Page 1

a

St

t ar

in

n Ma

ch

e est

r/

ve Uni

rsity

ar lford P a S f o

tnership

A Series of Activities


A Series of Activities CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Index Acknowledgements Introduction

Why have we created this booklet?

SoundMap

Notice new aspects of your surroundings! A listening activity that gets you in touch with the world around you in a different way.

Creative recycling

My life in a day: creative ways to explore what to do with all that rubbish we accumulate and dispose of in an average day. Also, explore the links to see other ideas for recycling.

Costume drama

Do you have a ‘wild side’? A fun activity to try with other people, which allows you to explore the hidden you.

Doodling exercise

Relax into this simple doodling activity that leads to a finished picture.

10 minute walk

Get out and about and see your environment in a new way involves simple photography using mobile phone, or any camera.

Can you bottle happiness?

Scientific studies show that positive thinking really does make a difference - test the theory by trying this simple activities.

Food for thought

An activity about food, health and your life - involves simple photography using mobile phone, or any camera. Also, explore the links to find out more about food, mood and well-being.

Back to nature

Environmental art: spend time out of doors in natural surroundings, and make a simple artwork - no drawing required. Also, explore the links to view work by artists who use natural materials in their work.

Complete the drawing

Intriguing activity to get your imagination going - complete these drawings in any way you want!

Creative writing

Connect with your powers of observation - use words to explore the small moments in life.

Supa-stimulating brain games Light physical exercises that also challenge the mind - can you master the sequences of movement? Even more fun with other people and set to music. Also, explore the links to find out more about how exercise can boost our mental health and thinking skills. The Origami Oracle

This playful exercise gives you the perfect excuse to get in touch with family and friends to enjoy a few light-hearted activities.

www.startmc.org.uk | www.salford.ac.uk

Activities


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Acknowledgements Start Manchester would like to thank the University of Salford for supporting this booklet.

Juliette Angus

Jill Cunningham

Benjamin Ramsey

Duncan Ashcroft

Angela Foley

Trevor Ramsey

Jude Atkin

Tamzin Forster

Paul Rippon

Suzanne Batty

Cathy Fortune

Glyn Thomason

Catherine

Irene Clare Garner

Annie Tortora-Cailey

T. Cole

Marilyn Hashim

Trish

Rachel Cooke

Stephen Holden

Wendy Teall

C.B.

Lucilla Jones

Steve Waterworth

Robin Colville

A.D. Mottershead

Pat Culbert

Lawrie Perrins

Thanks also to everyone else who helped produce this booklet.

Hat illustrations by T. Cole

www.startmc.org.uk | www.salford.ac.uk

The following people made this booklet possible:


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Create Space - the Healthy Head Kit

a series of mind-boosting creative activities

Oprah Winfrey declared, in a recent interview for O Magazine: “If you want your life to be more rewarding, you have to change the way you think…. Every day brings a chance for you to draw in a breath, kick off your shoes, and dance”, and in fact recent scientific studies indicate that the Queen of the Talk Shows is spot on in her advice. Making the effort to build enriching moments and reflective pauses into a busy life is now recognised to bring major health benefits. The more we learn about good health, the more we understand that healthcare is about prevention as much as cure. That’s the case as much for our mental wellbeing as for our physical wellbeing, although the two are inextricably entwined.

Why ‘Create Space’? The title refers to making space in your life for a bit of creative activity, both for your own enjoyment and relaxation, and to give you ‘quality-time’ with others. Creative activity can be many things: visual arts such as painting or photography, music, dance or creative writing. You might choose cookery, gardening or interior design as outlets for your creativity, or perhaps reading and discussing books is your passion. You can be creative either by being a ‘maker’ or by being part of the ‘audience’, whether you’re an expert or a beginner. You don’t need to have any special skills, just a willingness to have a go!

We are all vulnerable to emotional and mental distress. At least 1 in 4 of us will experience such distress in our lives, and most of us know friends or family members who have gone through a period of mental ill health. That’s why it make sense to do all we can to protect our health. Prevention has increasingly been the focus of research into mental health. Studies show that a balanced diet, regular exercise, a positive outlook, a supportive friendship circle, and a rewarding outlet for our skills and imagination are vital for our mental wellbeing.

