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Re se arc h Re p o r t o f t h e U n iver s i t y o f U t a h C o l l e ge o f S c i e n c e 2 0 1 6


“ R e s e a rc h R e p o r t o f t he U niversit y of U t a h C ollege of S cience 2016

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

Marcel Proust

2 Dean’s Message

4 Solving the Mysteries of Cellular Function

9 Frontiers of Science — 50th Anniversary

12 Research Roundup — Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy 20 Snails’ Speedy Insulin — Potential for Fast-acting Therapeutic Insulin

22 Lassonde Studios — A Living and Learning Environment for Students

24 Innovation Ecosystem DISCOVER PUBLISHER University of Utah College of Science

DEAN Henry S. White

GRAPHIC DESIGN Royter Snow Design

EDITOR James R. DeGooyer

PRINTING Seagull Printing

PHOTOGRAPHY Rick Egan Mike Schmidt Michael Schoenfeld CONTRIBUTING WRITER Paul Gabrielsen

CORRESPONDENCE University of Utah College of Science 1430 Presidents Cir. Rm. 220 Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0140

Office: (801) 581-6958 Fax: (801) 585-3169 office@science.utah.edu Visit us online: www.science.utah.edu

ON THE COVER Astronomy and physics professor Benjamin Bromley is searching for Planet Nine. The discovery of a new planet would improve our understanding of the solar system and the universe. Image credit: Planet Nine in Outer Space artistic depiction image by Prokaryotes.


Research Repor t of the U n ive r si t y o f U t ah Co l l e ge o f Sc i e n c e 2 0 1 6

2 Dean’s Message

4 Solving the Mysteries of Cellular Function

9 Frontiers of Science — 50th Anniversary

12 Research Roundup — Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy 20 Snails’ Speedy Insulin — Potential for Fast-acting Therapeutic Insulin

22 Lassonde Studios — A Living and Learning Environment for Students

24 Innovation Ecosystem


D E A N ’ S

M E S S A G E

Dear Colleagues, Alumni and Friends,

This inaugural issue of Discover presents compelling stories of research and innovation in the College of Science

and the dramatic impact the College has on students, the community, and the State of Utah. The University of Utah is a major economic engine in our State and the nation, and research discoveries in the College fuel that engine. The College filed 27 invention disclosures, eight licenses, and had 16 U.S. patents issued in the last year.

The University presents the Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award to recognize faculty members who

create products and initiatives with potential to change the world and improve lives. This year, Baldomero “Toto” Olivera, a Distinguished Professor of Biology, received that honor for his work on pharmacologically-active peptides in the venoms of marine cone snails. See page 20 for his latest study.

The College’s Center for Cell and Genome Science, highlighted on page four, provides a dynamic, interdisciplinary

environment for the development and pursuit of strategies to visualize, probe and manipulate the microscopic workings of cells. The Center is leading the University’s scientific community to maximize opportunities of the post-genomics revolution and meet the challenges of modern science and medicine.

Recent research developments from each department in the College — Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and

Physics and Astronomy — are highlighted in this issue of Discover. Starting on page 12, read about the hunt to discover Planet Nine, the spectacular diversity of pigeon genetics, the fight against the microbial “arms race,” and unraveling biological complexity with mathematics.

The College is celebrating a tremendous milestone this year — the Frontiers of Science lecture series is 50 years old!

These events provide a fabulous opportunity for the entire University community and general public to participate in the most important scientific questions and problems of our time. Frontiers lectures are held on campus and are free and open to the public — please join us! See page 11 for this year’s schedule.

I invite you to discover the College of Science in new and meaningful ways and to support our mission of student

education, scientific discovery, and economic impact in Utah.

Henry S. White Dean, College of Science 2


T H E

C O L L E G E

A T

A

G L A N C E

The College of Science was established in 1970 and is one of 17 Colleges at the University of Utah. Mission

Degrees of Study

To create, develop, apply, and disseminate new

The College

science; to educate the next generation of scientists;

offers the

to provide a strong education in science for

following

students of other disciplines and future teachers;

undergraduate and

to promote public understanding of science.

graduate degrees in biology, chemistry,

Departments

mathematics, and

• Biology; www.biology.utah.edu

physics & astronomy:

• Chemistry; www.chem.utah.edu

• Bachelor of Arts, B.A.

• Mathematics; www.math.utah.edu

• Bachelor of Science, B.S.

• Physics & Astronomy; www.physics.utah.edu

• Master of Arts, M.A.

• Center for Science and Mathematics Education

• Master of Science, M.S.

(CSME); www.csme.utah.edu • Center for Cell and Genome Science (CCGS); www.ccgs.utah.edu

• Master of Statistics, M. Stat.

Funding

• Master of Philosophy, M.Phil.

The College received $35.6 million of external

• Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D.

research funding in the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

Faculty

Scholarships

• Global Change and Sustainability Center (GCSC) www.gcsc.utah.edu • Materials Research, Science, and Engineering

The College employs 166 tenured or

The College awarded $833,265 in scholarships

Center (MRSEC); www.mrsec.utah.edu

tenure-track faculty members.

during the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

• Center for Quantitative Biology (CQB);

• Distinguished Professors: 25

www.biology.utah.edu Enrollment

• Full Professors: 85

Graduation

• Associate Professors: 28

The College of Science awarded 458 bachelor’s

• Assistant Professors: 28

degrees, 58 Master’s degrees, and 56 PhD degrees

There are currently 2,470 students enrolled

to the Class of 2016.

in the College, making it one the largest

Faculty Distinction

colleges on campus.

• Nobel Prize: 1

• 1,977 undergraduate students

• American Academy of

• 60 Master’s students • 433 PhD students The College taught 58,661 student credit hours (SCH) in Spring semester 2016.

Arts and Sciences: 8 • National Academy of Science: 7 • Rosenblatt Prize: 7

For more information about the College please visit www.science.utah.edu.


