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Issue no. 27 Autumn 2017

AMAZING

Aquafaba truffle THE

TEMPTATION

WAIKATO’S WEST COAST

WWW.NOURISHMAGAZINE.CO.NZ

FRESH LOCAL FLAVOUR

WAIKATO, NZ


NOURISH | issue 27

Welcome to Nourish Magazine This year is shaping up to be a big year at Nourish. The magazine and team continue to grow! As I write this we are searching for a dynamic sales manager to help us continue to grow and continue to uncover more great fresh local flavour. We have also branched out this year, offering local businesses delicious design, mouth-watering photography and marketing advice with bite. We look forward to sharing some of these exciting projects with you. People often ask me how I balance it all, so to illustrate it is not all work we are off to Fiji in June on our inaugural Nourish Foodies tour. Get in quick and you can join us. (www.nourishmagazine. co.nz/fiji)

regular the intoxicating world of local truffles. There is plenty to inspire you in the kitchen too with my mushroom recipes on page 39 and delectable tarts by Megan from Red Kitchen on page 67. Enjoy the last days of sunshine and the abundance of produce autumn offers because before you know it, it will be winter!

Vicki Ravlich-Horan Editor

Closer to home on page 34 we discover even more great foodie events in and around the region. We also have lots of fun putting Nourish together each season, and in this issue you can see us having a ball planning some unique Mother’s Day celebrations with help from Tina at The Birdcage, Sweet Pea Parties and Royal Laboratorie. On page 42 Kate Underwood delves a little deeper into the murky world of food additives, and on page 40 Paloma Ayleon discovers

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features

nourishmagazine

Hi, I’m Angela Finnigan from Tamahere. My focus is marketing and selling residential and lifestyle properties in the Waikato region specialising in Tamahere, Matangi and Cambridge areas. I have been one of Bayleys’ top selling lifestyle and residential agent for the past nine years. My venture into real estate stems from a love of architecture along with a passion for interior design. Bayleys provides me with the support I require to make the marketing and selling of a home as professional and stress free as possible. My approach is honest and enthusiastic and I enjoy taking care of people and the homes they value. If you are thinking of making a move, give me a call to discuss my unique approach to marketing and selling premium property.

M 021 623 550 B 07 834 3821 angela.finnigan@bayleys.co.nz

SUCCESS REALTY LTD, BAYLEYS, LICENSED UNDER THE REA ACT 2008 A MEMBER OF BAYLEYS REALTY GROUP

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04 Vic’s Picks 06 News 16 Beauty & Fashion 13 Wine Column 17 Inspiration 19 Herbs 20 Gardening 50 Mrs Goodness 51 Enviro 59 Local Art Scene 69 Event 70 Directory 08 14 18 34 40 42 44 52 54 57 60 63 64

Amazing Aquafaba Feisty Needle Edible Flowers Foodies Day Out The Truffle Temptation What’s Lurking in Your Food? Waikato’s West Coast Garden to Plate Plating it Up

recipes 10

Fluffy Chocolate Mousse Vegan Meringue

12 23

Spicy Baked Chickpeas

24

Omelette Rolls with Pulled Pork Caramelised Onion & Beef

26 29

Pumpkin Cupcakes

30 33

Chocolate Waffles with Poached Pears

39

Wild Stuffed Mushrooms Garlic Mushroom Pizza

53 58 67 68

Cucumber & Carrot Kimchi

Alpha Street Designing a Dream Home Selling the Dream Soft Brew - Excelso

EDITOR Vicki Ravlich-Horan CREATIVE DIRECTOR Bron Alexander CLIENT MANAGER Paula Baxter PROOF READER Nikki Crutchley from Crucial Corrections CONTRIBUTORS Bronwyn Lowe, Henry Jacobs, Megan Coupland, Denise Irvine, Kate Underwood , Liz French, Jim Bartee, Paloma Aeylon COVER IMAGE Brydie Thompson STYLING Vicki Ravlich-Horan & Bron Alexander MODELS Katherine Caddy & Vonita White PHOTOGRAPHERS Vicki Ravlich-Horan, Brydie Thompson, Leah Hoskins, Ashlee DeCaires THANKS TO Laminex NZ, Sweet Pea Parties, Royal Laboratorie, Southern Hospitality, The Birdcage ISSN 2324-4356 (Print) | ISSN 2324-4364 (Online) ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES Vicki Ravlich-Horan | vicki@nourishmagazine.co.nz 07 847 5321 or 021 065 1537 Feedback info@nourishmagazine.co.nz SUBSCRIPTIONS www.nourishmagazine.co.nz/subscribe– $30 for a year (4 issues)

Lamb Taquitos Bean & Corn Salsa

Chocolate Salami Salted Caramel Meringues Eggs in Tomato and Chorizo Stew Banana, Maple and Walnut Baked Oatmeal

Vanilla Bean & Honey Panna Cotta Caramelised Onion & Feta Tart Three Cheese Tart


NOURISH | spotlight

Vic’s Picks

BE IN

TO

With Mother’s Day upon us it’s time to think how we can show the special woman or women in our lives how much they mean to us. How best to do this? Flowers? Chocolate? Why not both with a bouquet from Edible Blooms? These fabulous edible bouquets make a great gift for any occasion, from Mother’s Day to a good old fashioned thank you, baby shower or Easter surprise.

BARKERS DULCE DE LECHE When a jar of this gorgeous dulce de leche (fancy caramel) landed on my desk I couldn’t wait to get into the kitchen and have a play! Make sure you head to our website and sign up to our Free Friday recipes so you don’t miss getting recipes like my Chocolate and Caramel Twists.

www.edibleblooms.co.nz WE HAVE A GORGEOUS BRIGHT DELIGHT BOUQUET TO GIVE AWAY! To go into the draw to win, email info@nourishmagazine.co.nz before 21 April with the best advice your mum ever gave you.

www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

VOLARE HOT CROSS BUNS

SUNDAY JAZZ SESSIONS

It’s finally that time of year again! Forget chocolate, Easter for me is all about hot cross buns, and they don’t come much better than the award-winning buns from Volare. Be quick though, they sell out fast!

Looking for the perfect way to while away your Sunday evening? What better way than with a group of friends, some delicious food and some soulful sounds? Dough Bros have you sorted then with their jazz evenings on the first Sunday of every month, from 6.30 pm to 8.30 pm.

Dough Bros 250 Victoria Street, Hamilton doughbros.co.nz

Pick some up from Volare Kahikatea Drive, Garden Place, Empire Street Cambridge and the Farmers’ Market

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NOURISH | news

Waikato News OPENINGS

JOIN US IN FIJI! This winter we are off to Fiji and we would love you to join us! Don’t miss the chance to be part of the inaugural Nourish Foodies Fiji Tour. Join the Nourish team for this exclusive holiday staying at Sofitel’s adult-only resort, the luxurious Waitui Club in Denarau. There is no other Fiji tour like this! We will be uncovering the true flavour of Fiji with some money can’t buy you experiences:

We have seen a flurry of exciting new places open over the last few months, including Winner Winner on Grey Street in Hamilton East making fabulous fried chicken and more; and Good Union in Cambridge which is a collaboration between Adrian and Suzanna Hodgson (ex District and Suburbia) and Good George.

+ See (and smell) fields of basil destined for New Zealand pesto growing under the Fijian sun.

In Frankton Gather Foodhouse are doing great things. Open Monday to Friday their delectable treats and fresh salads are all very tempting, making them worth a visit.

+ We’ll travel to the food bowl of Fiji, visiting coconut plantations, ginger farms and more.

CRUDO

+ Hear the bean to bar story and taste the results at Adi Chocolate Factory. + Learn the story behind Fiji’s only pasta factory. + Get hands-on with a Fijian cooking class. + Hone your best Tom Cruise with a Fijian Rum cocktail making session. + Enjoy a sunset dinner on the beach. + Plus enjoy plenty of time relaxing poolside. This fantastic holiday includes flights, transfers, luxury accommodation, daily buffet breakfasts, lunch each day, two great dinners, cocktails, excursions, jet boat ride and more. COST $3450pp (twin share) DATES 21 - 25 JUNE Spaces strictly limited so BOOK NOW! www.nourishmagazine.co.nz/fiji

In St Andrews, a Hamilton suburb already spoilt for choice when it comes to great places to eat, Crudo opened in the Braid Road shops. What was once Grace Café has been transformed into a clean and modern eatery. Open Wednesday to Sunday for lunch and dinner, don’t expect a cabinet filled with paninis, salads or even the latest raw slice, Crudo offers you the chance to be spoilt in the burbs, and on a regular basis. With only 25 seats, it is an intimate affair with attentive service, so it pays to book. The delicious dishes range in price from $19 to $30 and are all a work of art (see page 54) and a treat for the taste buds.

THE KIRK CAFE Kirk, the Scottish word for church, is an apt name for Hamilton’s newest cafe! Just off River Road on Te Aroha Street, The Kirk opened in January in what was a meeting room in the Link Centre beside St Andrews Church. Owner Kersti Mead will be a familiar face to many. A passionate foodie, Kersti has a long history in the local hospitality scene which began in the early days of Iguana. Many of the lessons Kersti learnt from this time has kept her in good stead and are still, she says, as important today. More recently, Kersti has been freelancing, helping others achieve their dream of owning a cafe or restaurant, that is until early this year with the opening of The Kirk Cafe. In the kitchen is partner and passionate chef Ben Teyssier producing fresh vibrant fusion food with a twist. The menu offers lots of vegan, dairy and gluten free options to cater for everyone. Kersti and Ben believe a menu is simply a list of ingredients and you can create anything from this list. And this attitude exemplifies perfectly what Kersti has spent a lifetime living and teaching, and that’s the art of hospitality: the value of a smile and a helpful attitude.

rouge food • espresso • wine

Come and enjoy a glass of wine in our sunny courtyard... Open 7.30am - 4pm, 7 days Closed public holidays Empire St, Cambridge RougeCambridge www.roug eempire.co.nz page 6 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

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NOURISH | feature

AMAZING

F A A U B Q A A JUST THE VEGAN-ING

Innovation in food often comes in one of two forms. The first, most beloved to foodies, is the re-imaging of old ingredients such as ancient grains—think quinoa. The second, more appealing to corporations and molecular gastronomists, is the development of new compositions and techniques—often patented. As a foodie, scientist and patent attorney, I appreciate both forms. Therefore, imagine my delight when a new ingredient turns up which defies the norm and has amazing qualities, that uses waste by-products and has little history plus inexplicable science behind those qualities. Something truly out of the box. Welcome to aquafaba! Aquafaba is an egg substitute, the new darling of vegans and those who have to be egg free. The Italian derived name (only coined in 2015) is reflective of its origin—water bean. Yes, this is the slightly slimy liquid we normally drain and discard from our canned chickpeas (preferably), beans, tofu and other legumes.

This is enhanced by adding acid (e.g. vinegar, cream of tartar, lemon juice) which slows clumping (coagulation) of the protein strands allowing more air to be introduced along with less drying to give greater strength. Voila! The perfect pav! Aquafaba meringues (see recipe on page 10) are made in a similar fashion to pavlovas as above; therefore protein is the likely culprit. Na-uh! Surprisingly, the protein content of the juice is only 1% compared with the 10% of egg white. Protein on its own cannot solely contribute to the end structure.

Miraculously, it can be used instead of eggs (and sometimes cream) to produce credible meringues, pavlova, macaroons, mousse, mayonnaise, brownies, ice cream and the list goes on …

The next suspect is saponins, a class of compounds that are soapy and have foaming qualities; therefore possibly part of aquafaba, particularly having regard to its sliminess.

I was first introduced to this product via my newly vegan daughter. Despite knowing her to be a gifted foodie and scientifically thorough, I was still sceptical as to the outcome of whipping chick pea juice to make meringues. To my surprise the meringues, accompanied by coconut yoghurt and blueberries, were delicious!

Na-uh!

The meringue structure was indistinguishable from classic meringues—crisp, light and with height. The taste, on its own while pleasant, had some mildly sour overtones. These were countered by the coconut yoghurt (non-dairy, fermented coconut cream) that, along with the blueberries, provided creaminess and sharpness. A berry compote with some sugar would have been even more complementary. Curious as to how something that is so different to egg (at least on the surface) could mimic its properties, I investigated (via my friend Madame Google) what the magic juice contained. I expected a significant amount of protein. Egg white has 10% protein and chick peas themselves 29%. It is the protein in egg whites that contributes largely to the structure of meringues and the like as follows. Protein molecules are in the form of multiple long strands, like wool. When beaten, some of the strands are broken, enabling the protein to form longer skinnier but weaker lengths (think of unravelled wool). Beating also incorporates air into the mix, trapping the air as bubbles between the weakened protein strands and forms a foam. VEGAN MERINGUES find the recipe on page 10

Adding sugar after the foam has formed causes the sugar to bond with the proteins, adding strength (plus some water) and eventually a meringue structure emerges that is around eight times the volume of unbeaten egg whites.