Who has created this booklet? Start Manchester, an award-winning centre for art and mental health, has created this book of ideas, all of which have been tried and tested by us. To find out more about Start Manchester’s work go to www.startmc.org.uk. Start is part of Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust, and uses art to help people recover and protect good mental health.

Giving time and attention to our natural creativity and need for self-expression, too, has been a recent research topic. Creative activity relaxes us - studies show that the creative process can slow the heartbeat, and even reduce blood pressure. More than this, creativity challenges us to learn new things, builds our confidence and self-esteem, and provides exercise for the body and the mind.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

In fact all these preventative approaches have this in common - they work on our physical and mental wellbeing simultaneously: because they bring enjoyment and achievement, refocus our minds, slow our pace, engross us in positive action rather than the everyday worries of life, get us out of doors and connect us with others, they also improve our immune system and make us more resilient to stress and illness.

Where are the Create Space exercises from? We have compiled the Create Space book from a range of starting points. Some activities are our own invention, some have been adapted from other sources including nature walk ideas, movement and physical health workshops, Waldorf teaching techniques and arts resources.

You’ve probably heard or read about some of these studies. Perhaps you’re interested, but wondered how you might find the time to apply such good advice to your life. Perhaps you aren’t too sure and are still waiting to be convinced. Either way, this booklet’s for you. It’s a practical guide to fitting a whole range of health-boosting activities into your daily life. As physical and mental health are intricately linked, you’ll find the booklet contains a mixture of creative games, movement, creative art, meditative and positive thinking activities, ideas to help you reconnect with nature, and strategies to give a lift to your social life. Try them alone, with friends or family. They’re bite-sized activities - you don’t need to change your life to do them, but doing them might change your life for you.

Myths about Mental Health Anyone can become ill, and many of us will, at some time or other. Some illnesses are more serious than others, but in most cases people recover fully. Most of us know these things, so why do we continue to hear myths about mental health ? MYTH Mental health problems happen to ‘other people’ TRUTH At least one in four of us will experience mental health difficulties at some time in our lives MYTH You’ll never fully recover from mental illness TRUTH Most people with mental ill health recover completely, and many never experience a recurrence of their illness MYTH You’ve either got it or you’ve not – there’s nothing you can do to look after your good mental health TRUTH Just like your physical health, there’s a lot you can do to make sure you stay well, or speed up your recovery if you do get ill.

This booklet is full of ideas for creative activities that may improve and protect your good mental health.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

SoundMap Our daily lives are so full of noise and distraction we can find it hard to concentrate, or to simply enjoy the world around us.

example 1

Too often the outside world is drowned out by the chatter inside our heads. Still your mind and change your focus - this listening exercise asks you to absorb and record the richness & detail of the sounds around you. By being attentive to one stimulus - your sense of hearing - for at least 5 minutes, you are building your concentration. Added to this, by visualising the sounds as a map, you are making connections between the auditory and visual centres of your brain. This may not only stimulate new ideas and associations for you, but also engages your thoughts fully so that your inner ‘chatter’ is stilled.

You will need: Pencil and paper and a book or sheet of card to lean on.

example 2

The exercise: You can try the exercise anywhere - outside, on a street, in a park or garden, in your home, at work. Take a minimum of 5 minutes for this exercise. Stand and listen to all the sounds around you. Get a sense of where they are in relation to you.

To make your map: Mark yourself in the centre of the page. On your paper, plot (draw) the sounds around you by using words, drawings, or symbols to represent what you can hear. Try to place the sounds on your map in relationship to yourself - a sound to your right will be drawn or described to the right of you on the map, and so on. example 3

For ideas, look at the examples.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Creative recycling - my life in a day The things we use on an ordinary day create a snapshot of who we are. The things we throw away tell another part of that story. Make a picture diary of one day by keeping a small section of every piece of rubbish you throw into the bin, or the whole item if you prefer (except food scraps - they don’t keep too well!). Think about receipts, bus tickets, food wrappers, medicine packaging, junk mail, scratch cards, plastic bags, and anything else that figures in your day. Collage the scraps onto a piece of paper or card.