Center for Cell & Genome Science

Solving the Mysteries

of Cellular

Function

of the post-genomics revolution and meet the challenges

of modern science education.

encouraged to have their own research program, which can

The CCGS provides a dynamic, interdisciplinary environ-

encompass a diverse array of interests. However, the regular

A major revolution is sweeping through the biological

ment for development and pursuit of strategies to visualize,

activities of the Center are focused on sharing research ideas

sciences. This revolution began with advances in molecular

probe and manipulate the microscopic workings of cells.

and fostering new collaborations. These opportunities will

biology that allowed the cloning and manipulation of pieces

be significantly enhanced when the CCGS research groups

of the genetic code. The resulting development of new

Our mission is to understand

techniques in genomics quickly led to the complete DNA

how genetic information is translated

The challenge now is to understand how approximately

20,000-25,000 genes in humans and other organisms contribute to the development and function of cells and organs.

Biologists alone cannot meet this challenge. Mathemati-

cians, bioinformaticians and computer scientists must provide expertise to elucidate the gene regulatory networks that control cell function and differentiation. Physicists will contribute to

are housed together in the new Crocker Science Center on

into the molecular mechanics of the

arranged and controlled to build cells with unique functions.

Presidents Circle.

A recent example of a collaboration catalyzed by the

Center occurred between Jen Heemstra, a chemist, and Julie Hollien, a biologist. Hollien challenged Heemstra to

cell, and how this machinery is

think about how to better label RNA in living cells.

sequencing of entire organisms, including humans.

4

The CCGS operates on a model where each member is

Villu Maricq, Director of the CCGS

“I studied the question and realized that there’s a huge

unmet need there, and one that my lab would be wellequipped to tackle,” says Heemstra.

Together they planned new methods for labeling RNA

the understanding of the nanoscopic world of the interior

Early Success

components with fluorescent small molecules and started

of the cell, engineers will design new strategies to peer into

“Research centers are typically founded around a specific

a series of experiments supported by a University of Utah

the workings of cells using sub-diffraction microscopy, and

research idea or question. In contrast, the strategy for the

Funding Incentive Seed Grant.

chemists will formulate new methods to label the cellular

Center for Cell and Genome Science is to bring together

machinery and influence its function using drug-like molecules.

creative scientists who think broadly, and let the problems

Chemical Society’s Chemical Biology journal in 2014, and

and questions naturally develop from the dialogue that results

now we’ve recently been informed that our National

A New Strategy

as we interact,” says Jen Heemstra. “This provides us with the

Institutes of Health (NIH) grant application for this project

The Center for Cell and Genome Science (CCGS) was

freedom and agility to continually seek out and tackle the

has been funded,” says Hollien. The NIH grant provides

established in 2006 precisely to maximize the opportunities

most exciting problems in cellular science as they emerge.”

nearly $1.5 million for five years of continued study.

“We published our initial results in the American


C O L L A B O R A T I O N F A C U L T Y

A N D

S T U D E N T S

B E T W E E N E N H A N C E S

C R E A T I V E T H E

S C I E N T I S T S ,

M I S S I O N

O F

T H E

C O L L E G E

5


A

N E W

D E V E L O P E D I N T O

T E C H N I Q U E T O

T H E

H A S

P R O V I D E

M E C H A N I C S

N E W O F

B E E N I N S I G H T S C E L L S

The Student Experience The CCGS, and the entire Crocker Science Center, will provide greatly expanded classroom space, modern research facilities, and enormous research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students at the U.

Given the explosive growth in the fields of genetics and cell biology, it is clear that the

CCGS, with its interdisciplinary approach, can provide new educational opportunities to students at all levels.

The College of Science could offer as many as 10 new courses, each with numerous

class sections, thereby allowing more students to register for more classes each year. The College could potentially increase the number of highly qualified science graduates by 50 to 100 people per year, representing a 10% to 20% increase in graduation rates.

Several new courses are already being developed and implemented. Students from

all departments on campus are offered opportunities to participate in classes and laboratory experiences taught by faculty in the CCGS who bring unique viewpoints and experimental techniques to bear on modern scientific questions.

Students and postdocs will have the opportunity to interact with researchers across the disciplines of the life sciences and physical sciences, and these interactions will be facilitated by the architectural design of the Crocker Science Center, which features shared “open lab” and equipment spaces. At the heart of the building is a three-story

atrium, which will place “research on display” by providing a full view into the research laboratories of the CCGS. This is unique from most science buildings where research labs are separated from classrooms and public spaces.


Center for Cell & Genome Science

Mission of the Center for Cell & Genome Science 1) To bring biochemists, cell biologists, geneticists, mathematicians, chemists, and physicists together in a creative interdisciplinary environment to advance the understanding of the molecular machinery that contributes to cellular function. The CCGS will support cutting-edge research, promote faculty interactions, open new areas of inquiry and generate competitive proposals for external research funding. 2) To contribute to educational and research training experiences for University of Utah undergraduate students, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. The CCGS is dedicated to fostering interdisciplinary scientific research that will tie together the Colleges of Science, Engineering and Medicine and provide a new mechanism to address the University’s goal of providing outstanding teaching and research training. 3) To establish core facilities for ultra-high resolution and cryo-electron microscopy that will serve as a valuable resource for the entire University of Utah scientific community and for researchers throughout Utah.

“Providing visual access to the research areas is anticipated to generate excitement for

and newly synthesized materials to deduce their structures,” says David Belnap, manager of

scientific research and encourage undergraduate students to seek out opportunities to work

the Electron Microscopy Core Lab.

in a laboratory on campus,” says Heemstra.

The CCGS will also sponsor annual travel awards to support graduate students who

We could make dramatic progress in addressing fundamental questions about cellular

would like to present their research at national or international scientific meetings. After

function and how it goes awry in disease, such as cancer, if we could obtain higher resolution

attending the meeting, the students will be invited to give their presentations to the CCGS

images,” says Belnap.

faculty, which is expected to further foster new collaborations and innovations.

“However, we are currently limited in our ability to evaluate the inner workings of cells.

Recently, a new technique has been developed and it is being used to provide previously

unimaginable insights into the molecular machines that mediate cellular communication Instrumentation

and the receptors that are targets of drug therapy for a variety of human ailments.

One central theme that ties together much of the Center’s research is the use of ultra-high

resolution microscopes to gain insight into how cells and organisms function.