Saponins only contribute a small percentage to the composition— around 0.003%—not enough. Regrettably, aquafaba is so new that the science behind it cannot be fully explained at the time of writing this article; however, we do know the following: + Chickpea water is best, followed by white beans, red beans and tofu + Leftover canned juice works well, but you can boil your own legumes and use that water + One tablespoon of aquafaba equals one egg yolk + Two tablespoons of aquafaba equals one egg white + Three tablespoons of aquafaba equals one egg I encourage you to have fun by trying this crazy new ingredient. As it’s so new and we are still exploring its possibilities, keep researching new recipes and see how far you can go. Enjoy! Kate Wilson | Prof’s @ Woodlands www.profs.co.nz

Kate Wilson Kate Wilson is the ultimate foodie from all angles. Originally her physics and chemistry degrees led her to horticultural research, then to a career as an internationally recognised intellectual property (IP) strategist, patent attorney and managing partner of James & Wells where she advised the food industry on numerous IP issues—plus wrote and presented extensively.

words & recipes KATE WILSON | photography BRYDIE THOMPSON

During that time she remained a keen gardener, appeared on MasterChef and published her cookbook Platter Chatter. Now she is immersed in cafe culture as proprietor of Prof’s@ Woodlands where she is working on creating the ultimate blend of great food, service and atmosphere.


NOURISH | recipes

VEGAN MERINGUE SERVES 8 Surprisingly, a near perfect substitution for egg whites, this recipe uses aquafaba, which is the leftover water from canned beans. Preferably use chickpea water, which is spring-water, rather than the brine. The resultant mix can be used for meringue kisses, nests and even a pavlova—dependent upon how you want to pipe it. Balsamic vinegar gives added warmth over the traditional use of cream of tartar. The meringues can be kept in an airtight container for a couple of weeks or can be frozen.

Drained water from 400g can of chickpeas (approx 160 ml) ½ tsp balsamic vinegar

FLUFFY CHOCOLATE MOUSSE SERVES 8 The following recipe creates a light, fluffy chocolate mousse which is also egg free, gluten free and can be vegan friendly if you take care with choosing milk solid free chocolate. It uses aquafaba, which is the leftover water from canned beans. Preferably use chickpea water, which is spring-water, rather than the brine. I recommend that the mousse is set in individual portions such as espresso cups rather than a large bowl. Vanilla essence can be substituted for the liqueur.

160ml aquafaba (2/3 cup) 100g dark chocolate

1 cup caster sugar

2 tsp icing sugar

½ tsp vanilla essence

1 tsp Kahlua or other liqueur

Preheat the oven to 110°C. Spray a baking tray with canola oil, top with baking paper and spray again. Beat the aquafaba until white and foamy (around seven minutes). Beat in the balsamic vinegar (around one minute). Beat in the sugar, adding it gradually until you have gloriously thick and stiff glossy peaks (seriously, it’s amazing how perfect you can get this). Fold in the vanilla essence. Pipe, blob or shape however you want the meringue onto the baking sheet (remember this is all-purpose meringue). Bake for two hours, resisiting the almighty temptation to open the oven. After the two hours, turn off the oven and still resist opening it for an hour. Serve however you like, but if vegan, whipped coconut cream and berries work a treat.

Place the dark chocolate into a bowl over a pot of boiling water to melt. Make sure the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Beat the aquafaba with an electric whisk until meringue-like in texture. Note that it takes longer than egg whites to reach an equivalent state. Beat in the icing sugar. Stir the Kahlua into the melted chocolate. Add around a sixth of the beaten ‘whites’ to the chocolate and incorporate thoroughly. Repeat. Then gently fold the choc/white mix into the rest of the whites taking care not to break up the air pockets. Place into individual serving dishes and refrigerate. Once set (allow two hours) you can top with a dab of beaten coconut cream and chocolate shavings.

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NOURISH | recipes

chick

THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGING

ME OUT

Now we’ve discovered just what can be created from the slimy brine in a tin of chickpeas we won’t be so quick to discard it. In fact you may just be draining a tin of chickpeas for the brine! What then to do with the chickpeas? Make hummus by blending chickpeas with garlic, lemon juice, tahini (if you have it) and a pinch of salt. Drizzle in extra virgin olive oil until smooth.

SPICY BAKED CHICKPEAS 1 tin chickpeas, rinsed and drained 1 tbsp avocado oil ¼ tsp paprika ½ tsp garlic powder* 1 tsp onion salt*

Toss through casseroles and curries.

¼ tsp celery salt*

Make a simple bean salad by tossing with blanched green beans, diced red capsicum, chopped cherry tomatoes and your favourite vinaigrette.

½ tsp dried oregano

Roast baby beets and place on a platter. Add chickpeas, rocket and grilled halloumi or crumbled feta. Finish with some chopped mint, a squeeze of lemon and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

The rinsed chickpeas will have a skin you need to remove. This, while time consuming, is very easy to do. Simply gently squeeze each bean between thumb and index finger and the outer skin will pop off. This is a great job to get the kids to do. Just expect a few to go flying across the room! Once all the chickpeas have been skinned, dry them in a tea towel before laying them on an oven tray. Bake at 180°C for 25 minutes. Toss the chickpeas in a bowl with the remaining ingredients. Spread back on the baking tray and cook for a further 25–30 minutes until golden. Allow to cool completely. * available from Bin Inn Dinsdale

Change is one of life’s certainties. Trends are great indicators of change; in the liquor industry we are seeing things evolve in front of us. In the quality versus quantity department we have seen the craft beer scene explode. They have hit the point where supply far outstrips demand. There are certainly indicators to say that this is what is happening. Too many producers and too small a population have led to a market that is confused and saturated. Emerson's and Panhead with Lion, and Tuatara with DB can look brightly to the future. Good George locally has invested not only in brewing but also in their gastropubs, which of course they supply—a great move. While others have hit the stock market, crowdfunded path: Moa, Garage Project and Parrot Dog, with healthy boosts to their working capital. The unfolding future will be extremely interesting to watch. In wine, a little of the same is happening with Sauvignon Blanc. We make the best examples of it in the world. However, in the pecking order of white grape varieties, it is near the bottom, due to what makes it what it is: a great wine to drink early in its life; best drunk from between 6 to 18 months after harvest. We are witnessing the commoditisation of Sauvignon Blanc. In our marketplace it has become so common, seen so often, that we take it for granted. It has lost a lot of its sparkle and uniqueness; its price is dropping as the supplies burgeon. It is losing the fine wine glow as it becomes more and more commercialised, a victim of its own success. It is very easy to buy a very good Sauvignon Blanc without paying a lot of money. The very best have lost none of their prestige even if the rest are struggling to hold their price point.

will struggle to gain as the craft beer fad is not limited to New Zealand. Our other international star, Pinot Noir, may have price pressures internally from time to time. However, its status as one of the very best red varieties is without question. The best international examples are receiving prices which are amongst the highest for any variety in the world. Our well-priced examples foot it on the world stage both in terms of price and quality. Weather Watching: Have you been watching the weather reports over the last month or so? Hamilton, like some areas, hasn't had the best of summers. Let's hope it has improved when these words go to press. However, the country’s main wine regions have really had great doses of sunshine and heat. Let's hope it continues until harvest in March and April and the rain gods stay away from those parts. If it does this vintage could be another cracker.

However, and it’s a BIG however, the international demand for our Sauvignon Blanc is huge and growing. This puts a much rosier picture on the future of Sauvignon Blanc. There are other markets, something that our craft beer producers

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Henry Jacobs primovino.co.nz


NOURISH | feature

Feisty NEEDLE

Deborah Parker says it should be a pleasure – a joyful thing – to get something new for your wardrobe. But quite often, in her line of work, she sees the opposite. She has women customers who’ve struggled to find what they want; they’ve bought a garment in desperation because it is “sort of okay”, and then they take it into Deborah to get her to alter it, to make it fit properly. Deborah runs Hamilton’s Feisty Needle business which specialises in clothing alterations, tailoring and dressmaking, and she spends a lot of time reshaping clothes, including wedding dresses, for her customers. She’s situated in a blue stucco building on River Road, opposite Fairfield Bridge, and you can’t miss it because there’s always a show-stopping mannequin out front dressed in a bright and bold Feisty Needle creation. Because as well as getting your clothes shortened, mended, relined or totally reinvented, you can buy a meticulously made limited edition dress, blouse or skirt at Feisty Needle. These all channel shapely vintage styles from the 1930s to 1950s, and shopping at Feisty Needle is guaranteed to be a joyful thing. You can buy off the rack, or have something made to order. Deborah and her team (fellow seamstresses Denise Turner, Ruth Fulford and Suraya O’Brien) want women to embrace the changes that happen to their bodies, and to buy clothes that flatter rather than camouflage. Deborah says, “We have women who come in and say, ‘I can’t wear a dress’, and then they’ll put one of ours on and suddenly they’ve got a waist, they’ve got shape, and they look great.” When Deborah bought the long-established River Road business in late 2012 and she rebranded as Feisty Needle, she continued to do a wide range of clothing alterations (“we always love a challenge”) but gradually became aware of the need among her women customers for bespoke dresses that fitted perfectly.

words DENISE IRVINE photography ASHLEE DeCAIRES

250 Victoria Street, Hamilton 07 834 2363 | www.doughbros.co.nz

A CELEBRATION OF LOCAL PRODUCE AND GOOD TIMES

gluten free, dairy free & vegan options available

So she and her staff began making such garments under the Bridget Bonnar label, each one in gorgeous colourful cotton fabrics decorated with flowers, birds and various art deco designs. Bridget Bonnar dresses are styled with elegant sleeves, darts, piping, cunningly placed pockets, maybe a high waist or a dropped waist, and a skirt length that skims neatly over the knees. It’s vintage with a contemporary twist. The label is named in honour of Deborah’s Scottish grandmother, Bridget Bonnar, who lived near Glasgow. Deborah was born in Scotland and Bridget looked after her for the first year of her life. Bridget was a strong woman who knitted, made bread and cared lovingly for her family and friends. Although Deborah immigrated to New Zealand with her parents as a one-year-old, she says Bridget’s influence and spirit has stayed with her always. Deborah comes from a long line of home sewers on both sides of her family, and her mother worked as a machinist. She taught her daughter to sew perfectly, but Deborah was always more interested in poking about in op shops and re-modelling vintage garments than she was making something from scratch. She remembers a black vintage dress she wore for years; it had beautiful fabric and a deep V neckline. “If I ever saw that fabric again I’d make another one.” Deborah was schooled in Hamilton; she has travelled widely, living in Britain and Germany, and at one stage she had a vintage clothing stall at London’s Camden Market when everyone except her was into tartan and punk fashion. She worked as a hairdresser for 25 years, and says she’s always loved helping women to look beautiful. At Feisty Needle, she’s keeping up the good work. Feisty Needle 535 River Road | 021 854 9693 | feistyneedle.co.nz

Fabric | Furniture | Curtains | Bed Linen

41 Market Street, Te Awamutu | 07 871 8890 www.redredred.co.nz

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NOURISH | living

Beauty & Fashion

PRESERVE THE

holiday feeling

YOUR TOP 5 ANTI-AGEING FIGHTERS! Ageing is something we are all afraid of! There are many different ingredients that are said to work wonders, but there are a few key ingredients that stick out above the rest. These top five ingredients (in no particular order) we suggest you look out for when selecting your skincare products. 1. Retinol – Prompts skin cells on the surface to turn over rapidly, letting new skin cells make their way to the surface. Minimises wrinkles and slows down the breakdown of collagen. Strengthens skin’s elasticity and lightens pigmentation caused by sun exposure. 2. Hyaluronic Acid – Naturally found in the body, hyaluronic acid replenishes the skin’s hydration by attracting and holding water. Just one gram of hyaluronic acid can hold six litres of H2O! 3. Rosehip Oil – Is rich in essential fatty acids (EFAs) which help repair and regenerate damaged skin. Rosehip oil also protects skin cells from sun damage. It is also healing and non-comedogenic, which means it’s great to use on scars and acne without causing breakouts. 4. Stem Cells – When used in anti-ageing products they are usually sourced from plants and are used to protect the skin cells from damage and deterioration also to stimulate the skin’s own stem cells to renew. 5. Vitamin C – A powerful antioxidant that helps rejuvenate and repair ageing skin. It also helps fight off free radicals which age the skin and cause pigmentation. You achieve more benefit to the skin by applying topically than what you get by consuming this internally, so it is a great ingredient in skincare.

TAILOR MASQUE A beauty essential made in New Zealand from the team at Tailor Skincare, the mask is made from bentonite clay and nourishing organic kanuka essential oil. It is highly detoxing and amazing for breakout-prone skin and when your skin needs extra love. The pot is ideal to travel with or as a wee gift to a friend. Available exclusively in Hamilton at Two Birds Eatery in the Clyde Street Shopping Centre

Oh, and don’t forget, the sun is our biggest ager! So wear a good quality SPF daily.

The summer holidays have been and gone and we’ve all returned to life’s daily realities. With autumn approaching, now is the time for preserving seasonal fruit and vegetables for the winter. This is a tried and tested way of making the most of seasonal produce and nourishing our families through food. For me, this conjures an image of a woman in the kitchen with pots boiling and jars on the bench, ready to envelop the goodness. However, this also begs the question, how do we need to preserve and nourish ourselves at this time of the year?

