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TextŠ 2011 by Quarry Books All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the copyright owners. However, the publisher grants permission for the purchaser of this book to copy the patterns for personal use. All images in this book have been reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the artists concerned, and no responsibility is accepted by the producer, publisher, or printer for any infringement of copyright or otherwise, arising from the contents of this publication. Every effort has been made to ensure that credits accurately comply with information supplied . We apologize for any inaccuracies that may have occurred and will resolve inaccurate or missing information in a subsequent reprinting of the book. First published in the United States of America by Quarry Books, a member of Quayside Publishing Group 100 Cummings Center Suite 406-L Beverly, Massachusetts 01915-6101 Telephone: (978) 282-9590 Fax: (978) 283-2742 www.quarrybooks.com Vi sit www.Craftside.Typepad.com for a behindthe-scenes peek at our crafty world!

Digital edition: 978-1-61058-021-2 Softcover edit ion : 978-1-59253-687-0 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data available

Stein, Jeannine. Adventures in bookbinding: handcrafting mixed-media books I Jeannine Stein. p.cm. ISBN-13: 978-1-59253-687-0 (flexibound) ISBN-10: 1-59253-687-5 (flexibound) ISBN-13: 978-1-61058-021-2 (e-book) 1. Bookbinding--Handbooks, manuals, etc. 2. Handicraft. I. Title. Z271.S73 2011 686.3--dc22 2011004914 CIP ISBN-13: 978-1-59253-687-0 ISBN-10: 1-59253-687-5 Digital edition published in 2011 elSBN -13: 978-1-61058-021-2 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Design: Debbie Berne Design Photography: Ken Chernus Illustrations: Mike Wanke Technical Editor: Marla Stefanelli Printed in China


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INTRO DU CTI 0N BOOKS ARE MY PASSION.

The first book I ever made-a

crafts into my books. Since doing that, my books have be-

cased-in journal with a hard spine-seemed like a magi-

come more interesting, new creative paths have opened, and

cal creation, and I was completely enthralled with creating

I feel more confident and capable as a book artist and crafter.

books by hand.

When I started making these mixed-media books, I

Since then, I've explored making books with a variety

wasn't the only one intrigued by the idea. I showed a friend,

of materials, structures, and purposes. And although books

an accomplished crocheter, a leather journal I made with a

are my primary focus, bookbinding isn't the only skill in

scallop-crocheted border, and she instantly wanted to know

my repertoire.

how to make it. I realized that integrating other crafts with

Like many crafters, I've learned how to do a lot of things

bookbinding would be a great way to get artists and craft-

throughout the years. As a child, I sewed, did needlepoint,

ers excited about creating their own books, photo albums,

knitted , and embroidered. And as an adult, I've learned

journals, and sketchbooks. I thought it might also get book

how to make jewelry, weave, quilt, crochet, and work with

artists interested in incorporating different materials and

polymer clay and metal. A crafter's curiosity is perpetual-

mediums into their work.

as soon as we see an amazing handmade creation we usually want to learn how to make it. I may not be a master at everything, but I like the fact

that I know enough to put together a quilt or a necklace if the mood strikes. I can also incorporate elements of those

6

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

You may fall in love with new techniques or rediscover old ones while creating these books. I had so much fun making these projects, and I hope you enjoy making them as well.


to those who have some experience in a craft, or to novices

-,- - -- -- -- - - -- - - - - - - -,- The shortcut projects are for those : SHORTCUT : who like the look of a particular craft -,- --- - - -- -- -- - ---- - -.but want a quick way to get there.

who are intrepid enough to dive in and give it a try. They're

The shortcut quilted book, for example, uses a cut-up vin-

designed to be fun and stress-free, and the bindings are

tage quilt for the covers.

straightforward. Some of the books are intended as sketch-

-路------ --- --- --- --- _,_

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

The illustrated step-by-step projects in this book are geared

books and have extra features such as pockets and foldouts. Since sketchbooks are personal items, and artists have

I

I

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I

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I

The master-level projects take the

MASTER : books to new heights. I asked various _,_ - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - _,_

highly skilled artists to create the

definite likes and dislikes about types and styles of paper,

covers, and then I bound the books to show how the proj-

feel free to substitute whatever paper you like to work with.

ects can be collaborative. These books are meant to be both

I find that 90-lb. (185 gsm) watercolor paper is perfect for

inspirational and a catalyst to foster creative partnerships.

almost any medium and isn't too heavy to work with in a text block. Each of the step-by-step projects contains a primer and

Books are meant to be used-don't let them languish on a shelf or in a drawer. Remember that a handmade book comes to life when it's filled not with blank pages, but with

instructions on the specific craft to help you get started.

words, drawings , photographs, paintings, and collages.

If the craft is new to you or you haven't done it in a while,

Creating things by hand is always an adventure, and I en-

take a little time to practice techniques with scrap materi-

courage you to take the plunge and start exploring.

als. It will make the process more satisfying and ultimately produce better results.

7


CHAPTER

1 LEARNING THE BASICS

of bookbinding makes for more

A few of the materials used in the various projects may

successful and trouble-free projects. If you're new to creat-

be unfamiliar to some experienced binders. But give them

ing books by hand, familiarize yourself with these tips and

a shot- working with supplies such as felt , fabric, clay,

tools. After a while, tasks such as folding paper and punch-

and yarn will expand your repertoire and open new creative

ing signatures will become second nature and streamline

paths. Feel free to substitute bindings whenever possible,

the process.

creating books that are distinctive and carry your signature.

Bits of ephemera and embellishments for collage can be kept in see-through vinyl pockets.

9


rARTS o~ ABOOK

Head

Books have an anatomy, just like living things. The following are some of the terms used in various projects. HEAD: TAIL:

Top of the book

Bottom of the book

Where the signatures are sewn or pages are bound. The spine of a book may be open (to show off decorative stitching) or closed. SPINE:

FORE EDGE:

Spine

Fore edge

Where the pages open

Where the covers connect with the spine to allow the book to open. Because the hinge gets a lot of use, book cloth or leather are often used to cover it because they are strong and durable. HINGE:

TEXT BLOCK: FO LI 0:

Tail

The inside pages of the book

A single piece of paper folded once

Several folios nested together form a signature. Signatures are then sewn together to form the text block. When folios are nested, the cut edges will begin to push out; this is called the fore-edge creep, or just creep. Heavier paper will create a larger creep. Some people retain this feature because it bears the mark of a handmade book, but the protruding edges can also be easily trimmed off for a neater look. Place the signature on a cutting mat and firmly hold a metal ruler on top, just to the left of the creep. Using a utility knife with a sharp blade, make long, continuous cuts against the ruler until the creep is removed. The creep can also be cut off with a heavy-duty guillotine cutter. Because the creep adds width to the signature and text block, keep this in mind when determining the size of the covers. SIGNATURE:

10

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Folio

Signature

Fore-edge creep


TOOL~

0

•• •

0

CUTTING AND FOLDING TOOLS

0

D

Good cutting tools are book artists' best friends. Most are in-

0

expensive and, if kept in good condition, will last for years. While paper cutters are handy for quick cuts and trimming

0

I

0

0

multiple pieces of paper, sometimes papers are too big or fragile to be cut with a trimmer and must be cut by hand. CRAFT KNIFE:

A craft knife is essential for cutting paper

and cardstock. Choose one that feels good in your handmany now have ergonomic features such as rubber grips

STANDARD BONE FOLDER:

Nothing makes a crisp, clean

that are comfortable to use. Replace the blade at the first

fold in paper and cardstock like a bone folder. First crease

sign of dulling or if the tip breaks off (A).

paper with your hands, then run the edge of a bone folder along the fold. Bone folders are also good for smoothing

UTILITY KNIFE:

This is best used for cutting heavyweight

cardstock, chipboard, and book board. Again, pick one

paper after gluing. Most are made from cow bone, but plastic ones are also available (E).

that's easy to use. I like the Olfa snap-off cutter because it's Thicker than the standard bone

lightweight and blades break off easily with a pair of pliers.

TEFLON BONE FOLDER:

I keep mini pliers in my tool kit for just this purpose (B).

folder, this one won't leave marks on paper or book cloth. Although pricier than a standard folder, it's a handy tool to

SCISSORS:

A good pair of scissors is a must in any tool kit.

have in the arsenal (F).

Make sure blades stay sharp and clean. Some people keep separate pairs for fabric and paper (C). CUTTING MAT:

A good-quality, self-healing cutting mat is

RULERS

A sturdy metal-edge ruler (G and H) is a must for trimming

necessary when cutting anything with a craft or utility knife ,

paper and book board. To cut safely, measure the area to be

when poking holes with an awl, or when setting eyelets.

cut and make small marks at the top and bottom of the ma-

Although they are available in different sizes, I go for the

terial. Line up the edge of the ruler with the marks and hold

largest one that my worktable can accommodate. Always

firmly, making sure fingers are behind the cutting line. Cut

keep the mat completely flat or it may warp (D).

against the edge of the ruler with a craft or utility knife.

GETTING STARTED

11


Some metal rulers come backed with a thin strip of cork. While this helps keep the ruler from moving, it also creates a small space underneath the ruler under which the knife blade can get caught, making for uneven cuts. Instead, glue a piece of 300-grit sandpaper on the back of the ruler with PVA to prevent it from slipping. When cutting book board, you may need to make several passes through the board to cut all the way through. Make sure your knife blade is sharp, and don't move the ruler between passes. NEEDLES AND THREAD

BINDING NEEDLES:

These are typically long and thin,

closed-spine as well as some open-spine books. Available

with a slightly dulled tip and an eye usually large enough to

in ivory as well as a range of colors, it can be run through

accommodate four-ply waxed linen thread. Darning needles,

beeswax (M) a few times for easier sewing.

found at any fabric store, are a good substitute and can be dulled by running the tip across sandpaper (I) .

WAXED LINEN THREAD:

Waxed linen thread is extremely

strong and comes in a variety of colors, making it perfect CURVED NEEDLES:

The C shape of these needles makes it

for showing off intricate open-spine stitches such as Coptic.

easier to slip between signatures when sewing bindings such

Four-cord thread is the standard size, but it's also available

as the Coptic stitch (]).

in a range of thicknesses, from thin two-cord up to twelvecord, the thickest. Keep in mind that thicker thread adds

TAPESTRY NEEDLES:

These have blunt tips and large eyes,

bulk to the width of the spine (N).

perfect for thin ribbon or hemp cording (K). OTHER THREADS: UNWAXED LINEN THREAD:

This standard binding thread

ing books, but they must be strong, pliable, relatively thin, and not stretchy. Test before making a final project (0).

(L) for most books is strong, pliable, and perfect for

BASIC TOOL KIT

• craft knife

•awl

• binding needles

These tools and materials are used in almost

• utility knife

• bone folder

• glue brush

• cutting mat

• metal ruler

• scrap paper for gluing

• scissors

• pencil and eraser

every bookbinding project, so keep them close at hand. They will be used in some combination in every project in this book.

12

Various materials can be used for bind-

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


s

w

AWLS AND DRILLS

GLUE STICKS:

An archival glue such as UHU is perfect for

tipping in pages or adhering pocket tabs (T). BOOKBINDING AWL:

This tool is great for punching small

holes in signatures and covers. Look for a sturdy awl with

DOUBLE-STICK TAPE:

a sharp point and fairly thin, even shaft for punching holes

ing papers (U).

Use for gluing pocket tabs and layer-

in signatures and book board (P). Larger holes in book board can be made with a heavy-duty paper punch (like the

REPOSITIONABLE TAPE:

Post-It correction and cover-up

McGill paper drill) or an anywhere punch, which is used

tape (and similar brands) won't tear paper and is perfect for

with a hammer and comes in various sizes. A Japanese screw

tacking down binding threads before they're knotted (V).

punch (Q) or book drill easily goes through leather, paper, and book board and has interchangeable tips in various

GLUE BRUSHES:

A sturdy glue brush with natural bristles

sizes. Although expensive, it's a wonderful, useful tool. A

(W) is best to use with PVA. Wash with a mild soap after

small rotary drill, such as a Dremel, (R) can be used for

using. Foam brushes (X) can be used, but be aware that if

making holes in book board, leather, plastic, metal, and wood.

left sitting in glue, they will soak it up , making it difficult to apply an even, thin layer.

ADHESIVES AND BRUSHES

PVA:

Polyvinyl acetate is the go-to bookbinding glue because

it is pH-neutral and won't yellow or crack over time (S).

GETTING STARTED

13


Tlr~

&TfCHNIQU[~

PREPARING SIGNATURES

Before the book is bound, the signatures must be readied for sewing. Fold individual pages with a bone folder instead of folding several at once, which will create an uneven fore edge. In the individual projects in this book, when a direction says to fold paper lengthwise, fold it parallel to the longest measure. When it says to fold widthwise, fold the paper parallel to the shortest measure. After the pages have been folded, nest the appropriate number of folios into a signature and mark the top of each signature with a T. Prepare the signature-punching template Punching through signatures

by making marks on the fold of one folio for each hole. Open the folio , carry the marks across the fold, and fold it the other way, so the marks are on the inside. Mark a Tat the top of the folio on the outside. Slip the template in the middle of one signature, matching top to top, and tap into place with a bone folder. Hold the signature flat on a level surface with one hand and open it to 45 degrees. With an awl held parallel to the surface, punch through all pages. Try to come out exactly on the fold. Remove the template and repeat until all signatures are punched. Marking the tops of the signatures helps keep them aligned when sewn. A punching cradle makes the task of punching signatures much easier and more accurate. Signatures are placed in the V of the cradle and punched through. When sewing signatures to the spine, make sure the signature holes match the spine holes.

Punching through signatures using a punching cradle

14

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


SEWING SIGNATURES

PAPER GRAIN

Unlike sewing fabric, the end of the thread is never knotted

Machine-made paper has a grain, which refers to how the

in bookbinding. Instead, knots are made in the course of

paper fibers line up during the manufacturing process.

binding the book to prevent threads from pulling through

Grain is important in making books because it can affect

the signatures or spine.

how the pages open and how they wear over time. Folding

When pulling threads to tighten, always pull parallel

against the grain can cause those paper fibers to break,

to the spine. Pulling up from the spine can result in a torn

creating a weakened fold that may eventually tear. Also , the

signature. Always check threads inside the signature when

paper may not lie completely flat. Fold with the grain and

sewing to make sure threads are not knotted or kinked.

the crease will be smooth and the paper flat. To determine grain direction , hold opposite edges of a piece of paper in one hand and bend the paper gently. Hold the other two edges and bend again. The bend offering the least resistance is the grain direction. When you're buying a ream of manufactured paper, the label should state the grain direction. Often it's written out (grain long and grain short), abbreviated as GL and GS, or the height or width will be underlined , indicating grain direction. Most handmade papers have no grain direction and can be folded in any direction.

GETTING STARTED

15


D[~l6NIN6 YOUR

OWN

BOOK~

Once you begin exploring handmade books you'll want to design your own. To make this process go more smoothly, I strongly recommend making a model before embarking on the final project. This allows you to work out any kinks, find the right binding, and play with ideas for closures and embellishments. Always keep the model as a reference and include any relevant notes. When designing a book, think about how it will be used, whether it will be mobile or stay at home, and whether it needs special features such as pockets, pages that open out, or a wraparound cover. Experiment and always have fun.

A sketchbook with perforated pages is perfect for any type of drawing or painting. A scrap of hand-printed cloth is large enough to cover a tiny blank journal.

16

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


GLO~~ARY

or [MBROID[RY &S[WING STITCH[~

Hemstitch

French knot

'

Whipstitch

Slipstitch Quilting stitch

GETTING STARTED

17


CHAPTER

2

{BINDING} LONG STITCH WITH X-STITCH {FINISHED SIZE}

5~"

X 8~" (13.3 X 21.6 CM)

THE FIRST NEEDLE-FELTED PIECE

I ever saw immediately fascinated me. I loved the

idea of being able to "paint" designs with wool roving and get 3-D felted effects. The concept of needle felting is simple: Wool roving turns into felt when special thin, barbed needles are repeatedly poked into it, matting and interlocking the fib ers. To help the fibers interlock, felting is done on top of a foam block base or a thick brush mat. Roving can be felted onto a substrate such as wool felt, linen, or flannel or directly onto a base to create dimensional items such as flowers. Designs can be done freehand , with cookie cutters, or with paper or cardstock templates. After a piece has been felted it should be gently lifted off the block. It will stick a little, since some of the fibers have been incorporated into the foundation. When you felt onto fabric , the fibers will show through on the underside. Basic needle-felting supplies are inexpensive and include the felting block, felting needles , wool roving, and wool. If 100 percent wool felt isn't available, felt an old wool sweater in the washing machine (use hot water and a tablespoon of liquid washing soap, then place the sweater in the dryer). Roving can be blended for a mottled or ombre effect. Felting needles are extremely sharp, so always focus on your work, don't work too quickly, and keep fingers away from the needles as much as possible. Have first-aid supplies on hand for any accidents. The guitar motif on this book is two-dimensional, but the raised polka dots and yarn border give the cover a 3-D effect. The text block, made of various shades of cardstock, is bound with a basic long stitch and then connected to the cover with an attractive X-stitch. A small pocket in back holds felting needles, pens, small bits of roving, and felt.

19


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • signature-punching template (see page 131) • 25 pieces of 8 Yt." x 9 Yi" (21x24.1 cm) cardstock; 13 sheets of white and 12 sheets of various colors, folded widthwise (Make six signatures of four sheets each and reserve one white sheet for the signature-punching template.) • 72" (1 .8 m) of four-cord waxed linen thread

{TOOLS} •

Basic Tool Kit, page 12

• foam block for needle felting

{COVER MATERIALS}

• cookie and canape cutters (optional, for creating need le-felted motifs)

• pattern for cover design (see page 130) • one 8 Yi" x 11" (21.6 x 27.9 cm) piece of thick wool felt

• felting needles (medium and lightweight sizes)

• one 9 Yi" x 12" (24.1 x 30.5 cm) piece of cotton fabric

• embroidery needle

• one 9 Yt." x 11 %" (23.5 x 29.8 cm) piece

• sewing machine

of double-sided fusible web • one 4 Yt." x 5 Yi "(10.8 x 14 cm) piece of contrasting

binding needle

• two tapestry needles

cotton fabric for the inside pocket • Japanese screw punch fitted with a 1.5-mm tip, • wool roving in various colors • embroidery floss

low-tack painter's tape

• sewing thread

iron

• 44" (1.1 m) of medium weight 100 percent wool yarn

• chalk, removable marking pen, tracing paper (optional, for marking design onto felt)

• 48" (1.2 m) of Yt." oro/s" (1 .2 m of 6 mm or 1 cm) thin, pliable ribbon, such as double-face satin • small beads (optional)

20

small-tipped anywhere punch, or medium awl

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


PREPARE THE COVER { 1 } Place the front of the 81/2 11 x 11"

A

____,,.

(21.6 x 27.9 cm) piece of wool felt on top of the foam block. To create the guitar or chosen center motif with a cookie cutter, set the cutter in the desired position. Place small pieces of roving inside the cutter in two or three thin layers, making sure the layers crisscross. With the medium felting needle , begin punching the roving into the wool felt using small, repeated stabbing motions. As you do this, the wisps of roving will be incorporated into the felt (See A). Don't jab the needle too far into the foam block. Be sure to felt the perimeter of the design as well as the center, and incorporate any stray bits of roving that stick up. When the roving is partially attached to the felt, switch to the fine needle and continue to felt until the design is fully incorporated into the felt. Fill in any thin areas with extra roving. Remove the cookie cutter and needle felt any remaining stray fibers. Gently lift the piece off the block to make sure the roving is incorporated into the wool felt piece. To make the design with a paper or cardstock template, copy the cover pattern, cut out the guitar shape, leaving a window, and felt in the negative space. Felt the outline first and then fill it in, using the same method as described above.

Stab the roving with quick up-and-down motions.

{ 2 } Place the cover back on the felting

block. Take a few wisps of roving in a contrasting color and roll it into a small ball in your hands. Place it on top of the guitar body, about a third of the way down in the center, and felt a small, flat circle for the sound hole. Take another tiny bit of contrasting roving, form it into a thin rectangle, and felt it below the sound hole for the bridge. Carefully peel the cover off the foam block.

{ 3 } Stitch the guitar strings by machine with the sewing thread or by hand (if stitching by hand, use embroidery floss and a running stitch), going from the top of the guitar to the bridge. Use embroidery thread to make three French knots on either side of the top of the neck for the tuning keys (or sew on small beads instead of making French knots). Needle felt three star motifs down the center of the back cover in the same manner as the guitar, using the templates on page 130, small canape or cookie cutters, or a paper template for the patterns.