(TEM). In this process, cells, proteins or other particles like viruses are instantaneously

“In the College of Science, we are imaging tissues to diagnose disease, cellular

frozen. Then, relying on sophisticated computer algorithms, tens of thousands of these frozen

structures to understand how cells work, large macromolecules to determine their function,

particles are imaged by TEM. Each particle is imaged from a unique angle of perspective, and

The technique is called cryogenic three-dimensional transmission electron microscopy

7


Center for Cell & Genome Science

given enough views of the particle, an entire three dimensional image can be reconstructed. In a process analogous to how MRIs in medicine can reconstruct an image of the knee, computer algorithms can build the full three-dimensional structure of a submicroscopic particle from electron microscopic images. CCGS Facult y Members (clockwise from top)

A. Villu Maricq, Director Jen Heemstra, Deputy Director Markus Babst Richard Clark Julie Hollien Erik M. Jorgensen Saveez Saffarian Michael Vershinin

The Crocker Science Center on Presidents Circle, now under construction, will provide

a state-of-the-art building to house these world-class research instruments and provide a unique resource for the University of Utah and the State of Utah.

A New Century The Center for Cell and Genome Science provides a dynamic, interdisciplinary environment for the development and pursuit of strategies to visualize, probe and manipulate the microscopic workings of cells. The CCGS will pursue cutting edge research that will bring together existing strengths at the University of Utah and help provide fundamental new insights into the workings of cells in health and disease.

As the 21st century — The Century of Biology — continues to unfold, the College of Science

and the University of Utah will continue to maximize the opportunities of the post-genomics revolution and meet the challenges of modern science education.

New Interdisciplinary Science Courses Optics in Biology – Physics 6210/4210

Building a Scanning PALM Microscope – Biology 7200/5200

Saveez Saffarian, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Erik M. Jorgensen, Department of Biology

The use of optics in biology has evolved from the simple light microscope

The diffraction limit of light was once considered unbreakable; it is a result

used by Darwin to the complex cryo-electron and live cell high resolution

of the wave-like nature of light itself. However, in the past five years, this

microscopes used today. With these advances it can be argued that we stand

barrier has been broken, opening new possibilities for visualizing molecules

at the dawn of quantitative biology and optics provides an essential tool in

at a nanometer scale.

this pursuit.

8


Large au

FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE

di e

A Lecture Series Spanning Five Decades

n ce

sp

ar

tic

ipa

The College of Science is celebrating the 50-year anniversary of the Frontiers of Science te in

Front i er

lectures.

(FOS) lecture series. Frontiers of Science is the longest running lecture series at the University of Utah.

In commemoration of this remarkable success, the College plans to hold six FOS

lectures during the 2016–2017 academic year, featuring a distinguished panel of speakers

Hajo E ic

k e n v i s i te d

Utah

in

1 20

presenting on a diverse range of topics including climate change, evolution, and the

1

global energy crisis.

“We are proud to offer an exceptional opportunity for people to share in the most

important scientific questions and problems of our time,” says Henry S. White, dean of the College of Science. “One can only imagine what the next 50 years will have in store.” The Next Frontier l laureate Ala n

J. H

eeg

Join us on November 9 to meet Dr. Richard Lenski, John Hannah Distinguished Professor er

7 19

2

Nobe

Peter Gibb

s in

of Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University, who will discuss, “Time Travel in Experimental Evolution.”

Lenski and his team perform experiments with microorganisms to watch evolution in

real time. In one experiment that Lenski started 28 years ago, he established 12 populations of E. coli bacteria from a common strain, then observed as they evolved in the laboratory for over 65,000 generations. The results of this work provide insights into the process of adaptation by natural selection, the dynamics of genome evolution, and the origin of new functions. Viable samples from throughout the experiment are stored in freezers, allowing scientists to revive and compare organisms that lived in different generations. 9


ld na Ro

W als wo rth

Kerry A. Emanuel

Neil Shubin

John Valley

A Brief History

Frontiers of Science was established in 1967 by Physics Professor Peter Gibbs and other physics faculty at the U.

exceptional opportunity for people

Gibbs and his colleagues sought to bring notable researchers from around the country to the University to discuss the current

to share in the most important

“frontiers” in physics research. The larger goal was to present

scientific questions and problems

public lectures that would attract attention to important

of our time. One can only

The first Frontiers event was presented by Peter Gibbs

himself, who discussed “Einstein the Sociologist,” on April 1, 1967. Physics Professors David C. Evans, Grant R. Fowles and

In the early 1980s, FOS audiences were treated to

firsthand accounts of the discovery of the structure of DNA by James D. Watson (“The Double Helix and Destiny,” 1981) and Francis H.C. Crick (“The Two DNA Revolutions,” 1984), the achievement for which they had received a Nobel Prize in 1962.

Many FOS speakers were not so famous or honored

when they spoke here, but became so later in their career.

will have in store.

For example, F. Sherwood Rowland spoke on “Man’s Threat

Henry S. White, Dean, College of Science

Jack W. Keuffel presented the remaining three lectures that

imagine what the next 50 years

developments in scientific research.

10

We are proud to offer an

to Stratospheric Ozone” in the 1978 academic year, and was a co-recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his

year. In the meantime, the group worked on scheduling

outstanding speakers for the following year.

adept at recruiting famous and soon-to-be-famous scientists.

carbons which was his topic in 1978!

Gibbs and colleagues made good on their promise to

They also were keenly aware of the state of scientific research

bring exceptional scientists to campus. During the 1968-69

and the social climate of the time. President Nixon was in

complemented by the Davern/Gardner Laureateship. Dean

academic year, eight lectures were held, including ones by

office, the Vietnam War was escalating and student protests

T. Benny Rushing, Biology Professor K. Gordon Lark, and Emeritus

C.N. Yang from the University of New York at Stony Brook

were common on university campuses including the U of U.