To healthy skin.

Sara

What can we do to preserve the remnants of that long distant summer holiday and the associated feel good endorphins? The post-holiday blues are common and can be difficult to deal with, but it is not all bad news. Here are my strategies to preserve those holiday feelings and kick those postholiday blues into touch. Try to figure out what it was about your holiday that made it so good. Maybe you enjoyed making time for that daily morning walk. Maybe it was catching up with friends and socialising, or day trips to different

NUE 19.04 EXCLUSIVELY AT CHIQ BOUTIQUE

Sara from Skin Beauty & Day Spa in Te Awamutu shares some great advice each season to keep your skin beautiful and healthy. skinbeauty.co.nz

Straight from the French catwalk and exclusively available at ChiQ Boutique in Queenwood, the Nue 19.04 range is stunning and oh so feminie! “Everything we strive to be at ChiQ”, says owner Anna Hale, “unique design, clever details, playful and romantic garments using beautiful fabric.” ChiQ Boutique Queenwood Village, Hamilton

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Connect with me: kathie@unlimitedu.co.nz or 027 424 7749 | www.unlimitedu.co.nz

Kathie Hill left her corporate career in the city to develop her personal coaching and human resources businesses and create a nourishing lifestyle for herself in the Coromandel. Through UnlimitedU, Kathie helps people figure out what their most satisfying life might look like and coaches them towards their goals. Kathie enjoys sharing coffee and conversation with lovely friends, barefoot beach walks and witnessing people’s joy when they are empowered to make positive life changes.

visit www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

D UP

WWW.

Try to recreate those moments, experiences and feelings in your everyday life. Get a book, find a sunny possie and put your feet up. Schedule those morning walks. Plan catch ups with good friends. Start planning some mini-breaks or mini-experiences to look forward to. The list is endless as long

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During holidays, we tend to give ourselves permission to do things we enjoy. We are not so caught up in the busyness of life and tend to be more relaxed, happier and more carefree. So why is it that we only think we can do these things on our annual holiday? Surely we shouldn’t just wait for a oncea-year holiday to experience these good feelings. Life is not about having an annual experience, it is for living and experiencing 365 days a year.

as it is your list—things that make you feel relaxed and put you in a good space. This doesn’t have to stop just because summer has. Create plans today!

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places. Perhaps it was something as simple as having the time to read a book from start to finish. Was it reconnecting with family in a relaxed environment? Spend some time reflecting and identifying what you enjoyed and why. The more time you spend digging into these thoughts and feelings, the better you will understand what brings you satisfaction.

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A whole movement of foraging has developed with many resources available to help you get started.

Edible flowers

Foraging is a fun thing to do, and once you start you’ll find yourself looking out the car window in a very different way. Every walk will provide opportunities to collect something; even a trip to the foreshore at the beach is an opportunity to collect dinner ingredients. Before you start though, there are some guidelines on foraging that you should follow. Only collect what you can identify and have a use for. If you are new to foraging, go with someone who is already knowledgeable, or use a trusted resource as a guide. Only forage from land that you have permission to be on. Foraging does not give you permission to raid other people’s gardens and fruit trees. If you think fruit, for example, is going to waste, please ask.

words VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN | photography BRYDIE THOMPSON

You may have noticed flowers appearing on dishes in your local cafe or favourite restaurant lately. Chefs are always looking for ways to add interest to their dishes, and garnish plays an important part in this. Move over micro greens, pretty petals are in. Forget fresh herbs, flourishing flowers are where it’s at. Do a little research and you will discover just how many flowers are edible. No need, though, to dig up your flower bed to get some floral action, as they are growing wild everywhere. I say go wild and pretty up that plate!

Here are some common edible weeds you could find in your back yard

Onion weed Oxalis Nasturtium Dandelion Clover Yarrow Daisy Chickweed Borage Viola

Try not to forage from beside the roadside because of car fumes, or in areas such as public parks/ playgrounds where there has been weedkiller sprays or similar products used.

Foraging

Herbalists have always gathered from the wild and they developed an intimate relationship and knowledge of plants while doing so. Nowadays many people are finding and exploring the plant world in their backyard.

As I have always been so interested in plants, I have always foraged. Any outing is likely to end with me coming home with something that I have collected. A drive in the country opens up all sorts of possibilities, depending on the time of the year. As well as the obvious fruits, nuts and berries that can be foraged, herbs and edible ‘weeds’ are a definite on the foragers list.

One of the easiest herbs to start with is chickweed. Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a delightful herb that has many uses and is found everywhere in gardens, fields and land that has been cultivated. The leaves are small and soft, and the small white flowers are star shaped. You can find chickweed just about all year round. Chickweed is a good salad herb and is showing up more often on restaurant dishes. It is best picked while young before the leaves and stems turn stringy. It is one of the few herbs that is rich in copper and iron and tastes nice. It is also high in B vitamins, calcium, sodium and manganese, phosphorus and zinc. Chickweed is equally beneficial externally and internally. Some benefits include soothing and healing the digestive system and any internal inflammation from bowels to lungs. Its actions are similar to the healing properties of slippery elm. Externally, chickweed is one of the best herbs to soothe and calm irritated hot, itchy skin. It is wonderful on insect bites. It can also be used as a drawing agent, placed directly on skin, used as a compress, poultice or wash. You can eat two handfuls of chickweed daily, chopped finely and added to a salad. Have fun foraging, just remember to get positive identification before eating/ using anything you have foraged. If you are unsure of any herbs you could always bring a sample in to your local herbal shop for identification.

by Bronwyn Lowe Medical Herbalist | MNZAMH The Herbal Dispensary | 6 Wallis Street, Raglan www.theherbaldispensaryraglan.co.nz

OPEN 7 DAYS | 44 Clyde Street, Hamilton 3216 | 07 856 8508 | www.twobirdseatery.co.nz page 18 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

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NOURISH | gardening

Autumn is an enjoyable and productive season in the garden. It is at this time of the year you get to reap the rewards of your hard work more than at any other time. Autumn is the season for harvesting, collecting, storing and preserving, ready for the cold and lean months of the winter ahead. It is for this reason that until the 16th century the autumn season was known simply as ‘Harvest’. Today in many countries autumn is still the season of harvest festivals and giving thanks for the bounty from the land. In our own gardens we can celebrate and make the most of the autumn season by harvesting produce such as tomatoes, beans, capsicums, chillies, pumpkins, main crop potatoes, apples, quince, persimmon and feijoa. In most gardens seasonal crops will continue until the first frosts. So keep harvesting and enjoying till this happens.

Seed SAVING

words ANNA SINCLAIR photography VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

But as the days grow shorter and the weather ever cooler a gardener must also have an eye to the future. So at this time of year in the vegetable garden you can be planting all brassicas (e.g. cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower, kale), carrots, leeks, silverbeet, broad beans and beetroot. Get these plants germinated and established before the cold weather sets in and you will have a plentiful supply throughout winter.

SEDDON PARK | CLAUDELANDS FMG STADIUM WAIKATO | FOUNDERS THEATRE

2) Processing your seeds will depend on the variety you are working with. For example, peas and beans can be manually shelled but seed heads are best picked and shaken into a paper bag or envelope. Fleshy fruit such as tomatoes are best cut open and left to dry for several days before extracting the seed. 3) Storage is the last but crucial stage. Seed needs to be kept dry and cool. Paper bags or envelopes (well labelled) placed in an airtight container are best. Avoid fluctuating temperatures and plastic bags which cause sweating, as this will reduce the quality of the seed and the germination percentage. And finally, it would not be autumn in the garden if it didn’t involve planting a bulb or two! Autumn is the perfect time to plant bulbs and I personally think you can’t have too many spring flowering bulbs. My absolute short list includes daffodils, erlicheer, freesia, crocus and tulips. But if you are a beginner and want something cheap and cheerful with lots of flowers you can’t go past anemones and ranunculus.

Berries and seed heads are another feature of the autumn harvest. Autumn is a great time to harvest and save seed from some of your favourite plants. Harvesting and saving seed is a simple and rewarding job that can save you money and help you multiply your plant stock quickly. Try saving seed from lettuce, coriander, beans, peas, capsicums, chilli and tomato. In the flower garden give poppies, zinna, nigella, dianthus and granny bonnets a go.

In a previous life Anna Sinclair was an expert in growing onions and potatoes on an industrial scale. She is now a busy mother of four, and she spends her spare time applying her horticultural expertise to growing flowers on her flower farm on Matangi Road and then arranging them beautifully. You can find her handy work for sale on the Flower Lady Cart every Monday and Friday on 62b Matangi Road.

Here are the basic rules for saving seed, but if you want more specific information I encourage you to have a look at the International Seed Saving Institute website which is www.seedsave.org

facebook.com/theflowerlady

1) Harvest when the seed is mature. This will be different from when the crop was ready to eat, normally between 2 and 6 more

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weeks. The easiest way with most vegetables and flowers is to wait till the seed pods are brown dry. Often they will make a rustling sound when shaken.

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page 21 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


NOURISH | recipes Magills range of pulled meat (pork, beef and lamb) means you can have succulent, melt in the mouth slow cooked meat in a matter of minutes. Not just convenient, but clearly delicious, as the beef, made from Hereford Prime Beef, won the Supreme title at the New Zealand Food Awards soon after it was launched in 2015.

LAMB TAQUITOS Rolled tacos, taquitos, are often fried but you can achieve the crispy texture with less calories by baking them. I used flour tortillas as they are readily available; if you want to make them gluten free use corn tortillas. If you like things spicy feel free to add more of the chipotle sauce. We used Barkers Really Useful Chipotle Sauce and love the smokiness it adds to the dish.

BEAN & CORN SALSA GLUTEN FREE | VEGAN

1 cup black beans (dried) or 1 400g tin 2 cups corn kernels 2 spring onions, chopped 1 red capsicum, finely chopped

1 tbsp oil

fresh coriander

½ red onion

your favourite vinaigrette (we love Pepler’s black raspberry vinaigrette)

1½ tsp ground cumin 1½ tsp dried oregano (Mexican if you can get it)

If using dried beans cook them in a pot of boiling water until al dente.

½ tsp smoked paprika

Rinse and drain the beans before adding to the remaining ingredients and tossing with the dressing.

400g tin of chopped tomatoes 3–4 tbsp chipotle sauce 400g packet of Magills Pulled Lamb 1 cup grated cheese 10–12 small tortillas Heat the oil in a pan and add the sliced onion along with the herbs and spices. Cook gently, being careful not to burn the onion or spices, for 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes and simmer for a further 15–20 minutes until rich and thick. Stir in the chipotle sauce before checking and adjusting the seasoning. Add the lamb and grated cheese. Divide the lamb mix between the tortillas, rolling up and placing seam side down on an oven tray. Bake at 180°C for approximately 20 minutes or until golden and crispy.

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Serve with guacamole, sour cream, and bean and corn salsa.

magills magic recipes & photography VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

WWW.MAGILLS.CO.NZ

REDKITCHEN.CO.NZ check out our website

Check out our blog, recipe page and enjoy online shopping with some of New Zealand’s lowest prices on your favourite kitchen brands! VISIT IN STORE AT 51 MAHOE ST, TE AWAMUTU

| OR SHOP ONLINE REDKITCHEN.CO.NZ

page 23 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


OMELETTE ROLLS WITH PULLED PORK AND ASIAN DRESSING These are great in the lunchbox or as a light dinner. MAKES 6 | GLUTEN FREE

¼ iceberg lettuce (finely shredded) ½ capsicum, finely sliced

Pour the egg in and swirl it to cover the pan. As it cooks continue to swirl the pan so any remaining raw egg cooks. When all the egg is set flip the omelette out onto a plate and start the next. When you have made all the omelettes heat the pork according to the instructions on the packet. Place a handful of the salad in the middle of an omelette, top with pulled pork and roll.

1 spring onion, finely sliced 1 cup of mung bean sprouts coriander

Serve garnished with coriander or fried shallots and extra dressing for a dip.

400g packet of Magills Pulled Pork

ASIAN DRESSING

1 carrot, grated or julienned

6 large free range eggs (size 7 or larger)

¼ cup sweet chilli sauce

Asian dressing

2 gloves garlic

Toss the salad ingredients together in a bowl along with ¼ cup of the Asian dressing.

1 tbsp fish sauce

Make the omelettes one at a time by beating one egg at a time. At this stage you can add some chopped herbs (chives or coriander are great). Heat a 21cm pan. I’m not a fan of Teflon but if you have one this is the time to pull it out. I prefer a cast iron or chef’s pan with a natural non-stick patina.

1 tsp sesame oil 2 limes, zest and juice 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 tbsp brown sugar Put in a food processor and blend until smooth and combined.