NEEDLE-FELTED JOURNAL

21


Needle felt small balls of roving for the border.

{ 4 } Mark the placement of the polka

dots and wavy yarn border from the template onto the felt with chalk, removable marking pen, or tracing paper, or just use the pattern as a guide. To make a raised polka dot, take a nickel-size amount of wool roving and roll it in your hands. Place the ball on the cover and stab it with a fine needle a few times to set it in place. Then needle felt around the sides of the polka dot, inserting the needle almost parallel to the block; this will give the polka dot a dome shape (See B). Continue to needle felt the center and the sides until the roving is integrated into the felt foundation. Continue until all polka dots are done.

22

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Felt the yarn in a wavy pattern.

{ 5 } Begin felting the 44" ( 1.1 m) of yarn at the lower portion of the back cover. Place the end of the yarn in the desired position, needle felt it in place, and then follow the pattern around the cover (See C). If the yarn begins to unravel and become too thick, twist it back into shape with one hand, while needle felting with the other. Needle felt the overlapping ends about 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) and trim any excess. { 6} Center the 91;4" x 11 3/4" (23.5 x 29.8 cm) piece of double-sided fusible web onto the wrong side of the 91/2 11 x 12" (24.1x30 .5 cm) piece of cotton fabric and iron it, following the manufacturer's instructions. Cut the fabric down to

81!4" x 10 34" (21x27.3 cm) , peel off the fusible-web backing, and center the fabric on the wrong side of the felted cover with the web facing down; iron in place.

{ 7} To make the pocket, turn in the sides and bottom of the 4 1/4" x 5 1/211 (10.8 x 14 cm) piece of fabric 1;4" (6 mm) and press. Turn in the top 1;4" (6 mm) and then 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) and press. Topstitch one row around the sides and two rows at the top . Use a slipstitch to attach the pocket to the inside back cover, sewing around three sides and leaving the top open.


signature 4

Sew the text block.

SEW THE TEXT BLOCK

{ 1 } Fold the signature-punching template widthwise with the marks on the inside; mark a Tat the top of the template and every signature. Use the template to punch holes in all six signatures. Place signature six in front of you with the fold facing you and the top facing left. Thread the binding needle with the 72" ( 1.8 m) length of waxed linen thread. Take the needle through the outside of the last hole at the bottom of the signature and leave a 3" (7.6 cm) tail. Enter the next hole from the inside and the next hole from the outside. Continue this running stitch until you are outside the signature at the last hole at the top.

Keep stitches a little loose-when attaching the text block to the cover there must be enough space for needles and ribbon to slide underneath (See D). { 2 } Close signature six, place signa-

ture five on top, and open it. Enter the top hole of the fifth signature from the outside, enter the next hole from the inside, and continue the running stitch until the needle is outside on the last hole at the bottom. Tie the two ends in a double knot. Place signature four on top, enter the bottom hole from the outside, enter the next hole from the inside, and continue the running stitch until the needle is outside at the top hole. Make a kettle stitch by angling the needle away

from the text block and slipping it under the previous stitch connecting signatures five and six. As the thread pulls away from the text block, a loop will form; take the needle through the loop and pull up to tighten. Continue sewing the remaining three signatures the same way, doing a kettle stitch at the end of each signature and making sure the threads are not too tight. Do a double kettle stitch at the end of the last signature and trim threads to 1 4" (6 mm).

NEEDLE-FELTED JOURNAL

23


ATTACH THE TEXT BLOCK TO THE COVER { 1 } To punch the holes in the cover,

center the punching template on the inside cover, matching top to top and secure it with low-tack painter's tape. Center the text block over the template along the fold. Using the horizontal lines as guides and marking right next to the text block, mark placement for six h oles on either side of the text block (See E). Punch holes with a Japanese screw punch or anywhere punch. If punching holes with a medium awl, the holes may not sh ow up on the felt side of the cover. Those holes may be marked on

{ 3 } Bend the cover back and slide the needles, one at a time, in opposite directions under the next row of stitches (See H). Take the needles through the same cover h oles you just entered and gently tighten the ribbons until the cover is up against the spine of the text block, making sure the cover doesn't buckle. Cross the ribbons right over left to form another X on the spine and continue the pattern until you are outside the last set of holes. Remove the needles and tie the ends in a bow. Trim the ends.

the felt with a disappearing ink pen or chalk to make them easier to see.

{ 2} Thread each end of the 48'' (1.2 m) piece of ribbon with a tapestry needle. Stand the text block on its fore edge with the head facing you. Slide one needle under the last row of stitches on the text block, centering the ribbon (See F). Pass each needle through the cover, through the corresponding h oles closest to the tail, and pull through. Cross the ribbons, right over left, and enter the next set of cover holes from the outside (See G). TIP Be sure to save every scrap from felted sweaters, because even the smallest piece can be used as an embellishment or a design element.

24

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


:

Mark holes with the cover-punching template.

Pass the ribbon under the binding stitches.

Ribbons form an X on the outside cover.

Pass ribbons under the next set of binding stitches.

NEEDLE - FELTED JOURNAL

25


I I -~----------------- - ~

: SHORTCUT : I

I

-~------------------~

NHDLf-rf LTf DJOURNAl {BINDING} LONG STITCH WITH X-STITCH {FINISHED SIZE} 51A" X 8~" (13.3 X 21.6 CM)

THIS QUICK VERSION

of the needle-felted journal uses pieces

and scraps of felted sweaters to achieve the plush look. The pocket was sewn on with a simple running stitch, using contrasting embroidery thread. The M was attached with fusible web. The pencil holder was anchored with four sew-through buttons. For this binding variation, I started with two separate pieces of ribbon instead of one continuous piece. The needles enter the two bottom holes from the outside, leaving a 6" (15.2 cm) tail. The ribbons then pass under the first row of stitches on the text block, going in opposite directions. They exit the same bottom holes and then cross on the spine to form an X . The rest of the binding is the same as in the main project, and the ends are tied at the top and bottom with a double knot.

26

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I I

I

MASTER

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NHDL[-f[LTf DJOURNAL {NEEDLE-FELTING ARTIST} STEFANIE GIRARD, BURBANK, CALIFORNIA {BINDING} LONG STITCH WITH X-STITCH {FINISHED SIZE}

5~"

STEFANIE GIRARD'S

X 8*" (13.3 X 21.6 CM)

use of color, texture, and dimension

sets her work apart from the rest. Stefanie, author of Sweater

Surgery: How to Make New Things with Old Sweaters (Quarry Books, 2008), created a cover that started out as a child's sweater. After felting it, she decided to retain the look of the garment, keeping the sleeves, collar, and front pocket intact. She added dimension by needle felting die-cut wool flowers on the front. The bird-shaped page markers, also made from wool, are attached to the top of the spine. Stefanie has a degree in industrial design from Pratt Institute, and she effortlessly integrates function with a flawless design sense. I added a lining of vintage-inspired cotton fabric with a fun Scottie dog pattern. The inside pages match the bright and pastel shades of the wool. The binding has a slight twist-as I crossed the pink gingham ribbons on the spine, I slipped on a small metal bead at the center of the X. This book, with a child's outgrown sweater as the cover, would make a unique baby scrapbook or brag book.

NEEDLE-FELTED JOURNAL

27


CHAPTER

3 {BINDING} SEWN POCKET ACCORDION WITH THREE SIGNATURES {FINISHED SIZE} 5" X 7~" (12.7 X 19.1 CM)

TWO FACTORS DROVE ME

to learn jewelry making several years ago: a love of bling and

the thought that I could save lots of money making my own jewelry. The saving money part-well, you know how that goes. But I enjoyed creating pieces perfectly suited to my taste, wardrobe, and color palette. From jewelry I segued into learning metalwork when I saw that metal had several applications to books-covers could be made from brass, copper, or nickel silver; fabricated pieces could be used as embellishments and closures; and metal could be stamped with letters or designs or etched. Some of those jewelry and metal techniques are incorporated into this book. The focal piece on the cover is a resin-filled bezel atop a hammered and aged piece of brass that's attached with handmade rivets. A hammered scroll-wire chain decorates the spine. This embellishment is purely decorative but references medieval library books that were often chained to a mooring so they couldn't be stolen. The wire-wrapped beads on the top and bottom give the book that essential bit of bling, and the chain closure and clasp ensure that the precious contents won't spill out. The covers are made from a recycled vintage book, which provides a little shortcut. Look for ones that have decorative covers and an intact spine with no tears or holes. For the inside pages I combined a pocketed accordion fold with three sewn signatures for a quick and easy binding. The pockets are perfect for holding magazine clippings, bits of ephemera, and the odd piece of ribbon or fiber. The pages are great for sketching or note-taking.

If you're adept at other jewelry and metal techniques, such as bead weaving, soldering, or chain mail, feel free to incorporate them. When you're done, you will have a beautiful handmade journal-the ultimate accessory. 29


MAT[RIAlS {EMBELLISHMENT MATERIALS} • approximately 18" (45 cm) of 16-gauge antiqued brass or copper wire • 1" to 2" (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of 12-gauge copper wire •

2" x 2 Y2" (5.1 x 6.4 cm) piece of 22- or 24-gauge brass

• one 30 x 40-mm brass bezel, Ya" (3 mm) deep

.

• two-part clear jewelry resin (ICE Resin is preferred) • clip art or small photograph, vintage book page • twelve 24-gauge antiqued brass headpins • 4Y2" (11.4 cm) antiqued brass chain • liquid brass ager (found in hardware or home improvement stores)

{COVER MATERIALS} • vintage book with an intact spine approximately 5" x 7Y2" x %" (12.7 x 19.1x1.9 cm)

• various small beads, pearls, and charms • approximately nineteen 8-mm and three 10-mm antiqued brass jump rings

• small piece of Bristol board and bookcloth • two pieces of decorative paper approximately 4Ys" x 7 Yt." (11 .7 x 18.4 cm). Paper is cut Yt." (3 mm)

• four Ya" (3 mm) eyelets • glue stick and E6000 glue or strong glue for metals

smaller than inside cover measurements. •

PVA

{TOOLS} • Basic Tool Kit, page 12

{TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} •

piece of lightweight cardstock approximately 50" x 10 Ya" (127 x 25.7 cm), grain short (See "Note" on facing page.)

• 28 pieces of text- weight paper approximately 9" x 7 Ya"

bench block (a steel block for hammering metal)

• ball-peen hammer

(22.9 x 18.1 cm), grain short (Fold in half widthwise and

• small jewelry vise

nest the pages into three signatures of nine folios each ;

• small electric drill

reserve one for the punching template.) (See "Note" on facing page.) • 66" (1.67 m) waxed linen thread

• Yt." (6 mm) -wide strong double-sided tape •

• small piece of 0 or 00 steel wool

low-tack repositionable tape

• round- and chain-nose jewelry pliers • wire and flush cutters • rawhide or rubber mallet • metal file • foam brush • Japanese screw punch or awl

30

ADVENTURE S IN BOOKBINDING

• eyelet-setting tools


Create texture with the ball-peen hammer.

Note: If your book is a different size, determine the cardstock size by measuring the book height, subtract 1A11 ( 6 mm) , and add 3 11 (7. 6 cm) for the pocket. For the width of the accordion panels, measure from the spine to the fore edge and subtract 1A" (6 mm). Multiply this number by 10 (to join pieces; see instructions). For the text-weight paper, cut to the same height as the cardstock, minus the 3" (7.6 cm) pocket. For the width , measure the distance from the valley fold of the accordion to the fore edge, double it, and subtract 1A'' (6 mm).

PREPARE THE COVER

{ 1 } Separate the text block from the cover by gently pulling it away from the

spine, then carefully cutting with a craft knife where it joins the cover in the front and back. Be careful not to pierce the cover. Trim away any leftover, jagged pieces from the spine. Tear a small piece of a book page with text and glue it on the middle of the cover with PVA.

{ 2} If the spine is weak or flimsy, reinforce it by cutting a piece of Bristol board 1A 11 ( 6 mm) shorter than the height of the spin e, equal to the spine width, and grain long. Glue it inside the spine with PVA. Cut a piece of book cloth %11 (3 mm) shorter than the height of the spine and three times wider. Glue into the spine with PVA, overlapping it onto the inside covers, making sure the book cloth is adhered in the hinges.

Buff to highlight the brass.

{ 3 } Clip 짜a 11 (1 cm) from each corner of the 2 11 x 21/211 (5 x 6.4 cm) brass piece to make an octagon. File the edges smooth with a metal file. To hammer the brass, place the piece on a bench block and begin tapping it with the rounded part of the ball-peen hammer, making small pits in the metal (See A). Leave a small space in the middle flat so the bezel can be attached. The metal will curl while being hammered, so flatten it as much as possible on the bench block with a rawhide or rubber mallet. Place the finished piece in the brass ager, following manufacturer's instructions. When the piece is a dark brown, remove , rinse, and dry off. Buff the piece lightly with steel wool to bring up some of the brass highlights without removing the darkened part (See B).

JEWELRY & METAL POCK ET SKETCHBOOK

31


c

D

Bend the wire into itself to form a loop.

{ 4} To make the rivets, cut two 1/2 11 to 1 11 (1.3 to 2.5 cm) pieces of the 12-gauge copper wire with the flush cutters. File one end until flat and smooth with the metal file. Place the wire in the vise so the filed end is sticking up Va" (3 mm). With the rounded side of the ball-peen hammer, gently hammer around the top of the wire to flatten it (See C). Remove from the vise and repeat with the other piece of wire.

E

Flatten the wire.

metal piece on the book over the torn book page, mark the top hole, and drill through the cover. Slip the rivet through the metal piece and cover, turn the book over, and place it on the bench block. Cut the wire to I/a" (3 mm) with the wire cutter, file, and flatten, using the rounded part of the ball-peen hammer as before. Mark the bottom hole , drill, and set the rivet.

{ 6} To make the bezel, cut a clip art { 5} Drill two small holes centered at the top and bottom of the hammered brass piece, about 114" (6 mm) from the edge. The holes should be almost the exact size of the wire, with little or no room for the wire to move. Center the

Flatten one wire end.

32

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

image or photo to fit inside. Adhere the image with a glue stick and allow to dry. Mix the resin according to the manufacturer's instructions and pour into the bezel, filling it just to the rim. Allow to dry and cure on a level, dust-free surface.


F

H

Bend the wire at a 90째 angle.

Bend the wire over the pliers for the loop.

{ 7} To make the scrolled-wire link

{ 8} Punch Va" (3 mm) holes in the

chain, cut eight 2" (5 .1 cm) pieces of the 16-gauge antiqued wire (more or fewer pieces might be needed to fit the height of your book). Grab one end of the wire with the tip of the round-nose pliers and bend the wire into itself, forming a loop (See D). Grab the other end of the wire and do the same, but with the loop facing the opposite direction, forming an S shape. The finished size should be 3'4" ( 1. 9 cm). Place the wire piece on a bench block and flatten with the flat end of the ball-peen hammer (See E). Repeat for the other seven wire pieces. Connect the scrolls with the 8-mm jump rings, making sure the scrolls are facing opposite directions.

middle of the top and bottom of the spine and set the Ya" (3 mm) eyelets. Attach the link chain with two 10-mm . . JUmp nngs.

{ 9} To make the wire-wrapped beads,

Wrap the wire below the loop.

chain-nose pliers. Wrap the end of the wire tightly around the headpin under the loop and above the bead two or three times (See H). Clip the wire with the wire cutters close to the bead and tuck in the end with the chain-nose pliers. Do this for eleven more beads and set them aside.

insert a headpin into a bead or beads. Grab the headpin at the top of the bead with the tip of the round-nose pliers and bend the wire toward you to a 90-degree angle (See F). Remove the pliers and grab the wire again at the top of the bend. Bring the wire around the top of the pliers to form a loop (See G). Rotate the pliers slightly and continue to bend the wire until a loop forms. Remove the roundnose pliers and grab the loop with the

JEWELRY & METAL POCKET SKETCHBOOK

33


I

K

J

.,..-.

- - -- ... _

-- -- -路 -..

_...

.... ...

~

I Glues sections together as needed .

Measure across accordion for pocket.

L

Fold up and trim pocket end sections ; tape. M

SEW THE ACCORDION { 1 } Mark the cardstock pieces at the

desired width for the panels (for the book shown, it's 4 3A" [12 cm]) and accordion fold. To join pieces together, glue one side of a mountain fold to one side of a valley fold with PVA or a glue stick (See I). You may need to trim one panel about Va" (3 mm) so the pieces will fit and the folds will be aligned.

{ 2} Measure 3" (7.6 cm) up from the bottom of the cardstock piece and score a line across all the accordion folds (See J). Fold up the 3" (7.6 cm) section. Use the bone folder to make a crisp crease. Since the folds of the pocket are now facing the opposite way, refold all the pocket folds to face the same way { 3} Cut off the pockets of the first and last panels only and secure the open side of the pockets with 1A" (6 mm) -wide strong double-stick tape (See K) .

34

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Sew valley folds together.

{ 4 } With the reserved sheet of textweight paper, make a mark on the fold l" (2.5 cm) from th e top and bottom.

Open the sheet, carry the marks across the fo ld, and refold the sheet so the marks are on the inside. Mark a Tat the top of the sheet. Mark a T on the top front of all three signatures. Place the signatures in the second, third, and fourth valley folds of the accordion fold. Use the template to punch holes in all the valley folds of the accordion, punching through the inserted signatures at the same time . The signatures are sewn directly into the accordion folds.

Sew back across to complete.

{ 5 } Thread the binding needle with the 66" (1.7 m) of waxed linen thread. Starting at the top hole of the first valley fold, enter the hole from the back, leaving a 3" (7 .6 cm) tail and securing it with repositionable tape. Enter the bottom hole from the front, and enter the bottom hole of the next valley fold from the back Enter the top h ole of the same valley fold from the front and enter th e top hole of the next valley fold from the back (See L). Although the illustration shows the accordion being sewn while it's open, the folds should be close together and the thread should be taut, with as little slack as possible.


N

Bend the wire for the hook clasp.

Glue first and last accordion panels to inside cover.

Continue this sewing pattern until the thread is at the bottom hole of the last valley fold at the back.

{ 6 } Reverse the sewing, entering the bottom hole of the next valley fold from the back and entering the top hole of the same valley fold from the front, then continuing the sewing pattern. At the last hole, tie the threads in a double knot and trim ends to 114 ' (6 mm) (See M). { 7 } Place the text block in the middle

of the spine and glue the first and last accordion panels to the inside front and back covers with PVA (See N). Glue the decorative cardstock papers over the panels.

{ 2 } Make five evenly spaced small

FINISH THE BOOK

{ 1 } For the closure, set a l/a (3 mm) 11

eyelet 14 11 ( 6 mm) from the fore edge of the front and back covers, in the middle. Attach a few chain links to the eyelet (you may need to attach the chain to the book with an 8-mm jump ring). To make the hook clasp, cut a 2 11 (5.1 cm) piece of 16-gauge antiqued wire, and with the round-nose pliers, make a small loop on one end. Bend the other end of the wire toward the loop, and make another small loop at this end in the opposite direction (See 0). Attach the clasp to the chain on the front of the book. Attach as much chain as needed to the back cover through the eyelet. Attach the remaining 10-mm jump ring on the end and fasten the clasp to the jump ring.

holes along the lower edge of the front cover and five along the upper edge using a] apanese screw punch fitted with a 1-mm tip, or an awl. Set an 8-mm jump ring through each hole and attach a wire-wrapped bead. For the top, attach the 41/2 11 ( 11. 4 cm) aged brass chain to the first and last jump rings, and attach two more wire-wrapped beads to the chain. Glue the bezel onto the octagonal brass piece with the E6000 glue.

JEWELRY & METAL POCKET SKETCHBOOK

35


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I

I

: SHORTCUT : -,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.I

I

JfWf LRY &MfTAL rOCKfT SKfTCHBOOK {BINDING} SEWN POCKET ACCORDION {FINISHED SIZE} 5" X 7~" (12.7 X 18.4 CM)

MY AFFINITY FOR

1940s- and 1950s-era paste jewelry was

on some pearls, then went back in the hole on the opposite

fueled by my mother's small but tantalizing collection of

side before coming out the hole directly below. I threaded

sparkly, feminine brooches, necklaces, and bracelets. The

on more pearls and repeated the process, gluing the end

look of those faux gems and pearls inspired this shortcut

of the monofilament inside the book. A faux pearl dangle

version of the jewelry book, which requires no jewelry-

from an earring was attached to the top row of pearls with a

making skills.

