and Early detection clinics in public transportation system • There is more to be done. Joining up the existing good

work in Mexico City, collaborating more widely with people of different expertise, and learning from others around the world is key to making the impact we need to defeat diabetes

Meet Iztac from Mexico City Watch the full session

Richard Florida, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, Global Research Professor at NYU, co-founder and editor-at-large of The Atlantic’s CityLab and Visiting Fellow of the FIUMiami Creative City Initiative. Author of the best-selling The Rise of the Creative Class.

• Cities can be engines of growth and prosperity, but

also places of risk • The way we live in cities – not just what we eat and

how much we exercise – plays a big role in how healthy we are • The prevalence of lifestyle diseases such as type 2

diabetes is rising alarmingly in cities across the world. But the social factors driving this epidemic are complex and need our urgent attention • The Cities Changing Diabetes study shines a spotlight

on the the link between social isolation in cities and vulnerability to poor physical health • Cities can also mobilise necessary resources to mitigate

these risks – urban infrastructures can be harnessed to elevate health and happiness, contributing to cities’ quality of place • Cities need to become more like teaching hospitals

where researchers, policy-makers, urbanists and residents can come together to identify the most effective ways to promote healthier lifestyles • Now is the time to get this right – we are about to

embark on the greatest epoch of city-building that history has ever seen, by the middle of the century 75% of humanity will live in cities


WEIPING WU

BJARNE BRUUN JENSEN

ALAN C. MOSES

MARC VAN AMERINGEN

INTERACTIVE SESSIONS:

DEEP-DIVE AND EXPERT SESSIONS ON THE URBAN FACTORS INFLUENCING DIABETES IN GLOBAL CITIES

Weiping Wu, Professor and Chair, Department of Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy, Tufts University Bjarne Bruun Jensen, Head of Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center Dr Alan C. Moses, Chief Medical Officer, Novo Nordisk Marc Van Ameringen, Executive Director, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition

URBAN PLANNING: Weiping Wu stressed the importance of ‘third spaces’ and pointed out that solutions will often require ‘retrofitting’ – redesigning cities by working with the existing built environment.

COMMUNITIES AND NETWORKS: Bjarne Bruun Jensen introduced the ‘supersetting approach’, where solutions are co-created together with citizens, leveraging social networks. In some instances these networks will need to be built from scratch.

CARE AND TREATMENT: Alan Moses presented the key elements of good case management of diabetes, emphasizing the central role of prevention. Examples from multiple cities highlight the lack of integration between different parts of the system.

HEALTHY LIVING: Marc Van Ameringen described how city environments promote weight gain and suggested how to re-orient the whole food system to produce, store, distribute, and create the demand for nutritious foods in order to take on rising obesity.

See the presentations from the four sessions

PANEL DIALOGUE:

THE COMPLEXITY OF URBAN DIABETES REQUIRES NEW APPROACHEST

Dr Shaukat M. Sadikot, PresidentElect, International Diabetes Federation

• Every 6 seconds a person dies from diabetes – we need

VOXPOP WITH:

to understand why this is • Activity levels of city life go down compared to living

Helle Søholt, CEO, Gehl Architects

life in rural areas in India Richard De Pirro, Director, DGL

• In China we are building cities app. 200 cities with

1 million citizens or more Helle Søholt, CEO, Gehl Architects Ellis Rubinstein, President & CEO, The New York Academy of Sciences Peggy Liu, Chairperson, JUCCCE, China Dima Zayat, Program Manager, ANERA Lebanon

• The growing diabetes burden in China has happened

throughout the last generation with the introduction of western eating habits because people believe it is safer food • If we can teach kids in China about how to eat

healthier and to be food heros we can improve the CO2 emission caused by the food industry and at the same time fostering healthier children • It is so difficult – even in a supportive environment

– to implement urban planning in cities because city municipalities often work in silos and because there is a lack of understanding of what integrated design solutions can do for the future in cities • We should focus more on the life that takes place in

– and between buildings when designing cities • Working across sectors is of great importance to

succeed in creating healthy cities

Peggy Liu, Chairperson, JUCCCE, China (1) Peggy Liu, Chairperson, JUCCCE, China (2) Dr Shaukat M. Sadikot, President-Elect, IDF Richard De Pirro, Director, DGL Dima Zayat, Program Manager, ANERA Lebanon SEE LEADING LIGHTS’ PERSPECTIVES ON ‘URBANISATION AND HEALTH’: Helle Søholt, CEO, Gehl Architects Peggy Liu, Chairperson, JUCCCE, China Dima Zayat, program manager, ANERA Lebanon Watch the full session