CARAMELISED ONION AND MOZZARELLA BEEF CROQUETTES Great as a canape or starter, these cheesy croquettes are also great as a main meal served as the star on a green salad. Pair with a green sauce like a salsa verde or tomato chutney. MAKES 18–24

1 tbsp oil 1 onion 1 bay leaf or sprig of thyme 60g butter ½ cup flour 1 cup beef stock ½ cup milk 200g mozzarella 400g packet of Magills Pulled Beef 2 eggs

Peel and slice the onion. Heat the oil in a saucepan and add the onion and bay leaf. Turn down the heat, cover and allow the onion to sweat for 15 minutes. While the onion cooks, stir it a couple of times to stop it from sticking. Remove the lid and continue cooking the onion until it is golden and caramelised, approximately 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaf and add the butter. When the butter has melted stir in the flour and cook for 2– 3 minutes. Slowly stir in the stock and milk and continue to cook, stirring often until the sauce is thick. Take off the heat and stir in the beef and mozzarella. Refrigerate for at least a couple of hours. Shape/roll the croquettes before rolling first in flour then beaten egg and breadcrumbs. In batches, deep fry (at 180°C) for 5-10 minutes or until golden brown.

2 cups breadcrumbs oil for deep frying

page 24 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


MAKE MOTHER’S DAY

SWEET Make mum’s day with a feminine high tea. Set the table with your good linen and fresh blooms (ours from The Birdcage in Te Awamutu). Forget worrying about the fine china though with the amazing range of paper plates available (from www.sweetpeaparties. co.nz). Make it super special with some Rose champagne and dainty finger food and Mum will feel totally spoilt! recipes LEAH HOSKIN | photography ASHLEE DE CAIRES

PUMPKIN CUPCAKES WITH A SPICED CREAM CHEESE ICING THIS MAKES OVER 24 REGULAR SIZED CUPCAKES

Spray and line muffin tins with cupcake liners.

3 cups flour

Preheat oven to 150°C.

1½ tsp baking soda

In a bowl mix together flour, baking soda and salt.

½ tsp salt

In a mixing bowl cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time then mix in the pumpkin, vanilla and oil. Slowly mix in the flour mixture alternately with the milk.

180g butter, softened 2 cups sugar 3 eggs

Divide the mixture evenly between the muffin liners, filling each to around three-quarters full.

1 tbsp vanilla essence 2 cups pumpkin, cooked and mashed (450g or approx ¼ of a medium crown pumpkin) ¼ cup vegetable oil

Bake for about 15–20 minutes or until the cupcakes are firm to the touch in the centre. Take out and leave to cool.

250g cream cheese, softened

Tip. Roast the pumpkin for more flavour. Cover an unpeeled piece of pumpkin and roast at 180°C for approx. an hour or until soft. When cool scoop the flesh out.

200g butter, softened

CREAM CHEESE ICING

2 tbsp maple syrup

In a large mixing bowl cream the butter and cream cheese until smooth. Mix in the maple syrup, vanilla and spices. Slowly add the icing sugar and beat on a low speed until combined, then increase the speed and mix until smooth and light.

1 cup milk CREAM CHEESE ICING

1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp allspice 1 tsp vanilla extract 6 cups icing sugar

Pipe cream cheese icing onto cooled cupcakes with desired amount.

GET THIS LOOK Flowers by The Birdcage, Te Awamutu Plates and cutlery from Sweet Pea Parties | Champagne saucers from Royal Laboratorie


CHOCOLATE SALAMI MAKES 1 LARGE OR 2 SMALL LOGS

280g dark bitter-sweet chocolate 125g butter ½ cup whole natural almonds ¼ cup natural pistachios ¼ cup hazelnuts

SALTED CARAMEL MERINGUES

¼ cup crystallised ginger

4 egg whites

¼ cup cranberries

1 cup caster sugar

100g amaretti biscuits (or any kind of crispy biscuits)

1 tsp white vinegar

zest from 1 orange

1 tsp vanilla essence

¼ cup thick cream

2 tbsp salted caramel (recipe below)

2 eggs

flaked sea salt to taste

50g brown sugar

Preheat oven to 150°C.

2 tbsp Frangelico or your choice of liqueur 2 tbsp cocoa icing sugar for rolling logs in Lightly toast the almonds, pistachios and hazelnuts. Leave to cool. Once the nuts have cooled down roughly chop. Roughly chop the crystallised ginger. Break up the chocolate and place with the butter into a bowl over a pot of boiling water, making sure the bottom of the bowl isn’t touching the water. Heat over a low heat, stirring until butter and chocolate are melted. Once melted, remove from heat and mix in the cocoa and brown sugar. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs and cream. Add the cream and egg mix, along with the Frangelico, to the chocolate mix. Roughly break up the biscuits by placing in a large zip-lock bag. Lay bag flat and bang the biscuits with a rolling pin or a wine bottle. You will want them to still be quite chunky.

Line a couple of baking trays with baking paper. Place the egg whites into a bowl. Whisk on high speed until the whites have just stiffened. Slowly add the caster sugar while still whisking. Once all the sugar has been added, continue to whisk the egg whites for a further 5 minutes until nice and glossy. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the vinegar and vanilla essence and whisk for another two minutes. Draw 4–5cm circles on the baking paper. Spoon the meringue mixture into circle. Top each of the meringues with a small spoonful of the salted caramel. Using a butter knife or a small palate knife, lightly swirl the salted caramel into the meringue. Lightly sprinkle each with a bit of sea salt. Place the meringues in the oven and reduce the temperature of the oven to 100°C and bake for 1 hour or until crispy to the touch. Turn the oven off and leave meringues in the oven to cool.

Once the chocolate mix has cooled down a bit add the chopped nuts, ginger, cranberries, orange zest and broken biscuits. Mix everything together well. Place in the fridge and leave for about 30 minutes. It should be soft enough to be malleable so you can shape into a log. If left too long in the fridge it will be too hard to manage.

SALTED CARAMEL - MAKES ABOUT 1½ CUPS

Place the mixture onto a piece of Glad Wrap about 40cm long. Shape into a log about 4–5cm thick in diameter and about 30cm long. Alternatively you can make into two smaller logs.

¼ tsp salt

Now wrap Glad Wrap tightly around the log, twisting each end tightly to squeeze the mixture in. Roll the log back and forth in the Glad Wrap to even it out and pack it together. Put in the fridge and leave for about 6 hours or overnight. When ready to serve, remove from the fridge and take off the Glad Wrap. Roll the log in some icing sugar. If you are gifting this you can wrap some white kitchen string around to make it look a little authentic, like a roll of salami. Once removed from the fridge, allow the log to sit for 10–15 minutes before slicing. Use a clean sharp knife and carefully slice into 1–2cm thick slices. Must be stored in the fridge as it contains raw eggs.

2 cups sugar ½ cup cream (add more if needed) 60g butter 1 tbsp Kahlua (optional) In a large, dry, heavy pot cook the sugar over a moderately high heat, stirring constantly with a heat-proof rubber spatula until the sugar is melted and turns a golden caramel, around 8 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and let cool for a minute. Slowly add the chunks of butter in one by one, whisk until combined. The caramel will bubble, this is OK. Now slowly add the cream and then whisk until combined. Return the pot to moderate heat and cook the mixture, stirring until the caramel has thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. If using, add the Kahlua and the salt. Leave to cool.


FALL FOR

BRUNCH Autumn is a great time to snatch the last few opportunities for alfresco dining before the cold winter days set in. Whether it’s for Easter, Mother’s day or an excuse to entertain friends our outdoor brunch is perfect with easy dishes you can prepare ahead of time. So set the table with an abundance of greenery (thanks Tina at The Birdcage for ours), fire up the bbq or brazier and enjoy a hearty meal with those you love. recipes VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN | photography ASHLEE DE CAIRES

CHOCOLATE WAFFLES WITH POACHED PEARS MAKES APPROX. 10 WAFFLES Waffles are a great weekend breakfast or brunch dish you can make ahead of time. Either make them the night before and simply reheat in a toaster, or make further ahead and freeze. No waffle iron? No worries. These can also be made into pancakes.

2 cups self-raising flour ½ cup cocoa ¼ cup sugar

Add a third of the beaten egg whites, mixing until just combined. Gently fold in the remaining egg whites. Cook in a waffle iron according to its instructions. These can be made ahead of time, even frozen and then quickly reheated in a toaster. Serve with poached pears, chocolate sauce and whipped cream. POACHED PEARS You can poach pears in a simple sugar syrup flavoured with cinnamon, vanilla or star anise. Add wine or a fragrant syrup like elderflower for another dimension.

3 eggs, separated

ELDERFLOWER POACHED PEARS

¾ cup milk

4–6 pears, peeled

1½ cups natural yoghurt

1 cup elderflower cordial

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup water

25g butter

cinnamon quill

165g dark chocolate (7 rows of Whittaker’s chocolate)

¼ cup sugar

Melt half the chocolate with the butter. Allow to cool slightly. Separate the eggs, mixing the yolks one at a time into the melted chocolate. Beat the egg whites to soft peaks. Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Add the milk, yoghurt and vanilla and mix gently along with the chocolate mix.

peel of ½ a lemon Heat all the ingredients, except the pears, in a medium pot until the sugar has dissolved. Peel and cut the pears in half, core if you like. Place the pears in the liquid and simmer gently for around 10–20 minutes or until they are tender (this will depend on how ripe the pears were to begin with). When cooked, turn off the heat and allow the pears to cool in the poaching liquid.

GET THIS LOOK Flowers by The Birdcage, Te Awamutu Plates from Sweet Pea Parties | Model's dresses from Feisty Needle


EGGS IN TOMATO AND CHORIZO STEW This hearty dish is a great alternative to your regular bacon and eggs. The chorizo can easily be swapped for bacon. Serve it with thick slices of toasted sourdough, we love Volare's San Francisco loaf.

2 tbsp oil

BANANA, MAPLE AND WALNUT BAKED OATMEAL An easy yet nutritional dish to feed a crowd for brunch, this is also a great breakfast dish when on the go.

½ cup walnuts 2 cups rolled oats

1 large red onion, sliced

½ cup raisins

1 red capsicum, sliced

1 tsp baking powder

100g chorizo, diced

½ tsp salt

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1¾ cups milk

2x 400g crushed tinned tomatoes

2 eggs

1 tsp salt

¼ cup brown sugar

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

¼ cup maple syrup

1 tsp brown sugar

4 ripe bananas

½ cup water 4–6 eggs

Chop two of the bananas and place in a greased 20cm x 25cm baking tray.

Heat the oil in a large heavy based pan. Add the onion, capsicum and chorizo. Turn down the heat and cook for 20–25 minutes until the onion and capsicum are soft. Add all the remaining ingredients except the eggs. Simmer for a further 15 minutes. Check and adjust the seasoning accordingly.

Mix the dry ingredients together. Mash the two remaining bananas. Beat the eggs and milk together and mix, along with the mashed bananas, into the dry ingredients.

Make four–six small holes in the sauce and crack an egg in each. Continue to cook until the egg whites are firm. Garnish with freshly chopped parsley and serve.

Pour over the chopped bananas. Drizzle the maple syrup on top and bake at 180°C for 45 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing.

IN MY OPINION, A CAST IRON PAN IS THE SECOND MOST IMPORTANT, (AFTER A GOOD KNIFE) TOOL IN THE KITCHEN. THROW AWAY THOSE TEFLON COATED PANS AN OPT FOR A NATURALLY NON STICK CAST IRON PAN THAT WILL LAST YOU A LIFETIME! THE TEAM AT THE SCULLERY (VICTORIA STREET, HAMILTON) HAVE A LARGE RANGE AND WILL BE ABLE TO HELP YOU PICK THE BEST FOR YOU. THEY ALSO MAKE THE BEST WEDDING OR 21ST PRESENTS!

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page 33 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


Foodies

DAY OUT WE ROUNDED UP A FEW OF THE BEST FOODIE EVENTS ON IN AND AROUND THE REGION THIS AUTUMN.

MEET BEN BAYLY The team at Kitchen Things have done it again and convinced another fabulous chef to come down to Hamilton and share some great recipes, tips and ideas. This time it is host of New Zealand's first My Kitchen Rules, 2015 Cuisine Magazine Chef of the Year and award-winning executive chef at The Grove & Baduzzi, Ben Bayly.

TASTE OF PLENTY With wonderful tours in and around the Bay, from Farm to Table to a French Country Lunch, Taste of Plenty are spreading their wings with new epicurean tours this autumn and winter, including special trips to some of the best farmers’ markets (think Clevedon, Hastings...), and their Hawke’s Bay Food and Wine Classic – Friday 16 June–Sunday 18 June and Friday 30 June–Sunday 2 July. www.tasteofplenty.co.nz

All proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to Hospice Waikato.

PALATE'S TRUFFLE DEGUSTATION DINNER Discover the amazing flavours of the elusive Truffle. 28 June, five courses including wine matches for each course $160pp www.palate.co.nz

SERVING UP EVENTS IN VIP STYLE Enjoy a generous serve of VIP treatment at this year’s Great NZ Food Show with event hospitality specialists Spoilt For Choice. The Great NZ Food Show, held at Claudelands this May 13 & 14, showcases the best food, wine and delicious innovative products. Enjoy the VIP treatment at this year’s show with a unique and exclusive opportunity to host a group of friends or clients with a private masterclass cooking demonstration with Brett McGregor! Limited to just 24, on May 13 you will enjoy access to an exclusive VIP Lounge, VIP parking, pre-dinner finger food, wine tasting and live entertainment. For more information on this and other VIP experiences visit spoiltforchoice.co.nz page 34 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

Not just super food...