JUmp nng.

I started with a small hardbound book and removed

.

.

A stunning faux amethyst brooch was used for the

the text block. The original dark-red book cloth was badly

centerpiece. It was adhered with E6000 glue and also wired

stained, so I covered it with a few coats of moss green acrylic

onto the cover (I like embellishments firmly secured). Small

paint. For a vintage look, the embossed pattern was high-

vintage brass flowers, taken from a bracelet, were attached

lighted with brown rubber-stamping ink. I cut out a window

the cover with mini brads.

in the cover to reveal the book's title. For the spine decoration I made five parallel rows of

journal was stamped onto a piece of damask-patterned paper and glued to the inside of the cover. The book uses

small holes along either side of the spine, then glued about

the same accordion pocket binding as in the main project,

2" (5. 1 cm) of monofilament to the inside of the book. I

but since this book had a wider spine, two extra signatures

brought the monofilament through one top hole, threaded

were added.

JEWELRY & METAL POCKET SKETCHBOOK

to

37


-路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路MASTER -路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路I I

I

I

I

JfWf LRY &MfTAL rOCKfT SKfTCHBOOK {JEWELRY ARTIST} PETER SOLOMON, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA {BINDING} SEWN ACCORDION {FINISHED SIZE} 514" X 714" (13.3 X 18.4 CM)

PETER SOLOMON'S SKILLS

as an expert jeweler translated

perfectly for this piece, which started off as a children's book on the history of France. Although he'd never worked on

says this "assures that no future wizard will ever be without the means to make notes and observations." A bookmark was fashioned from a detailed "potion

such a project, he had an affinity for it, even researching an-

bottle" that contains a formula of herbs, minerals, and oils

tique books and photo albums to see how metal and jewelry

and is topped with a ruby cabochon. Attached to a silver

could be added to the cover.

chain, it can also be removed and worn as a pendant.

When I saw it in its finished state, I was astoundedevery piece on the book was fabricated or cast, and the detail was incredible. A cast silver plate that reads Magic sits over

A dedication engraved into the corner reads, "To those who fill books with their wisdom." Peter wanted the text block to reflect the book's en-

the original title so the book now reads, Magic for the Use of

chanted theme, so I added pockets, pull-outs, envelopes,

Children. This set the tone and theme for the book. The spine

and even a pop-up to the sewn accordion, in addition to

is accented with a silver hinge, and cast sterling silver frogs

blank pages for drawing and writing. The end result is truly

surround the glass lens. Inside the lens Peter placed an as-

a magical book.

sortment of crystals, gemstones, and small charms, and the skull opens on a hinge to reveal a tiny carved-jade frog. The corners are capped with sterling silver, rose quartz, and chrysoprase. The closure was made with a cast sterling

Besides creating his custom jewelry work, Peter is coowner of Precious Metal Arts in Santa Monica, California, which is part jewelry gallery and part classroom space where he teaches aspiring jewelers and metalsmiths.

silver pen that neatly fits into a coiled piece of silver; Peter

JEWELRY & METAL POCKET SKETCHBOOK

39


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CHAPTER

4 {BINDING} STICK BINDING {FINISHED SIZE}

3~"

MY LOVE OF TEXTILES

X 5%" (8.9 X 14.6 CM)

goes back to my childhood. My family and I lived in and traveled

through Europe, and I became mesmerized by the beautiful textiles unique to every country and region. Handweaving revives that special connection. These woven mini book covers were created on a Schacht mini loom, a small, affordable, plastic loom that's great for beginners or small projects. Because of its size (about 7" x 81/2 11 [17.8 x 21.6 cm]), projects can be made up quickly but with countless variations. For the weft (threads woven horizontally), I experimented with pieces from my yarn and fiber stash. For the warp (lengthwise threads), I used hemp, strong cotton yarn, and jewelry cording. Warp threads should be sturdy and strong and fairly thin; they should not stretch very much when pulled. You can make a simple loom by cutting small, evenly spaced grooves into two sides of a sturdy piece of cardboard or book board and then wrapping the warp threads around the board and weaving weft threads with a weaving needle or small shuttle. Weaving with heavier yarns or fabric strips, plus compressing the threads tightly with the beater, makes for sturdy covers that hold up to use. For the featured project (shown at center) weft threads included hand-spun wool, acrylic chenille, a thick mesh ribbon yarn, and chunky wool. Hemp cording was used for the warp. Of the two other books shown, the one at left was made with hand-spun fabric rag yarn for the weft and jewelry cording for the warp, which created a solid, robust cover. The one at right was made with more lightweight yarns for the warp and weft. Both covers made with yarn were woven using a plain weave, which is done by taking the weft thread over one warp thread, under the next, over the next, and repeated row after row. This is the most fundamental weave, but experimenting with weave patterns is a great creative challenge. This book's binding is a simple one-signature stick binding in which the signature is sewn through the cover and around a stick. Adding more sticks and signatures for larger books is easy, since each signature is sewn independently.

41


MAT[RIAlS {TOOLS} • Basic Tool Kit, page 12 • Schacht mini loom or comparable small loom • small shuttles for weaving the fibers through the warp threads (these come with the Schact mini loom or can be purchased separately) • beater (a comblike tool that compresses the weft threads) • weaving needle • large yarn need le • two small safety pins

{COVER MATERIALS} • 20 yards (18.2 m) of 20-lb. natural hemp cording • various thick or chunky yarns in different colorsseveral yards (meters) of each (Thinner or more lightweight yarns or fibers may be used as well but should not make up much of the fabric.)

{TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • seventeen 6 Yi" x 5 Yt." (16.5 x 13.3 cm) pieces of Ingres paper, folded in half lengthwise and nested into one signature (Reserve one folded page for the signature-punching template.) • one5Yi"to6Yi" (14to 16.5cm) piece of driftwood or dried twig • 21" (53.3 cm) of four-cord waxed linen thread • 26 large-hole beads, about 8 to 10 mm • one small seashell with a hole drilled into the top (optional) • invisible thread (optional)

42

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


PREPARE THE COVER

A

B

{ 1} To set up the warp threads, tie one end of the hemp cording to the hole on the left side of the loom, making sure it's secure (if using a handmade loom, secure the cording somewhere on the side, out of the way of the weaving). Wind the cording around the entire loom so there are two strands between each peg and 40 strands total going across the loom. Keep the cording as taut as possible (See A). Tie the end of the cording tightly around the hole on the right side of the loom. Although this is different from how warp threads are usually set up on this loom (they are typically wound around the pegs), this allows for a piece to be woven the entire length of the loom and still have a substantial fringe . { 2} Wind about 3 yards (2 . 7 m) of yarn around one of the shuttles, leaving about 24" (61 cm) of yarn free. Starting on the bottom on either side of the loom, begin to weave with the shuttle in an underone, over-one pattern. Leave about a 6" (15.2 cm) yarn tail (See B). At the next row, go under the first warp thread and then continue the over-under pattern. When weaving into a new row, pull the weft thread at a slight diagonal (See C) . When the weft thread is woven all the way through, pack the threads tightly with the beater (See D) . Make sure the yarn is not wound around the first warp thread too tightly, or it will pull the fabric in, making the edges uneven.

â&#x20AC;˘ Wind the warp threads all the way around the loom .

Weave in an under-one, over-one pattern.

Weave with the shuttle at a diagonal so the threads are not too tight.

Pack each row down with the beater.

c

WOVEN MINI BOOK

43


..

Leave long thread tails when ending and adding weft threads.

{ 3 } Continue this pattern until a few rows have been woven. To change weft threads, weave partway through a row and then cut the working weft thread, leaving an 8 11 (20.3 cm) tail. Overlap the new weft thread over the old in the same over-under pattern, leaving an 8 11 (20.3 cm) tail. Continue to weave the rest of the row (See E). Change weft threads as often as you like, but keep in mind that only about 3 V2 11 to 4" (8.9 to 10.2 cm) of the fabric will show on each

side when the book cover is folded. { 4 } As you get near the top of the loom

the warp threads will get tighter, the space will narrow, and it will be more difficult to get the shuttle through the warp threads. At that point, continue to weave with the weaving needle.

44

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

.

Cut the threads to remove the weaving.

{ 5 } When the entire piece is woven, weave in the loose ends with the yarn needle and trim on the underside of the piece.

{ 6 } Cut the threads in the middle of the back of the loom with scissors (See F). Carefully remove the piece from the loom. Lace three strands of the warp threads through a large-hole bead and make an overhand knot as close to the bead as possible, and continue across (since there are 40 warp threads, one of the beads will have four strands through it) (See G). Trim the fringe to about V2 11 (1.3 cm). Repeat the beading and knotting on the other side.

Use large beads to finish the warp threads and create fringe.


BIND THE BOOK

{ 1} On the signature-punching template, make a mark 314 '', 2 Ya" , and 41/2 11 (1.9 , 6.7, and 11.4 cm) from the top next to the fold. Unfold the template, carry the marks across the fold, and refold it the other way, so the marks are on the inside. Place the template inside the signature and punch holes at the marks on the fold. Remove the template.

{ 2} Measure the width of the cover and mark the spine location at the center on the top and bottom outside edge with safety pins. Place the signature inside the cover and center it, using the pins as a guide. Thread the binding needle with 21 11 (53 .3 cm) of waxed linen thread. { 3 } Enter the bottom hole of the signature from the inside and exit through the cover, leaving a 6 11 (15.2 cm) tail. Make sure the thread comes out at the midpoint of the spine. Pick up the driftwood or stick and place it along the midpoint. Wrap the thread three times around the driftwood tightly, keeping the threads

close together (the illustration shows them apart) (See H). Enter the cover as close as possible to where the thread exited and go back through the signature at the bottom hole. Tighten the thread by pulling the tail and main thread gently in opposite directions but parallel to the spine. { 4 } Enter the middle hole from the inside, wrap around the driftwood three times, keeping threads tight, and enter the cover and signature from the outside (See I). Enter the top hole from the inside, exit, wrap around the driftwood three times, and enter the cover and signature from the outside. Slip the thread under the last stitch until a loop forms, bring the needle through the loop, and pull toward the head of the book (See j) . Repeat once more and trim the thread to 1/.+ 11 ( 6 mm). Rethread the tail thread onto the binding needle and knot the thread in the same way at the first stitch, pulling the thread toward the tail of the book when knotting.

H

Exit cover and wrap around stick.

I

I

..I l

I

I

Repeat at the center hole.

{ 5 } Attach a small seashell to the front of the book with invisible thread.

J

~I

TIP

Add larger pages, if desired, by tipping in folded papers. For example, cut a sheet of paper 11 Y2" x 3" (29.2 x 7.6 cm), grain short. Fold at 3 Yt." (8.2 cm) from both ends and glue the largest panel onto one of the book's pages. Tie off thread inside signature.

WOVEN MINI BOOK

45


I I -~----------------- - ~

: SHORTCUT : I

I

-~------------------~

WOVlN MIN I BOOK {BINDING} STICK BINDING {FINISHED SIZE} 6" X 9%" (15.2 X 24.8 CM)

THE COVER OF THIS BOOK

was made with a striped woven

placemat found at an import store. Woven placemats are inexpensive, easy to find, available in a vast assortment of bright colors and patterns, and usually heavy enough to be book covers without addition of a liner. The placemat was trimmed on the top, bottom, and sides with a rotary cutter, although the mat can be used without trimming. To prevent the mat from fraying, use a sewing machine

to

straight stitch the top and bottom edges and

satin stitch the side edges, or serge all cut edges. Three signatures of lightweight ivory cardstock were sewn to the spine with waxed linen thread and chopsticks, using the same binding technique as the main project. The closure was made with a ceramic button and two strands of waxed linen thread twisted into a ply. Since placemats often come bundled, these would make terrific quick gifts.

46

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


_,_- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I I

I

MASTER

_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I

-路I

WOV[N MIN I BOOK {WEAVING ARTIST} NICKI BAIR, PACIFIC PALISADES, CALIFORNIA {BINDING} STICK BINDING {FINISHED SIZE} 8" X 11" (20.3 X 27.9 CM)

NICKI BAIR'S HOME

might be mistaken for a museum were

it not for her Chihuahuas running excitedly through the house. Woven pieces and tapestries are on almost every wall: some huge, some tiny, the intricacies of the textures and patterns and the vibrant colors tempting the eye. Nicki started weaving in 2002 when her mother, a fiber artist, passed away and she inherited her two looms. More have been added over the years . The piece used for the cover of this sketchbook was one Nicki designed and wove in a Navajo weaving workshop (she considers it a sampler) that wasn't being displayed. Since her woven sampler was textured and earthy, I used three dried twigs and blue and red waxed linen thread for the binding. Real wood and stone buttons form the closure, and the tie is made with a two-strand ply of waxed linen thread. Since the piece was quite wide, I folded one end over to form a flap. The inside pages are smooth, ivory textweight paper with graph paper tipped in.

WOVEN MINI BOOK

47


CHAPTER

5 {BINDING} FIVE-HOLE PAMPHLET STITCH {FINISHED SIZE}

3~"

X 5%" (8.9 X 13.3 CM)

I STARTED MAKING DOLLS

when my friends were having children, but when that

stopped happening, so did the doll making. With the advent of the plushy/feltie/softy doll trend, I got right back into it, inspired by the dolls' goofiness and the ability to use recycled materials such as old sweaters. Creating patterns for plush dolls and toys is relatively simple, yet the possibilities for decoration, embellishment, and personalization are limitless. This doll is made from various sweaters, felted wool pieces, a shirt, and some vintage buttons. It's a perfect project for repurposing old clothes and using up fabric scraps. The doll body has a pocket that holds a small sketchbook ideal for jotting notes and drawings. Keep the doll on the bed and the book can be a dream journal. The doll-book combo also makes a great children's gift that encourages creativity. The book, bound with a basic five-hole pamphlet stitch, can be made in a short amount of time, so making several at once will ensure there's always paper handy when you need it.

49


MAT[RIAlS • two 41h 11 x 51h 11 (11.4 x 14 cm) pieces of decorative paper for the covers (corners rounded on one short side) • two 3%" x 4 % 11 (8.6 x 12 cm) pieces of decorative paper for the inside covers (corners rounded on one short side) • fifteen 10 11 x 3% 11 (25.4 x 8.6 cm) sheets of text-weight paper, grain short, corners rounded (Fold 14 sheets widthwise, nest into one signature, and reserve one folio for the signature-punching template.) • one 15" (38.1 cm) piece of unwaxed linen thread • 24 11 (61 cm) of Y4 11 (6 mm)-wide flexible ribbon • PVA glue

{DOLL MATERIALS} • various sweaters, old clothes, wool felt, and fab-

{EMBELLISHMENT MATERIALS} • one 18" x 3" (45.7 x 7.6 cm) piece of fabric for the scarf

ric scraps (no more than a Y4 yard (22 .9 cm) of each

• one small paper or fabric flower

fabric is needed) for the doll. To felt wool, place pieces

• one glass E bead

in a washing machine in hot water with a tablespoon of liquid washing soap, then tumble dry. When choos-

• small linen fabric scraps

ing fabrics, note that some nonfelted knits stretch

• embroidery floss

quite a bit when stuffed; when in doubt, test.

• chipboard and paper scraps

• polyester fiberfill • two small buttons for the eyes • scrap of wool felt for the nose

{TOOLS} •

Basic Tool Kit, page 12

11

• % (1.9 cm) button for the scarf • sewing and embroidery thread

• binding needle • sewing and embroidery needles • sewing machine

{BOOK MATERIALS} • two 31h" x 5" (8.9 x 12.7 cm) pieces of chipboard, grain short (corners rounded on one short side.) • one 11h" x 3 Va" (3.8 x 7.8 cm) and one 41h" x 3" (11.4 x 7.6 cm) piece of book cloth

50

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

• Japanese screw punch fitted with a 1.5 mm tip or Yis 11 (1.6 mm) hole punch • doll-stuffing tool and doll-turning tool or chopstick


Attach the ears to the head.

MAKE THE DOLL

WST =wrong sides together, RSI = right sides together.

NOTE:

{ 1 } Cut the fabric pieces using the

templates for the head, body, arms, legs, ears, and pocket on pages 132 to 135. For the ear, the front piece was cut from lightweight woven fabric and the back from a sweater knit. { 2} Pin two ear pieces, RSI, and sew around the edge with a 1/4" (6 mm) seam allowance, leaving the straight edge open. Clip curves and turn right side out. Lightly stuff with polyester fiberfill. Repeat with the other two ear pieces.

Pin the pocket and arms to the body.

Pin ears to the right side of one head piece between the marks (See A). Pin the other head piece on top, RSI. Stitch along the edge with a 1/2 11 ( 1.3 cm) seam allowance, leaving the neck edge open. Clip curves, turn right side out, and stuff firmly. { 3 } Pin two arm pieces, RSI, and sew with a Va" (3 mm) seam allowance, leaving the straight edge unstitched. Turn right side out (a turning tool or chopstick makes this easier). Stuff firmly, leaving the last 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) at the top unstuffed (when stuffing small areas, insert small bits of fiberfill and pack with the larger end of a chopstick, or use a stuffing tool). Repeat with the other arm pieces.

{ 4} The outside of the pocket was made from a sweater knit and the lining from lightweight fabric. Pin the two pieces, RSI, and stitch along the straigh t edge with a 14" (6 mm) seam allowance . Turn right side out and press. { 5 } To sew the body, place one body piece right side up on a flat surface. Pin the pocket on top, right side up , and flush with the body lower edge. Pin the arms onto the body between the marks (See B) and pin the other body piece on top , RSI. Stitch around the edge with a 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) seam allowance, leaving a 4" (10.2 cm) opening at the bottom. Stuff the body moderately-don't overstuff or the book won't fit in the pocket.

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

51


Tack the foot to the leg.

Stitch the opening closed, catching the legs.

{ 6 } Pin two leg pieces, RST, and stitch around the edge with al/a" (3 mm) seam allowance, leaving the straight edge open.

{ 8 } To attach the head to the body, turn in the bottom of the neck l" (2. 5 cm) and whipstitch the neck to the body (see

{ 10} For the face, determine placement of the eyes, nose, and mouth. You may want to draw the face on scrap paper

Turn right-side out and stuff firmly. For a more angled foot, pinch the leg about 1 1/2 11 (3.8 cm) from the curved edge to move the stuffing out of the way and sew across the leg from seam to seam by hand or machine. Tack the foot to the leg on either side of the stitch line with a needle and thread (See C).

page 17). The seam will be covered by the scarf.

for reference before stitching anything in place. For the eyes, sew the buttons to one layer of fabric with needle and thread, making knots underneath the buttons. For the nose, whipstitch a 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) round felt scrap to one layer of fabric. For the mouth, thread a long embroidery needle with an 18" (45.7 cm) piece of six-strand embroidery floss and knot it. Enter the back of the head with the needle, pull the knot through one layer of fabric, and come up 1/ 2 11 (1.3 cm) directly under the center of the nose. Reenter the head at the base of the nose and bring the needle up about

{ 7 } Turn in the body opening edges

1/2 11 (1.3 cm) and then pin the top 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) of each leg inside the body at the marks. Sew the opening closed with a slipstitch (see page 17), capturing the legs at the same time (See D) .

52

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

{ 9} To make the scarf, fold an 18" x 3" (45.7 x 7.6 cm) piece of fabric in half lengthwise , RST Stitch one short and one long side with a 14" (6 mm) seam allowance, leaving one short side open. Clip across the corners close to the stitching, turn right side out, and press. Turn in the opening 14" (6 mm) and stitch closed. Find the middle of the scarf and center it on the front of the neck. Wrap both ends around the back of the neck and cross in front. Sew the 3/4 " (1.9 cm) button onto the scarf where the ends cross.

Embroider the left side of the mouth.


G

Chipboard cover

Decorative paper r-----&-

Embroider the right side of the mouth.

314t1 (1.9 cm) to the left (See E). Insert the needle back in the starting point 1/2 ti (1.3 cm) under the nose and come up 314 ti ( 1.9 cm) to the right. Knot the thread about 1 1/2 11 (3.8 cm) from where it exits the fabric and then bring the needle back to the starting point, pulling the knot through one layer of fabric (See F). Push the needle toward the back of the head and clip the thread flush with the back of the head. If any thread shows through, massage the stuffing until it can no longer be seen.

Clip the paper corners to the chipboard, fold up, and glue.