Professor Boyer Jarvis wished to honor the memory of two

(“Symmetry Principles in Physics”) and Murray Gell-Mann

The United States had just put a man on the moon. Personal

former College of Science faculty members who made

from the California Institute of Technology (“Elementary

computers did not exist.

extraordinary administrative contributions to the University of

Particles”). Nobel laureates gave three of the eight

Utah: Cedric “Ric” Davern and Pete D. Gardner.

presentations that academic year, and during 1969 as a

each academic year, but by 1980 the pace had slowed to a more

whole, six of thirteen lectures were given by Nobel laureates.

manageable five or six per year. The FOS series had become

the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation to fund

Topics included astronomy, mathematics, anthropology,

immensely popular and the topics were broadened to include

the Davern/Gardner Laureateship. The Laureateship allowed

politics and social issues.

biology, chemistry, mathematics and the earth sciences.

the College to bring a notable scientist to campus to deliver

Gibbs and the early FOS organizers were extremely

Through the 1970s as many as ten lectures were presented

pioneering studies on the destruction of ozone by chlorofluro-

From 1994 to 1997, the Frontiers of Science series was

Rushing, Lark and Jarvis secured a generous grant from


COMMEMORATING

50 YEARS

Lo nn ie T hom pson

2016-2017 Frontiers of Science Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016

a public lecture and to interact with research

Paul F. Hoffman, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Harvard University

teams and faculty that shared the invitee’s scientific

(“Snowball Earth: Testing the Limits of Global Climate Change,” 2003) and

interests. Dr. John Cairns gave the first lecture in November 1994. A total

Peter B. deMenocal, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University

of six Davern/Gardner Laureateship lectures were presented until the grant

(“Climate Shifts and the Collapse of Ancient Cultures,” 2004).

was exhausted.

The history of venues for Frontiers of Science presentations is quite

and science of hurricanes, including how climate change may be influencing

colorful. From 1967 to 1970, various rooms were used, including 103 North

storm cycles around the world. He used stunning photos and graphics

Physics, 200 Music Hall and Mark Greene Hall in the College of Business. By

to explain how hurricanes work, what determines their energy and

1974, FOS events were often held in the Waldemer P. Read auditorium in

destructiveness, and the economic and social implications of our policies

Orson Spencer Hall. The Read auditorium featured stadium seating for about

for dealing with the risks they pose.

400 people and was primarily used through the 1980s.

By 1990, the Fine Arts auditorium became the venue of choice because it

graced Utah audiences with a superb presentation on “Time: From Harrison’s

was newer, larger, and had a better sound system. However, the lighting and

Clocks to the Possibility of New Physics.” Other international guests were

sound controls were problematic and scheduling conflicts forced organizers

Dr. Jennifer Graves, Distinguished Professor at La Trobe University, Australia,

to utilize the nearby Social Work auditorium on occasion.

and Dr. Stefan Hell, Nobel laureate and Director of the Max Planck Institute for

Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany.

In the meantime, the College of Science was constructing the Aline Wilmot

In March 2007, Professor Kerry A. Emanuel of MIT discussed the history

In 2008, The 14th Astronomer Royal of Great Britain, Sir Arnold Wolfendale,

Skaggs Biology Research Building (ASB) that included a beautiful 325-seat

lecture auditorium and an adjoining 125-seat room complete with modern

Utah College of Science and the College of Mines and Earth Sciences. Visit our

sound systems, digital video projectors and lighting. When ASB opened in

website at www.science.utah.edu for more information.

1997, the Frontiers series finally had a home within the College.

In 2003, the College of Mines and Earth Sciences joined with the

College of Science to co-host FOS and increase the number of lectures

Eugenia Kalnay “Population and Climate Change”

Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 Richard Lenski “Time Travel in Experimental Evolution”

Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017 Siegfried S. Hecker “North Korean Nukes: What, How and Why”

Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017 Cagan Sekercioglu “Why Birds Matter: Conserving the World’s Birds and Their Ecosystem Services”

Thursday, March 30, 2017 Daniel G. Nocera “The Global Energy Challenge: A Moral Imperative for the University”

The Frontiers of Science lecture series is sponsored by the University of

Editor’s Note: Peter Gibbs retired in 1993 after serving 36 years on the faculty at the U. He was well known as a tireless educator and gifted researcher, and was named Emeritus Professor of Physics that same year. Gibbs maintained teaching and research relationships on campus for several more years. He still resides in Salt Lake City.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 Frank H. Brown “The Omo-Turkana Basin, East Africa: A Treasury of History”

Lectures begin at 6 p.m. in the Aline Wilmot

devoted to aspects of geology, geophysics and meteorology. The effort was

Skaggs Biology Research Building. Free and

successful and a total of five presentations were scheduled, including

open to the public. Mark your calendar!


Biology Department Highlight

Darwin’s Favorite Birds Enter the Genomics Age

structure, pigmentation, physiology, and behavior,” says Shapiro.

“We’re doing this by using genetic techniques that are similar

Scholar. This is a new award given by the University’s Vice

to the methods used in humans to track down the genes

President of Academic Affairs to recognize extraordinary

What can the genetics of a common bird species tell us about diversity and disease in other species, including ourselves? Probably a lot more than you think, according to Michael Shapiro, Associate Professor of Biology at the U.

responsible for susceptibility to cancers and other diseases.”

research and academic efforts of early- to mid-career faculty

members. It will provide $10,000 per year for three years to

Given the extreme conservation of genes among humans, birds, mice, and even worms, what is it that specifies such diverse body plans, behaviors, and cell functions from a common genetic toolkit?

Shapiro currently supervises two postdoctoral fellows,

two graduate students, and three undergraduates in his lab.

support scholarly, teaching or research initiatives.

Undergraduates are key contributors to his lab and regularly earn authorship on published studies.

IMPACT In just a few years, Shapiro has sequenced the genomes of

WHO Biology Associate Professor Michael D. Shapiro studies genetic variation and its effects on embryonic and adult development.

U. biology professor Michael Shapiro holds an English Pouter pigeon. His research has found that breeds that have similar appearances can be genetically more distant than those whose phenotypes are far apart.

dozens of pigeon breeds, representing a spectacular amount

Rick Egan - The Salt Lake Tribune

pigeons. For example, mutations in the genes that Shapiro

of biological diversity. By understanding the DNA-level differences among these breeds, he is able to identify mutations that produce dramatic variations within this single species.

The importance of these studies extends beyond

studies in pigeons have major effects in humans. “The

He uses traditional breeding experiments, DNA sequencing (genomics), and studies of developing embryos to address

FUNDING

same genes that control feathered feet in pigeons control

this question in pigeons and other species.

Shapiro’s work is supported by major research grants from the

clubfoot and other limb changes in humans,” he says. “Genes

National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes

that control feather color also impact human pigmentation

of their spectacular diversity among over 350 different breeds.

of Health (NIH), totaling about $4.2 million.

and disease, including melanoma and hereditary blindness.”