, Prof ’s @ Woodlands

42 Whitikahu Road, Gordonton | 027 469 0694 Follow us Prof ’s at Woodlands See menus and more at www.profs.co.nz page 35 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

Tickets are $20pp and include a glass of bubbles and nibbles. Get in quick as the last event with Jo Segar sold out in record time! www.eventfinda.co.nz/2017/meet-BenBaly/Hamilton


Fiji THE INAUGURAL NOURISH FOODIE TOUR

TAUPO MARKET

RAW BALANCE

Looking for a great day out? The Taupo Market, held every Saturday on Redoubt Street, is a great excuse to make a day of it in Taupo! Owners Monika and Hermann say “we are always looking for interesting, original or curious merchandise, fresh, clean and tempting produce and scrumptious, ‘have to come back for this next week’ foods”.

One of the stalls you have to visit at the Taupo market is Raw Balance. Monika and Carolyn make delicious raw, dairy and gluten free goodies. They also have a deli in Taupo and run regular workshops.

The first Saturday of each month sees the Trash and Treasure market join regular stall holders making it a bigger event and a great reason to linger longer.

See our Events page for more details or check out their Facebook page rawbalancenz 45 Oruanui Street, Taupo

www.taupomarket.kiwi.nz

DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN THE NOURISH TEAM ON AN EXCLUSIVE FOODIES HOLIDAY IN FIJI.

Escape winter for a slice of tropical sunshine and experience Fiji’s untapped culinary secrets. We’re talking visiting fields of basil, chocolate factories, coconut plantations, cooking classes, cocktail making and a little time to chill at the amazing adults only Waitui Club at the Sofitel Denerau. FOR THE FULL ITINERARY AND BOOKING DETAILS EMAIL

info@nourishmagazine.co.nz

Organic produce, gluten free products, local gifts

Wholesome homemade food using fresh, local and seasonal produce.

022 069 5744 | farmshop@thevillage.kiwi whatawhata.farm.shop

07 829 8892 | café@thevillage.kiwi Villagecafewhatawhata

1 ROTHWELL LANE, WHATAWHATA | THEVILLAGE.KIWI page 36 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

$

3450 pp/TWIN

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NOURISH | recipes WILD RICE STUFFED MUSHROOMS SERVES 2 | VEGAN, GLUTEN FREE

4 portobello mushrooms 1 tbsp oil ½ onion, finely diced 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 1–2 cups mushrooms (a variety if you can find them, button, oyster, porcini …) ½ cup wild rice (Iavailable at Herbal Dispensary (Raglan) and The Farm Shop (Whatawhata)) 1–2 cups baby spinach (optional) 1½ cups vegetable stock 1 tsp porcini powder 2 tbsp toasted pine nuts Using a teaspoon remove the mushroom stalks from the portobello mushrooms. Set aside the portebellos, to be stuffed later. Finely chop the stalks and add these to the other mushrooms.

or m

ushr ooms

Heat the oil in a pan and gently sauté the onion for 3–5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another few minutes before adding the chopped mushrooms. Cook for five minutes then add the rice. Stir to coat the rice and cook for a further five minutes.

e k a M

m o ro

f

Add the stock and porcini powder. Simmer for 20 minutes or until the liquid has evaporated and the rice is al dente. If using spinach add this in the last 5 minutes of cooking. Check and adjust the seasoning. Add the pine nuts. Divide the mixture into four, tightly packing onto each portobello mushroom. Bake at 180°C for 15–20 minutes.

GARLIC, MUSHROOM AND PROSCIUTTO PIZZA WITH ROCKET AND TRUFFLE OIL I’m a fan of simple pizzas with just a couple of well-chosen toppings. This, my current favourite, is inspired by a pizza we had while on holiday in New Plymouth. The delicious mushroom flavour is enhanced by a drizzle of truffle oil at the end. You’ll find truffle oil from good food stores like Vetro Tauranga or Rotorua. It may seem a bit of an extravagance, but once in your pantry you will find all manner of uses! It turns a simple roast chook into a gourmet treat.

2 readymade pizza bases (Flaveur in Mount Maunganui do great ones!) garlic butter 250g portobello mushrooms 6 rashers of prosciutto mozzarella rocket truffle oil (available a good food stores like Herbal Dispensary in Raglan) Place a pizza stone in your oven and crank it up to as high as it goes. Slice the mushrooms. Fry these in two batches in a generous spoonful of garlic butter until golden. (You do this in batches so the mushrooms fry and not steam.) Spread each base with garlic butter. Scatter on the mushrooms, then prosciutto and finally the mozzarella. Place on the pizza stone and cook for 5–6 minutes or until golden. In a bowl toss the rocket with a drizzle of the truffle oil. Cut the pizza and top with the rocket just before serving. GARLIC BUTTER 200g soft butter

6–8 cloves garlic, very finely chopped 1 tsp garlic powder Mix all the ingredients together. Store in an airtight container in the fridge. recipes VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN | photography ASHLEE DE CAIRES

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There are more to mushrooms than white button and portobello (which are simply more mature button mushrooms). Oyster mushrooms have a unique look with a delicate and sweet flavour. Porcini are a real meaty mushroom. Favoured in Italian cuisine, they have a slightly nutty and creamy flavour. In New Zealand the dried version, including powdered porcini, are more common than fresh. Shiitake mushrooms are common in Asian cuisines, as they add an umami flavour to dishes. Use fresh, dried or powdered forms to add flavour to soups, stews and risottos. Enoki mushrooms have long stems with little caps and look a little like a large bean sprout. Common in Asian cooking, they are delicious in soups and salads.


NOURISH | feature

A few doors down from Ian is fellow truffiére owner Adrian Collins. Sharing learnings and a love for working the land, both Adrian and Ian are about to enter their third season of harvesting truffle and are excited to work closely with Gus of Bidfresh to share their treasures with local chefs and food lovers throughout New Zealand. “Gus treated me to a delicious meal at Victoria Street Bistro in Hamilton just after we sold them truffle from our truffière. Each course included an amazing application of truffle, both savoury and sweet, paired with wine, which made sense given that truffle varies in flavour by what region they were grown in,” Adrian reflected. Other New Zealand restaurants that have celebrated locally-grown truffle on their menus include Palate in Hamilton; The French Café, The Grove, and The Grill in Auckland; Falls Retreat in Waihi; and Bistro 1284 and Stratosfare restaurants in Rotorua. So why is it that such fancy names lead the list of those who showcase the memorable mushroom on their menu? Well, there is a reason that Savin likened the truffle to a diamond. Truffles are very difficult to grow, and are thus a rare find. Most New Zealand truffières, located from Invercargill to the Bay of Plenty, have spent over 10 years cultivating the crop before seeing the first sign of truffle come to life. Ian, for example, waited 12 years to see his first truffle. “You have to be a stayer. You have to be patient with truffles.” With an average price of $3,000–$3,500 per kg of truffle, one can’t help but think good things really do come to those who wait.

Last week, while eyeing a decorative cheese plate served at a family function, a creamy half wheel of brie caught my attention. This brie was different, though. Oozing with creaminess, it smelled special—perfectly pungent.

Ian and I were introduced by Gus Tissink, General Manager of Bidfresh in Hamilton, a gourmet wholesale food provider with a passion for sourcing New Zealand’s best local produce.

Inching closer, I could see that the brie was lightly speckled with black beauty marks.

With a finger on the pulse of the future, Gus identified the growing volume of locally grown truffle early on and has since been the wholehearted glue that brings truffière owners and chefs together over a new ingredient that he knows will be celebrated in New Zealand for years to come.

Second guessing the brie in front of me, I asked my mother what type of cheese it was. She told me brie with black truffle. Biting into a slice of sinful smoothness, I felt the corners of my mouth stretch into a deeply satisfied smile. I could hear Ian Treloar’s voice in the background proclaiming the Catholic Church once banned truffle because of its aphrodisiac qualities. Ian, head of the New Zealand Truffle Association, is a passionate owner of a truffière based in Whakatane and is an inspired foodie, paving the way for New Zealand’s emerging truffle industry, which began in the late 1990s.

While it may be hard to part ways with summer, we now know that there’s something spectacular to look forward to right here in New Zealand during the chilly months. Something sexy and seductive. Something divinely different. Something definitely worth trying: the tempting truffle.

Truffle is a member of the fungi family. It lives on and around the roots of certain types of trees, such as hazel nut or holm oak trees. Unlike other mushrooms that grow above the soil’s surface, truffle grows below ground. Although there are many species of truffle, those that are most sought after for culinary use are the Italian White, Perigord Black, Bianchetto and Burgundy truffle. To date, it is estimated that there are around 30 productive truffiére in New Zealand, located between the Bay of Plenty and Invercargill. To learn more or to order fresh truffle, contact Gus Tissink at Bidfresh. Bidfresh works closely with truffière owners like Ian and Adrian to distribute truffle to those who are tempted throughout New Zealand.

We love Over The Moon's black truffle brie!

Aside from the profitability of the unique mushroom that is truffle, both Ian and Gus personally adore the gourmet item used by top chefs around the world. In New Zealand truffles are harvested in winter months, from May to August. The truffle can be enjoyed in simple pairings like creamy scalloped potatoes, scrambled eggs, pasta and rice says Gus. “Truffles really elevate comfort foods, which we kiwis love, and they bring out the best in fats found in butter, cheese or salmon. These foods totally absorb the aroma and make for an incredible sensory experience,” echoed Ian.

Aside from richness in smell, taste and value, truffles are also increasingly known for their health properties, including high protein, fibre and minerals like calcium and potassium. Although pricey, all you need is a sliver to experience the ecstasy that is truffle, which makes the mushroom within reach for all kinds of kiwis who like to flirt with their food.

THE PERFECT SOLUTION TO YOUR FRESH MENU REQUIREMENTS CONTACT GUS TISSINK

0800 346 3366 | 027 241 3090 | gus.tissink@bidfood.co.nz


NOURISH | nutrition

beans

garlic +MSG

Eggplant

+sodium

asparagus

apple

beetroot

+HFCS

Sodium Sulfite (E221)

spring onion

WHAT’S carrots

lemons +sodium

lurking IN YOUR FOOD?

chilli

antimicrobials stop the development of harmful bacteria and mould. Sausage meat, for example, may contain sulphur dioxide to help limit microbial growth, while sodium nitrate is often found in bacon, salami and cured meats. High consumption of this nitrate ‘salt’ has been linked with blood vessel damage, an increased risk in heart disease and some cancer. Food authorities have limits on the amount processors can use in their products, but unfortunately limited evidence exists around the long term and potentially harmful effects of many food additives. As with anything the key is monitoring how much we consume. By reducing our intake of processed food we immediately reduce our exposure to additives. Thankfully the FSANZ guidelines ensure all forms of additives must be stated on ingredient labels. But food producers are clever, so don’t fall for catchy taglines and complicated ingredient lists. Their marketing messages are designed to both entice and confuse. But any codes, numbers or unrecognisable ingredients will directly relate to some type of food additive. High fructose corn syrup is basically America’s cheap impersonator of white table sugar. This highly processed sweetener is made from corn starch, where the sucrose is commercially converted to excess fructose. The health risks implicated by high consumption of this adulterated sugar are well-documented. When consumed, a large dose of free fructose heads straight to the liver, initiating lipogenesis or fat production, and overtime can lead to fatty liver disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. The major warning

signs around HFCS is that it’s a clear marker of nutrient void foods found only in processed cereals, baked goods and soft drinks. But it’s not all doom and gloom, the resurgence of homemade preserving, pickling and fermented foods are drawing us back to nature. Buzz words like ‘wholefoods’ and JERF (Just Eat Real Food) are actually positive ones and this slow shift towards using real, natural ingredients is catching on. A super simple way to reduce additive consumption is to cook more. When you cook from scratch, you don’t need additives to make food taste better, look good or ensure it lasts six weeks. Have you ever seen a mayonnaise recipe with ¼ tsp of soy lecithin? Instead the egg yolk and some good old-fashioned elbow grease plays the role of an emulsifier. As the controversy surrounding many of these food additives continues to grow, the truth is, knowledge is power. By informing ourselves about the types of additives lurking in our food we can make better decisions about what and how much we consume. Trying to cut them out completely can be drastic, difficult and unnecessary. As an ancient physician once said, “The dose makes the poison.” So don’t let the fact you ate bacon for breakfast stop you from ever buying it again. Simply save it for occasional eating or look for nitrate free options. Check labels, be mindful of words you can’t pronounce and start making purchasing decisions based on the ‘less is more’ policy. Because really, what’s life without bacon. Kate Underwood | Relish the Memory Talestosavor.blogspot.co.nz

cherries Red E124

words KATE UNDERWOOD

MEET

BEN BAYLY

Host of New Zealand’s first My Kitchen Rules 2015, Cuisine Magazine Chef of the Year 2015 and Award-winning Executive Chef at The Grove & Baduzzi

The idea behind food additives is not a new phenomenon. For thousands of years people have been adding things to food, by altering its natural state and increasing capability for consumption. What started with vinegar, salt and sugar has evolved into manufactured chemicals represented by acronyms, numeric codes and long-winded scientific names.