MAKE THE BOOK { 1 } Apply glue to one side of the front

piece of chipboard and adhere one sheet of 41/2 11 x 51/2 11 (1 1.4 x 14 cm) decorative paper flush with one short side. Clip the rounded corners in four places, apply PVA to the cut sections, and adhere to the chipboard, pulling gently. (See G). Adhere both long sides and the one short side with PVA. Repeat for the back cover and press both covers under a heavy weight until dry.

{ 2} Fold the l 1h" x 3%" (3.8 x 7.8 cm) piece of book cloth lengthwise and center it on the outside of the signature with the right side of the book cloth facing the pages. Mark the signature-punching template, using the spine-punching template on page 13 5. Carry the marks across the fold and refold so the marks are on the inside. Place the template inside the signature and punch holes, making sure you come through the book cloth.

{ 11 } Tack a small flower with an E bead

at the center to one ear with needle and thread. Sew small fabric patches on one arm and one leg with embroidery floss.

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

53


J

I

â&#x20AC;˘

,." \~ Tighten the thread and enter the fifth hole from the outside

Begin binding from inside the signature at the center hole.

Both threads should be on opposite sides of the center thread.

K Tie the ends in a double knot, capturing the center thread.

{ 3 } Thread a binding needle with the

15 11 (38.1 cm) piece of unwaxed linen thread and enter the third hole from the inside, leaving a 3 11 (7.6 cm) tail. Enter the second hole from the outside and enter the first hole from the inside (See H). Pull the thread parallel to the spine to tighten. Enter the second hole from the outside (do not split the previous thread with the needle), skip the third hole, and enter the fourth hole from the inside. Enter the fifth hole from the outside (See I) . Enter the fourth hole from the inside and enter the third hole from the outside, making sure the needle comes up on the opposite side of the center stitch from the tail thread (See J). Tighten threads by pulling them parallel to the spine and tie ends around the center stitch in a double knot (See K) . Trim threads to 114 11 ( 6 mm).

54

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

End with threads on either side of the center stitch.

{ 4} Place a sheet of scrap paper under one book-cloth flap and glue up to 1/4 11 (6 mm) from the fold. Remove the scrap paper and adhere to the inside cover, centering it. Repeat for the back cover (See L). Draw a line down the center of the 41/2 11 x 3 11 (11.4 x 7.6 cm) piece of book cloth on the wrong side, along the 41/2 11 (11.4 cm) length. Place the text block on top, matching the signature fold with the line on the book cloth and centering it. Allow the covers to open onto the book cloth. Fold up each side

of the book cloth against the covers and crease. Remove the text block and recrease the book cloth firmly with a bone folder. At the intersection of the centerline and each crease, make holes with the Japanese screw punch fitted with the 1.5mm tip or a 1/16 11 (1.6 mm) hole punch. Brush PVA along the centerline up to the holes and adhere the 24 11 (61 cm) piece of 1/4 11 (6 mm)-wide ribbon, making sure it's centered. Bring each end of the ribbon through the holes (cutting the ends at an angle will make this easier) (See M).


L

Book cloth sewn to signature

....

M

~

!

-v"'

.........

~

-- ---

...

.

-

I I

-

Cover right side

.........._ '

~

Glue ribbon to the centerline between creases; thread the ends through the holes.

Adhere the book cloth to the inside front and back covers.

Text block

Ribbon

N

{ 5} Apply glue to the book cloth (on the same side as the ribbon) and then adhere it to the covers, again making sure the signature fold is aligned with the centerline of the book cloth (See N). Tuck both sides of the book cloth between the signature and the covers. { 6 } Glue the wrong side of one 318" x 43/4" (8.6 x 12 cm) piece of decorative paper and adhere it to the inside front cover. Repeat for the back cover. Place the book in the doll pocket and tie the ribbons around the scarf button.

Inside cover

Glue the book cloth with ribbon to the outside covers; fold edges to the inside, and tuck under signature.

Note: The small composition book is made exactly as the large book, but scaled to 1 1/4" x 111 (3 x 2.5 cm) using the chipboard and paper scraps. Adhere it to the wrist.

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

55


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I

I

: SHORTCUT : -,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.I

I

rLU~H

DOLL SK[TCHBOOK

{BINDING} FIVE-HOLE PAMPHLET STITCH {FINISHED SIZE} DOLL (SEATED): 5" X 10" (12.7 X 25.4 CM); BOOK: 3%" X 5" (9.5 X 12.7 CM)

PREMADE PLUSH TOYS

are great gifts for kids (and adults),

The solution: sew patches of the hook part of the tape

and incorporating a handmade book adds to the charm and

to the paws, and make the book out of an extra-fuzzy felted

appeal. The challenge comes in integrating a book with a

sweater, which would act as the loop part of the tape. I sized

finished product.

the book so it would fit comfortably on the toy. The cover

I found a solution after spotting this bunny in a chil-

was lined with fabric, using the same process as with the

dren's bookstore. I was drawn to its cute face and extra-long

needle-felted book. I sewed three signatures directly to the

arms-arms that could wrap around a book.

spine with a five-hole pamphlet stitch, so the stitches showed

But how to hold that book in place? I thought hook-and-

on the outside. The motif on the cover echoes the polka-dot

loop tape might work, with one piece sewn to the paws and

pattern on the bunny. Strips of wool felt attached to the front

one to the book. Yet I disliked the idea of adding unattract-

and back covers with a small button create the closure.

ive pieces of tape to the cover.

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

57


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I I

I

MASTER

_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I

rLU~H

-路I

DOLL SK[TCHBOOK

{DOLL ARTIST} MIMI KIRCHNER, ARLINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS {BINDING} FIVE-HOLE PAMPHLET STITCH {FINISHED SIZE} DOLL, 9" X 16" (22.9 X 40.6 CM); BOOK, 5Yz" X 7" (14 X 17.8 CM)

are like illustrations come to life.

I sized the book to fit into the sleeve and continued the

With expressions that range from innocent to impish, they

garden theme by using a vintage seed-pack image from the

seem to want to start speaking.

Vintage Workshop (transferred onto cloth) for the cover.

MIMI KIRCHNER'S DOLLS

Her collection includes swaddled babies, schoolchildren,

Hand embroidery accents the flowers, and the book is

and (my favorite) tattooed men and women; the tattoos be-

bound with a five-hole pamphlet stitch, using the same tech-

ing toile fabric. These art dolls were born out of the wealth

nique as the main project.

of materials Mimi acquired while clearing out her parents' house, which was filled with fabrics and notions her mother

Mimi started making art dolls in 2001 after twenty years as a potter. I hope they are always a part of her repertoire.

had amassed over fifty years. Besides using "rescued" fabrics that would otherwise be discarded , Mimi also incorporates wool, cotton, and cashmere from thrift-store clothes and estate sales. Each doll is meticulously crafted with hand embroidery and applique details. This Garden Lady doll is based on her pillow lady design, a cross between a pillow and a doll-rectangular in shape but still huggable. Mimi says she was intrigued by figuring out a way to incorporate a book and decided to create a sleeve underneath the embellished coat, which closes with buttons. Making a paper mock-up helped her anticipate the doll's layers and how the pieces would fit together. The doll's main fabrics are recycled-wool thrift-store clothing that has been machine washed and dried. The appliques are made from wool scraps and wool felt. Vintage buttons accent the coat, as do her near-perfect embroidery stitches.

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

59


CHAPTER

6 {BINDING} SEWING OVER RAISED CORDS {FINISHED SIZE} 9" X 12" (22.9 X 30.5 CM)

COLLAGE HAS A SPECIAL APPEAL FOR ME,

because I can tap into my vast collection of

stuff and create something unique. The art form, loosely defined as assembling various bits of ephemera and found objects onto a substrate, can be both freeing and intimidatingwhere to start? How should pieces be arranged? I like to start by choosing a focal point, which can be a photograph, an original drawing, a single word or sentence, or a graphic element. It should be something that draws the eye. A well-stocked supply of ephemera isn't essential-magazines, phone books, newspapers, junk mail, fabric scraps, food packaging, office supplies, and old letters found around the house can be used for collage. Gather more than you think you'll need. I prefer using pre-gessoed flat canvases for covers. They're inexpensive, sturdy, and available in a range of sizes. I usually begin by coloring with acrylics, watercolors, or pastels that set off the materials I've chosen. Backgrounds can also be created with stamps or stencils. Compose the collage elements, starting again with the focal point and arranging them until the composition is pleasing. The most important element in collage is time. Having time to think about color and composition only makes the piece better. In composing the collage, I take into consideration how the book will be bound. This sewing-over-cords binding, for example, has cords extending to the front and back covers, so they shouldn't interfere with critical parts of the design. They may even become part of the overall design. Think about how the book will be used. If it's destined to be a sketchbook and will be handled quite a bit, tack down the various cover elements securely so they don't come off. A few coats of gel medium will secure paper, while rivets, brads, wire, and strong glue are good for holding down three-dimensional pieces. This book is designed to be used as a collage workbook. The inside pages include 90-lb. hot-press watercolor paper, as well as an eclectic array of decorative papers, maps, transparencies, and colored art paper. It also includes two pages of pockets, sewn from clear vinyl, to hold stray bits of ephemera. 61


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} •

I

(ir.ll!D:I

• thirty-seven 17 % "x 11 %" (44.5 x 29.8 cm) sheets of various types of paper (Paper size can vary; for this book, smaller papers were also used. Fold all sheets in half widthwise and nest into six signatures of six folios each. Reserve one larger sheet of textweight paper for the signature-punching template). • two 9" x 11 %" (22.9 x 29.8 cm) sheets of paper (Fold in half lengthwise and wrap around the outside of the first and last signatures.)

{COVER MATERIALS} • two 9" x 12" (22.9 x 30.5 cm) flat, pre-gessoed canvases • gesso

• clear vinyl cut into the following sizes for the pocket page: one 17 %" x 11 %" (44.5 x 29.8 cm), four 3 Yt." x 7 % " (8.3 x 19.1 cm), two 3 % " x 7 % " (9.5 x 19.1 cm), and one%" x 11 %" (1 .9 x 29.8 cm) • three pieces of 1O" (25.4 cm) heavy jute cording • one 120" (3 m) piece of waxed linen thread

• two or three colors of acrylic paint • soft gel matte medium • acrylic sealing spray • permanent dye-based black and brown rubber stamping inks • various collage elements for the covers: vintage

{TOO LS} • Basic Tool Kit, page 12 •

rubber stamps and stencils

• stencil brush

maps and ledger paper, book pages, sheet music,

• filbert brush

old photograph, vintage label, tapestry fabric, faux

• foam brushes

jewel, cigar label, handmade paper, and clip art • • two 8 %" x 11 Ya" (21 .6 x 30.2 cm) sheets of decorative cardstock for the inside covers • six 12" (30.5 cm) pieces of waxed linen thread • small drawer knob with Yt." (6 mm) flathead screw • one %" x 12" (1.9 x 30.5 cm) piece of washed and frayed linen or cotton fabric • two matching velvet leaves • thick craft glue and PVA glue

62

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

large plastic plate

• paper towels • jar of water • low-tack artist's tape • sewing machine and thread • Japanese screw punch or anywhere punch • binding needle


PREPARE THE COVERS { 1 } Tear away as much of the backing

paper as possible from the backs of both canvases. Choose two or three shades of acrylic paint that complement the colors of your collage materials and squeeze some out onto a large plastic plate. Wet the filbert brush, dip it into the paint, and begin painting both canvases. The idea is to get random spots of color on the canvas, so don't be too careful. Try different colors and intensities of paint, being sure to cover the sides and back of the canvas where it is exposed (See A). Allow the paint to dry and spray it with one or two coats of acrylic sealer (this will prevent the paint from coming off when the gel medium is applied). { 2 } Tear two vintage maps into pieces wide enough to span the width of the canvas and about 2" (5 .1 cm) high. Age one piece by brushing brown rubberstamping ink on the edges with a stencil brush (See B). Adhere the map papers at the bottom of the canvas by brushing gel medium onto the canvas with a foam brush, then applying the map papers so they barely overlap. Smooth them down with your fingers and a bone folder, making sure there are no air bubbles. If the paper is especially fragile, just use your fingers to smooth it out.

Paint the canvas.

Antique the edges of the map.

Antique the ledger pieces and add to the canvas.

Stamp and whitewash the image.

{ 3} Cut five pieces of vintage ledger paper about 4" x l '' (10.2 x 2.5 cm) and age them using the brown ink and stencil brush. Adhere them to the upper right side of the canvas, above the maps, with the gel medium (See C). Apply the vintage label in the upper right corner the same way. Allow the papers to dry completely-this may take one or two hours, depending on the humidity.

{ 4} Stamp a design on the left side of the canvas using the permanent black rubber-stamp ink. When the ink is dry, spray the canvas with a coat of acrylic sealer and allow it to dry. Brush a thin layer of gesso over the stamped area with a foam brush. While the gesso is still wet, remove some of it with a paper towel so the stamped image looks whitewashed; allow to dry (See D). Cover the entire canvas with two or three thin coats of gel medium, allowing each coat to dry before adding the next.

CANVAS COLLAGE IDEA BOOK

63


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(2.2 cm) (2.2 cm)

Back cover decorated in the same manner

{ 5 } Stitch the photograph to the piece of heavy tapestry fabric by machine or hand. Glue or sew the faux gem to the top of the photo. Apply small amounts of thick craft glue to the back of the fabric and adhere it to the canvas. Glue the cigar band to the bottom of the photo with thick craft glue. Adhere a 41/2 11 x 1 11 (11.4 x 2.5 cm) piece of handmade paper to the center bottom of the canvas with PVA. { 6 } If using canvas for the back cover, collage that as well (See E). The back cover can also be made from book board covered with paper or book cloth, a game board , or other recycled materials.

64

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Vinyl pocket placement and stitching guide

MAKE THE VINYL POCKET PAGE

{ 1 } Assemble the pieces of vinyl as shown (See F). Tear off small pieces of low-tack artist 1s tape and use them to hold the pieces of vinyl in place, overlapping a scant 1/a" (3 mm) on the vinyl. This will help keep the vinyl in place while sewing so it doesn't move or buckle (See G) .

{ 2} Following the stitching diagram, sew the pieces of vinyl together, leaving a %" (6 mm) seam allowance, and making sure not to sew over the tape. Backstitch at the beginning and end of every row of stitches. Trim threads and fold the pocket page in half, making a sharp crease with a bone folder. The pocket page may be added to any signature before sewing the book.


H

------+------~---

. ~

Use tape to hold the vinyl while sewing.

SEW THE TEXT BLOCK

{ 1 } Arrange the signatures so the first and last signatures have the pages measuring 9" x 1134" (22.9 x 29.8 cm) on the outside, because they will eventually be glued to the inside covers. Write a small T in pencil at the top of each signature. Make the following marks on the fold of the signature-punching template, measuring from the top:34" , 1 3'4", 5짜'a", 10'', and 11" (1.9, 4.5 , 14.8, 25.4, and 27.9 cm). Unfold the paper, carry the marks across to the other side of the fold , and refold it with the marks on the inside. Mark a Tat the top. Place the template inside each signature, matching top to top, and punch the holes.

Sew the signature, capturing the jute cording (sixth and fifth signatures shown).

{ 2} Place the sixth signature in front of you, top facin g left. Thread the binding needle with the 120" (3 m) of thread. Enter the bottom hole of the signature from the outside, leaving an 8" (20.3 cm) tail. Exit the next hole from the inside and place one of the 10" (25.4 cm) pieces of jute cording across the spine at the hole; hold it in place. Bring the needle under the cord to the left and wrap the thread around the cord counterclockwise, capturing it tightly. Go back into the same hole in the signature from the outside, being sure not to split the thread. The cord should be centered so there are equal amounts overhanging on the front and back covers. Enter the next hole from the inside, capture the

next piece of cord with the thread the same way, and enter the signature at the same hole. Enter the next hole from the inside, capture the cord , and enter the signature at the same hole. Exit the next hole from the inside and pull the thread parallel to the spine in the direction of the sewing to tighten (See H). { 3 } Place the fifth signature on top and enter the top hole from the outside. Enter the next hole from the inside , exiting to the right of the cord and wrapping the thread around it clockwise. Enter the signature through the same hole. Continue this pattern until the thread is outside of the signature at the last hole. Tie the main thread and the

CANVAS COLLAGE IDEA BOOK

65


I

Kettle stitch

\ Secure the signatures together with double kettle stitches.

tail thread in a double knot; do not trim the threads. Place the fourth signature on top, enter the bottom hole from the outside, and continue the same sewing pattern, wrapping the thread around the cord counterclockwise when sewing toward the left and clockwise when sewing toward the right. When the thread is on the outside of the fourth signature at the top hole, secure the thread with a double kettle stitch. Pass the needle under the thread that connects the sixth and fifth signatures. Pull until a small loop forms and bring the needle through the loop. Tighten by pulling the thread straight up. Do the kettle stitch one more time. Continue adding signatures using this sewing pattern and always making double kettle stitches, until all six signatures are sewn together (See I).

66

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

{ 4 } Bring the needle back into the bottom hole of the first signature and secure it by passing the needle under the last stitch until a small loop forms. Take the needle through the loop and tighten, pulling toward the bottom of the signature. Repeat once more and trim the thread to 1/4" (6 mm). Remove the needle and thread it back onto the tail thread. Bring the needle back into the bottom hole of the sixth signature and knot as you did in the first signature. Trim thread to 1/4" (6 mm) (See ] ).

Tie the knots inside the first and sixth signatures to finish.


K

Glue the raveled cord ends to the inside covers.

ASSEMBLE THE BOOK

{ 1 } Place the text block between the covers and center it, so the spine is flush with the edges of the covers. Bring the top and bottom cords across the cover and mark 3'' (7.6 cm) from the left edge. Bring the middle cord across and mark 2" (5 .1 cm) from the left edge. With the Japanese screw punch or anywhere punch, punch the three holes in the canvas. The holes should be just big enough to push the cords through. If the cords begin to fray, apply some PVA to the tips and let dry Do the same with the cords on the back cover, using the same measurements.

{ 2 } Bring the cords through the front cover h oles and pull until they're tight against the cover and th e text block spine is aligned with the edge of the cover. Open the cover, trim , and untwist the jute fibers until they are completely frayed. Use the tip of an awl to help fray the fibers and trim them to about 1 11 (2. 5 cm). Glue them to the inside cover using PVA, spreading out the fibers so they're as flat as possible (See K). When dry, do the same on the back cover.

CANVAS CO LLAGE IDEA BOOK

67


M

L

Tie ends in a double knot

,

'

\

''

\

\

\ I I

~------------------

-- . --

Punch holes in the cover and sew over the cording.

{ 3 } Glue the first page of the first signature to the inside front cover with PVA, making sure the fold is flush with the edge of the cover. When dry, apply glue to the wrong side of one piece of 81/2" x 11 "Va" (21.6 x 30.2 cm) decorative cardstock and adhere it to the inside of the front cover. Do the same with the back cover. Allow the inside covers to dry, placing several sheets of waste paper between the front and back covers and the text block and pressing the book under heavy weights to avoid warping.

68

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Sew back over the cording, forming X's.

{ 4} Working alongside a 3'' (7.6 cm) cording piece, punch six small holes just above and just below the cording using an awl. Thread the binding needle with one piece of 12" (30.5 cm) waxed linen thread and from the inside the cover, enter the bottom hole closest to the spine, leaving a 2" (5.1 cm) tail. Cross over the cord diagonally into the second hole from the spine along the top. Enter the next hole along the top from the inside. Continue this pattern until the end of the row (See L). Enter the hole directly

below from the inside and cross over diagonally into the second hole on the top row so the threads form an X. Enter the next hole along the top from the inside. Continue this pattern until you reach the end, tie the threads in a double knot, and trim to 11+" (6 mm) (See M). Repeat for the other 3" (7.6 cm) -long piece of cord. For the 2" (5 cm) pieces of cord, use an awl to make a hole in the canvas underneath the cord about Ya" (2.2 cm) from the spine. Do not punch through the cord. Thread the binding needle with


12" (30.5 cm) of waxed linen thread and enter the hole from the inside, leaving a 2" (5 .1 cm) tail. Wrap the thread around the cord four or five times, then make another hole with the awl directly underneath the cord where the thread ends; enter the hole from the outside (See N). Tie the thread ends in a double knot; trim to %" (6 mm).

