Issuu on Google+

nt e d u h t g s u g ro n i h c t n t a n h e n m e e g e f a i g l t en n e d u t s


student life: more than fun and games.

NOVA Student Life is building a community of learners and inspiring the growth of the whole student. We facilitate extracurricular and co-curricular programs that support the following big ideas: INNOVATION: Creatively utilizing current resources to develop programs and resources to student needs DIVERSITY: Foster the learning and development of students with unique backgrounds, talents, knowledge, skills, and interests EXCELLENCE: Recognition for high achieving students through campus and college events including NOVA SEAL Awards, Who’s Who distinction, Academic and Athletic awards ACCESS: Opportunity for participation in high quality programs and events while enjoying NOVA’s affordable tuition and fees SUCCESS: Development of lifelong learning, educational opportunities and leadership tools through co-curricular programming leading to increased likeliness of academic and professional success

contact us! Brian Anweiler

College-Wide Student Activities Coordinator Alexandria Campus, AE 214 Phone: 703.845.6206 Email: banweiler@nvcc.edu

Alexandria

Bisdorf Building, Room AA 134 Phone: 703.845.6218 Email: vacosta@nvcc.edu

Manassas

Howsmon Hall Room 108A Phone: 703.257.6665 Email: mschreibman@nvcc.edu

Annandale

Food Services Building, Room CF 232 Phone: 703.323.3147 Email: tdicato@nvcc.edu Email: jggardner@nvcc.edu

2

contents success stories....4 innovation.........5 excellence.........6 access..................7 diversity............8

Medical

Room HE 140 Phone: 703.822.6598 Email: pmartinmattocks@nvcc. edu

Loudoun

Room LR 142 Phone: 703.450.2616 Email: tlaing@nvcc.edu

Woodbridge

Room 158 Phone: 703.878.5729 Email: MMcCarl@nvcc.edu

Extended Learning Institute Phone: 703.425.5489 Email: amorley@nvcc.edu


What is that You are sitting at your desk when suddenly the sound of music, laughing and loud voices disrupts your concentration. It sounds like chaos, students slacking off, but what is it really?

Engagement. This is not the quiet rustling sound of students rushing to the bus as soon as class is over. Their head down while texting on their phone. Not the clicking and pinging sounds of a student who is chatting with their friends at Mason on-line. These students are present, in the moment, and activity engaging in our community. What is the benefit of the noise? It indicates energy and enthusiasm that can potentially be harnessed with programming and staff support. It means that students are networking with their peers and developing relationships that will make them feel as though they are part of our community. The bottom line: Students who are engaged stay on campus. Habley and McClannan’s study What works in Student Retention? Two-year Public Colleges cites “Student Involvement in Campus Life” as one of the top six institutional factors that affect attrition (Habley and McClannan 10). So what is the noise? A priceless opportunity. What can you do about the noise? Go see what’s happening. Ask students what they are working on or what is so exciting. Encourage them to start a club or a program that recruits others to participate in their passion. Your suggestion that they channel their enthusiasm, contact Student Life for support and become a student leader will not only benefit our community and retention rates, but will make a lasting impression on that student’s life.

Habley, Wesley and Randy McClananah. “What works in Student Retention? Two-year Public Colleges”. ACT, Inc 2004.

3


Success stories

NOVA Forensics Team Adopts Legacy of Success!

F

rom the sharp-minded debater to the talented performer who brings literature to life to the polished public speaker looking to make an impact, the students on the NOVA Forensics team are taking great strides to become one of the top speech and debate programs in the nation! The term forensics denotes intercollegiate competition in a variety of public speaking, debate, and literature performance events. Our team is composed of hard-working NOVA students willing to practice regularly and maintain academic requirements so they can represent NOVA at local and national forensics tournaments!

In just our second year of competition, the NOVA Forensics Team has traveled to over fifteen tournaments.

Our students have accrued top awards in events such as Parliamentary debate, dramatic interpretation, informative speaking and poetry interpretation. NOVA also hosts its own college forensics tournament in January that is recognized as one of the best tournaments in the region!