You will need: Paper or card as a backing for your collage Strong glue, sticky foam pads or a glue gun

Tips Glue guns and foam sticky pad fixers are excellent for this exercise, especially if wanting to include 3D items. You can get them in supermarkets and stationers. What does your collage tell you about your ‘Life in a day’? What do you think about the amount of rubbish we all throw away every day? Do you want to make some changes to your lifestyle? Would you like to recycle some of your rubbish, creatively or otherwise? Look at the links below to find out more...

Creative recycling www.arthunt.co.uk/creative recycling.htm www.mookychick.co.uk/diy_ethic/plastic_bag_rug.php http://familycrafts.about.com/b/a/018288.htm Other recycling information: www.recycle-more.co.uk/ or call 08450 682 572


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Costume drama In everyday life we often have to be responsible and serious. Drama and role play games give us a chance to let those other more adventurous sides of ourselves come to the fore. Liberating, exhilarating and comic, this exercise is designed to let you and your friends or family explore your wilder or mysterious sides. All you need are a few props, some household lights, and a bit of imagination.

Think about interesting ways to compose your pictures in order to help create a dramatic and dynamic shot

Equipment Checklist

Wanna be a Rock Star? - Invent a new persona for yourself! Give yourself a different name and an alternative life story!

A group of friends A camera Table lamp Candles Wine (optional!) Make Up Hats Scarves Wigs False Moustaches Sweets with coloured cellophane wrappers

You can produce a variety of dramatic effects using one table light at different angles. Try placing the light above your subject’s head, angled down; or at 45 degrees; or light from below to give a sinister look. You can create some funky lighting by holding coloured cellophane sweet wrappers over the lens of your camera.

To create this side-lit effect, place a table lamp on the left-hand side of your subject


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Doodling exercise Doodling is an outlet for the frustrated artist in all of us. As children we express ourselves through drawing without inhibition, but as adults we develop an ‘inner censor’ that prevents us from simply enjoying mark-making. But have you noticed how often you catch yourself doodling, when on the phone or in a meeting, and how relaxing it is? When we are mildly absorbed in any moderate thinking activity, and we have a pen in hand, the ‘inner censor’ may be switched off and this allows us to enjoy expressive drawing once more. Doodling also keeps us productively busy when we are bored, inactive or unoccupied – evolution has hard-wired us to be busy with our hands, so that’s what we do. Try this structured doodling exercise, and if you enjoy it, you might try finding your own pictures to doodle on.

ples

exam

You will need: Pen, pencil or biro Fill in the drawing by choosing patterns and textures from the examples above, or make up your own.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

10 minute walk How often do you walk somewhere, busy thinking, talking or texting and not really noticing your surroundings... This exercise will help you to see your environment in a different way. You’ll need a camera, or a mobile phone that takes photos. Take a ten minute walk, stopping every minute to take a picture of whatever you see when you look around.

“Some things stand out more than others as you’re passing by”

“This reminds me of childhood - carving names into trees”

“Anything can be art, anything can be beautiful”

“Looking at something from a different angle can alter the meaning of your life”

“It’s easy to become desensitized and lose the curiousity you had as a child”

“It’s the details of your life that make it what it is”

How often do you pass this spot? Is this a journey you make every day? Do you see anything you’ve never noticed before?


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Can you bottle happiness ? * Scientific studies show that happier people are healthier, harder-working, caring, and more successful in their work and social lives. Positive emotions make people think faster and more creatively. But the same studies show that negative thoughts are deeply ingrained in the human psyche, and so we may have to make a conscious effort to change our thought habits for the better. This exercise retrains us to focus on the positive aspects of our day rather than the negative.

You will need: A jar, bottle or similar something you can get your hand in easily. At least 30 smallish squares of paper to write messages on.

* happiness means different things to different people - it may be something that lifted your sprits, a fleeting moment of joy or contentment, having a laugh with your friends, feeling valued, something that has gone well - in fact anything that works for you.