N

t â&#x20AC;˘

I

\

{ 5} Punch a hole on the right-hand side of the front cover at the midpoint that is large enough to accommodate the 1.4" (6 mm) flathead screw Push the screw through from the inside and attach the small knob. Punch another small hole in the back cover, opposite the knob , and lace through the 12" (30.5 cm) piece of frayed linen from the outside. Make a small hole about 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) from the end of the linen and bring the other end through; pull tight. Glue the velvet leaves together with wrong sides facing and encasing about 1/ 2 11 (1.3 cm) of the linen end. Wrap the linen around the knob to close the book. The knob will elevate the cover a bit when the book is completely open. For a completely flat book, use two pieces of frayed linen and tie together for the closure. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for back cover.

\ \

'

.......

''

' \\

'

'I I

I

Tie ends in a double knot

I

I I

I

I

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ Punch holes and wrap the cording.

CANVAS COLLAGE IDEA BOOK

69


I I -~----------------- - ~

: SHORTCUT : I

I

-~------------------~

CANVA~

COLLA6[ ID[A BOOK

{BINDING} PACKED CORDS {FINISHED SIZE} 6" X 9" (15.2 X 22.9 CM)

THE COVER OF THIS BOOK

was made from scrapbook paper

that has the look of collage, combining butterfly images, text, and flowers. I glued it onto book boards that were trimmed at each fore-edge corner to make hexagonal covers. Adding a few simple decorations gave the book dimension and ratcheted up the collage look. I adhered an antique photo case and a small tintype to the cover with brads and glue and then added a few paper-punched butterflies. I used the same sewing-over-cords binding but wrapped the thread around the cord a couple of times before going back in the signature, so that the binding thread goes all the way across the spine, with no cord showing through. For the closure, I attached vintage adding-machine buttons with screws, then tied a piece of seven-cord waxed linen thread to the back and wound it around both buttons in a figure eight. Ivory text-weight paper makes up the inside pages, and signatures were wrapped with various decorative scrapbook papers that enhance the collaged look.

70

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


_,_- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I I

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MASTER

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CANVA\ COLLA6[ ID[A BOOK {COLLAGE ARTIST} TRACIE LYN HUSKAMP {BINDING} SEWING OVER RAISED CORDS {FINISHED SIZE} 8" X 10" (20.3 X 25.4 CM)

ARTIST TRACIE LYN HUSKAMP'S

collages seem complex yet

effortless, incorporating bits of vintage ephemera and fabric along with her gorgeous paintings. For the cover she painted flowers on muslin canvas, then cut them out and attached them to an arranged background of vintage papers and dyed fabrics . Tracie Lyn, author of Nature Inspired: Mixed-Media

Techniques for Gathering, Sketching, Painting, journaling, and Assemblage (Quarry, 2009) and a fabric designer, says that she uses art journals much like a diary. "Keeping a diary was something I tried over and over to do as a child with little success, mostly because I felt my words were uninteresting. But art journaling has been an incredible activity, as it combines both images and words into a visual tapestry, recording the days of my life by capturing both significant and daily events." I used the same sewn-over-cords binding for this book, but added a French (or link) stitch to the binding in between the cords-this starts out as a long stitch, and as signatures are added the working thread hooks into the previous stitch . For the cords I used gold gimp and glued it to the outside of the covers, then stitched through the covers to hold it in place. Waxed linen thread wraps around brads in the front and back to create the closure. Pages are made from watercolor paper and the book opens flat. CANVAS COLLAGE IDEA BOOK

71


CHAPTER

7 {BINDING} SEWING OVER LEATHER TAPES {FINISHED SIZE} 4" X 6" (10.2 X 15.2 CM)

POLYMER CLAY

is the chameleon of the craft world. It can look like stone, wood, glass,

marble, or metal and can be molded, cut, and layered into almost any shape. The clay comes in an array of colors that can be blended for even more variety. It can also be stamped, painted, glazed, gilded, and washed with a patina. A few tools make working with polymer clay extremely easy. A dedicated pasta or clay machine effortlessly rolls it into various thicknesses. An acrylic roller also flattens the clay or embeds it into a clay mold or rubber stamp, which can give it a raised design or pattern. Clay cutters make neat trims. Polymer clay must be baked to harden and set; this is best done in a toaster oven in a ventilated area. Because baking the clay releases fumes , never use an oven intended for food. Condition the clay first by kneading it with your hands or pressing it with an acrylic roller. This warms it up in preparation for work. Then place it on a smooth, clean surface and use the roller to flatten it

to

its desired thickness, or flatten it just enough to put

it through the pasta machine or clay roller. This project, an open-spine diary, uses two stamping methods and adds a stunning crackled gold-leaf accent. A technique called a Skinner blend (best done on a pasta or clay machine) creates a beautiful gradation of color. Try it with small pieces of clay before attempting the cover. The book's locked closure is optional but lends a distinctive look. The faux deckleedge watercolor paper used in the text block is perfect for any art medium, and the across-the-spine binding allows the book to open flat.

73


MAT[RIAlS • six miniature brads • four large decorative brads • glazing medium • acrylic paint in burnt umber light (Golden brand) • PVA glue

{TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • twenty-two 712" x 5 %" (19.1 x 14.6 cm) pieces of 90-lb. watercolor paper, trim by tearing it against a deckle-edge or plain metal ruler (fold each piece in half lengthwise and make seven signatures of three folios

{COVER MATERIALS} • 6 oz. (170 g) of polymer clay in black

each. Reserve one folio for the punching template). • seven 7%" x 5%" (19.7 x 14.6 cm) pieces of lightweight colored cardstock, trimmed with a deckle edge and folded

• 5 oz. (140 g) of polymer clay in stonewash

(Wrap each signature with a sheet of the cardstock.)

(Sculpey Ill brand) • two 30" (76.2 cm) pieces of waxed linen thread • 2 oz. (57 g) of polymer clay in moss (Sculpey Ill brand) •

• two Ya" x 6" (1.6 x 15.2 cm) pieces of sturdy leather

1 12 oz . (43 g) of polymer clay in sweet potato (Sculpey Ill brand)

• one sheet of composition gold leaf

{TOO LS}

• five pieces of cardstock cut to the following

Basic Tool Kit, page 12

pasta or clay machine

dimensions: 4" x 6", 2 %" x 6", 1" x 6", Yt." x 6", and % "x 1" (10.2 x 15.2 cm, 7 x 15.2 cm, 2.5 x 15.2 cm, 6 mm x 15.2 cm, and 1.9 x 2.5 cm) • permanent stamping ink (Palette or Staz-On) • one Ya" x 1" (1.5 x 2.5 cm) decorative brass hinge • one Ya" x 1 Ya" (1.5 x 4.7 cm) decorative brass hasp • small decorative brass lock (about 1" [2.5 cm])

• small foam brush • various rubber stamps or clay molds • deckle-edge ruler or plain metal ruler • hand or automatic drill • binding needle • small piece of scrap wood for drilling • toaster oven with sheet pan

74

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


B

Trim the clay to size.

PREPARE THE COVERS

Abut the stacked triangles.

Run the triangles through the machine.

D

{ 1 } For the front cover, roll 3 oz. (85 g)

of conditioned black clay through a pasta or clay machine on the second-thickest setting or roll by hand to l/16 11 (1.6 mm). Place the 4'' x 6 11 (10.2 x 15.2 cm) cardstock template on top and trim the clay to size using a clay cutter (See A). Set the cut sheet on the oven's metal sheet pan. { 2} To make the Skinner blend, condition 2 oz. (57 g) of stonewash and 2 oz. (57 g) of moss clay separately. Roll each on the thickest setting of the machine until you have a sheet from which you can cut a 3" x 6 11 (7.6 x 15.2 cm) piece.

{ 4} Run the piece, short side first ,

{ 3 } Place one clay sheet over the other and trim both to 3" x 6 11 (7.6 x 15.2 cm). With the cutter, cut both sheets into two triangles, separate the layers, and place the same color triangles on top of each other. Push the pieces together so there are no gaps (See B).

through the pasta machine at the thickest setting (See C). Fold the piece in half, matching short side to short side, and pinch the fold gently. Run the folded side through the machine, again at the thickest setting. Repeat this folding and rolling process about 15 to 20 times , or until there is a smooth gradation of

Examples of the Skinner blend at various stages

color (See D). The Skinner blend is a bit temperamental, so make sure no stray bits of clay become incorporated while rolling, or it will ruin the effect. Run the piece without folding it through the machine one last time at the second-thickest setting. Trim to size using the 2 3/,i." x 6 11 (7 x 15.2 cm) template.

POLYMER CLAY DIARY

75


Lightly stamp the image onto the clay.

{ 5} Ink a stamp with the permanent ink and stamp it lightly onto the clay, just enough to get an image (See E). Don't make a deep impression. If the clay sticks to the stamp, gently peel it off. Carefully place the stamped piece on the right side of the black foundation piece.

{ 6 } Run a conditioned 1-oz. (28 g) piece of black clay through the machine at the thickest setting until it measures about l" x 5 1/2'' (2.5 x 14 cm). Place a piece of the composition gold leaf along the length of the clay piece, carefully tearing the leaf into smaller pieces if necessary and burnishing gently with your fingers . It will adhere without needing any glue.

76

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Place the gold leaf over the black clay and run through the machine.

Run the clay through the machine at the second-thickest setting to get a crackle effect (See F). Trim to size using the %" x 6" (6 mm x 15.2 cm) template and place it to the left of the stamped piece, making sure there are no gaps. { 7 } Condition the 11/2-oz. ( 43 g) piece of sweet potato clay and run it through the machine at the second-thickest setting. Trim to size using the l" x 6" (2.5 x 15.2 cm) template. Stamp a design firmly into the clay with a rubber stamp to get an impression (See G). Or press the clay into a clay mold and then trim to size. (If the clay sticks to the mold, try using a release such as a small amount

of cornstarch or a fine mist of water in the mold before adding the clay.) Place it next to the gold-leafed piece. Use the cutter to trim any overhanging or uneven pieces on the cover. { 8} For the back cover, condition, roll, and cut 3 oz. (85 g) of black clay as in step 1. Condition and roll 3 oz. (85 g) of stonewash clay (you can also do another Skinner blend for the back if desired), trim to size using the 4" x 6" (10.2 x 15.2 cm) template , and stamp with an inked stamp as in step 5. Gently place it over the black piece. Trim any overhanging or uneven pieces. Place on the baking sheet.


G

H

Stamp impressions into the clay.

{ 9} Fold the closure, condition a 1/2-oz. (14 g) piece of stonewash clay, and roll it through the machine at the thickest setting. Trim to size using the 3!4" x l" (1.9 x 2.5 cm) template. Place on the baking sheet and bake all pieces according to the manufacturer's directions. { 10 } When cool, remove the clay pieces. With the foam brush, paint the outside of the back cover and the closure piece with one coat of glaze. Paint one coat of glaze over only the metal leaf and ink-stamped portions of the front cover. Mix 1/3 (.33) part glaze with 짜3 (.66) parts of the burnt umber light acrylic paint and

Mark holes, drill, and attach the hinge and hasp to the back cover. Attach the staple to the cover after the book is bound.

sponge over the stamped, far-left panel of the cover; allow to dry { 11 } To assemble the covers, mark hinge holes on the closure piece and back cover as shown (See H). Place a small scrap of wood under the book and drill small h oles, then attach the hinge to the closure piece and back cover with miniature brads. Mark holes for the hasp on the closure piece, drill the holes , and attach with the mini brads (the hasp staple will be attached later to the front cover). Place the signatures between the covers and make sure the closure fits. If not, add or subtract signatures.

POLYMER CLAY DIARY

77


~%"

%"~ (1.9

(1.9cm)

Mark paper for signaturepunching template.

SEW THE TEXT BLOCK

{ 1 } Measure 3A" (2 cm) from the top and bottom of the signature-punching template along the fold and make a mark. Place each r'a" x 6 11 (1.6 x 15.2 cm) leather piece on the inside of each mark and make a mark on the other side of the leather piece (See I). Don't make the marks too close to the leather or the stitches will make it bunch up. Open up the template and carry the marks across the fold, then refold the template so the marks are now are on the inside. Mark a Tat the top of the template and at the top on the front of all the signatures. Use the template to punch all seven signatures.

78

K

J

I

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

m)

Begin sewing the bottom

row.

{ 2 } The signatures are sewn across the spine, over the leather strips, and the bottom row is sewn first. Enter the bottom hole from the inside of the seventh signature, leaving a 3" (7 .5 cm) tail. Place the leather piece across the edge of the signature, center it, and enter the top hole of the signature from the outside. Tie the thread in a double knot at the top hole (See j). Exit the top hole from the inside.

{ 3} Pick up the sixth signature and enter the top hole from the outside. Enter the bottom hole from the inside and enter the top hole again from the outside. Enter the bottom hole from the inside (See K). Pick up the fifth signature and enter the bottom hole from the outside.

Signatures are added as you

go.

Enter the top hole from the inside, the bottom hole from the outside, and the top hole from the inside (See L). Pick up the fourth signature and repeat the sewing. Continue in the same manner until the first signature has been sewn and the needle is on the inside at the bottom hole. Knot the thread by bringing the needle under the stitch until a single loop forms. Bring the needle through the loop and tighten, pulling downward (See M). Make one more knot and trim the thread to 1A" (6 mm). Trim the thread in the seventh signature to 1A'' (6 mm). Repeat the sewing for the top row of stitches; illustration L shows the stitching pattern.


L

M

Repeat the process to sew each signature.

ASSEMBLE THE BOOK

{ 1 } Trim the front leather pieces so they overlap the covers by about 2" (5 .1 cm). Adhere to the front cover

with PVA, making sure the text block is centered under the cover. When the glue is dry, do the same with the leather pieces on the back cover. Drill small holes through the leather pieces and the cover to accommodate the decorative brad prongs and attach the brads.

Tie off the thread inside the signature.

{ 3 } Place a sheet of waste paper under the first page of the first signature and glue the entire sheet with PVA; adhere to the inside front cover. Do the same with the last page of the last signature and adhere to the inside back cover. Fasten the hasp closure with a small lock.

{ 2} Mark placement for the staple part of the hasp, mark holes, and drill through the cover. Attach the staple with two miniature brads.

POLYMER CLAY DIARY

79


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I

I

: SHORTCUT : -,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.I

I

rOLYMlR CLAY DIARY {BINDING} BUTTONHOLE STITCH OVER TAPES {FINISHED SIZE} 31's" X 5" (9.2 X 12.7 CM)

MANY TALENTED POLYMER CLAY

artists sell canes in a

Handmade paper was glued to a piece of book board,

variety of designs, colors, and shapes, such as faces, flowers,

and the clay pieces adhered with E6000-an industrial-

and geometric patterns. Canes are cylindrical or log-shaped

strength craft adhesive.

pieces of clay with a design that runs all the way through.

I bound the book using a buttonhole stitch (developed by

When sliced, each piece shows the design. Some of the pat-

book artist Keith Smith), another sewn-over-tapes binding.

terns are so intricate they're like little jewels.

Instead of using leather for the tapes, I used folded pieces of

When the cane is sliced (much like ready-to-bake cookies), the pieces can be used for jewelry or other projects. I

the cover paper and glued the tapes between the cover and first page.

found two beautiful canes on Etsy.com that were made by

The book is colorful and lightweight and was made in

polymer clay artist Keila Hernandez. Since the colors and

just a few hours. Leftover clay pieces were used to make ear-

patterns reminded me of tile, I cut the canes into Va" (3 mm)

rings and a bracelet.

-thick slices, baked them, and then arranged the pieces in a design reminiscent of a tile accent on a door or window.

POLYMER CLAY DIARY

81


-路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路MASTER -路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路I I

I I

I

I

rOLYMlR CLAY DIARY {POLYMER CLAY ARTIST} KEILA HERNANDEZ, OTTUMWA, IOWA {BINDING} SEWING OVER TAPES {FINISHED SIZE} 4" X 6" (10.2 X 15.2 CM)

WHEN I FOUND KEILA'S

polymer canes on Etsy.com I

crystals between the leaves to add a touch of sparkle (she

checked out her blog, where I discovered her talents

cautions that any nonpolymer embellishments should be

stretched much further. Her larger and more detailed cane

able to withstand heat because the clay piece is baked in

work was exquisite and her color palette was lovely.

the oven).

Keila has been working with polymer clay for more than

Both books were bound with sewn-over-tapes bind-

fifteen years and teaches polymer clay techniques. She also

ing; the book on the left was sewn using the same method

sells her jewelry and functional art pieces through art shows

as the main polymer clay book , and the one on the right

and galleries as well as online.

was sewn with a simple X-stitch across the spine. This

She made covers for two books using a caning technique

sewing starts with the thread entering the top hole of one

called millefiore. Adapted from glassmaking, the term refers

signature from the inside and then entering the bottom

to a design built within a log of clay so the pattern is visible

hole of the second signature from the outside. Next the

at each end. The cane is then stretched and rolled to the de-

thread enters the top hole in the second signature from the

sired diameter, typically a fraction of its original size. Slices

outside, then spans across diagonally to the bottom hole in

taken from the cane show the design consistently through

the third signature from the outside. The pattern contin-

the entire length, giving patterns a seamless look.

ues until the last signature and then comes back across

Base sheets of clay were layered with slices from several different canes. For the fall leaf book, Keila embedded

the spine the same way to form the X motif, ending with threads knotted in the first signature.

POLYMER CLAY DIARY

83


CHAPTER

8 {BINDING} ROMANESQUE STITCH {FINISHED SIZE}

7~"

MY GRANDMOTHER

X 9" (19.1 X 22.9 CM)

was an expert quilter who turned out incredible hand-stitched

quilts. I hoped to inherit her skills, but after taking a number of quilting classes and ripping out a lot of seams, I came to terms with the fact that quilting wasn't going to be my forte. I did, however, learn enough that I could piece together simple throws and quilted items such as pillows, potholders, and tote bags. Thinking of other things I could make out of patchwork, I came up with the idea for a quilted workbook that would be perfect for sketching and trying out new designs. The cover is easy enough for even first-time quilters, with straightforward strip piecing, fused appliques, and a ribbon rose. I hand quilted the piece using perle cotton and an embroidery hoop, but machine quilting is another option. The book is bound with the Romanesque stitch, which creates a beautiful crisscross pattern on the spine. This binding is usually sewn over tapes, but here the cover itself becomes the support for the stitches. Special features are found inside. A pocket on the inside cover holds fabric scraps, pencils, or notes. The first two "pages" are made of felt, on which pieces of fabric stick to create various quilt blocks and designs. The rest of the signatures are a mixture of lightweight cardstock and graph paper, the latter for charting patterns. Sari ribbons, made from sari fabric strips sewn together, serve as the closure and are also used for the rosette embellishment. Utilitarian and pretty-what more could you ask for?

85


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • thirty-three 14" x 8 % " (35.6 x 22.2 cm) pieces of lightweight cardstock, grain short • eight 14" x 8 %" (35.6 x 22.2 cm) pieces graph paper, grain short • one 14" x 8%" (35.6 x 22.2 cm) and two 6%" x 8%" (17 x 22.2 cm) pieces of felt • two 24" (61 cm) pieces of Ya" (3 mm) -wide double-face satin ribbon • two 6 % "x 8 % " (16.5 x 21.5 cm) pieces of Bristol board for the felt pages • su perglue (optional)

{COVER MATERIALS} • Yt. yard (22.9 cm) each of six different coordinating lightweight cotton quilting fabrics, plus various scraps for appliques •

% yard (45.7 cm) of one fabric for the cover and lining

• two 2" x 9" (5.1 x 22.9 cm) and two 2" x 18" (5.1 x 45.7 cm) pieces of fabric for the cover binding • one 6%" x 12%" (16.5 x 31.8 cm) and one 6%" x 3 % " (16.5 x 8.9 cm) piece of fabric for the pocket • two 1" x 6 % " (2.5 x 16.5 cm) pieces of fabric for the

{TOO LS} • Basic Tool Kit, page 12 • embroidery hoop (optional, for hand quilting) • sewing, embroidery, and tapestry needles • sewing machine • repositionable tape • eyelet-setting tools • Japanese screw punch fitted with a 2.5-mm tip or anywhere punch with a Ya" (3 mm) tip

pocket binding • twenty Ya" (3 mm) metal eyelets with washers (Darice

• rotary cutter, mat, and quilting ruler (optional but recommended)

Finishing Accents eyelets were used for this project.) • fourY4" (6 mm) two-piece metal eyelets

iron

• one 14" x 22" (35.6 x 55.9 cm) piece of light- to midweight cotton batting • quilt-basting spray or quilt pins • double-sided fusible web • four 15" (38.1 cm) pieces of sari ribbon or 1" (2.5 cm) -wide lightweight flexible ribbon for closure • size 8 perle cotton if hand quilting

86

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

{EMBELLISHMENT MATERIALS} • one 18" (45.5 cm) piece of sari ribbon or 1" (2.5 cm) -wide flexible ribbon or torn fabric strip for the rosette • one 2 % " (6.5 cm) square of mull (stiff mesh used in bookbinding) or crinoline • 12 glass E beads


Press the vertical seams in one direction.