They also have a unique place in the history of biology:

Charles Darwin was a pigeon aficionado, and pigeons — yes,

Switching in Mammalian Herbivores,” is pending with colleague

Center and the Natural History Museum of Utah to develop

pigeons — strongly influenced the way he thought about and

M. Denise Dearing and could provide more than $750,000 over

public education and outreach efforts. A cornerstone of these

communicated his ideas about how evolution works.

three years. This new direction could identify specific genes that

efforts is the video game Pigeonetics and associated educa-

impact how toxic compounds, including some pharmaceuticals,

tional materials (learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/pigeons),

are metabolized in humans and other mammals.

which is played throughout the world as an interactive way

Shapiro uses pigeons to study these questions because

“We are interested in learning more about the genes that

control diversity in pigeons, including differences in skeletal 12

In July, Shapiro was selected as a U of U Presidential

A new NSF proposal, “The Physiological Genomics of Diet

Shapiro also works with the Genetic Science Learning


to learn basic principles of genetics. Pigeonetics was also recently released as an iPad app so players can explore pigeon genetics offline.

“Our collaborations with the Genetic

Science Learning Center and the Natural History Museum have a potential audience of millions of people,” says Shapiro.

FUTURE “We have several exciting ongoing projects to decipher the genetics of anatomical variation, including massive changes in beak size and shape,” says Shapiro. “We are also eager to study genetic changes that alter behavior in pigeons,” says Shapiro.

For example, “rolling” is a heritable behavior in which

pigeons uncontrollably perform backward somersaults while in flight or when trying to initiate flight. It was described by Darwin as “one of the most remarkable inherited habits or instincts ever recorded.”

Despite the severity of the phenotype in locomotion,

the neuroanatomy of roller pigeons appears to be normal. Early clues about the cause of rolling suggest surprising parallels with certain human mental illnesses.

It seems Darwin’s favorite birds have earned a place of

profound importance in the genomics age.


Department Highlight

Chemi Can humans keep up with bacteria, viruses, biofilms and superbugs, or will we fall behind in the microbial “arms race”? “We’re already behind,” says Ryan E. Looper, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Henry Eyring Fellow at the U.

Completely drug resistant Tuberculosis, the New-Delhi Superbug, Bird Flu, SARs, West Nile Virus and Zika virus have each served as a wake-up call that there is an alarming emergence of new diseases and the reappearance of old diseases in new locations around the world. WHO Chemistry Associate Professor Ryan E. Looper is working to address the looming crisis of emerging infectious diseases. “Nature continues to be an inspirational source of specific small-molecules that help fight human diseases,” says Looper. “There is hope.” Research in his laboratory has led to two promising compounds for antibiotic development — a derivative of the natural product amicetin that selectively hits


stry

Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Clear and Present Danger

a new site in the bacterial ribosome and an anti-biofilm

FUNDING

antibiotic molecule called CZ-99.

Looper’s work is supported by private investments and by

on the market within three to five years. Curza’s anti-biofilm

Biofilms, in particular, are a leading cause of antimicrobial

major research grants from the American Chemical Society

compounds, in particular, could have wide applications in

resistance (AMR). In fact, bacteria in biofilms are up to

and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling $3.3

agriculture, healthcare, food production, oil and gas processes,

1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than free floating

million over the next four years.

and water treatment plants.

planktonic bacteria.

Biofilms are a problem in chronically infected knee

Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant of $598,770 entitled

FUTURE

implants, cystic fibrosis infections, diabetic foot ulcers and

“Natural product-inspired antibacterials with unique ribosomal

Because no other anti-biofilm

tuberculosis, and are implicated in the chronic persistence of

binding” that will provide two years of support.

antibiotics currently exist,

Curza CEO Ryan Davies expects CZ compounds to be

In addition, Curza has been awarded a Phase I Small

Lyme disease.

CZ-99 will first have to be IMPACT

approved as a traditional

biofilm to kill the bacteria. Then the surviving bacteria, closely

Since antibiotics were discovered in the 1950s, they have

antibiotic. Ideally, this com-

confined in the biofilm, much more efficiently transfer the

been mismanaged and overutilized. While many antibiotics

pound’s approval will help

developed resistance from bacterium to bacterium.

still function today, the rate at which they are becoming

clarify biofilm-related infec-

useless is faster than the rate that new ones are being

tions and how to prove clinical success of treating them.

company based on technology developed at the U by Looper

discovered and developed.

and Dustin Williams, a research professor in Orthopedics.

By 2050, it is estimated that antimicrobial resistant

pharmaceutical companies who are interested in partnering

Curza is a small-molecule drug development company

infections will cause 10 million deaths annually around the

on this new drug program. These partnerships will help

and a leader in anti-biofilm technology. Curza has developed

globe at an economic cost of $100 trillion. For comparison,

identify a molecule as a clinical candidate. If clinical success

several structurally distinct classes of proprietary drugs,

that is more than the 8.2 million per year who currently die of

can be realized, a new class of antibiotics will be available to

including CZ-99, that have shown the potential to treat

cancer and 1.5 million who die of diabetes, combined.

combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance.

diseases with known biofilm phenotypes, including

Tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis and Lyme disease.

times to 200 times more effective at killing biofilms than

helped by this new class of drugs,” says Looper.

Data suggests that CZ-99 is more than 200 times as

traditional antibiotics,” said Dustin Williams. As a result, the

effective at eradicating biofilms than standard of care

FDA has placed Curza’s compounds on its fast track program.

chemistry provide the best chance for winning the microbial

Therapeutic drugs can’t break through the protective

Looper is working closely with Curza Global, LLC, a

antibiotics like Vancomycin.

“CZ compounds have been shown to be between 10

Curza is currently in discussions with several large

“The ultimate hope is that chronic infections can be

Fundamental research in chemistry and medicinal

“arms race” against bacteria, viruses, biofilms and superbugs. 15


Department Highlight

Mathematics Using Mathematics to Understand Biological Complexity

FUNDING

or more biological areas, and development of effective

The research conducted by members of the mathematical

interdisciplinary communication skills.

biology group is well supported by external grants, totaling

more than $11 million in research grants since 2001. In

grants allowed us to recruit excellent students and to forge

Can mathematics help answer the complex questions of biophysical dynamics, such as how a cell works, how neurons communicate and process information, or how blood clots form in our arteries and cause heart attacks?

addition to funding from the National Science Foundation

a graduate training program in mathematical biology that is

(the main source of funding for mathematics research of all

generally regarded as the best in the U.S.,” says Fogelson.

