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IMPACT REPORT

2016


On the cover, clockwise from top left: Sir Fraser Stoddart, chemistry, was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering contributions to molecular design and synthesis. Photo by Jim Prisching.

Photo by Nathan Mandell

Northwestern enjoyed another exceptional year of high-impact discovery, including a Nobel Prize in Chemistry and contributions to landmark astrophysical and biomedical projects. In every knowledge domain — and often by harnessing expertise from across different disciplines — University thought leaders continued to make breakthroughs that extend humanity’s understanding of complex forces at all levels, from the cosmic to the molecular. This Report offers a snapshot of such advances, which are a part of our more extensive accomplishments in 2016. We also provide key metrics that show Northwestern’s research strengths at a glance. For example, Northwestern again experienced record-breaking growth, with annual sponsored funding reaching nearly $650 million. This success continues a decade-long trend that fuels discovery, including in our 54 University Research Institutes and Centers — interdisciplinary knowledge hubs. That research is possible because of the University’s ecosystem, which combines outstanding intellectual capital, great facilities and instrumentation, infrastructure, entrepreneurship, financial stewardship, and administrative excellence. Each part of the ecosystem is crucial, including administrators who enable discovery from “behind the scenes.” Dedicated staff, such as in the Office for Sponsored Research, help manage awards and proposals, while colleagues in the Office for Research Safety provide training and services that allow our investigators and labs to conduct extraordinary science safely. Our Institutional Review Board (IRB) enables our investigators to conduct human subject research with the highest levels of ethical compliance. In fact, this year the IRB achieved accreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP), an accomplishment that helps raise the global benchmark for protections in science. Considered the “gold standard,” this accreditation assures research participants, researchers, sponsors, regulators, and the public that Northwestern is focused on excellence. Many other colleagues from within the Office for Research and across the University also play vital roles in our institutional success. That success is attracting additional resources to Northwestern — including world-renowned figures such as bioelectronics pioneer John Rogers and developmental economist Christopher Udry; Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey; and prestigious physicist Gerald Gabrielse. Equally important, our ecosystem is cultivating many junior faculty “rising stars,” including those who have earned distinction such as early CAREER awards from the National Science Foundation. As we take pride in our past year’s achievements, we look ahead to additional opportunities for Northwestern to create knowledge with transformative social impact.

The Clean Catalysis Core at Northwestern is dedicated to aiding students and investigators in the advancement of understanding the catalytic function of materials for environmental and energy processes. Photo by Veronica Hinojosa. Depiction of gravitational waves. Vicky Kalogera, Shane Larson, both physics and astronomy, and Selim Shahriar, electrical engineering, were part of a global team of LIGO scientists who helped to detect gravitational waves — extremely subtle ripples in the fabric of spacetime caused by the merger of two black holes 1.3 billion light years away. Image by R. Hurt/Caltech-JPL. The Trust Project at Northwestern examines trust’s nuances and multiple dimensions by harnessing the insights of University faculty in marketing, psychology, sociology, medicine, and philosophy. Trust Team members, from left, Sanford Goldberg, Kent Grayson, Kelly Michelson, and Bruce Carruthers are among those helping bridge disciplines to create diverse content. Photo by Eileen Molony. The Mouse Histology and Phenotyping Laboratory at Northwestern assists researchers with tissue histopathology, or the study of changes in tissues caused by disease. Photo by Veronica Hinojosa.

Office for Research Jay Walsh Vice President for Research Matt Golosinski Director of Research Communications Roger Anderson Publications Editor Jeanine Shimer Designer Award and Proposal Data Office for Sponsored Research Printer K & M Printing Address all correspondence to: Matt Golosinski Director of Research Communications Northwestern University Office for Research 1801 Maple St. #5313 Evanston, IL 60208 research@northwestern.edu www.research.northwestern.edu ©2017 Northwestern University. All rights reserved.

Jay Walsh Vice President for Research


NOBEL PRIZE FOR MOLECULAR BREAKTHROUGH Sir Fraser Stoddart, the Board

SIR FRASER STODDART chemistry

Photo by Jim Prisching

of Trustees Professor of Chemistry, won the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering contributions to molecular design and synthesis over the past three decades. His breakthrough introduction of the mechanical bond has led to the fabrication of artificial molecular switches and motors, opening a bold new arena within chemistry, one with diverse implications for information technology, healthcare, and more. Upon receiving the Nobel (an honor that he shared with two other eminent scientists), Stoddart praised Northwestern’s research ecosystem, calling the University a “special place” where collaborative discovery flourishes.