MAKE THE COVER

All seam allowances are 14" (6 mm) and seams are sewn with a straight stitch. A quilting ruler and rotary cutter are best for making accurate cuts. You may want to preshrink the fabrics before making the quilt. For this project I did not preshrink the fabrics but hand washed and machine dried the piece after quilting it (to achieve a more puckered look) and then attached the eyelets, grommets, appliques, and rosette.

Arrange fabric and pieced sections in sewing order.

Out of the 1/2-yard (45.7 cm) fabric, cut one 14 11 x 22 11 (35.6 x 55.9 cm) piece for the lining, one 41/2 11 x 8 11 (11.4 x 20.3 cm) piece for the cover, one 31/2 11 x 8 11 (8 .9 x 20.3 cm) piece for the back, and one 214 11 x 9 11 (5.7 x 22.9 cm) piece for the spine.

{ 2} Sew the pieces cut from the 1/t.-yards (22.9 cm) fabrics together along the 2 11 (5 .1 cm) sides, alternating lengths and fabrics, until you have a strip measuring at least 60 11 (1.8 m) long. Cut the strip into five 5 11 (12 .7 cm) -long strips and ten 3 14 11 (8.3 cm) -long strips.

{ 1 } From the six 1/t.-yards (22. 9 cm)

fabrics, cut these lengths and quantities: twelve pieces of 2 11 x 2 11 (5.1x5.1 cm), nine pieces of 2 11 x 3 11 (5.1 x 7.6 cm), and nine pieces of 2 11 x 4 11 (5.1x10.2 cm).

{ 3} Arrange the 5 11 (12. 7 cm) -long strips next to each other in preferred order and press the seam allowances in opposite directions on each strip. Sew the

pieces together along the 5 11 (12. 7 cm) sides. Press the 5 11 ( 12.7 cm) seams in one direction (See A). Do the same with the 3 14 11 (8 .3 cm) strips, assembling them into two groups of five strips each. { 4 } Trim the sides of each patchwork block, if n ecessary, so they are even. Sew the 4 1/2 11 x 8 11 (11.4 x 20.3 cm) piece to the top of the larger patchwork piece, pressing the seam allowance toward the bottom. Sew the two smaller patchwork pieces to both 8 11 (20.3 cm) sides of the 3 1/2 11 x 8 11 (8.9 x 20.3 cm) back cover piece, pressing seam allowances toward the patchwork sections. Sew both front and back cover pieces to the 21;4 11 x 9 11 (5.7 x 22.9 cm) spine piece, pressing seam allowances toward the cover pieces (See B).

QUILTED WORKBOOK

87


c

Attach short binding pieces before the longer binding pieces.

{ 5 } To make the quilt sandwich, place the 14" x 22" (35.6 x 55 .9 cm) piece of fabric on a flat surface, wrong side facing up. Layer the same-size batting piece over the fabric and place the patchwork piece over that with the right side facing up. Use quilt-basting spray or quilting pins to hold the layers together. { 6 } Quilt the piece by hand or machine. For hand quilting, sew a small running stitch using an embroidery hoop and size 8 perle cotton. Machine quilting can be done with a regular or free-motion presser foot. Beginning quilters shouldn't be intimidated; just make rows of evenly spaced straight stitches across the piece, starting from the middle and working toward the edges. Practice on some scraps

88

AD VENTURE S IN BOOKBINDING

Sew binding to folded edges of pocket pieces.

before tackling the cover. Do not quilt the spine where the eyelets are attached (consult the spine-punching template on page 136 for spacing). { 7 } Trim the inside cover and batting

flush with the outside cover. For the binding, fold the cover-binding strips in half lengthwise and press. Fold in each long edge to the center crease and press. Attach the binding to the cover on all four sides by hand, using a slipstitch (see page 17) or by machine. The ends of the short binding pieces should be flush with the cover top and bottom edges, and the ends of the long binding pieces should be folded in 1h" (1.3 cm) before stitching in place (See C).

{ 8} Cut out the applique pieces, leaving a substantial border around the images. Following the manufacturer's instructions, iron double-sided fusible web to the wrong side of the pieces. Cut the pieces to the desired shapes and then fuse to the cover.

{ 9} For the pocket, fold the 61/2 11 x 121/2 11 (16 .5 x 31.8 cm) fabric piece in

half widthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Fold the 61/2 11 x 31/2 11 (16.5 x 8.9 cm) fabric in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Fold each l" x 61/2 11 (2.5 x 16.5 cm) pocket-binding piece in half lengthwise and press, and then fold in each long edge toward the center and press. Sew the binding onto the folded side of each pocket piece by


F

Hammer

Eyelet setter

Slipstich the pocket to the inside front cover.

machine or a hand-sewn slipstitch (see page 1 7) (See D). On both pocket pieces turn under and press each cut side 1.4" (6 mm) and then stitch I/a" (3 mm) from the edges. Place the pocket sections on the inside cover with the bound edges abutting; slipstitch the edges to the cover. (See E). { 10} For the closure, cut or punch two 1.4" (6 mm) holes along the edge of the front and back covers, 2 1h" (6.4 cm) from the top and bottom and 3.4" (1.9 cm) from the edges. Attach the 1.4" (6 mm) twopiece eyelets with the appropriate setter. Lace one 15" (38.1 cm) piece of the sari ribbon through one eyelet hole and around the cover, tacking it to itself with needle and sewing thread. Repeat for the other three eyelet holes and ribbon pieces.

BIND THE BOOK Washer

{ 1 } Place the spine-punching template

(see page 136) along the inside of the spine and secure with repositionable tape. Punch holes in the spine at each mark using a Japanese screw punch fitted with a 2.5-mm tip, or use a Va" (3 mm) anywhere punch. To set the Va" (3 mm) eyelets: Place an eyelet through the hole on the right side of the cover, place a washer over the prong, and set the eyelet with the eyelet-setting tool (the washers prevent the eyelets from being torn from the fabric). Repeat for the other eyelets (See F).

'

,.

Quilt

Eyelet Set the eyelets on the spine.

QUILTED WORKBOOK

89


H

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{ 2} Place the two 6 3,4'' x 8 3,4" (17 x 22.2 cm) pieces of felt on top of the 14" x 8 3,4" (35.6 x 22.2 cm) piece of felt , flush with the left and right edges. Pin in place, leaving a 1/2 " (1.3 cm) gap in the middle. Stitch around the perimeter only with a 1 /a" (3 mm) seam allowance. Slip the two 6 1/2 11 x 81/2 11 (16.5 x 21.5 cm) pieces of Bristol board into the pockets, and stitch the openings closed with al/a" (3 mm) seam allowance. Fold the thirty-three 14" x 8 314" (35.6 x 22.2 cm) pieces of cardstock and the eight 14" x 8 314" (35.6 x 22.2 cm) pieces of graph paper in half widthwise, and nest into four signatures of ten folios each,

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

2

4

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Sew ribbon through the holes of the first signature.

90

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incorporating two sheets of graph paper per signature. Reserve one cardstock folio for the signature punching template Place the fold of the signature-punching template along one vertical row of holes on the hole-punching template, centering it. Make a mark on the fold at each hole, open the template, and carry the marks across the fold . Fold the template the other way, so the marks are inside, and use the template to punch holes in all the signatures, including the felt pages. { 3 } With the felt signature on top of the stacked signatures, place the signatures inside the cover with the spine facing you. The left set of holes will be sewn first.

Thread the tapestry needle with one 24" (61 cm) piece of I/a" (3 mm) -wide doubleface satin ribbon and enter the third signature from the inside at the left hole, leaving a 4" (10.2 cm) tail. Secure the tail with repositionable tape. Bring the needle through the cover at the corresponding eyelet and enter the fifth signature at the right hole. Make sure the ribbon does not twist as it crosses over the spine. Enter the left hole of the fifth signature from the inside, again coming through the corresponding eyelet (See G). As you pull the ribbon to tighten, make sure the signatures are snug against the cover but not so tight that the cover cinches up or buckles.


Twist and tack the ribbon , forming an inward spiral.

{ 4} Enter the second signature at the right hole from the outside. Enter the left hole of the second signature from the inside (See H). Enter the right hole of the fourth signature from the outside and enter the left hole of the fourth signature from the inside (See I).

{ 5 } Enter the right hole of the first signature from the outside and enter the left hole of the first signature from the inside (See j ). Enter the right hole of the third signature from the outside. Tie the ribbon ends in a double knot at the left hole and trim to 14 11 (6 mm) (See K).

Secure the knot with a bit of superglue if desired . Repeat the sewing for the other set of holes.

MAKE THE ROSETTE

{ 1 } Thread a needle with a long piece of doubled thread that matches the sari ribbon and knot it. Place one end of the ribbon on the mull , or crinoline, near the edge and tack it in place with the thread. Twist the ribbon once, about 34 11 (1.9 cm) from the tacked end, and stitch again on the fold . Continue twisting and tacking,

forming an inward spiral (See L). As the spiral gets smaller, one or two twists can be made in the ribbon. Make sure no crinoline shows through the rosette. When the rosette is complete, slip an E bead onto the needle and tack it into the center. Continue adding eleven more beads to form a cluster in the center and then knot the thread on the underside. Trim the crinoline at the edges with scissors and tack the rosette onto the book cover.

QUILTED WORKBOOK

91


_,_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _,_ I

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: SHORTCUT : -,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.I

I

QUILTlD WORKBOOK {BINDING} ROMAN ESQUE STITC H { FIN I SHED SI ZE} 71/z" X 10 1/z " ( 19.1 X 26. 7 CM)

CUTTER QUILTS

are old quilts that are beyond repair but

To cover the worn spots on the front and back of the

still have enough integrity to be repurposed. This book was

book I made yo-yos from more tea-dyed fabric and attached

made from a vintage cutter quilt with 1930s-era fabrics.

them with a slipstitch. Twill tape ties were stitched on under

Although it was faded and worn in spots, there was enough

two of the yo-yos on the front and back.

to make a book cover, and all it needed was a few nips, tucks, and embellishments. After hand washing the quilt piece in a gentle soap and allowing it to dry, I cut binding strips from reproduc-

Still thinking the cover needed a little something more , I added a piece of vintage lace and some old buttons. The book was bound with turquoise gimp.

If an older quilt has lost its loft and is too flimsy to be a

tion '30s-era fabrics. Because the binding fabrics looked

book cover, stitch two quilt layers together or shore up the

too bright next to the quilt, I tea dyed them and put them

inside with interfacing and a layer of cotton fabric.

in the dryer for a shabby look, then sewed them on with a slipstitch. That extra step took a little time but paid off in making the binding look authentic.

TEA DYEING

Rinse fabric in hot water. Steep three or four tea bags in a quart (946 ml) of boiling water. Add fabric and let soak until the desired shade; rinse. If a darker shade is desired, add more tea bags or soak longer.

QU ILTE D WORKBOOK

93


-路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路MASTER -路- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -路I I

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QUI LTf DWORKBOOK {QUILT ARTIST} DANITA RAFALOVICH, WASHINGTON, D.C. {BINDING} ROMANESQUE STITCH {FINISHED SIZE} 11" X 13%" (27.9 X 34.3 CM)

I FIRST GOT TO KNOW

Danita Rafalovich through book arts,

The blocks evolved as she worked on them. She designed

then quickly discovered she was a master quilter as well,

a mariner's compass for the inside front cover that is paper

with more than thirty years of experience. The coauthor of

pieced. Cotton fabrics were used throughout, and the quilt is

the quilting book Backart: On the Flip Side , Danita has quilts

machine pieced and appliqued.

placed in private collections and has taught workshops around the country.

The Romanesque binding was used to stitch the book, but I used three rows of stitches (in two colors) because of

Shortly after giving her the parameters for the cover I

the book's large size. Felt pages make up the first signature,

received this amazing work of art in the mail. Seeing it from

but I skipped the pocket because it would have covered up

one perspective doesn't do it justice; the back has a similar

Danita's gorgeous work. The other signatures are made up

geometric pattern, and Danita made another separate quilted

of drawing paper, to be used to create more stunning quilt

piece for the inside.

designs.

The block she designed for the cover (and inside back cover) began as variable arcs superimposed on a four-patch.

QUILTED WORKBOOK

95


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CHAPTER

9 {BINDING} COPTIC STITCH WITH X-MOTIF BOARD ATTACHMENT {FINISHED SIZE} 10" X 11~" (25.4 X 29.2 CM)

THE ART OF DECOUPAGE-decorating objects with glued paper-goes back centuries but is still incredibly popular today. A few tricks make for a successful project: Use small, sharp, detail scissors

to

cut images. Hold the scissors steady in one hand and

turn the image with the other while cutting. Use a craft knife to cut out interior pieces. Precision counts, because the smallest nick can be noticed. Artful layering, the key to great decoupage, is easily achieved by taking time to configure the images until you're happy with the arrangement. The other secret

to

decoup-

age is patience. Allowing the layers to dry before adding more medium helps reduce air bubbles and rippling. Clip art, magazine pages, book pages, handmade paper, napkins, tissue paper, and laser-copy images can all be used for decoupage. When in doubt, test a scrap to make sure the colors don't run and the paper can stand up to the medium. This journal is bound with the Coptic stitch, an easy and attractive chain stitch that goes across the open spine. I devised the X-motif board attachment because I wanted something more decorative than the typical Coptic attachment. This design would also make a great guest book.

97


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • forty-nine 91h" x 7Ys" (24.1x20 cm) pieces of card stock and/or text-weight paper • four double-sided 12" x 12" (30.5 x 30.5 cm) pieces of scrapbook paper for the pockets • four 36" (91.4 cm) pieces waxed linen thread (more than one color can be used) • four curved needles (found at fabric stores and bookbinding supply sources) • double-stick tape or glue stick

{COVER MATERIALS}

{TOOLS}

• Ya" (3 mm) plywood (Baltic birch is preferred) cut into

two 5" x 8" (12.7 x 20.3 cm) pieces and one 1O" x 111h"

Basic Tool Kit, page 12

• foam brush

(25.4 x 29.2 cm) piece (Use the template on page 138 to cut the larger piece to the desired shape.) • decoupage glue (Mod Podge decoupage medium in satin finish was used, but gloss and matte finishes are also available.) •

papers: two 6" x 9" (15.2 x 22.9 cm) vintage cookbook pages for the face of the front covers and several more pages for the back cover; two 6" x 9" (15.2 x 22.9 cm) pieces and one 11" x 121h" (27.9 x 31.8 cm) piece of decorative paper for the inside front and back covers; two 5" x 1 Y4" (12.7 x 3 cm) pieces of

• sandpaper • small detail scissors • pinking shears or decorative-edge scissors • craft knife •

• steel bench block • hammer •

• two miniature spoons • two Y4" oro/a" (6 mm or 1 cm) two-part silver rivets

98

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

hand drill, center punch, and small drill bits (E6000 glue can be used to attach the

decorative paper for the face of the front covers; photos of food and wine bottles cut from magazines • gold metallic paint pen

rivet-setting tool

spoon handles instead of rivets.) • safety glasses •

large rubber bands


0

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Trim the paper even with the cover.

MAKE THE COVERS

{ 1 } Sand the wood after cutting to make sure all edges and surfaces are smooth. When adhering background paper, it should be cut a bit larger than the cover, then trimmed flush with the edges when the glue is dry. (Both front covers can be worked on simultaneously.) With the foam brush coat one side of the plywood with a thin, even layer of decoupage medium and attach the 6'' x 9" (15.2 x 22.9 cm) page, centering and smoothing it with your hands and then a bone folder to make sure there are no air bubbles. When dry, trim the paper

flush with the cover edges with a craft

Adhere the wine bottle images to the lower edge.

knife or scissors (See A). Spread another even coat of decoupage medium over the page using long, continuous strokes; allow to dry. { 2 } Glue the wine bottles that have been cut from magazines in a row at the bottom of the front cover. Spread a bit of decoupage medium over the lower left area and adhere a wine bottle, allowing it to overhang the edges just a bit (See B). Smooth to remove any air bubbles or ripples. Repeat until all wine bottles are adhered. Brush decoupage medium across the top of the cover and adhere a S" x 1 14" (12.7 x 3 cm) strip of scrapbook or decorative paper (trim the paper's lower

edge with pinking shears or decorativeedge scissors if desired before brushing with decoupage medium). When dry, brush decoupage medium over the center area and adhere the fruit image or other food photo cut from a magazine. When the cover is completely dry, trim the overhanging bits with a craft knife or scissors. { 3 } Coat the entire cover with three layers of decoupage medium. Allow the cover to dry between coats, and alternate between horizontal and vertical brushstrokes on each coat. Sanding between coats will create a smoother finish, but it's not essential.

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

99


{ 4} For the inside of the back cover, adhere layers of cookbook pages in a patchwork style, covering the entire surface, trim, and then coat with one layer of decoupage medium. Adhere the fruit and vegetable images at the top of the peaks with the decoupage medium, let dry, and trim any overhang. Add another three coats of medium to the entire surface as with the front covers. Adhere the 6" x 9" (15.2 x 22.9 cm) pieces of decorative paper to the inside of the front covers, trim, and coat with three layers of decoupage medium. Do the same with the outside of the back cover using the 11" x 12 1/2 11 (27.9x31.8 cm) piece of decorative paper. Let dry and trim any overhang. Edge the boards, if desired, with the metallic paint pen. Work carefully so the paint doesn't bleed onto the covers.

Note: If the boards warp while gluing, let them dry completely and then press them under a heavy weight overnight. Air-drying usually removes any residual tackiness from the decoupage medium. Excessively tacky boards may be sealed with acrylic sealing spray or a coat of interior varnish. { 5} Using the cover hole template on page 138, drill holes in the left and right sides of the cover (reverse the template for the right side). Drill the front and back covers together to make sure the holes are aligned.

100

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Use a hammer and rivet setter to set the cap in place.

{ 6 } Place the spoons on a flat surface and make sure the spoon bowls and the h andle bases make contact. If not, gently bend the spoons until both the bowl and the handle make contact. With a center punch and hammer, mark the placement of the hole in the bowl of one spoon and drill a hole large enough to accommodate the rivet prong (always wear safety glasses while drilling, and note that the spoon will get extremely hot while being drilled). Mark and drill the hole in the base of the handle. { 7 } Determine the placement of the

spoon on the cover and mark the top hole. Drill through the cover. Insert the rivet prong from the back and attach the spoon (this may require a 14" or 짜a" [6

mm or 1 cm] rivet, depending on the thickness of the spoon). Place the rivet cap on top of the prong. Place the cover on a bench block and, using the rivet setter, hammer the cap into place (See C) . For the bottom hole , drill through the spoon into the cover and attach the rivet. Alternately, the spoons can be attached using E6000 glue, but do this after the book is bound.


BIND THE BOOK

{ 1} Fold forty-eight 91/2" x 7r'a" (24.1 x 20 cm) text pages widthwise and nest them into twelve signatures of four folios each. Reserve one folio for the signaturepunching template. One side of the book opens to the left and the other to the right, so keep this in mind when creating the signatures. Placing the pockets in the center of the signatures makes them easier to sew. If you plan to glue photos or other bits of paper onto the pages, shorten the width on some of the pages. This will ensure the book won't expand too much.

Fold in the tabs, fold bottom up, and then fold in half the other way.

{ 2 } To make the pockets, cut shapes

using the template on page 139. Do not add more than two pockets per side or the book will not close properly Score the paper where noted. (To score paper, align a metal ruler along the line to be scored, and then impress a line with the pointed end of a bone folder or scoring tool.) Fold the two tabs inward, fold the bottom half up , and then fold in half lengthwise (See D). Place double-stick tape on the inside of the tabs or use a glue stick and adhere. { 3 } Mark the fold of the reserved folio using the signature-punching tern plate on page 13 7, making sure the signature holes align with the cover holes. Open the folio , carry the marks across the fold,

and refold it the other way so the marks are on the inside. Use the template to make holes in all twelve signatures. { 4 } This binding is done by sewing the right and left pair of holes at the same time using four needles (two needles for each set of holes). While a four-needle Coptic sounds difficult, it isn't, because stitches are simply repeated. Instructions are for the left set of holes (shown in red on page 103), so just replicate them for the right set (shown in blue). Using curved needles makes it easier to pass underneath previous threads when forming the chain stitches.