“The fellowship stipends provided from these three

types), the group has been successful in obtaining substantial funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a

IMPACT

“Mathematics is a powerful and versatile tool

Because mathematics is well-suited to exploring the function

that can provide new answers to complicated

of systems consisting of many variables with complex interac-

biological problems,” says Aaron Fogelson, a

tions, it is becoming an essential tool and is complementing

Professor of Mathematics at the U.

traditional laboratory experimentation and fieldwork for studying biology.

WHO

The Department of Mathematics contains a large group of

biological areas, a mathematician’s work can bear directly on

mathematical biologists who use math to study a wide range of biological topics, from heart attacks and strokes to neural

16

Left to right: Aaron Fogelson, Paul Bressloff, Fred Adler, Alla Borisyuk, Sean Lawley, James Keener.

Since similar mathematical themes arise in different

many seemingly disparate biological systems. At the same time that mathematics is being used to provide new insights

networks and astrocytes in the brain, and from the spread of

strong indicator of the growing recognition of the group’s

into biological systems, the demands of studying complex

disease to the function of the immune system.

contribution to medical research.

biological problems is driving the development of new

mathematics in dynamical systems, stochastic processes,

The group currently consists of six faculty members:

The group has also been successful in obtaining funding

Professor Fred Adler, Associate Professor Alla Borisyuk,

from the NSF for its innovative approach to graduate student

computational fluid dynamics, and other areas.

Professor Paul Bressloff, Professor Aaron Fogelson, Distinguished

education. Beginning with a five year IGERT grant in 2001 and

Professor James P. Keener and Assistant Professor Sean Lawley,

continuing with two additional five-year Research Training

of papers in leading mathematics and biology journals, the

plus three postdoctoral researchers and 35 graduate students.

Grants, more than $8.5 million has been awarded to

group’s influence is spread by its alumni.

Several undergraduate students also participate in related

support graduate student and postdoctoral training that

research projects.

emphasizes strong mathematics, deep immersion in one

at many colleges and universities, have research positions in

In addition to its research impact, measured in hundreds

“Our graduates and postdocs hold positions as faculty


government labs and research hospitals, and in industry including local companies. Six of our alumni work at BioFire Diagnostics in Salt Lake City where they lead the effort to provide models and algorithms related to BioFire’s diagnostic products,” says Keener.

The program also has good success in recruiting and graduating

women and minority students. Of the 35 current students, 17 are female and four are Hispanic.

FUTURE One goal of the U’s mathematical biology group is to develop a fundamental mechanistic understanding of how biological systems function.

“Our belief is that a better mechanistic understanding will lead to improved

diagnoses, analyses, and treatment of health issues affecting individuals as well as those issues affecting the health of larger ecosystems with which humans interact. We do this directly through our own research projects and, indirectly, by training new mathematical scientists to enable them to find interesting new questions in biology to which mathematics can help contribute answers,” says Keener.

One example of this effort is the involvement of mathematical biology faculty and

students in the University’s new NIH Training Program in Computational Approaches to Diabetes and Metabolism.

The goal of this interdisciplinary program is to prepare predoctoral and postdoctoral

trainees to be leaders in computational and mathematical methods and engage them in the analysis of large data sets involving complex biological problems in diabetes, obesity, and metabolism.

The program works in tandem with the U’s Diabetes and Metabolism Center to support

clinicians, researchers, and educators to prevent, treat, and eradicate diabetes in the U.S.


Department Highlight

Physics Planet Nine: A Solar System Stowaway?

Could a giant icy planet be lurking on the edges of our solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune? The answer is “yes,” according to Benjamin C. Bromley, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the U.

Astronomers and scientists around the world, including Bromley, are searching for the massive object, which is estimated to have at least 10 times the mass of Earth. WHO Benjamin C. Bromley was appointed Department Chair of Physics and Astronomy in July 2016. His research focuses on computational and statistical methods in astrophysics including planet formation, evolution of black holes, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

“A few years ago, before direct hints of Planet Nine emerged, my collaborator Scott Kenyon and I ran a set of simulations of planet formation that included gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn,” says Bromley.

“We noticed that as these big

planets form, they might scatter — using gravity as a slingshot — other smaller ‘super-Earths,’ sometimes to the most 18


& Astronomy remote regions of a solar system.” Bromley and Kenyon

others, totaling about $200,000 in recent years. He has two

published a paper in July 2016 describing what the orbit of a

grants pending at NASA, “Emerging Worlds” and “Exoplanet

map in the astrophysics community, with access to world-

scattered “Planet Nine” might look like.

Research Programs,” for another $200,000 per grant.

class telescope facilities and cutting-edge surveys of stars and

galaxies,” says Bromley.

The evidence suggests Planet Nine is 10 times farther away

In addition, Bromley, working with Scott Kenyon at the

“Our recent expansion into astronomy has put us on the

from the Sun than Neptune, or several hundred times farther

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, receives

than the Earth. At that distance, the sunlight reflected by Planet

allocations of supercomputing resources from NASA — up to

the U exceed 5,000 per year, and the Department has about

Nine would be very faint, and it would be difficult to detect.

five million computer-hours per year. That is equivalent to an

300 declared physics majors and 100 graduate students. In

ultra-fast desktop computer working full speed for over 500 years.

June, the Utah State Board of Regents and the Northwest

at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, crunching through

Commission on Colleges and Universities approved a

data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Satellite Explorer (WISE),”

50 contributions at scientific conferences.

new Astronomy and Astrophysics emphasis within the

says Bromley.

undergraduate physics degree.

Using a method that Meisner developed to tease out

undergraduate student working with him on projects involving

light from the faintest objects, they looked for sets of items

solar system dynamics and the motions of stars in the Milky Way.

“I’m currently working with Aaron Meisner, a researcher

Bromley has authored 70 peer-reviewed papers, and over

Bromley currently has one graduate student and one

that are transient — meaning they appear in an image of one

Student enrollments in physics and astronomy classes at

FUTURE “While Planet Nine may not reveal itself in the WISE data, our

region of the sky but not other snapshots of the same area.