The latter or manufactured varieties are where most of the concerns lie, as they are added to highly processed, packaged and pre-prepared foods. Evidence around their safety varies dramatically throughout the world and the web. Claims that MSG causes headaches and asthma to intolerant individuals exist, while the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officially deem MSG to be perfectly safe.

Preservatives play a crucial role in maintaining food quality and preventing bacterial growth. Ascorbic acid halts the ripening process, antioxidants impede fats from going rancid and

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Funnily enough, MSG is found naturally occurring in almost all foods, particularly meat products, breast milk and Parmesan cheese. It is a non-essential amino acid, the sodium salt component of glutamic acid, and provides a savoury and umami flavour profile to many foods. Both naturally occurring and added MSG is chemically the same and according to Food Standards Australia & New Zealand (FSANZ), the human body cannot distinguish the difference. So it’s no wonder there is so much confusion!

6PM | WEDNESDAY 29TH MARCH

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Common additives include flavour enhancers, preservatives, stabilisers, thickeners, emulsifiers and colours. These additives can be defined in one of three categories: a) Natural substances extracted from the environment, such as beetroot juice used for colouring; b) Manufactured but chemically the same as the natural substance, such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) used as a preservative; or c) Manufactured and not found in nature, such as aspartame

used as an artificial sweetener. Other well-known additives include monosodium glutamate or MSG (flavour enhancer 621), sodium nitrate (preservative), high fructose corn syrup (sweetener), soy lecithin (emulsifier 322) and sulphur dioxide (preservative 220).

P

These days the realm of food additives is a vast, confusing and complex one. But what exactly are these extras residing in our food? And do we need to avoid them? Put simply, the term ‘additives’ refers to any substance that is added to food for a particular purpose. It may be required for preservation, to maintain quality, enhance flavour or improve appearance. Regardless of whether it is natural or synthetic, these additives play a crucial role in ensuring food items remain a certain way over time.

11 Maui St, Pukete, Hamilton 07 850 9040 | www.kitchenthings.co.nz

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NOURISH | feature

WAIKATO’S

West coast Take the road less travelled and discover Waikato’s stunning west coast.

words & photography VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

Waikato’s west coast winds its way from one river mouth to another. Starting in the north at Port Waikato where our country’s longest river, the mighty Waikato, meets the sea, all the way to Mokau, whitebaiters’ heaven, 200 odd kilometres south and where the river of the same name becomes the Tasman Sea. Between you will find rugged coastline, lush fertile fields and quaint small towns steeped in local history. If you are looking for some peace and tranquillity, a chance to marvel and be one with nature, this sparsely populated slice of paradise is just the place.

to settle. And like today these landmarks made it a natural travel route. You can discover the history of the Village at the Pirongia Heritage and Information Centre. Whether you have half an hour or all day, the mountain and surrounding bush is worth a visit. At 959 metres tall, Mount Pirongia is the highest peak in the region. Combined with the 17,000 hectares of native bush, there is a walking track for all fitness levels—from a 15 minute, wheelchair accessible loop to an advanced trek to the summit taking two days.

We decided to make a day of it and discover the section of the coast that connects Raglan with Kawhia. Starting in Hamilton our first stop is Pirongia, just 25 minutes away and a great spot for a caffeine fix or something more substantial.

Once a year (in September) the Village comes alive with the annual craft fair, but don’t fear if you miss this as there is also a small version with the Pirongia Country Market on the last Sunday of every month as well as a couple of local galleries open to the public all year round.

Once known as Alexandra, Pirongia Village is steeped in history. Sitting on the banks of the Waipa River and at the foot of the mountain made for an ideal place for Māori, and later European,

Mountain biking, horse trekking and farm visits are also great ways to spend time in this quaint village so close to so many other wonderful Waikato attractions.

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NOURISH | feature Back on the road we head towards Kawhia. On the way we pass the Oparau Roadhouse. It’s hard to miss in its fluorescent yellow gloriousness and the line of dead bikes along the fence line pointing us in the right direction. If you are planning on staying a night or two in the area they offer no frills accommodation including free tenting space. No stopping for us this time round. Aside from being full from our brunch at The Nest we are on a mission to make it to Kawhia in time for low tide, and today that happens to conveniently be just before noon. Why low tide? It’s a little local secret that on the Ocean Beach, two hours either side of low tide, you can dig a hole to soak in naturally warm hot springs. Local, and owner of the historic B&B Rosamond House, Jude Johnston says, “The ultimate is to be able to have the tide right just before sunset where you can soak in a hot pool and watch the sun go down.” Locals also know about the steep sand dune you need to summit to get to the beach! While us visitors need to remember to bring a spade (to dig our wallowing hole) and decent sand shoes (forget jandals they just make the steep incline harder and the black sand means it heats up fast, burning even the hardiest souls), you’ll find the locals have ‘cheated’, arriving on quad bikes, some even by horseback. THE NEST We stopped in at our favourite cafe in town, The Nest. Having moved to the area a couple of years ago, Phil and Tania Hows opened The Nest not long after. Having sold their Hamilton cafe, Olive, they were looking for something different. Set in the heart of Pirongia Village, The Nest has become a favourite stop for those regularly using the road who know they will get a great coffee along with some hearty homemade fare. The homemade pies and lamb rolls are always a hit. With lots of space, including a big grass area complete with giant chess board, it’s perfect for the kids to run around in, it’s also the perfect weekend destination cafe for those who live in nearby Te Awamutu (a mere 10 minutes away) or the big smoke of Hamilton.

success. Tania says the food is not trendsetting, instead it is great cafe food with a little twist and lots of care and attention. Expect your favourites like eggs bene and French toast sitting alongside delicious burgers and dishes like their Sticky Chicken Salad with Halloumi or the Creamy Scallop Chowder. And then there is the coffee. It’s hard to miss the magnificent copper espresso machine that sits proudly on the cafe’s counter. Lovingly restored by Phil, this piece of art was one of the first espresso machines in the Waikato, brought to Hamilton by local hospitality legend, Joe de Maio, who would have served many their first ever espresso from this machine. See it in action as The Nest’s skilled baristas make your cuppa and send you on your way with a smile.

Knowing who their customers are is the key to the Howses’

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Don’t let the hike put you off; the experience is something you won’t find anywhere else in the world—soaking in a hot pool on a glorious black sand beach that stretches for as far as the eye can see. With our appetites firmly restored we head into Kawhia town for lunch. There is really no choice in this—it’s fish n chips or fish n chips. I say when in Rome, and we grab our newspaper wrapped package of fresh tarakihi and chips and head to the park to enjoy it with gusto. While in town be sure to visit the local museum which sits proudly on the waterfront and often doubles as an art gallery with regular local exhibitions. Kawhia has a wonderful history, including the landing of Tainui Waka and is thus the ancestral home of the Tainui people. Once a major trading port, the harbour, which stretches some 6,000 hectares, holds some truly amazing treasures. In 2016 a group of school children discovered a 28 million year old fossil of a giant penguin. Standing, the penguin would have measured 1.5 metres tall and weighed 100kgs. While you may not find a million year old artefact at low tide, the harbour still offers the opportunity to hunt for pipi, cockles, oysters and mussels. If kaimoana is your thing and you have some time you can book a fishing charter into the harbour. Alternatively pack your rod and bait and head to the wharf. Here you can share stories and strategies with the locals trying their luck while watching the kids test their courage as they jump off. For us the road was calling. It’s 70 kilometres from Kawhia to Raglan following the coastal road. Normally such a distance you would expect to be at your destination in an hour. Think again! This road, while picturesque and most definitely the scenic route, comes with a warning. Loved by off-road bikers, you could be forgiven for thinking you were in a rally while actually only going 40 kilometres an hour. Gravel much of the way, it can be quite narrow and twists and turns often. Just over half way you can decide enough is enough and take the sealed route in from Te Mata which exits onto state highway 23, the main road to Raglan. It is here you can also deviate for a stop at the famous Bridal Veil Falls. page 47 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


We carried on along the coast road which skirts around Mount Karioi for stunning vistas of the Tasman Sea. Ruapuke beach offers a perfect stop for a walk along this unspoilt beach. For the enthusiasts Ruapuke also offers consistently good surf and is considerably less crowded than Raglan beaches. Back on the road, and we are quickly in the thriving community of Raglan. Here you will find all manner of accommodation options from camping to glamping, basic baches to luxury lodges. You can learn to surf, paddle board, go on a harbour cruise, hire an electric bike and pedal around town, throw a line out on the wharf or visit one of the many artist galleries. There are also many options to grab a bite! Our favourite is The Shack on the corner of Bow & Wainui Road, serving fresh delicious brunches and lunches. Be sure you make it in time or stay long enough to watch the sunset; always a stunning sight and the perfect way to end a wonderful day in the Waikato! THE VILLAGE CAFE If doing this route in reverse (Raglan to Kawhia) be sure to stop in at The Village Cafe in Whatawhata. This gorgeous country cafe is an amazing playground for the kids to run around in while you enjoy a coffee and some of their delicious fare.

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NOURISH | enviro

What came first, the chicken or the egg? Conscious Consumers would prefer you to ask not what came first, but if they are free range. Established in 2010 Conscious Consumers is a New Zealand-based social enterprise that connects businesses with customers interested in social and environmental issues. With a focus on hospitality businesses, Conscious Consumers has around 400 members, including local cafes like Rouge in Cambridge. Conscious Consumers endorse businesses via an accreditation process which results in the business gaining badges they can display illustrating to customers their commitment to doing good for our planet. The badges reflect sustainable practices and use of products that respect people, the planet and animals. There are currently 19 badges from composting to fair-trade, sustainable seafood to free range.

CONSUMERISM HOW CONSCIOUS ARE YOU? It's an unfortunate fact of life for all creatures great and small that there are ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’. And although there are some weeks when I don't know where our next mortgage payment is coming from, I'm pretty sure that as far as 99% of the world's population is concerned, I'm a 'have'. Why? Because I have a loving, happy and healthy family who are safe each night in our comfortable house; I have more than enough delicious, healthy food than I need; I have had (and still have) access to education, employment and healthcare; and most importantly, I have CHOICES. For a long time, I thought it was the privilege of having choices that qualified me as being ‘free’. Whenever I felt trapped in a situation I didn't particularly like, I assumed it was because I had no choice. So there was nothing for it but to feel stuck and make the best of it. However, a defining moment in my adult life (and the beginning of the Mrs Goodness journey) was an epiphany I had about a year ago. I realised that choices have less to do with freedom and happiness than does the conscious act of taking responsibility for my choices. I've grown up in a society obsessed with the idea that we are all consumers—consumers who have rights, who deserve choices, who need more. As a teacher, I saw parents (and teachers) who wanted their children to be ‘empowered’. So they did everything they could to ensure these children had choices. Lots and lots of them.

of us have access to, but don't ever grasp. Far too often money gets in the way. We start our decision-making process as ‘empowered’ consumers by saying, “I can afford this. I believe it is worth this much ($). And so I choose A.” So we've made a choice, but at the end of it we are still slaves to money. Conscious consumerism is about putting values and beliefs before money. Not disregarding it altogether, but about reprioritising so it's further down the list. It is about taking responsibility for the choices we make for ourselves by acknowledging that they impact on other people, the environment and future generations. While it is often promoted as an ethical way of shopping with an extrinsic focus, I believe that it is important for our intrinsic good. Because the act of conscious consumerism is actually about putting ourselves first. By saying “I believe this is important. I think I can change the world for the better through my actions. And so I choose G” we are not only taking responsibility for our choices and benefiting others through our actions, but we are empowering ourselves. And who knows? The biggest reward for this kind of responsible consumerism could be our own happiness ... and freedom.