Each day for a month, take a square of paper and write a short message to yourself describing something or someone that lifted your spirits that day. Fold up the message and place in the container. From time to time, if you need to, you can dip into the messages to help you counteract negative moods. At the end of the month read all the messages, looking out for any ‘themes’ running through your ‘happiness triggers’, so you can arrange to have more of those triggers in your life. Did the exercise help you shift your focus from negative to positive ?

Tips and ideas You can have your own private jar or bottle so that you can write down absolutely anything you like. Or if you prefer, you can share the exercise with others you live with, creating a ‘house-happiness-bottle’. Try having a few pieces of paper with you at all times so you can jot positive thoughts down as they occur to you. You can also use a notebook to do this exercise - it works just as well.

The Joy Diet: 10 Steps to a Happier Life by Martha Beck Stumbling on Happiness by Daniel Gilbert The Architecture of Happiness by Alain de Botton Authentic Happiness by Seligman, M.E.P. - www.authentichappiness.org Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard www.coachingtowardhappiness.com


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Food for thought You are what you eat, or so they say... Did you know that a diet lacking in fruits, vegetables and essential (polyunsaturated) fats such as Omega 3 can actually contribute to depression, panic, anxiety and other mental health difficulties? Or that not drinking enough water impairs your concentration? The brain and body needs a whole range of vitamins and nutrients to work well and stay healthy. Do you get “five a day” ? Try photographing everything you eat and drink during one day - you may be surprised. Look back at your photographs in a month’s time and see if your diet has changed at all.

16th August 2006 07.00 Glass of orange 08.50 Grapes (x3) 09.05 Coffee 10.25 Coffee, and a jam tart 11.37 Banana

Some useful websites: www.eatwell.gov.uk

11.43 Coffee

www.5aday.nhs.uk

12.30 Coffee

www.mentalhealth.org/feedingminds (click on the Nutrition Table to find out which foods help you manage your mental health)

12.55 Broccoli & baked beans 13.30 Tea 15.50 Coffee, cookies (x2) 18.30

Pasta, roasted veg and tomato sauce Glass of water Coffee

21.30 Chocolate Bar

EAT 22 - by Ellie Harrison Ellie is a Nottingham-based artist, who recorded everything she ate for one year. See: www.ellieharrison.com/eat22.html


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Food for thought -2 Be honest - what is your diet really like ? Are you eating well, or fueling up on junk food? Use the chart below to record what you eat, and how wholesome you think it is on our ‘bodyfriendly’ scale.

Is your food body-friendly?


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Back to nature - environmental art ‘Nature heals’ is a well-known phrase, and many of us identify with this sentiment in its widest sense, feeling that we’d like more contact with the natural world. Being outside is healthy for our mind and body. Sunlight improves our mood, and boosts our Vitamin D levels, whilst being surrounded by nature can relax and refocus us in a positive way, helping us get our lives in better perspective. Yet these days we spend so much time indoors, disconnected from nature, that we can lose touch with all it can offer. This exercise encourages us to get outdoors, whether into the countryside, a park or garden, and observe the natural world - its seasonal colours, its many textures, shapes and forms. It also shows you how to get creative with natural resources, making impermanent works of environmental art. Making fleeting, impermanent ‘creations’ can be liberating, as we can’t become too precious over what we make. We enjoy the moment of creating, and then move on!

Environmental art: Andy Goldsworthy: www.sculpture.org.uk/ John Dahlsen: www.johndahlsen.com/ www.greenmuseum.org/ Parks and gardens to visit: www.manchester.gov.uk/leisure/parks/ www.salford.gov.uk/leisure/parks/ www.getoutguide.co.uk/outdoors/parks.htm

You will need: Two pieces of light card, 10-15 cm square Scissors, or a craft knife and cutting surface Sticky tape A plastic or paper bag A camera or mobile phone that takes photos (optional)

What to do: Cut matching windows in your cardboard squares. Tape together at one side to create a hinge. Go for a walk, gathering fallen leaves, twigs, petals, grasses etc into your bag (don’t pick flowers etc unless they are yours!). When you have a good selection, sit down and create a collage: Lay items in the frame, and when you have a composition you like, close the frame and hold the collage up to admire. These are impermanent creations, but of course you could snap a photo before dismantling and trying more collages.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Complete the drawing Exercising your mind is like exercising your body. Drawing exercises visual, spatial, and hand/eye coordination parts of the brain, amongst others. Making links between different parts of your brain also develops neural connections, and this is thought to stimulate creative ideas association and better ability to think around and solve problems.