T

he team works under the watchful eyes of Dr. Nathan Carter, who has over ten years of experience coaching nationally competitive forensics teams. “This is a great opportunity,”

NOVA Athletics celebrating success! NOVA Women’s Volleyball accepting the NJCAA Region 20 D-II Runners-up Trophy in 2013

stated team member Samuel Guyidde-Biasse. “Not only do we travel to other tournaments across the country and compete, but we also gain an incredible amount of confidence and appreciation for the power of the spoken word. I love working with the NOVA Forensics Team!”

E

ach competitor on the team selects at least three events to prepare for competition. From informative speeches to intellectually-charged debates to literature readings, participants on the team constantly seek to share valuable messages with all who view their polished performances. “This activity represents the best in all of us,” stated Dr. Nathan Carter. “Forensics is about showing your passion for a topic and really impacting an audience. The students on the NOVA Forensics Team really care about the work they are doing. I could not be more happy with their accomplishments and the honor they bring to our college!”

NOVA may feature one of the nation’s newest athletic programs, but that doesn’t mean NOVA student-athletes aren’t already making an immediate impact within the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). In 2012, the NOVA Volleyball team garnered national attention by earning a top-20 national ranking. The team then raced off to a 10-1 record. In November 2013, NOVA reached the NJCAA Region 20 Division II Championship Game. Unfortunately, the tournament host and reigning regional champions Hagerstown (MD) Community College ended NOVA’s magical run at the championship game. “We have much to be proud of,” said NOVA head coach Marcus Robinson. “In only our second season, advancing to the championship is quite an achievement.” The volleyball team was the first NOVA team to reach a regional championship and return to campus with an NJCAA trophy. NOVA wrapped-up its 2013 campaign with a program best 30-10 record.

4


a v t o i on n n i goi

n

w i t h r e c y c l e d a rt a n n e e r dn gg

o im

pa c t m a n

D

uring the fall semester, The Extended Learning Institute (ELI), Annandale Student Life, NOVA Green Club and the NOVA Sustainability Office were excited to collaborate on an educational event that focused on environmental impact and sustainability. ELI hosted a Common Reader program surrounding the book “No Impact Man” by well-known green activist Colin Beavan. Students were encouraged to connect through an online blog discussion about the book’s themes of creating environmental change. Colin Beavan was then invited to speak at NOVA’s Annandale campus. Beavan’s lecture highlighted the inspiration for his no impact movement and how each individual can support a sustainable way of life. After his talk, Beavan attended a reception where NOVA students and staff mingled with the author and asked more specific questions about his eco quest.

I Colin Beaven

n addition to Mr. Beaven’s speaking event, NOVA Annandale’s Green Club in conjunction with Student Life coordinated and hosted NOVAs 1st Recycled Art Exhibition. This exhibition gave Green Club members the opportunity to learn about developing a professional “Call for Entries” and exhibition Prospectus, as well as proper art handling and exhibition installation techniques. Artists from Virginia, Maryland and the DC area were invited to apply and the resulting exhibition was a wonderful blend of student and professional work that increased awareness about sustainability and environmentally friendly art.

“Welcome to the House of Fun,” by Tamara Embrey

“Concentric Circles on Deep Teal,” by Sarah E. Dale

5


Excellence 20 NOVA studentathletes awarded Dean’s or President’s List designation

T

wenty Northern Virginia Community College student-athletes were recognized as Dean’s List or Presidential Scholar recipients during the Spring 2013 semester.

NOVA Women’s Basketball in action against Prince George’s Community College

At NOVA, Dean’s List students are recognized for earning a GPA of 3.5 or higher while Presidential Scholar students have a 3.75 GPA or higher and have earned more than 20 credit hours at NOVA. The NOVA men’s lacrosse team led the way academically with 10 of 20 students earning a 3.0 GPA or higher. Women’s volleyball and men’s soccer each had six students with 3.0 GPAs and men’s basketball added four. Ice Hockey, a member of the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA), had seven students with 3.0 or higher. “Our student-athletes had a great year academically,” said NOVA College-wide Student Life Coordinator Brian Anweiler. “We know there is room for improvement, but it is always a great honor to recognize the academic achievements of our student-athletes.”

Women’s Cross Country is NOVA newest intercollegiate sport

2013 marks the first year NOVA student-athletes are eligible for National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) academic and athletic honors.