But it isn't empowering to have a choice between A and B. It's not even empowering to have a choice between A, B, C, D and E. What's empowering is saying, “I believe in this. This is important to me. And so I choose G.” This is real freedom. The kind of freedom most people only dream of. And it's the kind of freedom that many page 50 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

Now we can determine the chicken and eggs are both free range, the dilemma remains, which came first? The same dilemma is faced by those, like Conscious Consumers, trying to effect social change. We live in a capitalist society, so the most powerful way to effect change is to vote with your wallet. Great in theory, but what if you don’t know what goes on behind the scenes of businesses like your local cafe, or worse, can you trust what they say to be true? Hence the Conscious Consumers badge system. But what if there are no businesses, or very few incorporating ethical practices in their business model?

practices is good for business. In November last year they launched a revolutionary app which changes all this. The idea behind it is to get more businesses doing good by allowing them to find out more about their customers and their values—what they care about, how much they spend and how often they visit. The app is linked directly to the paymark system which means the customer doesn’t need to do anything more than pay by eftpos or credit card yet benefit by gaining loyalty points for shopping ethically and voting for positive social change with each transaction. Find out how you can vote with your wallet and make positive change in our world by downloading the Conscious Consumer app and supporting local businesses, like Rouge, doing great things. *In a Colmar Brunton survey “Better Business Better Future”, 80 per cent agreed that previous generations haven't protected the planet, and believed the responsibility is on their generation to improve the situation. Every time you spend money you are casting a vote for the kind of world you want, so spend consciously! words VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

Many of Conscious Consumers’ members to date have joined because they believe in doing the right thing. Phil MacKay from Rouge in Cambridge says when they joined in 2013 they already did much of what was required for several badges from recycling, composting, using free range and so on. These practices reflected Phil and wife Alana’s beliefs and Conscious Consumer helped them promote this and, as Phil says, “It was a great framework to help us progressively up our sustainability game, and it’s been an important part of our sustainability journey.” With more and more people wanting to make ethical and environmentally wise choices* it has been a big part of Conscious Consumers’ plan to illustrate to businesses that adopting great

Mrs Goodness Mrs Goodness is an architecturally trained secondary school teacher, turned mum passionate about the idea of living a ‘good’ life. “For me, this means a fulfilling, healthy life, which is not experienced at the expense of others. I strive to make daily lifestyle choices that are ethical, responsible, practical and sustainable.” | www.mrsgoodness.nz

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NOURISH | recipes

Carrots … not those illumine orange, perfectly formed ones that you find in the supermarket, but rather the lumpy, bumpy ones that come out of our vege gardens. They can come in all shapes and sizes and colours and here at The Falls Retreat, we tend to focus on growing the baby orange version for the kitchen to use. Small, sweet and full of flavour, we put them to a variety of uses: the vegetable component of our kids menu (we are talking pan fried snapper with hand cut Bistro chips and garden baby carrots). Always a staple in our veges of the day and now a vital component of our beef entrée (see carrot and cucumber kimchi recipe below). All gardeners know that carrots can be a hit or miss depending on your soil conditions: not too rich in compost, and a soil that is rich and deep in moisture with not too many stones. Sow them sparingly (don’t those tiny little seeds just drive you mad?) and soil temperature is also critical. An inch of water per week … It’s almost a miracle that we produce these little bundles of Vitamin A. It’s not a myth that carrots help you see in the dark — they are full of beta-carotene which the body converts into vitamin A, an essential vitamin for health vision. And they go back years (we are talking 5000 years)! Rumour has it that the modern orange carrot was developed by 16th century Dutch growers to honour William of Orange. Myth or truth … the fact is that carrots can be used in anything and everything: grated in lunch box wraps, served raw as mini snacks for kids dipped in hummus, made into cakes, doused in olive oil and roasted with your chicken, stir fried or even pickled. The common carrot is a hero in our books. Respect to our orange (or purple or white) friend! www.fallsretreat.co.nz

CUCUMBER & CARROT KIMCHI 2 large cucumbers shaved with vege peeler in long thin strips stopping at seeds 2 tbsp caster sugar 3 carrots peeled and shaved with vege peeler in long thin strips 1½ tbsp fish sauce 1½ tbsp light soy sauce 2 tbsp rice vinegar 100g spring onions, julienned 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 50g ginger peeled and julienned 20g coriander Place all ingredients in a large bowl. Cover and leave in the fridge for at least 24 hours: the longer the better.

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words BRAD KING | photography VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

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NOURISH | tips

There is always a list of story ideas we would like to cover in Nourish. Some are just a crumb, while others are half baked! With each issue this list grows longer, not shorter, as we see great ideas, meet amazing people and learn new things we want to share with you. Long-time readers will know our penchant for a good pun, and I’ll admit some of our stories begin because of a great pun or catchy title. Dishing It Up started with this, a title. For several months we discussed what the focus would be: plate and serveware trends, tips from local chefs to improve your presentation, a technical guide with tools and techniques. After a recent visit to Crudo, on Braid Road in Hamilton, where owner Amy Hodgson proudly describes the food as “next level” I knew we had our story. At Crudo, each dish is a work of art, so I was determined to pin down head chef Gareth Cowie for his tips. Gareth, who trained at what was then called Waikato Polytech, has spent the past 18 years cooking his way around the world, most recently at Richard Branson’s Necker Island in the Bahamas. Luckily for us, Gareth says, “It was time to come home and settle down.”

Keeping with this natural theme, dishes with texture are proving popular with chefs. Bright white plates are being replaced with muted tones and black, a difficult colour to make food ‘pop’ on, is still a challenge many are taking up. Want to take your presentation to the next level? See Gareth’s top tips below.

KEEP IT SIMPLE. CONSIDER... + how the dish is going to be eaten + what dish you are going to use + the colours on the dish + how you are going to execute it, especially if plating mor than two I say research is always important, so a visit to Crudo to see just how it’s done and to taste the results is a must!

Gareth says, “Flavour is always the first consideration when creating a dish, but plating is a consideration from the get go.”

yum

Colour is a crucial element to think about. On Crudo’s Eton Mess, Gareth uses edible flowers to add extra colours instead of the traditional green leaves, like mint, that would often be used. !

WE WATCHED GARETH CREATE HIS GORGEOUS TAKE ON AN ETON MESS FROM BEGINNING TO TASTING.

dishing IT UP

Deciding what you are going to serve the dish on impacts on the final dish as well as how you can put that dish together. Both Amy and Gareth admit they are “obsessed with plates”. A few years ago the trend was for geometric shaped plates when today you will see more natural organic shapes—round perhaps but not a perfect circle.

Crudo | 29 Braid Road, St Andrews Hamilton

Bin Inn Dinsdale specialty grocery store

specialising in organic, gluten free, whole food and super foods bininndinsdale

bininndinsdale11

Dinsdale Shopping Centre | 07 847 7045 | Monday to Friday 9:00am-5:30pm, Saturday 9am-2:30pm words & photography VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN

page 55 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


NOURISH | feature

Alpha

STREET

words VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN | photography LEAH HOSKIN

Fresh, innovative food that’s fun, tasty and with just a little fuss. You step up to enter Alpha Street Kitchen & Bar, which is apt as stepping it up has been the goal of owner Fiona Massey and executive chef Harry Williams. This ambitious pair have worked hard since taking over the space 18 months ago to create a modern eatery in the heart of Cambridge. The elevated space in this historic building was one of the first attractions of the business says Fiona. “I could immediately imagine what could be done with the space,” says Fiona who is passionate about Cambridge and at the time was looking for a great excuse to move back home to Cambridge having been away for over a decade. Originally the Alpha Hotel, its most recent incarnation was The Nash. After stripping back the heavy curtains obscuring the stunning stain glass windows, the addition of classic white linen table cloths, some great lighting and replacing the mustard walls with fresh turquoise, Alpha Street was born. While the visible changes out front were taking place even more was happening behind the scenes. “Getting the right team has been key,” admits Fiona. This started with Harry, who Fiona met the same day the purchase of the business went through, so Fiona was off to a great start! A talented chef with a wealth of experience under his belt, Harry was looking for a new challenge when he met Fiona. Key to this successful relationship, according to Fiona, is a shared food philosophy. “It needs to be friggin’ tasty but not over pretentious,” smiles Fiona while Harry nods his head in agreement. Sensibly the duo didn’t change everything overnight; instead the menu slowly evolved to what it is today: changing with the seasons to keep things fresh while highlighting good quality ingredients. Harry admits they are tough on suppliers to ensure no compromises are made. Something great must be happening in that kitchen as Harry’s team now consists of some great local talent. The key he says is “not to rest on our laurels—that’s when people get bored” and he is revelling in the creativeness of the team. Alongside the culinary team, Fiona has been working on building a top notch front of house brigade. Assistant manager Sebastian Lemercier ensures the wine list is one to drool over. He is also in charge of staff training; a key component in Fiona’s books, who bemoans the fact that waitering is not seen by many as a profession. Front of house staff, Fiona says, need to be able to relate to the customers, have a great knowledge of the food, wines and beer; it’s their job to make the whole experience one to remember. “We get a lot of feedback about the great atmosphere,” says Fiona and she believes this starts with the warm welcome guests get. “We still have a lot more we want to achieve,” says Fiona, but now they have a solid team and a gorgeous space they are keen to put their foot forward. So step out to Alpha Street and enjoy a casual yet elegant dining experience, be it a delicious quick lunch, nibbles and a few vinos on the deck watching the world whizz by or a lovely dinner. page 57 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


NOURISH | recipes

NOURISH | arts

Local Art Scene

TOP TIPS FOR HANGING YOUR ARTWORK - from Sarah Marston of The Framing Workshop Consider the placement of the artwork in relation to the furniture. Think of the furniture as much a part of the composition of the arrangement as the framed artworks on the wall. For example, the console table and the objects on it should interact and balance with the framed piece above it. Installing artwork at the right height is of paramount importance. We follow a guideline of one third down from the top of the frame is approximately eye level. However, this is not a rule. The use of the room, or the positioning of furniture may influence where the artwork is placed. For example, you may want a piece to hang a little lower, placed next to the bedside table. Consider the layout of a group of artworks carefully before hanging. A good tip when hanging a group of different sizes in one space is to experiment with the layout on the floor to create the layout that suits the story you have in mind. When hanging a series of artworks of the same size, a grid formation looks fantastic. Ensure the gaps between the artwork are all

VANILLA BEAN & HONEY PANNA COTTA, ROAST PEACH, GRANOLA, BURNT APPLE | SERVES 6 PANNA COTTA

ROAST PEACH

GRANOLA

BURNT APPLE PUREE

1½ cups cream

2 peaches

1 cup rolled oats

2 Granny Smith apples

1½ cups milk

2 tbsp honey

½ cup slivered almonds

3 tbsp brown sugar

½ cup honey

1 tsp white balsamic

½ cup macadamia nuts

3 tbsp vegetable oil

2 ½ gelatin leaves

1 tbsp butter

½ cup pistachio nuts

½ teaspoon salt

½ tsp salt

½ tsp vanilla bean paste

⅓ cup shaved coconut

1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Into a pot add honey, balsamic, butter and vanilla. Bring to the boil. Place peach halves on roasting tray (skin-side down). Pour honey and balsamic mix over peaches. Roast at 200°C for 10 minutes or until golden.

2 tbsp dark brown sugar

De-seed apples and place on a roasting tray. Sprinkle brown sugar and salt over apples. Cook for 30 minutes at 200°C or until apples are very dark. Blend with hand blender adding oil slowly.

In a pot add cream and milk, slowly bring to the boil. Take off heat and add honey, salt and vanilla. Bloom gelatine, then add to the mix. Set in six 170ml moulds, and refrigerate for 3 hours.

2 tbsp vegetable oil 1 tsp salt Set oven to 150°C. In a bowl mix all ingredients. Spread onto a baking tray and cook for 1 hour 15 mins, stirring every 15 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Garnish with fresh basil.

equal. We can offer tips to achieve this, just ask one of the team at our workshop. Avoid hanging artwork in direct sunlight. Ultraviolet light rays and extra heat damages artwork. Do not hang artwork over heaters. Fluctuations in heat can cause long-term damage to an artwork. Be careful installing artwork in very damp areas such as bathrooms and steamy kitchen areas. Moisture and humidity can damage artwork significantly over time. It is nice to have artworks in these rooms so it is good to be mindful of the risks that these environments place on the artworks. Pinterest is a great source of ideas and inspiration for hanging artwork. It illustrates many concepts, both contemporary and classic. Check out some of the selection we have made on our ‘ideas catalogue’ on The Framing Workshop Pinterest page. www.theframingworkshop.co.nz

THE MANDARIN TREE Set in the heart of Gordonton, The Mandarin Tree is an art and concept store owned by Waikato photographer and artist Claudia Aalderink. The gallery represents 100% NZ made artwork from over 100 artists and offers a large variety of artwork from paintings, photography, ceramics/pottery, prints, cards, jewellery, woodwork, recycle art as well as beautiful and unique pieces in their whimsical sculpture garden. GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday – Friday 9.30 am – 4.30 pm Saturday 10.00 pm – 2.00 pm

1034 Gordonton Road – Gordonton www.themandarintree.nz

Alpha St | 47 Alpha Street, Cambridge

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Peplers


COLOUR AND TEXTURE Gorgeous linen on the bed ties in the colour of the ceiling and the artwork on the wall. The custom made headboard and mix of different textures are a look easily replicated in your boudoir and a visit to Red Red Red Interiors in Te Awamutu is a great place to start. Their showroom has a brilliant selection of stunning linens as well as a full range of fabric samples, not to mention many other tempting additions that would look great in your home.

Mother and daughter duo, Margaret Verkroost and Vanessa Johnson are experts at creating warm, luxurious spaces. They recently completed what Vanessa describes as a “dream job.” A three year project where the Red Red Red Interiors team were in charge of every aspect from the exterior colours through to the carpet, furniture and fixtures, upholstery, lighting and more! Not one aspect of this gorgeous home hasn’t had the Red Red Red treatment. Margaret says the clients loved Huka Lodge and so that was their inspiration. The key, Margaret explains “was to inject some colour and ensure it felt like home.” One of the innovative ways they did this was by painting the vaulted ceilings not only in different colours but also in high gloss. This adds a stunning injection of colour and personality into the rooms and as Margaret points out creates a warm lustre.