You will need:

ple

exam

Pen, pencil or biro Use your skills of observation and imagination to complete these figures, as true to life or as fantastically as you like!

have a go at completing these figures


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Creative writing Exploring the small moments in daily life Finding ways to better explore and appreciate even the smallest experiences in daily life can help to build a greater connection with our surroundings. Using words creatively to record what we feel or notice can help improve our powers of observation, self-expression and ability to connect thoughts laterally in our minds. This is excellent exercise for the brain, and a good outlet for our more creative ideas.

sheen e with its ruby red m ts gh li de y rr be A Straw s with flying ribbon its bonnet of green d speckled seeds its plump form an its perfume but the sweetness of taste and luscious juicy are what lingers... mer’s long, ...to recall the sum dreaming days, childhood teas and rry romances champagne strawbe

here’s an example You will need: A piece of fruit or salad vegetable - something you like Paper and pencil to write down your thoughts

...or what about this one? ies A bowl of strawberr them lovely, no calories in tart A bite – oh no, too ? Where’s the sweetness sugar They need a bit of y calories uch sugar, not man That’s okay, not m cream a bit boring without o, n oh – te bi r he Mmm – anot , a small dollop Just a bit of cream rely too many calories su That’s alright, not Mmm, lovely to lose any weight But…I never seem eat fruit Even though I only

Choose a piece of fruit or a salad vegetable. Look at it closely, handle it, smell it. With closed eyes, bite into the fruit/vegetable - feel the texture and the first taste sensation as it hits your taste buds. Eat the whole fruit/ vegetable slowly, experiencing its texture, taste and aroma. Now jot down words and associations that occur to you, and weave them into a poem - no need to rhyme.


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Supa-stimulating brain games It’s official - physical exercise is good for our brains! It boosts the brain’s efficiency by increasing blood and oxygen flow, and this sharpens thinking and concentration, and improves memory. Exercise also makes us more cheerful, by stimulating the release of endorphins, the powerful, pain-relieving, mood-elevating chemicals in the brain. Easy - starter game to warm your brain and body up This game works with a basic count of 8, using steps just as in ordinary walking steps. You’ll step both forward and backwards during the game.

1st 8 counts walk forward 8 steps

2nd 8 counts walk forward 7 steps and back 1 step

3rd 8 counts walk forward 6 steps and back 2 steps

4th 8 counts walk forward 5 steps and back 3 steps

Physical exercises that challenge the mind, such as those using complex, changing movement sequences, can offer additional benefits to memory and concentration. This is because they are believed to increase brain efficiency by strengthening neural connections and even creating new ones.

8th 8 counts

Try these quick, brain-boosting games. They can be done on your own but could be even more fun with friends or family. They are suitable for all ages, and can be adapted for people with limited mobility by using head, shoulder or arm movements instead of steps and jumps.

walk forward 1 step and back 7 steps

Try them to music too!

5th 8 counts walk forward 4 steps and back 4 steps

6th 8 counts walk forward 3 steps and back 5 steps

7th 8 counts walk forward 2 steps and back 6 steps

Repeat 3 times or more, trying a little faster each time


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Supa-stimulating brain games 2 Moderate challenge – now you’re warmed up, have a go at the next game This game uses stamps, and jumps with both feet off the ground, if you can. Combine the jumps with a clap of your hands for maximum energising effect!

This game works with a basic count of 4.