{ 5} Thread each end of a 36" (91.4 cm) piece of waxed linen thread onto a curved needle. With the top of the first signature facing right, pass the needles from inside the signature through the leftmost pair of holes , pulling through and making sure the threads are even. Place the cover face down, directly underneath the signature, and with the top to the right. (While sewing, it's best to elevate the signatures to eye level. If the spoon is attached to the cover, allow it to hang off the edge of the support to let the cover lie flat.) Cross the left needle diagonally into the right cover hole from the outside. (See E, on page 103.)

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

101


{ 6} Working with the same needle, loop around the cover through the same hole once more, entering the hole from the outside and ending with the thread to the right of the stitch that loops around the cover. Do not tighten threads (See F). { 7 } Cross the right needle diagonally

into the left cover hole from the outside. Loop the thread around the cover and enter through the same hole once more from the outside and end with the thread to the left of the stitch that loops around the cover (See G). Tighten stitches by pulling the X that has formed on the cover board and then pulling the stitches that loop around the cover. The signature will recess from the cover about Va 11 (3 mm). { 8 } Insert each needle back into its corresponding hole in the first signature, cross threads inside the signature, and then exit the signature with both needles. There will be three threads inside the first signature between the pair of holes. Place the second signature on top of the first, matching top to top. Enter the corresponding holes with both needles from the outside, cross threads inside the signature, and exit both needles from the inside (See H).

102

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

{ 9} Slip the left needle under the lefthand stitch that wraps around the cover board from left to right, being careful not to gouge the board, and pull the thread through. Slip the right needle under the right-hand stitch that wraps around the board from right to left, and pull the thread through. Place the third signature on top of the second signature and enter the corresponding holes with both needles (a chain stitch is formed on the outside between the first signature and the cover). Cross threads inside the third signature and exit with both needles (See I). { 10 } Slip the left needle between the first and second signatures from left to right, passing it under the existing stitch. Slip the right needle between the first and second signatures from right to left, passing it under the existing stitch; pull the threads through (another chain stitch is formed). Place the fourth signature on top of the third and enter the corresponding holes from the outside with both needles. Cross threads inside the signature and exit with both needles (See j).


E

Bring thread from inside through holes, even up, and then insert left needle in right cover hole.

G

Loop thread around cover again through same hole.

H

Re-enter and exit the first signature, add the second signature, enter the holes from the outside, cross the threads, and exit.

Repeat attaching the cover with the right needle.

I

J

Slip the needles under the threads between the first signature and cover and then into the third signature, cross threads, and exit.

Pass under the threads between the first and second signatures, and then into the fourth signature, cross threads, and exit.

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

103


K

Attach the back cover in same fashion as front cover.

{ 11} Chain as you did previously, this time slipping the needle between the second and third signatures. Stitches always chain between the previous two signatures with the needles going toward the center of the paired holes, never outward. Repeat the sewing for the fifth and sixth signatures. On the sixth signature cross the threads inside and exit, but do not chain.

104

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

{ 12 } Place the back cover face up on top of the sixth signature. Cross the right needle diagonally into the left cover hole from the outside. Loop around the cover through the same hole once more , and end with the thread to the left of the stitch that loops around the cover; do not tighten. Cross the left needle diagonally into the right cover hole from the outside. Loop around the cover through the same hole once more and end with the thread to the right of the stitch that loops around the cover (See K). Tighten stitches as for the front cover.

{ 13 } Make the final chain stitch by taking the left needle and slipping it between the fourth and fifth signatures from left to right and hooking around the existing stitch. Slip the needle from right to left (going outward) under the left-hand stitch that wraps around the board. Slip the right needle between the fourth and fifth signatures, going from right to left, and hook it around the existing stitch. Then slip it from left to right under the right-hand stitch that wraps around the board (See L).


L

M

/ Make the final chain stitches.

{ 14 } Enter each needle into its corresponding hole in the sixth signature from the outside. Open the sixth signature and pull needles through. Make a knot by slipping one needle under the threads until a loop forms. Take the needle through the loop and tighten, pulling the thread toward the hole (See M). Repeat with the other needle. Cut threads to 14" (6 mm).

Enter the sixth signature, make knots, and cut threads.

{ 15 } When sewing signatures on the other side of the book, secure the first set with one or two rubber bands to hold the pages and cover in place.

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

105


I I -~----------------- - ~

: SHORTCUT : I

I

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D[COUPAG[ corrH TABL[ BOOK {BINDING} COPTIC STITCH WITH X-MOTIF BOARD ATTACHMENT {FINISHED SIZE} 12" X 12" (30.5 X 30.5 CM)

THE LOOK OF INTRICATELY LAYERED

decoupage is stunning,


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MASTER

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D[COUrAG[ DRAWING BOOK {DECOUPAGE ARTIST} REUBEN MUNOZ, RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA {BINDING} COPTIC STITCH WITH X-MOTIF BOARD ATTACHMENT {FINISHED SIZE} 8" X 10" (20.3 X 25.4 CM)

REUBEN MUNOZ is a talented artist adept at a number of me-

diums. For his covers he expertly layered engraved vintage images into a cohesive, striking design. "In my too-young-to-be-a-hippie junior high school days I really admired psychedelic posters and album covers," Reuben says. "I wanted to get that same feeling in this piece-a kind of trippy Victorian surrealism." I painted the edges and inside of the boards with black acrylic paint, then sealed them with a shiny varnish. The same Coptic stitch used in the main decoupage project was sewn with red waxed linen thread. Pages are made from watercolor paper. Reuben is a lifelong "sketcher/doodler." His favorite sketchbooks have utilitarian covers and textured watercolor paper inside. Although he appreciates both tiny books and enormous ones, he admits to not always filling them up. "After enjoying the thrill of putting pen to pristine paper for a page or two, I abandon them," he said. But they're never discarded. "I usually find them later tucked into bookshelves, like little time capsules."

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

107


CHAPTER

10

{BINDING} SCREW POST {FINISHED SIZE} 101A" X 41A" (26 X 10.8 CM)

CARVING YOUR OWN DESIGNS

onto linoleum blocks is easy, fun, and practical-with

one or two blocks you can print countless designs on a variety of materials. Linoleum blocks consist of a Va" (3 mm) piece of linoleum glued to wood or a wood chip block. They come in a range of sizes, are relatively inexpensive, and will last a long time if properly cared for. Designs can be drawn directly onto the block with a pencil. Designs can also be drawn onto tracing paper with pencil and then transferred by burnishing the paper onto the block with a bone folder. If drawing directly onto the block, images will be reversed when stamped. Transferred images will stamp right-side up. Bold images are best for printing on book cloth, because the intricacies of detailed images may

â&#x20AC;˘

not transfer to a textured surface. Once the design is on the block, begin to carve your image. Always carve away from you , making sure your hands are behind your tools. Apply medium pressure and go slowly. Don't carve too deeply into the linoleum. Remember that what is carved away will be blank, and what is left will print. Once something is removed it can't be put back, so carve judiciously. The gouges used for this project include a fine line cutter, used for outlining an image, and a large U-gouge and large V-gouge. The U-gouge removes wider pieces of linoleum, and the V-gouge digs out deeper, narrow pieces. Feel free to experiment with carving tools in other sizes and shapes. Clean linoleum blocks with baby wipes and dry with a paper towel. Do not run the block under water or the linoleum will separate from the block. Block-printing ink may stain the linoleum, but it won't affect the printing. This sketchbook is designed as a workbook for carvers. The pages are perforated and the book is easily refillable and can be used for years. The structure is also basic enough that it can be adapted to almost any size.

109


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • approximately sixty 1O"x4 Va" (25.4 x 10.5 cm) pieces of thin, smooth white cardstock for the inside pages (Round two corners on the short side of the sheets if desired.) • two 20-mm (approximately%") screw posts • thick craft glue (optional)

{TOOLS} • Basic Tool Kit, page 12 • carving tools: fine line cutter, large V-gouge and U-gouge, plus handles (Having more than one handle makes it

{COVER MATERIALS} • two 10 Yt." x 4 Yt." (26 x 10.8 cm) and one%" x 4 Yt." (1.9 x 10.8 cm) piece of sturdy book board (.059" to .098"

easier to switch between cutters while carving.) •

large plastic plates

• several sheets of plain newsprint

[1.5 to 2.5 mm]) for the cover (Round the corners on one short side of the two larger pieces of book board if

desired. Corners can be rounded with a sanding block, a

• paper towels

heavy-duty corner rounder, or a curved chisel.) • one 23" x 5 %" (58.4 x 14.6 cm) piece of book cloth for the cover (The smoother the book cloth, the better the design will print.) • one 2" x 4 Ya" (5.1 x 10.5 cm) piece of book cloth for the inside cover • two 9 Ya" x 4 Va" (25.1 x 10.5 cm) pieces of handmade

baby wipes

• press cloth, thin cotton, or linen dish towel • foam brushes • small paintbrush • perforating rotary blade • corner rounder meant for paper and cardstock

• Yt." (6 mm) hole punch

paper, such as lokta paper, for the inside covers (Round two corners on the short side of each sheet if desired.)

• Japanese screw punch fitted with a 4.5-mm tip or a Yt." (6 mm) anywhere punch

linoleum blocks of various sizes (For this project 2" x 3" and 4" x 5" [5.1 x 7.6 cm and 10.2 x 12.7 cm] blocks were used.)

• water-based block-printing inks (For this project turquoise and red Speedball block-printing ink were used.) •

110

PVA glue

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

• brayer • household iron and ironing board •

blow dryer


PREPARE THE

A

B

BOOK CLOTH

{ 1 } Use the templates on page 140 or create your own designs. Draw or trace the designs onto linoleum blocks, following the instructions in the chapter introduction (See A). Keep in mind the book cloth size and texture when choosing the design.

{ 2} Begin to carve the image, outlin-

Draw or transfer the designs.

Begin carving with the fine line cutter.

ing it first with the fine line cutter. Work slowly, applying medium pressure, and don't carve too deeply (See B). Once the outline is finished, remove larger pieces of the linoleum using the deep U- and deep V-gouges (See C). When working on curves, keep the gouge steady and turn the block. I

\

\

{ 3} Once the block is carved, test the design by printing onto a sheet of plain newsprint. Squeeze some block-printing ink onto a plastic plate, roll the brayer back and forth in the ink, and roll the ink onto the block. Or apply the ink directly onto the block with a foam brush. Continue carving and testing, but consider leaving some extra lines around the image to lend a hand-carved look (See D).

. 0

.

~

.

'

1

Test the carved design.

Remove larger areas with deep gouge tools.

r---------------------------------------, TIP Try carving on other materials such as carving blocks, erasers, and cork. And don't forget the old stand-by, a raw potato.

LINO - PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

111


F

Decorate the book cloth.

Heat set the printed design.

{ 4} When the image is complete, test

{ 5} The ink must be completely dry

it on a piece of book cloth. I found that applying the ink to the block with a foam brush worked best for book cloth. Stamp the designs onto the book cloth, alternating the circle and vine patterns (See E). Fill in any large spots that don't print with a small paintbrush and some ink. Speed up the drying process by going over the stamped areas with a blowdryer. Stamp the circle image repeatedly onto both pieces of the 9 Ya" x 41/a" (25.1 x 10.5 cm) lokta paper as well. Clean the linoleum blocks with baby wipes and paper towels.

and heat set before the book cloth is glued to the boards. When the ink is dry to the touch, place the book cloth, print side up, on an ironing board and set the iron to medium-high heat with no steam. Place a sheet of plain newsprint over the book cloth and set a press cloth over that; iron for about 15 seconds (See F). Some ink may come off onto the newsprint. Replace the newsprint and continue to iron until no ink appears on the paper. Repeat the process with the two sheets of stamped lokta paper.

112

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


G

/Book cloth /

........

r -------------------------------------------------------------~-------~~~~~~--

1O Yt. 11 x 4 Yt. 11 (26 x 10.8 cm) book board

10 Yt. 11 x 4 Yt. 11 (26x10.8 cm) book board

______________________________________....__.________________________________________,

..._

Glue the book board to the book cloth .

MAKE THE BOOK { 1 ) When the book cloth is cool, place

it on a table, print side down, and draw a faint pencil line 314" (1. 9 cm) from all sides. Glue one side of one 1O1.4" x 4 114" (26 x 10.8 cm) book board with PVA and place it on the wrong side of the book cloth, using th e lines as a guide, and with rounded corners facing out. Glue one side of the 314" x 4 114" (1 .9 x 10 .8 cm)

spine piece of book board and place it l/a" (3 mm) away from the edge of the board th at's been glued down, making sure the top and bottom edges are aligned. Glue one side of the other 10 114" x 4 114" (26 x 10.8 m) piece of book board and place it Va" (3 mm) from the spine and with rounded corners facing out (See G). If the glue makes the ink tacky, use the blow-dryer again to dry the ink.

LINO-PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

113


H

I r

.,.

\..

_..

..

'1

Glue the book cloth over the spine area.

J

Clip and glue the book cloth corners.

{ 2 } Round the four corners of the book cloth. Clip each corner in four spots, as shown in the photo, starting and ending at the beginning of the curve and cutting right up to the book board. Apply glue to the clipped sections and adhere them one by one, pulling them tightly to the board (See H). After adhering each piece, press with a bone folder along the edge to flatten. Repeat for the other three corners. Apply glue to the top flap of the book cloth and adhere to the boards , making sure the book cloth is pressed into the Va " (3 mm) spaces between the covers and the spine piece. Do the same for the bottom flap and both side flaps.

114

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Adhere the lokta paper, overlapping the book cloth .

{ 3} Glue the back of the 2" x 41/a" (5 .1x10.5 cm) piece of book cloth and adhere it to the center of the inside covers, making sure it's pressed into the Va'' (3 mm) spaces between the spine and covers. (See I.) Glue both pieces of the 9Ya" x 4Va" (25.1x10.5 cm) lokta paper and adhere them to the inside covers. (See].) Use the blow-dryer if the glue activates the ink.


K

â&#x20AC;˘ --.--+--¡

1" (2.5 cm)

~--.~--~--~--~~~~~~~--~-

-,I~

....-...

perforate each page

N

CJ1 (')

(')

3 ..._..

3

Punch%" (6 mm) holes in the cardstock .

{ 4} Punch two 1/.+11 (6 mm) holes 111 (2 .5 cm) from the top and bottom edges and 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) from the left edge in all the 10 11 x 41/a" (25.4 x 10.5 cm) sheets of cardstock. With a perforating rotary blade, perforate the pages 1 1/2 11 (3.8 cm) from the edge with the holes (See K). Use one sheet of punched paper as a template and place it on the inside of the book on the back cover. Center it, making sure

not to cover the hinge, and mark the hole placement. Punch holes in the back cover with the Japanese screw punch or anywhere punch. Place the sheets of paper in the book and push the screw posts through the holes. Screw on the top of the posts. If desired , hold the screw posts in place by gluing the inside bottoms of the screw posts to the back cover of the book with thick craft glue.

LINO-PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

115


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llNO-rRINTfD SKfTCHBOOK {BINDING} RING BINDER AND FIVE-HOLE PAMPHLET STITCH {FINISHED SIZE} RING BINDER: 61h" X 9 14" (16.5 X 23.5 CM); PAMPHLET STITCH JOURNALS: 5" X 61h" (12.7 X 16.5 CM) AND 41h" X 51h" (11.4 X 14 CM)

THERE'S MORE THAN ONE WAY

to get a block-printed look

paper was then glued on to lightweight chipboard for the

without doing any carving. Some rubber stamp manufactur-

journal covers, and black book cloth was used for the spines.

ers feature designs that look hand carved, and the online

A single signature was sewn directly to the spine with a five-

site Etsy.com features hand-carved stamps made by many

hole pamphlet stitch (described in chapter 5). While print-

talented artists. Vintage Indian textile blocks, originally

ing with the textile stamps, I stamped several extra sheets of

used to print fabric, come in a wide range of sizes and styles

paper to use for future projects.

and work equally well on paper or fabric. The ring binder was constructed the same way as the main linoleum-printed sketchbook. Instead of binding pages with screw posts, I attached a ring-binding mechanism to the spine with screws and acorn nuts. The papers used on the outside and inside covers were stamped with commercial rubber stamps that have a hand-carved look. Book cloth was used on the spine, and I added a copper bookplate to the cover. I've collected a few Indian textile stamps over the years, but I confess that they're used more for decoration than printing. This project gave me a great excuse to take them off the shelf. I inked up the blocks with water-based black block-printing ink and stamped them on lokta paper. The

LINO - PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

117


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MASTER

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llNO-rRINTlD ~KlTCHBOOK {LINOLEUM-CARVING ARTIST} SAHARA DALLEY, LONDON, ENGLAND {BINDING} RIBBON-BOUND SINGLE SHEETS (LARGER BOOK), CASED-IN BINDING (SMALLER BOOK) {FINISHED SIZE} LARGE BOOK, 12" X 12" (30.5 X 30.5 CM); SMALL BOOK, 314" X 1%" (8.3 X 4.5 CM)

SAHARA DALLEY'S LINOLEUM BLOCK designs

are so detailed

it's hard to believe they're hand carved. Her patterns range from stately crowns to flowing tropical foliage and Asian

printing process is done by hand by first inking the lino block with a brayer and then pressing it with a rolling pin. These designs were printed on upholstery-quality white

motifs . Sahara is a self-taught artist (and former criminol-

cotton. I thought a large book would be best for Sahara's

ogist) who specializes in sculptural work in addition to

work, because the patterns are big and bold. I first had to

lino prints .

turn the fabric into paper-backed book cloth, because plain

"My lino patterns are inspired by my love of Japanese

fabric would allow glue to seep through. My quick recipe for

culture and exotic botanical forms," she says. Another influ-

book cloth starts by ironing thin, double-sided fusible web

ence is her passion for gardening and the dense tropical

to the back of the fabric, peeling off the protective sheet, and

gardens she creates.

then ironing the fabric to acid-free tissue paper.

Sahara first draws her designs directly onto a sheet of linoleum, then carves the pattern with lino-carving tools. The

The book is constructed the same way as the main project, but instead of using screw posts to hold the single sheets, I tied them to the back cover with cotton twill ribbon, which adds a colorful, feminine touch. A scrap of dark leather sewn to the back cover overlaps the front and is held in place with a tiny finial to form the closure. The larger format gave me an opportunity to feature two sizes of paper inside. Each sheet is perforated so it can easily be torn out. I couldn't bear to part with a leftover scrap of book cloth,

so I used it to make a tiny cased-in book, perfect for holding small poems or secrets.

LINO-PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

119


CHAPTER

11 {BINDING} SEWN THROUGH THE SPINE {FINISHED SIZE} 71/z" X 10" (19.1 X 25.4 CM)

I MANAGED TO LIVE

most of my adult life never being tempted by yarn stores-until I

decided to make a leather book with a scalloped-crochet edge and needed to learn how to crochet. Crochet is fairly easy, and after two classes and some practice I made that book. Within a couple of months, I also had several other crochet projects going (scarves, flowers, a baby blanket), a sizable yarn stash, some pattern books, and a number of hooks. If you've never crocheted, you have been warned. Moving beyond the leather book, I made journals that incorporated more crochet stitches than just a scalloped border, eventually creating this notebook that has a crocheted mesh cover and a fabric liner. Although a sturdy cover can be made from thick yarn without a liner, I wanted to add a pocket in back for storing hooks, small scissors, and patterns and thought the fabric would make a good base. The mesh crochet pattern is quite easy and allows the fabric to peek through. It can be done in one color or several, and in cotton, wool, or a blend. The binding couldn't be simpler and uses seam binding instead of thread. Details make it special-the ruffled border, the crocheted circles on the spine, and the larger circle on the cover. A crushed velvet ribbon, woven through the mesh pattern, serves as a closure.

If you've never tried crochet and can't get to a class, learning how is easy via books with detailed illustrations or photos, or through Internet tutorials. Knitters can easily create a similar rectangular piece.