IMPACT

search strategy is quite powerful, and we will push on using

A planet will stand out among these “transients” because its

The discovery of Planet Nine would help us learn how our

other data sets provided by the National Optical Astronomical

position will move around in a very specific way.

Solar System was formed. With a good understanding of what

Observatory, the Department of Energy and other academic

happened around our own Sun, we can learn how planets,

institutions,” says Bromley.

computer runs, we are sitting on the brink of the discovery of a

including ones like Earth, develop around other stars.

lifetime,” says Bromley. “So far, we‘ve found intriguing hints that

says Bromley.

might be Planet Nine — but not yet a clear detection.”

question about space: Do we have company in the universe?

“Every time Aaron and I open up results from the super-

This scientific push forward will help answer a big

“Scientists will find Planet Nine. It’s just a matter of time,”

Utah now has several large research-grade observatories,

FUNDING

including the Willard Eccles Observatory in southern Utah.

Bromley’s work is supported by research grants from the

That facility houses a 32-inch optical telescope that can be

National Aeronautical and Space Agency (NASA), among

accessed remotely from the U of U campus. 19


In the News:

Snails’ Speedy Insulin University of Utah researchers have found that the structure of an insulin molecule produced by predatory cone snails may be an improvement over current fast-acting therapeutic insulin.

Small and speedy Human insulin is a hormone that is produced in the pancreas and secreted to aid in the body’s uptake of glucose. The insulin molecule consists of an “A” region and a “B” region. Diabetes mellitus disorders arise from impairment of the body’s normal production of insulin. The most effective treatment for diabetes is

The finding suggests that the cone snail

injection of synthetic insulin.

insulin, produced by the snails to stun their

prey, could begin working in as few as five

and form aggregations of six insulin molecules. It’s how insulin is stored in the

minutes, compared with 15 minutes for the

pancreas. But injected insulin must de-aggregate into individual molecules

fastest-acting insulin currently available.

before doing a person any good — and that process can take up to an hour.

Biologist Helena Safavi, co-author on

The fastest-acting insulin on the market, Humalog, still takes 15-30 minutes

a paper describing the cone snail insulin

to become active. “The ideal scenario would be

published September 12 in Nature

to take the region off of the ‘B’ chain” Safavi says.

Structural & Molecular Biology, says that

“But then you completely abolish insulin activity.”

studying complex venom cocktails can

open doors to new drug discoveries.

lin produced by the cone snail Conus geographus

“You look at what venoms animals

lacked the segment of the “B” region that causes

make to affect the physiology of their prey,

aggregation. Tests on insulin receptors in the lab

and you use that as a starting point,” she

showed that although the snail insulin was less

says. “You can get new ideas from venoms. To have something that has already

effective than human insulin, it was still effective,

been evolved — that’s a huge advantage.”

and could possibly start acting in five minutes.

Baldomero Olivera received the 2016 Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award for “creating products and initiatives with potential to change the world and improve lives.”

But a part of the “B” region causes insulin molecules to stick together

Chou, Safavi, and colleagues found that insu-

Funding for the study was provided by the National Health and Medical

Research Council of Australia, the National Institutes of Health, USTAR and the

Insulin as a weapon

European Commission.

The Conus geographus snail is a predatory cone snail that eats fish.

U biochemists Danny Chou and Maria Disotuar, and biologists Joanna

C. geographus and its relatives have developed complex brews of venoms to

Gajewiak and Baldomero Olivera, contributed to the study along with

rapidly paralyze prey fish. Some snails use venom to overload the fish’s nervous

colleagues from Australia.

system, sending it into “excitotoxic shock.” Others, including C. geographus, secrete insulin, alongside other compounds, into the water, causing the blood

20

Conus geographus hunting a fish. The snail releases a specialized insulin into the water, along with neurotoxins that inhibit sensory circuits, resulting in hypoglycemic, sensory-deprived fish that are easier to capture.


sugar in nearby fish to plummet and sending the fish into hypoglycemic sedation. Once the fish is stunned, the snail engulfs and consumes it.

In 2015, Safavi and U biology professor Baldomero Olivera described

C. geographus’ so-called “weaponized insulin,” suited for quick action. In a related paper published August 16 in Molecular Biology and Evolution, Safavi and colleagues describe how weaponized insulins evolved rapidly to more effectively target prey.

“It makes sense because the snail has to very rapidly induce insulin shock in its

fish prey, so it has evolved something very fast acting,” Safavi says.

Putting snail insulin to work Studying the structure of the cone snail insulin could help researchers modify human insulin to lose its self-aggregation but retain its potency, Safavi says. “Now we can look at the human insulin and see if we can make it more snail-like.”

The team still needs to conduct more experiments to measure how quickly

snail insulin, or a modified human insulin, would work when injected into an organism. Fish are affected almost instantly because the insulin passes over the gills. In humans, the process may take a few minutes longer.

Chou studies human insulin for use in an artificial pancreas device that could auto-

matically deliver insulin in response to changing blood sugar levels, much as the natural organ does. The first generation of such a device may be available as soon as next year. Cone snail-inspired insulin, although “still not as good as we want for human use,” Chou says, could replace the current fast-acting insulin used in artificial pancreas development.

Bio-inspiration “It’s really about learning from nature,” Chou says. Safavi agrees. “People think it’s easy to make drugs,” she says. “But where do you start? You have to have some kind of idea of what a drug should look like, what kind of properties the drug should have, so it’s very difficult to design novel drugs. That’s why we use the snail venom system.” 21


22


Lassonde Studios:

Student Entrepreneurs Live. Create. Launch.

The Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute at the University

innovation. Above are four floors of student housing where

anywhere,” said Troy D’Ambrosio, executive director of the

of Utah opened the doors in August to the $45 million

400 students live, collaborate and launch new ideas.

Lassonde Institute.

Lassonde Studios, a one-of-a-kind facility where students

can live, create new products, and launch companies.