1st 4 counts –

3rd 4 counts –

1 = left foot stamp

1 = left foot stamp

2 = right foot stamp

2 = jump and clap

3 = left foot stamp

3 = right foot stamp

4 = jump and clap

4 = left foot stamp

2nd 4 counts –

4th 4 counts –

1 = right foot stamp

1 = jump and clap

2 = left foot stamp

2 = right foot stamp

3 = jump and clap

3 = left foot stamp

4 = right foot stamp

4 = right foot stamp

Try 3 times or more, a little faster each time. Tip : Setting this to different pieces of music, some fast, some slow, makes this game more varied


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

Supa-stimulating brain games 3 Challenging – now you’re cooking, have a go at the next game. This game works with a basic count of 4. Practise the steps in column 1 a few times, before adding the arm movements in column 2.

1st 4 counts – 1 = with right foot, step to right 2 = tap left foot up to right, weight still on right foot 3 = with left foot, step to left 4 = bring right foot together with left, weight on both feet

2nd 4 counts – 1 = with left foot, step to left 2 = tap right foot up to left, weight still on left foot 3 = with right foot, step to right 4 = bring left foot together with right, weight on both feet

3rd 4 counts – 1 = with right foot, step forward 2 = tap left foot up to right, weight still on right foot 3 = with left foot, step backward 4 = bring right foot together with left, weight on both feet

4th 4 counts – 1 = with left foot, step backward 2 = tap right foot up to left, weight still on left foot 3 = with right foot, step forward 4 = bring left foot together with right, weight on both feet

1st 4 counts – 1 = extend left arm out to your side 2 = bring left hand in to touch the top of your head 3 = extend left arm out to your side again 4 = bring left arm down to side of body

2nd 4 counts – 1 = extend right arm out to your side 2 = bring right hand in to touch the top of your head 3 = extend right arm out to your side again 4 = bring right arm down to side of body

3rd 4 counts – 1 = extend left arm in front of you 2 = bring left hand in to touch your nose 3 = extend left arm in front of you again 4 = bring left arm down to side of body

4th 4 counts – 1 = extend right arm in front of you 2 = bring right hand in to touch your nose 3 = extend right arm in front of you again 4 = bring right arm down to side of body

Phew!


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

The Origami Oracle When Jean-Paul Sarte wrote “hell is other people”, it looks like he was wrong.

picture 1

Rather than money, it’s our friendship circles and social contacts that make us happy, according to new ‘happiness studies’. With the pace and pressure of our busy schedules, it’s all too easy to lose touch with our social life. This playful exercise gives you the perfect excuse to get in touch with family and friends to enjoy a few light-hearted activities.

picture 2

You will need: Coloured pencils if you want to colour in the Origami Oracle (use our template by cutting it out, or trace or photocopy if you don’t want to cut the page)

Instructions 1 Apply colours of your choice if you wish. 2 Cut out the Origami Oracle 3 Turn paper over to back and fold each corner in towards you (picture 1) 4 Turn paper back over and fold each corner towards you (picture 2)

Now you are ready to try the Origami Oracle out.

picture 3

5 Turn paper back over and place thumbs and index finger into each of the flaps (picture 3). 6 You will find that by moving the index fingers of each hand, as a pair, and the thumbs of each hand, as a pair, away from each other, forwards/ backwards and side to side, you can open and close the Origami Oracle (picture 4) picture 4

Pick a word and spell it out open / close the Origami Oracle once for each letter of the word. As you spell the word, opening and closing the Origami Oracle, you will reveal the numbers inside the Origami Oracle. Pick a number and count it out, opening and closing the Origami Oracle as before Pick a number and open the flap to show the friendship activity the Origami Oracle suggests for you. Get going on the activity - enjoy!


CREATE SPACE FOR YOUR CREATIVE SPACE MAKE YOUR SELF SPACE CREATE YOUR OWN SPACE

The Origami Oracle - template

Trace or photocopy the template Tip: Try making up your own words and activites to write on the Origami Oracle. Make sure that the 4 words on the front (corners) contain both odd numbers of letters (e.g. breathe) and even numbers of letters (e.g. wish) or you will always finish your ‘Pick a Word and Spell it Out’ part of the game on the same numbers

HN Research: Create Space  

A series of mind boosting opportunties developed by Start in Manchester / University of Salford Partnership