NOVA Men’s Soccer in action against Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville

3 student-athletes recognized nationally for academic achievement

T

he National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) has recognized three NOVA student–athletes for their outstanding scholastic achievements. Anuar Khvan-Beiseuov, a sophomore, achieved the NJCAA’s highest academic honor earning the Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a perfect 4.0 grade point average (GPA). He was a two-year member of NOVA’s men’s basketball team, and will be attending Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. Sophomore Anita Rios earned the Exemplary Achievement Award for having a cumulative GPA of over 3.7. Rios was a two-year member of NOVA’s women’s volleyball team, and will be attending George Mason University and majoring in biology. Robert Holdren, a NOVA sophomore, also earned the Exemplary Achievement Award. He was a member of NOVA’s men’s soccer team. Holdren is transferring to the University of Virginia and majoring in aerospace engineering.

6


Access noor naveed, annandale alum N

oor Naveed was a student at NOVA for five semesters and graduated in Dec. 2013. She is now a student at George Mason University, but her connection to NOVA is far from over. Noor spent her first semester at NOVA going to class and going home, but she remembers the day that changed. “It was in my 2nd semester, a Student Ambassador told me about all the stuff that happens on campus. It’s not like you just have to go home!” After that conversation Noor became the epitome of an engaged student, joining several student organizations and taking on leadership roles. Noor served as Phi Theta Kappa Public Relations Chair and Black Student Association’s Chief Director. Her experience with BSA left her with fun memories as well as teaching her successful events don’t just happen. “I learned that you can’t do it all alone. You need to find your core people to run the show.”

A NOVA alum and a NOVA student on how Student Life gave them access to a richer college experience

Noor also used her club knowledge to pursue professional goals. She applied and became a Student Ambassador, later being promoted to Senior Student Ambassador. She now continues to work at NOVA Annandale as Student Life’s Office Manager.

“Working in Student Life has taught me patience, professionalism and how to work with difficult customers. You have to learn to work with everyone and now I know how it’s done.” Noor is especially proud of her involvement with the planning and implementation of Welcome Week 2013. “These events give students the chance to understand Community College isn’t just go to class/ go home. There’s a lot for them to do here!”

Diego Aliaga, Manassas student My experience as a Student Ambassador has been truly remarkable. When I first began working as an Ambassador I was very shy and reserved and kept to myself, but the job really helped me spread my wings, become more outgoing, and step out of my comfort zone. Before being an Ambassador I would go to class and straight home, never staying after class or engaging in any activities. When I decided to embark into this amazing experience, I began to engage in a variety of clubs and organizations. As a result of this, now I am an active participant in different organizations on campus. Another aspect of the job many people don’t take into consideration is the amount of networking opportunities that arise from being a student Ambassador. I have given tours to many highly regarded people within our community. This job has been truly a blessing and has really helped me grow personally and professionally. I have learned many new skills that I will be able to carry on to my future endeavors in life. This job has opened so many doors for me, and has also helped me strive to broaden my horizons and be more involved academically and socially.

7


diversity D

ia de los Muertos, also known in English as Day of the Dead, is a traditional holiday when family and friends gather to welcome and remember loved ones that have parted. Families build altars to the dead and honor them with food, drink, flowers, candles, personal mementos and other offerings as a celebration of life and death. Pictured is an entry in the 1st annual Día de los Muertos Altar Competition at Annandale, 2013

NOVA Serves...MLK Day of Service

F

or five years, Northern Virginia Community College has hosted “NOVA Serves” as part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day National Day of Service. NOVA has also partnered with Stop Hunger Now for the past three years, a nonprofit organization focused on providing food and life-saving aid to the world’s most vulnerable populations.

E

ach year, more than 250 students, faculty and staff volunteered to assemble over 21,000 food kits in an effort to end hunger in our lifetime. Each meal kit contains six servings, which means NOVA made a difference by providing 128,304 meals to children and families around the world this year.

Canned goods were also collected during the event to help families in the local community. In past years NOVA Serves has gone into the community and worked with several non-profit organizations in the service district including Habitat for Humanity, Loudoun Animal Shelter, Drive to Employment, and hosted a school supply drive. Taking place each year on the third Monday in January, the MLK Day of Service is the only federal holiday observed as a national day of service – a “day on, not a day off.” The MLK Day of Service is a part of United We Serve, the President’s national call to service initiative. It calls for Americans from all walks of life to work together to provide solutions to our most pressing national problems.

8


NOVA Student Life Big Ideas