OPENING A NEW WINDOW ONTO THE UNIVERSE

VICKY KALOGERA, SHANE LARSON physics and astronomy

Photo by Jim Prisching

Northwestern astrophysicists contributed to a landmark discovery that confirmed a major prediction of Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity. Part of a global team of scientists affiliated with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project, Vicky Kalogera and Shane Larson, both physics and astronomy, helped to detect gravitational waves — extremely subtle ripples in the fabric of spacetime caused by the merger of two black holes 1.3 billion light years away. The first detection occurred on September 14, 2015, and was announced in February 2016, after the LIGO team (which includes Selim Shahriar, electrical engineering) confirmed the results. LIGO detected a second wave on June 15, 2016. This discovery enables physicists to observe the universe in an entirely new way, using gravitational force to learn about the origins of black holes and the nature of gravity, rather than relying on forms of light. This breakthrough is especially valuable when studying phenomena, such as black holes, that do not emit light. Gravitational waves promise a “new kind of astronomy” that Larson and Kalogera, director of Northwestern’s

Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, say will generate cosmic knowledge for decades to come.

3-D PRINTING INNOVATION PRODUCES ‘BONES’ A Northwestern research team led by Ramille Shah, materials science, aims to change the nature of bone implants, particularly for pediatric patients. The team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic “bone” material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for treatment of bone defects in children, for whom bone implantation surgery is particularly painful and complicated. “Adults have more options when it comes to implants,” says Shah. “Pediatric patients do not. If you give them a permanent implant, you have to do more surgeries in the future as they grow.” Shah’s hyperelastic “bone” material shows great promise in animal models; this success lies in the printed structure’s unique properties, which includes porosity. “Porosity is huge when it comes to tissue regeneration, because you want cells and blood vessels to infiltrate the scaffold,” says Shah.

RAMILLE SHAH materials science

Photo courtesy of McCormick School of Engineering


LEADER IN ‘GAME-CHANGING’ PRECISION MEDICINE INITIATIVE

PHILIP GREENLAND

preventive medicine: cardiology

Photo by Eileen Molony

Last summer, Northwestern was selected to play a leading role in one of the most ambitious scientific endeavors in American history, one that aims to improve disease prevention and treatment based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment, and genetics. The Illinois Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) is a pioneering longitudinal research study that plans to engage 1 million or more Americans. Northwestern, in collaboration with four local institutions, is receiving funding from the National Institutes of Health this year to help launch the initiative. A grant from the National Institutes of Health’s Illinois Precision Medicine Consortium is funding the effort, which is expected to receive more than $51 million over the next five years. “The big excitement here is the opportunity to improve the way we predict, prevent, and eventually treat disease,” says Philip Greenland, the Harry W. Dingman Professor of Cardiology and the University’s primary investigator for the initiative. “Just the scope of it is beyond anything that anybody in the US has ever done. This could be a game changer.”

CROSS-DISCIPLINARY TRUST PROJECT EXPLORES CRUCIAL FOUNDATIONS Trust is the bedrock of diverse social institutions — from the marketplace to government and media — which is why a major new Northwestern research effort brings together experts from many disciplines to examine trust’s roots and dynamics. Trust has long been a focus for scholars at the Kellogg School of Management and across campus, but an organized project crystalized in 2013 with the exploration of investing in the subject as part of the Kellogg Markets and Customers Initiative. Then, last February, The Trust Project at Northwestern launched to examine trust’s nuances and multiple dimensions by harnessing the insights of University faculty in marketing, psychology, sociology, and philosophy. Combining theory with practice and aiming to produce actionable insights — including through more than 30 videos, as well as podcasts, blogs, and articles — the Project is bridging disciplines even as it creates new content, says its faculty coordinator, Kent Grayson, marketing. The Trust team is building on the combined expertise of its scholars, a dynamic that positions Northwestern to be a leader in this arena.

KENT GRAYSON marketing

Photo by Eileen Molony

NORTHWESTERN HOME TO ‘ASTONISHING’ ARTS Northwestern’s interdisciplinary collaboration includes groundbreaking advances in the arts. The Arts Circle on the Evanston campus continues to thrive, combining theater, music, film, and visual and literary arts to present world-class performances and exhibitions. One 2016 highlight was the Block Museum’s acclaimed “Feast of Astonishments:

Charlotte Moorman and the Avant-Garde, 1960s-1980s,” a bold, revelatory retrospective on the accomplishments of an influential yet underappreciated cellist and performance artist. A collaborative effort between the Block and Northwestern’s Library — home to the Charlotte Moorman archives — the multimedia exhibition celebrated the Juilliardtrained Moorman’s dedication to a radically new way of looking at music and art. More than an exceptional exhibition, “Feast” also was the catalyst for a rich and diverse series of associated lectures and performances at Northwestern. Photo by Takahiko Iimura curteosy of Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art


$649.7

MILLION

SPONSORED PROJECT FUNDING, FY16 A 5 PERCENT INCREASE OVER FY15

3,072 TOTAL AWARDS

OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS

$2.9 BILLION SPONSORED PROJECT FUNDING

0

12,500+

RESEARCH VIOLATIONS

LAB SAFETY TRAINING

OR NONCOMPLIANCE CITATIONS

COURSES COMPLETED BY

(USDA AND OFFICE FOR HUMAN

NORTHWESTERN SCIENTISTS

FACULTY RECOGNITION

20

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

84

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

5

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE

27

HIGHLY CITED RESEARCHERS (11TH WORLDWIDE)