DR EDUARDO JARAMILLO NAVARRETE

NINNA THOMSEN

ZHANG FUXIA

PROF JOHN NOLAN

THE LEADERSHIP WE NEED TO DEFEAT URBAN DIABETES Ninna Thomsen, Mayor of Health and Care, Copenhagen Dr Eduardo Jaramillo Navarrete, Health Promotion Director General, Ministry of Health, Federal Government, Mexico Zhang Fuxia, Deputy Director General, Tianjin Health and Family Planning Commission Prof Weiping Jia, Director, Shanghai Institute of Diabetes Prof John Nolan, CEO, Steno Diabetes Center Lars Rebien Sørensen, President & CEO, Novo Nordisk

• Leadership is important at all levels to create change • Often we tend to think that an issue like diabetes is

a problem of the health ministries which limits us to turning to medical institutions to solve problems • There have been many diabetes conferences but this is

the first time that we get the chance to talk to mayors, city planners and others that are normally not in the diabetes community. That is true leadership • The conversations we have had today has really helped

highlight that even as business people we can benefit from these discussions and we can define our role in how we contribute (better) to the local communities • Ultimately, we are talking about an existential problem

MARK WATTS

FROM LEADERSHIP TO ACTION VOXPOP WITH: Ninna Thomsen, Mayor of Health and Care, Copenhagen (1) Ninna Thomsen, Mayor of Health and Care, Copenhagen (2)

Mark Watts, Executive Director, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

• Two urgent challenges in the 21st century are the

global diabetes epidemic and climate change • C40 represents 10 years of mayors working together

to tackle climate change • 30% of C40’s climate action is delivered through

knowledge sharing • Climate change and health issues share some of the

Prof John Nolan, CEO, Steno Diabetes Center (1) Prof John Nolan, CEO, Steno Diabetes Center (2)

and that no one can do alone

same root causes • There is strong motivation for change: sprawling,

motorised, disconnected cities deliver worse health outcomes • Strong health co-benefits from climate action

and vice-versa Watch the full session

Watch a three minutes interview with Mark Watts Watch the full session


JAKOB RIIS

DR FAITH FOREMAN

THE VISION FOR CITIES CHANGING DIABETES

SOLUTIONS IN CITIES

Jakob Riis, Executive Vice President, Novo Nordisk

• The research done in the Cities Changing Diabetes

programme takes us to a new level in terms of looking at the diabetes epidemic problem in a new way • Instead of looking at addressing the unmet need of

those who already have diabetes, we are now looking at the much greater proportion of people who are at risk of developing the disease 733 million have high blood glucose levels (sometimes referred to as prediabetes) while 1.9 billion are overweight or obese (with a BMI over 25 or over) which means that they are at risk of getting diabetes • To make a practical difference we need to find new

ways of working beyond the existing system, through collaborative action focused on vulnerability • To date, the vast majority of diabetes research has

focused on biomedical factors • What is really new with this research is that we have

looked the other way up at the problem – at the cultural factors that are putting people at risk in the first place, and standing in the way of people getting diagnosed and achieving treatment outcomes

Cities Changing Diabetes summit recap film

Dr Faith Foreman, Assistant Director, Houston Health Department

Watch the full session

• For Houston to achieve health equity, we must create

opportunities for health and work to eliminate the gaps in health outcomes between different social groups • We need to act at the grass roots – people in the

Yu Ruijun, Deputy Director General, Tianjin Municipal Bureau of Human Resource and Social Security Cai Chun, Deputy Division Chief, Disease Prevention and Control, Shanghai Health and Family Planning Commission

community and at the grass tops – the leaders who represent the grass roots • Example of Houston’s multi-sector response to the diabetes

Meet Eve from Houston Meet Chaoyang from Shanghai

epidemic: • Over 125 grasstops leaders engaged through 11

Roundtable Conversations • Over 100 ideas from diabetes patients and caregivers

participating in American Diabetes Association Expo • Over 125 participants at the One-Year Anniversary Event • 5 Action Work Groups to begin meeting monthly

towards a portfolio of feasible and fundable projects • The model of medical insurance for diabetes management is

very comprehensive and patient-centered • Community-based Diabetics Management in Shanghai is

covered in all communities across Shanghai, 630,000 people with diabetes in management system