DESIGNING a dream home

WORDS Vicki Ravlich-Horan | PHOTOGRAPHY Ashlee de Caires

FLOWERS | JEWELLERY | GIFTS

196 Alexandra Street, Te Awamutu 07 871 2920 | thebird-cage.co.nz

page 61 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


UPHOLSTERY Much of the furniture was custom made. The pair has excelled themselves with the upholstered chairs and couches which are not only gorgeous but super comfortable. These are complimented by the use of texture and colour in the window treatments, throws and flooring.

THE HALLWAY A perfect space to display artwork! Margaret pulled together the family’s extensive collection by organising the framing and placement of all the artwork in the hallway and throughout the house.

STYLING RED RED RED Interiors | PHOTOGRAPHY Ashlee de Caires

RED RED RED INTERIORS | 41 Market Street, Te Awamutu | www.redredred.co.nz

SELLING

ANGELA’S TOP 5 TIPS

Angela Finnigan specialises in selling lifestyle properties and has been one of Bayleys’ top selling agents for the past nine years. So we asked her for her top five tips to get the most when selling your property.

Accentuate your outdoor spaces. Kiwi’s love spending time outdoors but this doesn’t necessarily mean mowing the lawns so make sure all the gardens and maintenance are up to scratch. Then sell the lifestyle and dress it up. This can be as simple as placing some great outdoor furniture in the space.

the dream

For more advice or if you would like Angela to sell your house get in contact today

021623550 | 07 8343821 angela.finnigan@bayleys.co.nz page 62 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

Add colour and personality to a neutral room inexpensively with soft furnishings. These are also easily changed if the buyer wants.

Declutter but remember to keep some personality and a feeling that this is a home. Removing everything can make the house feel sterile! The kitchen is the heart of the home so if yours is a little tired consider investing in a revamp. Pick a great agent! So give Angela a call.


NOURISH | how to

SOFTLY softly

words VICKI RAVLICH-HORAN | photography BRYDIE THOMPSON

and more accessible forms of brewing a cuppa jo are making a comeback. I personally love a great plunger (French press) coffee. Unlike espresso-based coffees, ‘soft brew’ methods are easily mastered and don’t require a big bulky machine. That is not to say we should forget all we have learnt in the past two decades! Fresh coffee beans are essential. Coffee trailblazers Excelso were one of the first coffee roasters in New Zealand back in the early 90s. Jeff and Carrie Evans have been educating Kiwis about coffee ever since, and this includes how to get delicious coffee from methods other than an espresso machine. ‘Soft brew’ refers to the method of making coffee using a slow extraction, as opposed to the quick high-pressured extraction of an espresso. This allows you to taste the pure characteristics of the coffee.

I remember when we got one of these machines at home and how sophisticated I thought we were! This almost made up for the

I’m giving away my years with these anecdotes, but for those who may be a little younger and can’t remember a time without their daily flat white it’s a good reminder of how quickly our coffee knowledge and tastes have expanded in just over two decades. It’s also interesting to see that fashion, even in coffee, can come full circle. Espresso machines are an obligatory piece of equipment in every cafe and a common occurrence in homes, yet some of the older

page 64 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

Old stale coffee will never smell or taste as good as freshly roasted beans. Freshly roasted coffee is best between 3–10 days old. So buy just what you need to last a maximum of two weeks. COUNTING THE BEANS Beans stay fresher than ground coffee. Ideally grind just what you need just before each brew. If you don't have a grinder, buy smaller quantities of coffee more often. THE GRIND Getting the grind right for the brew method is crucial. Fine for espresso; medium/coarse for filter, Chemex, AeroPress, V60; and coarse for plunger and siphon.

The Chemex was invented in 1941 by German born chemist Dr Peter J. Schlumbohm. A prolific inventor, Dr Schlumbohm moved to New York in 1936, where he invented the Chemex, undoubtedly his most enduring legacy.

WATER

An elegant, one-piece, hourglass shaped vessel, the Chemex has not changed since 1941 and is part of the permanent collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art as well as the Smithsonian.

Fiddle and adjust until it is just the way you like it. The amount of coffee you use, the coarseness of the grind and the length of time you brew or extract will all make a difference to the flavour of the coffee. Try altering some or all of these and see what happens. The type of bean also makes a world of difference. Where espresso machines work best with blended coffee, single origin beans are perfect for soft brew.

The AeroPress is ideal when on the move or when camping/ tramping. Made of plastic, it is very portable. Using tiny filters it operates like a pump. It even includes space for a small grinder, so all you need is hot water and your coffee.

lukewarm insipid coffee. Things changed when I began to work in restaurants just as espresso coffee was making its indelible mark on New Zealanders and our culture.

FRESH IS BEST

Visit Excelso’s roastery on Third Ave in Tauranga or peruse their website and you will see all manner of brewing equipment. The team also offer workshops to get you familiar with the different methods.

It produces a clear, pure, flavourful coffee without bitterness or sediment. The coffee only comes in contact with the scientifically designed filter and non-porous glass. With the Chemex method you can make coffee as strong as you like without bitterness and because of its purity, Chemex brewed coffee can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for reheating ... without losing its flavour!

It’s hard to believe pre the 1990s you would have been hard pressed to find a cappuccino in New Zealand, let alone a macchiato! Coffee was predominantly instant, unless you had European lineage and then perhaps, like my nana, you would brew thick strong coffee in a stove top percolator. In posh hotels you may have been offered Kona coffee, brewed in a pot. You know the ones, like you see Americans on TV guzzling by the bucketful in diners.

EXCELSO’S TOP TIPS FOR GREAT SOFT BREW COFFEE:

Filtered water results in a superior coffee as it ensures nothing, like chlorine, affects the taste of the coffee. EXPERIMENT

For great coffee and all your soft brew equipment go to www.excelso.co.nz

Style in the Suburbs 6 Te Aroha Street | Hamilton thekirkcafe page 65 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz


SAVOURY

TARTS

words & recipes Megan Coupland | photography BRYDIE THOMPSON

Tart in culinary terms … makes me laugh! My subtle way of being a bit childish. I giggle inside when I read sweet or savoury ‘tarts’ on a menu. A good savoury tart is quite a delight. The tip for making an excellent tart (hehe) is having every CARAMELISED ONION AND FETA TART CRUST

2 cups wholemeal flour ½ tsp salt 220g cold butter, cut in cubes ¼ cup iced water cracked pepper ½ cup walnuts Pulse the flour and salt in a food processor then add the butter and mix until just broken up. Add the walnuts, pepper and pour in the water, pulsing to just bring the pastry together. Roll into a ball and rest. CARAMELISED ONIONS

8 red onions, sliced 4 tbsp macadamia oil 20g butter ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup balsamic vinegar salt

component tasty by itself. The pastry has to be delicious and exciting so when you come to the corner pieces it’s not just a carrier for the filling, but an integral part of the dish which would gain MasterChef contestant marks in itself. Heat the oil and butter in a sauté pan. Add the onions and salt and fry till golden. Scrape the brown caramelised yumminess from the bottom of the pan and keep frying. This step takes approx. 10 minutes. Add the brown sugar, salt and vinegar to the onions. Cook for approx. 10–15 more minutes until the vinegar and sugar reduce down and become syrupy. Cool down before using in the tart. This can be made up to a week in advance, and you can make a double batch so you have some ready for a spare tart later in the week! ASSEMBLY

200g feta 2 tsp fresh thyme Roll the dough out on a baking sheet to a circle approx. 35cm in diameter. It does not matter if the dough is a bit rough and hangs over the edges of the baking sheet a bit. Put the caramelised onions in the centre, leaving a 5cm border around the outside. Layer the onions quite thick. Sprinkle with the thyme and the crumbled feta and then fold the pastry over towards the centre, leaving a window in the centre. Pop in the oven and bake at 180°C for approx. 35–40 minutes till the pastry is golden brown and cooked through. Serve with a simple garden salad.

SPEND TIME GETTING YOUR PASTRY SHELL PERFECT I always roll my pastry out between two pieces of cling film and I only put flour on one side, so the other side of the film sticks to the pastry and I can use this to lift it up and hold it together while I line my tart case. Once it is lined, I chill the pastry for 5 minutes before I peel the cling film off and shape the edges. Then I pop it

back in the chiller to rest for another 10 minutes before baking blind. Always use beads or rice to bake blind, and once the side is slightly golden take the beads or rice out and cook the base for another 5 minutes to dry out. If you do have a little crack on the base you can patch it up with a bit of raw pastry before you add the filling.


THREE CHEESE TART WITH AN OATMEAL CRUST

8 thin slices brie

CRUST

230ml cream

300g flour

EVENTS

salt and pepper pinch of nutmeg

cracked pepper

Slices of brie

MEET BEN BAYLY Host of New Zealand's first My Kitchen Rules, 2015 Cuisine Magazine Chef of the Year and award-winning executive chef at The Grove & Baduzzi, Ben Bayly is coming to Kitchen Things with all proceeds going to Hospice Waikato.

1 tsp fresh thyme leaves

Mix cream cheese, cream, eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper in a food processor.

Wed 29 March, 6pm Kitchen Things, HamiltonTickets $20 from eventfinda.co.nz

150g oats 200g softened butter 2 eggs salt

1½ tsp sugar Mix all ingredients in a food processor and rest. Line a 20cm (diameter) deep pie tin with pastry. Bake blind, ready for the filling. FILLING

350g cream cheese 100g pronto rosso (tomato paste) 150g crumbled blue cheese

6 eggs GARNISH

Chopped chives

Spread pronto rosso on the base of the oatmeal crust and crumble the blue cheese on top.

THE GREAT PUMPKIN CARNIVAL Over the years The Great Pumpkin Carnival has grown and evolved to include more categories to enter, things to see and do, and more fun for the whole family. Started back in 2009 by Jenny Rowden as an event to celebrate all things pumpkin, it promises to be a fun family day out for people of all ages.

Pour the cream cheese mix over and top with chives and slices of brie. Cook on bottom shelf at 155°C with an empty tray on the top shelf to stop it from browning too much. Cook for approx 45 minutes. It should still be quite wobbly in the middle (do not let it soufflé while cooking).

Claudelands Events Centre, Saturday 13 May 2017 www.spoiltforchoice.co.nz CORPORATE CRICKET Give you and your most valued clients a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enjoy exclusive access to Hamilton’s boutique international cricket ground with Spoilt For Choice’s Corporate Cricket Packages. Play your own game of 20/20 under lights, while your VIP guests enjoy the view and refreshments from the boundary club. Seddon Park, Summer 2017/2018 www.spoiltforchoice.co.nz

THE

NARROWS LANDING

Weddings, Conferences, Boutique accommodation and Special events

RedKitchen www.redkitchen.co.nz

www.facebook.com/rawbalancenz

CAMBRIDGE AUTUMN FESTIVAL Bigger and brighter than ever before this year’s festival kicks off with a launch at Rouge Café on Empire Street on Wednesday 19th April. 19th – 30th April www.cambridgeautumnfestival.co.nz

2 April www.thegreatpumpkincarnival.co.nz THE GREAT NZ FOOD SHOW VIP MASTERCLASS Enhance your Great NZ Food Show experience by securing your spot for the exclusive VIP Lounge & Masterclass Package on offer by Spoilt For Choice. The package includes a private masterclass cooking demonstration with NZ’s first MasterChef, Brett McGregor.

Megan Coupland

RAW FOOD WORKSHOPS Be inspired with these great workshops from the team at Raw Balance. Various workshops run from May to August, so check out their Facebook page for more details.

07 858 4001 www.thenarrowslanding.co.nz

page 69 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

WAIKATO FOOD INC AGM Get involved in this group doing great things for the Waikato food and hospitality industry. Tuesday 2 May, 6pm Prof’s at Woodlands www.waikatofoodinc.com

TAUPO MARKET Meet the producers, artists and chefs. Be inspired by their passion and take home original presents for him, her, the garden and for you! Every Saturday 9am–1pm Redoubt Street, Taupo www.taupomarket.kiwi.nz


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FOR FULL INTINERARY AND BOOKING DETAILS EMAIL andrew@standrewsgolf.co.nz

Combining creativity with expertise.

TALK TO US TODAY 0 7 8 4 7 5 32 1 | 0 2 7 6 31 4 8 9 7 paula@nourishmagazine.co.nz

page 70 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

SEE OUR FRAMING TIPS ON THE ARTS PAGE

07 856 4236 | 120 Silverdale Road | Hamilton www.theframingworkshop.co.nz

WITH A FLOWER FARM OF FRESH FLOWERS AT HER FINGER TIPS, SEE THE FLOWER LADY FOR ALL YOUR FLOWERY NEEDS POSIES & BOUQUETS | WEDDINGS SPECIAL OCCASIONS | CORPORATE & EVENTS

PHONE ANNA 021 023 80788 The Flower Lady

theflowerladynz

page 71 www.nourishmagazine.co.nz

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HAMILTON CENTRAL 6 GARDEN PLACE, HAMILTON 07 444 5043

BAKERY STORE 236 KAHIKATEA DRIVE, HAMILTON 07 847 1206

www.volarebread.com

CAMBRIDGE STORE 27 EMPIRE ST CAMBRIDGE 07 444 5142

Nourish Waikato Autumn 2017  

Fresh local flavour from the Waikato region in NZ. We get dishy with edible flowers, celebrate Mother's Day and discover Aquafaba.

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