121


MAT[RIAlS {TEXT BLOCK MATERIALS} • thirty-seven 13" x 8 %" (33 x 21.6 cm) pieces of lightweight cardstock, grain short • nine 13" x 8 %" (33 x 21.6 cm) pieces of graph paper, grain short • eight 8 11 (20.3 cm) pieces%" (1.3 cm) -wide seam binding

{TOOLS} •

Basic Tool Kit, page 12

• size E crochet hook

{COVER MATERIALS} • five 50-g skeins of Aran-weight yarn (For this project, Louisa Harding Nautical Cotton was used in grass, Atlantic blue, burgundy, and sand. Two skeins make up the cover, one skein is used for the ruffled border, and one for the rounds.) • two 1O"x16" (25.4 x 40.6 cm) pieces of solid-color heavyweight linen or hemp fabric for the liner • one 36" (91.4 cm) piece of Ya" (2.2 cm) -wide crushed velvet ribbon for the closure • fabric cut into one 6 %" x 13" (16.5 x 33 cm) piece, one 6 % "x 7 % " (16.5 x 19.1 cm) piece, and one 6 %" x 4 %" (16.5 x 11.4 cm) piece for the pocket • one 12" (30.5 cm) and one 1O" (25.4 cm) piece of Yi." or o/e" (6 mm or 1 cm) -wide flexible ribbon for pocket • one%" (1.3 cm) sew-through button for pocket • sewing thread

122

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

hand-sewing needle

• sewing machine • tapestry needle • Japanese screw punch fitted with a 1.5-mm tip or a Y16 11 (1.6 mm) anywhere punch • disappearing-ink fabric marker •

iron


MAKE THE COVER

This pattern uses a smaller-than-normal crochet hook to make tight stitches. If you prefer using a larger hook, make a test swatch. The cover, without the ruffle, should measure about 9" (22.9 cm) high. The pattern is worked in multiples of three plus one for the base chain, so it can easily be adjusted. The fallowing are abbreviations for stitches: ch = chain, sl st = slip stitch, st = stitch, sts = stitches, sp = space, sc =single crochet, hdc =half double crochet, de= double crochet, fpsc =front post single crochet. For the front post single crochet, insert the hook from right to left around the front of the double crochet post (see A), then do a single crochet, pulling up a loop and then pulling through two loops on the hook (see B). { 1 } Referring to the key and the pattern chart on page 12 4 , begin with color A and ch ain 46. Row 1: Sc in the second ch from the hook, and in each ch across ( 45 sc), turn. Row 2: Ch 5 (counts as 1 de and 2 ch),

First part of front post single crochet stitch.

c Row 4: Ch 5, [skip 2 sc and de in the n ext sc, ch 2] 14 times, ending with 1 de in the turning ch and changing to color B: While there are still two loops on the h ook when making the last de, yarn over the h ook with color B, leaving a 6 11 (15 .2 cm) tail, pull through the two loops. Cut yarn A, leaving a 6 11 (15.2 cm) tail. Turn. Row 5: Ch 1, 2 sc in the next 2 ch sp, [fpsc in the next de, 2 sc in the next 2 ch sp] 14 times, endin g with 1 sc in the

skip 2 sc and de in the next sc, ch 2, [skip 2 sc and de in the next sc, ch 2] 13

turning ch, turn.

times, ending with 1 de in the turning ch, turn.

Row 6: Ch 5, [de in the next fpsc, 2 ch] 14 times, ending with 1 de in the turning ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, 2 sc in the next 2 ch sp, [sc

Pull thread through both loops on hook.

Key for Crochet Stitches.

--------- -------------------c:::>

..

chain slip stitch

+

single crochet

T

half double crochet

1 ) v

double crochet front post single crochet work two single crochets into the same place

*

work three single crochets into the same place

v

work two half double crochets into the same place

in the next de, 2 sc in the next 2 ch sp] 14 times, ending with 1 sc in the third st of the turning ch , turn.

CROCHET NOTEBOOK

123


D

E

t

00

ft

t,j tl 00 ~~:::::x::>-r<::x~~~t f t~f

t tt t

t

t

0

:~~=t=t=r =f ~++

1 t.S t t.:5 ts o cx::>-:r<::X:>-i:r-CX:>-r<::x::>-r<X:>-r<X:l-r-CX::::>T-<X>-r-'tcx:>f t 0

-r<::>C>o-<>~::x:>-r<:X:>-r-<:X:>-r-<X::>-r-<:>C>-r<::x:>T-tOC>f

tt +++++++ 0 cx:>-r<::x:::>-re:K:>.,-cx::>-r<c:x::>-r-<:x::>~oc.y-oo ~

+

+ + + + + -+

~+o

~tt

+

=f=+

+= f

:~~ =

"t

-1- 4-

+ + +

-1-

++++t +++++

~ ++++++++++++

~'¢'~~~~~~~'fx>¢c~

Crochet pattern for border.

Crochet pattern chart for cover.

Row 7: Repeat the pattern from row 3 on, changing to color C at the end of row 9, and back to color A at the end of row 13. Continue changing colors every four rows until the piece measures about 15'' (38.1 cm). Fasten off at the end and weave in ends (See C and D).

{ 2} For the border, use any color yarn and pull up a loop in any st (but not a ch sp) along the perimeter. Yarn over, pull through, and then [2 sc in the next 2 ch sp, 1 sc in the next st] around the entire perimeter, doing 3 sc in each corner sp. End with a sl st in the last st. Fasten off and weave in ends. With right side facing, pull up a loop in the color reserved for the ruffle in any st along the perimeter. Yarn over, pull through, ch 1, 2 sc in the same st, [3 sc

124

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

in the next sc] around the perimeter, ending with a sl st in the last st (it's not necessary to adjust for corners on the ruffle) (See E). Fasten off and weave in ends. { 3 } Make twelve small rounds in sand or any contrasting color: ch 4 , sl st in the first ch, ch 1, work 10 sc into the ring. Sl st in the first ch, fasten off Weave in ends (See F).

{ 4} For the large round, ch 4, sl st in the first ch, ch 1, work 10 sc into the ring, sl st in the first ch. Ch 2, [2 hdc in the next sc] 10 times (20 hdc). Sl st in the first ch, changing to another color for the yarn over and pull through, leaving a 6" (15.2 cm) tail. Cut the previous yarn to 6" (15.2 cm). Ch 1, [l sc in the next hdc, 2 sc in the next hdc] 10 times. Sl st in the first ch. Fasten off and weave in ends.

{ 5} Pin the two 10" x 16" (25.4 x 40. 6 cm) pieces of linen fabric together with right sides facing (measure the finished crochet piece and adjust the fabric size if necessary). Sew around the edges with a 1/2" (1. 3 cm) seam allowance , rounding the corners, and leaving a 4" (10 .2 cm) opening along the bottom. Clip corners and turn right side out, press, and sew the opening closed with a slipstitch (see page 17) (See G).


Crochet patterns for small and large rounds.

{ 6 } To make the pocket, press under 114" (6 mm) along one shorter side of the 6 1/2 11 x 71/2 11 (16.5 x 19.1 cm) fabric piece and topstitch along the fold. Press under 114" (6 mm) on one longer side of the 61/2 11 x 4 1/2 11 (16.5 x 11.4 cm) piece of fabric and topstitch along the fold. Layer the smaller piece over the larger one, aligning the unstitched 61/2 11 (16.5 cm) sides, which will be the lower pocket edge. Working both layers as one, press under 114" (6 mm) along the sides and bottom. Pin the pieces together at the edges. Sew the two pieces together, stitching four vertical rows from the top of the smaller pocket to the bottom, 1 11 , 2", 4" , and 5"

(2.5, 5.1, 10.2 , and 12.7 cm) from one edge. Pin the pocket to the inside back of the liner, about 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) from the side and bottom. Insert a 12" (30.5 cm) piece of the 114" (6 mm) -wide ribbon 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) between the bottom of the pocket and the liner. Using thread that matches the fabric liner (so it won't show through the crochet piece), stitch Va" (3 mm) from the pocket edge along the two sides and bottom.

Turn the piece right side out, turn in the raw edges 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) , and press (See Hon the following page). Pin the flap 's turned-in edge about 1 114" (3 cm) above the pocket, aligning the sides, and zigzag or straight stitch across the top. Secure the 10" (25.4 cm) piece of 114" (6 mm) -wide ribbon to the center bottom of the flap with the 1/2 11 (1.3 cm) button.

For the flap, press the 61/2 11 x 13" (16.5 x 33 cm) fabric piece in half widthwise, right sides together. Stitch along the two sides with a 114 " (6 mm) seam allowance.

CROCHET NOTEBOOK

125


Sew the pockets and ribbons.

Secure the crochet to the liner.

{ 7 } With a needle and sewing thread,

BIND THE BOOK

tack the crochet piece to the fabric liner along the border with a hemstitch (see page 17) just underneath the ruffle (the ruffle should extend beyond the liner) (See I). Tack the crochet piece to the liner at various spots along the mesh, being sure to go through only one layer of fabric.

{ 1 } Center the spine-punching template (see page 141) on the inside of the cover. Mark holes with a disappearing-ink fabric marker. Depending on the weave of the fabric, you may be able to push the tapestry needle and seam binding through without making holes in the liner. If not,

make small holes in the fabric with a Japanese screw punch fitted with a 1.5mm tip, or with a 11i6" anywhere punch.

{ 2} Fold the thirty-seven pieces of 13" x 81/2 11 (33 x 21.6 cm) lightweight cardstock and the nine pieces of 13" x 81/2 11 (33 x 21.6 cm) pieces of graph paper widthwise. Create three signatures of fifteen folios each, incorporating three

126

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

folios of graph paper into each signature. Reserve one cardstock folio for the signature punching template. Mark the fold of the reserved folio 1 14", 3 14" , 514", and 714" (3, 8.5, 13.5, and 18.5 cm) from the top. Carry the marks across the fold, fold the folio the other way, and mark a Tat the top. Mark a Tat the top of the first page of each signature. Use the template to punch holes in the three signatures, matching top to top.

{ 3} Thread both ends of one 8" (20.3 cm) piece of seam binding with a tapestry needle. Enter the top hole of the first signature from the inside with one needle, and enter the next hole down from the inside with the other needle. Pull both needles through and


L

K

J

Thread seam binding through first two holes of first two signatures and through cover.

Tie seam-binding ends together.

even out the seam binding. Take each needle through the corresponding marks or holes in the cover, being careful to not catch the crocheted piece. Thread each needle with one small crocheted round and push it flush with the cover; unthread the needles (See j). Bind the second signature the same way Tie the seam binding ends together with the knot in between the crocheted rounds; trim ends to about l" (2.5 cm) (See K).

coming through the cover and the crocheted round. Enter the next hole of the second signature from the inside with the other needle, again coming through the cover and the crocheted round; unthread the needles. Rethread the needles with another piece of 8" (20.3 cm) seam binding and bind the third signature the same way as the first, adding the crocheted rounds (See L). Tie the ribbon ends together with the knot in between the crocheted rounds of the second and third signatures. Bind the lower halves of the signatures the same way

{ 4} Thread two tapestry needles with another 8" (20.3 cm) piece of seam binding. Enter the top hole of the second signature from the inside with one needle,

Thread the seam binding through the holes of the second and third signatures and cover.

MAKE THE CLOSURE

{ 1} Weave the 36" (91.4 cm) piece of crushed velvet ribbon through the mesh in the horizontal center of the cover. Tack the large crocheted round to the cover on the front with needle and thread. Tie ribbon ends in a knot or bow.

CROCHET NOTEBOOK

127


I I -~----------------- - ~

: SHORTCUT : I

I

-~------------------~

CROCHlT NOT[BOOK {B INDING} NONAD HESI VE , SEWN- TH RO UGH CO VERS { FI NIS HED SIZE} 6%" X 9~" (16 X 24.1 CM)

T H IS SHORTCUT VERSION

of the crochet book has the look

of intricate handwork but needs no hook or yarn. I combined washed natural-linen fabric with hand-dyed vintage crocheted doilies from my stash. The linen cover was made the same way as in the main project, with heavy-duty interfacing sandwiched between two pieces of linen fabric to lend some body. I hand stitched crochet edging around all four sides and then moved the dyed crochet pieces around , puzzle-style, until they fit. I tacked them in place with thread that matched the doilies . Stitched linen ribbons sewn onto the inside of both covers form the closure. Two ten-page signatures of medium-weight art paper make up the inside pages. For the binding I sewed the sign atures directly to the cover using an unobtrusive stepped stitch that can barely be seen.

TIP

When dying the doilies I also added a few extra to be used later for pincushions, sachets, and as gift embellishments. The doilies also make great accents on skirts and cardigan sweaters.

128

AD VE NTU RES I N BOOKB I ND I NG


-,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -,MASTER I

I

1

I

-.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.I

I

CROCH[T NOT[BOOK {CROCHET ARTIST} TERI ARTINYAN, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA {BINDING} BRAIDED BINDING SEWN THROUGH THE SPINE {FINISHED SIZE} 9" X 9" (22.9 X 22.9 CM)

BREAKING OUT

of the traditional crochet barriers was

crochet artist Teri Artinyan's goal in creating the piece that became the cover for this book. Using jamieson's wool yarn and Habu Textiles Tsumugi silk yarn in warm tones , she created a mesh pattern, then wove strands of the yarn through the open spaces. She accented the piece with a free-form butterfly and iridescent buttons. Teri learned

to

crochet in elementary school and started

to knit a bit later, but found a renewed passion for both about seven years ago. I created a linen liner for Teri's crocheted cover using the same method as the main crochet project and added a similar pocket inside. Wanting to keep the spine as intact as possible while still

After taking each ribbon through the signature and spine

drawing attention to the stitching, I created a braided binding

again through the second hole from the top, I braided the

also using seam binding. Like the main project, this book

three pieces of ribbon until reaching the second pair of holes.

has three signatures with two pairs of holes each. In each

I entered the third hole from the top from the outside, the

signature I entered the second hole from the top from the

fourth hole from the inside, and the third hole again from the

inside (going through the cover), entered the top hole from

outside, then knotted the ribbon by slipping under the stitch,

the outside, and knotted the ribbons inside the signature.

forming a loop, and going through the loop to knot it.

CROCHET NOTEBOOK

129


Tf MrlATfS

NEEDLE-FELTED JOURNAL

Cover design Photocopy at 200%

130 ADVENTURE S IN BOO KBINDING


I

I

Lines are for punching cover.

Dots are for punching signatures.

~

0

~

I

I

I

I

I

I

NEEDLE-FELTED JOURNAL

Signature-punching template Photocopy at 200 %

TEMPLATES

131


Pin arm between marks

'

'

'' '

'' '

/ / /

'

/ /

/

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

Body Photocopy at 200% cut 2

r I

-

-

r - -- -

, I

Pin legs at marks

132

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Pin arm between marks

/

/

-

, I


'

; '

Pin ear between marks

Pin ear between marks

''\

'

/

I

I

I

'

'

' --- """

;

/

/

\

I

;

' , __ .,,

/ ./

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBOOK

Head Photocopy at 100% cut 2

TEMPLATES

133


PLUSH DOLL

PLUSH DOLL

PLUSH DOLL

Leg

Ear

Arm

cut 4

cut 4

cut 4

Photocopy at 100%

134

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


-

PLUSH DOLL SKETCHBO OK

Signature- punching template Photocopy at 100%

-

PLUSH DOLL

Pocket for body cut 2 Photocopy at 200%

TEMPLATES

135


• •

• • • •

QUILTED WORKBOOK

Spine-punching template

• • • •

• •

• •

136

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING


T

....

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL Signature-punching template Photocopy at 100%

TEMPLATES

137


138

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL

Back cover

Cover hole template

Photocopy at 200%

Photocopy at 200%

ADVENTURE S IN BOOKBINDING


-

-

-

-

-

-

score cut

I

I

I

I

I

I I

-, -

-- -

,I

I

I I I I DECOUPAGE FOOD & WINE JOURNAL Pocket template Photocopy at 200%

TEMPLATES

139


LINO-PRINTED SKETCHBOOK

Design template Photocopy at 100%

• •• '

140

ADVENTURE S IN BOOKBINDING


• • CROCHET NOTEBOOK

Spine-punching template

• •

TEMPLATES

141


R[~OURC[~ BOOK ARTS GUILDS, RESOURCES, AND FORUMS

The Book Arts Web www. philo biblon. com The Bookarts Forum www.bookartsforum.com The Guild of Book Workers 521 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10175 USA www.guildofbookworkers.org secretary@guildofbookworkers.org BOOKBINDING SUPPLIES

BookMakers, Inc. 8601 Rhode Island Ave. College Park, MD 20740 USA 301.345 .7979 bookmakers@earthlink.net Hiromi Paper, Inc. 2525 Michigan Ave., Unit G-9 Santa Monica, CA 90404 USA 866.479.2744 http://store .hiromipaper.com washi@hiromipaper.com

142

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Hollander's 410 N. Fourth Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 USA 734.741.7531 www. hollanders.com info@ho Handers. com ] ohn Neal, Bookseller 1833 Spring Garden St. Greensboro, NC 27403 USA 336.272.6139 www.j ohnnealbooks. com info@johnnealbooks.com Paper Source 410 N. Milwaukee Ave. Chicago, IL 60654 USA 888. 72 7.3 711 www.paper-source.com customerservice速paper-source. com Talas 330 Morgan Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11211 USA 212.219.0770 www.talas-nyc.com Volcano Arts (also jewelry-making supplies and metal) Volcano, CA 95689 USA www.volcanoarts.com info@volcanoarts.com

ART AND CRAFT SUPPLIES

Confections Heirloom Fiberarts (for handspun rag yarn) www.etsy.com/shop/confections Dick Blick Art Materials PO. Box 1267 Galesburg, IL 61402 USA 800.828.4548 www.dickblick.com Etsy www.etsy.com Jo-Ann Fabric & Craft Stores 5555 Darrow Rd. Hudson, OH 44 236 USA 888.739.4120 www.joann .com Michaels 800 Bent Branch Dr. Irving, TX 75063 USA 800.642 .4235 www. michaels. com Paradise Fibers (needle-felting and weaving supplies) 1011 N. Thor St. Spokane, WA 99202 USA 888.320.7746 www.paradisefibe rs. net info@paradisefibers.net


The Vintage Workshop (vintage clip art images, craft supplies) www. thevintageworkshop. com

CONTRIBUTORS

CRAFT GUILDS

Page 129

Teri Artinyan forzadino@gmail.com

Tracie Lyn Huskamp TheRedDoorS tudio@yahoo.com www.TheRedDoor-Studio.com Page 71

American Quilter's Society www.americanquilter.com Collage Artists of America 1401 W Morningside Dr. Burbank, CA 91506 USA www.collageartists.org

Nicki Bair nicki@nickibair.com http://nickibair.com Page 47

Page 59

Sahara Dalley saharamather@hotmail.com www. papatotoro. com Page 119

Handweavers Guild of America, Inc. www.weavespindye.org hga@weavespindye.org International Polymer Clay Association 1350 Beverly Rd., Suite 115-345 McLean, VA 22101 USA www.npcg.org

Mimi Kirchner mimik@pobox.com www.mimikirchner.com

Reuben Munoz reubix@earthlink.net http ://ranchoreubidoux. word press. com Page 107

Stefanie Girard plaidbunny@aol.com http://sweatersurgeryblogspot.com Page 27 Keila Hernandez khernandezart@gmail.com www.khernandez.etsycom www.khernandezcanes.etsycom

Danita Rafalovich DR90066@comcast.net Page 95

Peter Solomon peter@preciousmetalarts.com www.preciousmetalarts.com Page 39

Page 83

National Guild of Decoupeurs www.decoupage.org

143


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I first must thank the amazing team at Quarry who made this book possible: Winnie Prentiss, Betsy Gammons, Regina Grenier, Marla Stefanelli, and, of course, my incomparable editor, Mary Ann Hall. Thanks also to artist Michael Wanke and photographer Ken Chernus for their incredible work. I am forever grateful to my family and friends who are always supportive and patient. To my wonderful husband, Mark-the words "thank you" don't begin to express the gratitude I feel for all you've done. You put up with a lot of take-out meals and random piles around the house while cheering me on, and a lesser man would not have done so. I love you always. A huge thank-you goes to the amazing artists who contributed their work. I realize this was a leap of faith, and I hope I did justice to your art. It was an honor and a privilege to work on these collaborative pieces.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeannine Stein has been making books for more than fifteen years, and her commissioned work includes wedding albums, journals, guest books, and photo albums. She is the author of the Quarry book, Re-Bound: Creating Handmade Books

from Recycled and Repurposed Materials, and her work has been featured in a number of national magazines, including GreenCraft and Cloth Paper Scissors. She has taught book arts for several years and especially enjoys introducing artists and crafters to bookbinding. Jeannine is a journalist living in Los Angeles with her husband, Mark Elson, a photographer and filmmaker.

144

ADVENTURES IN BOOKBINDING

Original tintype photograph courtesy of Mark Elson Pictures

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