Studios in the inaugural year. Residents applied by describing

“The University of Utah is already among the best

More than 1,300 students applied to live at Lassonde

there during the 2016-17 academic year, have a variety

schools in the country for entrepreneurship. Lassonde Studios will help us reach the next level,” said Taylor Randall, dean of the David Eccles School of Business. “We train

Science students, in

thousands of students, help develop hundreds of startup

particular, can benefit from

companies, and provide dozens of programs to all students.

the Lassonde Studios as they

The building will amplify these efforts, allowing us to

translate their lab research

give every student at the University of Utah an

into practical applications and products.

“Science students, in particular, can benefit from the

Lassonde Studios as they translate their lab research into

entrepreneurial experience.”

The first residents of Lassonde Studios, who are living

Henry S. White, Dean College of Science

practical applications and products,” said Henry S. White, dean of the College of Science.

Lassonde Studios contains 160,000 square feet on five

floors. The first floor is a 20,000-square-foot innovation space,

themselves and their desire to join the unique community.

of interests including business, chemistry, engineering,

workshop and cafe´ open to all students at the University of

Those selected are called the Lassonde 400 and form a

computer science, physics, and video game design.

diverse group of future leaders and change-makers.

including workbenches, group working areas, 3-D printers,

accomplishes this year and in the future. We expect big

laser cutters and power tools. The first floor is similar to a

applied to join us and live at the Lassonde Studios. We think

student union for those interested in entrepreneurship and

we have assembled one of the best groups of entrepreneurs

Utah. That floor has many spaces and tools for students,

“We were impressed by the quality of students who

“We can’t wait to see what the Lassonde 400

things,” said D’Ambrosio.

23


Innovation Ecosystem Driving Innovations Through Collaboration

UTAH.EDU/INNOVATE

The innovation ecosystem at the University of Utah is like a mountain range. Numerous innovation centers, institutes and functions form individual mountain peaks, overlapping through many collaborations.

CAMPUS PARTNERS The University of Utah has many innovative partners across campus.

Get involved at utah.edu/innovate.

Developing inventions and making a positive impact is a broad effort that includes countless people and organizations.

TVC.UTAH.EDU

LASSONDE.UTAH.EDU

EFS.UTAH.EDU

TECHNOLOGY & VENTURE

LASSONDE ENTREPRENEUR INSTITUTE

ENTREPRENEURIAL FACULTY SCHOLAR

CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION

COMMERCIALIZATION Technology and

The Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute is home

The Entrepreneurial Faculty Scholars program

Medical doctors and students interested in

Venture Commercialization manages the U’s

base for student entrepreneur programs at

brings together innovative faculty at the U who

innovation have a one-stop-shop for resources

intellectual property and works with new and

the U. Programs include student business plan

share the common dedication to motivating and

at the Center for Medical Innovation. It serves as

established companies to develop technologies.

competitions, innovation courses, internships

enriching the translational experience for faculty

an information and gathering hub for all in the

and commercialization opportunities.

and student entrepreneurs.

health sciences.

CEI.UTAH.EDU

24

RESEARCH.UTAH.EDU

OSP.UTAH.EDU

CENTER FOR ENGINEERING The College of

CORPORATE CONCIERGE

V.P. RESEARCH

OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROJECTS

Engineering, with the Utah Nanofabrication

The Corporate Concierge Program helps com-

The Vice President for Research office at the U

The Office of Sponsored Projects (OSP) was

Laboratory, established the Center for Engineer-

munity partners leverage the entire set of capa-

oversees many aspects of research and related

established in 1967 at the University of Utah.

ing Innovation. It bridges the gap between

bilities at the U. The program helps coordinate

activities across campus, including commercial-

Its mission is to enhance research by providing

basic science and engineering innovation

everything from scholarships and internships to

ization, compliance and education.

service and support to administration, faculty

and commercial product development.

sponsored research and entrepreneurship.

and staff.


Innovation Ecosystem Driving Innovations Through Collaboration

UTAH.EDU/INNOVATE

The innovation ecosystem at the University of Utah is like a mountain range. Numerous innovation centers, institutes and functions form individual mountain peaks, overlapping through many collaborations.

CAMPUS PARTNERS The University of Utah has many innovative partners across campus.

Get involved at utah.edu/innovate.

Developing inventions and making a positive impact is a broad effort that includes countless people and organizations.

LASSONDE.UTAH.EDU

EFS.UTAH.EDU

TECHNOLOGY & VENTURE

LASSONDE ENTREPRENEUR INSTITUTE

ENTREPRENEURIAL FACULTY SCHOLAR

CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION

COMMERCIALIZATION Technology and

The Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute is home

The Entrepreneurial Faculty Scholars program

Medical doctors and students interested in

Venture Commercialization manages the U’s

base for student entrepreneur programs at

brings together innovative faculty at the U who

innovation have a one-stop-shop for resources

intellectual property and works with new and

the U. Programs include student business plan

share the common dedication to motivating and

at the Center for Medical Innovation. It serves as

established companies to develop technologies.

competitions, innovation courses, internships

enriching the translational experience for faculty

an information and gathering hub for all in the

and commercialization opportunities.

and student entrepreneurs.

health sciences.

CEI.UTAH.EDU

RESEARCH.UTAH.EDU

OSP.UTAH.EDU

“ The aim of science is to discover and illuminate truth.

24

CENTER FOR ENGINEERING The College of

CORPORATE CONCIERGE

V.P. RESEARCH

OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROJECTS

Engineering, with the Utah Nanofabrication

The Corporate Concierge Program helps com-

The Vice President for Research office at the U

The Office of Sponsored Projects (OSP) was

Laboratory, established the Center for Engineer-

munity partners leverage the entire set of capa-

oversees many aspects of research and related

established in 1967 at the University of Utah.

ing Innovation. It bridges the gap between

bilities at the U. The program helps coordinate

activities across campus, including commercial-

Its mission is to enhance research by providing

basic science and engineering innovation

everything from scholarships and internships to

ization, compliance and education.

service and support to administration, faculty

and commercial product development.

sponsored research and entrepreneurship.

and staff.

Rachel Carson

TVC.UTAH.EDU


Resea rch Repor t of t he U niversit y of U t a h C ollege of S cience 2016 Nonprofit Organization

U.S. Postage Paid 1430 Presidents Circle Rm 220 Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0140

Salt Lake City, Utah Permit No. 1529

DISCOVER research report 2016  

University of Utah College of Science DISCOVER research report 2016. Published for alumni and friends of the College of Science.

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