• Actions and new announcements: The 5 original study

cities will work collaboratively towards action. 2 new cities – Vancouver and Johannesburg – will join the network. Novo Nordisk has committed 20 Million Dollars leading up to 2020 to fund further research. Finally, we have forged a strategic alliance with the C40 to put urban diabetes on the agendas of cities around the world

Watch a five minutes interview with Faith Foreman

• Providing prevention and control services from • Monitoring of Blood glucose, blood pressure and

complications • Risk factors surveillance • Lifestyle intervention • Health education • Diagnostic test for IGR patients every year

Watch the full session


GABRIEL GILLAUME

JEAN-MICHEL BORYS

JAKE SEGAL

WILLIAM LAU

INTERACTIVE SESSIONS:

Jean-Michel Borys, General Secretary, EPODE International Network

MOBILISING COMMUNITIES: Gabriel Guillaume demonstrated what a coordinated, cross-sector ‘collective impact’ model can achieve in terms of public policy, environmental changes, community investments and behaviour change.

SCALING GOOD SOLUTIONS: Jean-Michel Borys showed a model for replicating successful community childhood obesity interventions across geographies and stressed the need for identifying one or more individuals with catalytic and coordinating skills.

Jake Segal, Associate Director, Social Finance

INNOVATIVE FUNDING:

William Lau, A.Alliance Design International, Singapore

URBAN PLANNING AND POLICIES:

Jake Segal described the rapid growth of pay-for-success models to address social challenges, often as a three-way performance contract between private funders / impact investors, non-profit intervention providers, and payers (often governments). Pay-for-success is one way of driving government resources toward more effective programs that could be used to fund diabetes prevention at scale.

William Lau explained how, in Singapore, an influential government has been able to foster integrated planning to promote healthy living top-down. Yet in many cities, integrated planning is held back by silos within the planning system, a lack of political commitment, and a bias among urban planners to focus on ‘buildings’.

JOHN KANIA

EDWIN B. FISHER

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORING AND DEVELOPING SOLUTIONS TO DIABETES IN GLOBAL CITIES

Gabriel Gillaume, Executive Vice President, LiveWell Colorado

HELLE SØHOLT

See the presentations from the four sessions

Helle Søholt, Founding Partner & CEO, Gehl Architects

• People-centric design of public spaces can improve

citizens’ health

Watch a five minutes interview with John Kania

• Health and wellbeing should be included in urban

John Kania, Managing Director and Board Member, FSG

planning and progress measured • Cities Changing Diabetes holds the potential to

VOXPOP WITH: Helle Søholt

mobilise large scale change to tackle urban diabetes Edwin B. Fisher (1)

Edwin B. Fisher, Global Director, Peers for Progress

• Core to success is working together across sectors and

forging partnerships that don’t exist today • It is essential to mobilise resources outside the health

system – people who care about other people

Edwin B. Fisher (2) Meet Michael from Copenhagen Watch the full session


CHARLOTTE ERSBØLL

LARS REBIEN SØRENSEN

SUMMARISING WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED

CLOSING SESSION

Charlotte Ersbøll, Corporate Vice President, Novo Nordisk

• We keep talking about the problem and looking at the

statistics. Somehow whatever we are doing in each of our expertise areas does not change the rising numbers we see for example published by IDF each year • If we can take the blueprint of how C40 has worked

with climate in cities and apply it to diabetes then I think we are off to a good start to find real solutions • One thing stands out: We talk about putting the

persons in the centre. But somehow we are really missing that voice in this meeting. We should bring the people we are talking about in the room as well

Watch the full session

PROF JOHN NOLAN

PROF DAVID NAPIER

Prof David Napier, University College London

• This has been a diabetes meeting unlike any before

Lars Rebien Sørensen, President & CEO, Novo Nordisk

• If we do it right people can live healthily with diabetes

Prof John Nolan, CEO, Steno Diabetes Center

Voxpop with Lars Rebien Sørensen

• We are today building a new diabetes community.

Cities Changing Diabetes summit recap film

• It is encouraging to see the engagement from each

of the five cities and the hard work they have put into developing this new knowledge about diabetes in their cities. • See you at the next Cities Changing Diabetes summit

in 2017

Watch the full session


JOIN THE GLOBAL FIGHT AGAINST URBAN DIABETES CitiesChangingDiabetes.com #UrbanDiabetes @CitiesDiabetes

December 2015

Profile for Novo Nordisk A/S

Cities Changing Diabetes Summit 2015 Outcomes  

Cities Changing Diabetes Summit 2015 Outcomes  

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