16

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING

RESEARCH PROTECTIONS SITE VISITS)

45

203

INVENTION DISCLOSURES

130

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CAREER AWARDS

14

4

CORE FACILITIES

$17.5 MILLION ANNUAL CORE

FACILITIES REVENUE

ISSUED PATENTS

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

54

UNIVERSITY INSTITUTES AND RESEARCH CENTERS

7

GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES


SPONSORED PROJECT AWARDS $650M

Number of Awards

3,200 2,800

$550M

2,400 Award Amount

2,000 $350M

1,600

$250M

1,200

Number of Awards

$450M

800

$150M

400

$50M 0

FY2007

FY2009

FY2011

FY2013

FY2015

FY2016

0

FY2007

FY2009

FY2011

FY2013

FY2015

FY2016

$415.3

$477.1

$511.6

$549.5

$620.9

$649.7

7.2%

7.4%

13.0%

4.6%

AMOUNT IN MILLIONS

% CHANGE

14.9%

FY07-FY16

56.5%

$2,600M

3,500

$2,200M

3,000

$1,800M

2,500 2,000

$1,400M

1,500

$1,000M

1,000

$600M

Number of Proposals

Number of Proposals

Request Amount

SPONSORED PROJECT PROPOSALS

500 $200M 0

0 FY2007

REQUEST AMOUNT* IN MILLIONS

% CHANGE

FY2009

FY2011

FY2013

FY2015

FY2016

FY 2007

FY 2009

FY 2011

FY 2013

FY 2015

FY 2016

$1,720.5

$1,763.8

$1,897.0

$2,094.1

$2,508.9

$2,569.2

2.5%

7.6%

10.4%

19.8%

2.4%

* Excludes proposals submitted in response to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

FY07-FY16

49.3%


SPONSORED PROJECT AWARDS BY FUNDING SOURCE

SPONSORED PROJECT PROPOSALS BY FUNDING SOURCE

$650M

$2,600M

$600M $550M $500M

27.8% $172.5M

$2,400M

23.3% $151.2M

$2,200M

$300M 72.2% $448.4M

76.7% $498.5M

Request Amount

Award Amount

$350M

$1,600M $1,400M $1,200M $1,000M $600M

$100M

$400M

$50M

$200M FY2015

87.3% $2,190.5M

90.0% $2,312.9M

$800M

$150M

0

Federal

$1,800M

$400M

$200M

12.7% $318.4M

$2,000M

$450M

$250M

Non-Federal 10.0% $256.3M

0

FY2016

FY2015

FY2016

2016 FACULTY RECOGNITION AND HONORS This partial list is representative of our faculty excellence. For a continuously updated list, visit news.northwestern.edu/topics/show/honors. Brenna Argall, electrical engineering/computer science, CAREER Award, National Science Foundation Yarrow Axford, earth and planetary sciences, CAREER Award, National Science Foundation Bernard Black, law, elected fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Serdar Bulun, medicine, member, National Academy of Medicine David Cella, medical social sciences/neurology, Lienhard Award, National Academy of Medicine Cynthia Coburn, education and social policy, fellowship, American Educational Research Association Dyan Elliot, history, fellowship, American Council of Learned Societies Antonio Facchetti, chemistry, ACS Award for Creative Invention, American Chemical Society Omar Farha, chemistry, Kavli Emerging Leader, American Chemical Society Danna Freedman, chemistry, CAREER Award, National Science Foundation

Franz Geiger, chemistry, fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry Elad Harel, chemistry, Young Investigator Award, Office of Naval Research

Mercouri Kanatzidis, chemistry, James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials, American Physical Society

T. David Harris, chemistry, Sloan Research Fellowship, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Yevgenia Kozorovitskiy, neurobiology, Sloan Research Fellowship, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Brent Hecht, communication studies, CAREER Award, National Science Foundation

Bryna Kra, mathematics, elected fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Mark Hersam, materials science and engineering, US Science Envoy, US Deptartment of State

Richard Kraut, philosophy, Guggenheim Fellowship, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation

Yonggang Huang, civil engineering, Nadai Medal, American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Todd Kuiken, materials science, fellow, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering

Joseph Hupp, chemistry, fellow, Materials Research Society

Carol Lee, education and social policy, fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Daniel Immerwahr, history, Merle Curti Award, Organization of American Historians Vicky Kalogera, physics and astronomy, Hans A. Bethe Prize and Special Breakthrough Prize, American Physical Society

Tobin Marks, chemistry, Priestley Medal, American Chemical Society Chad Mirkin, chemistry/ materials science, Dan David Prize in the Future Dimension, Dan David Foundation Joel Mokyr, economics, Balzan Prize for Economic History, International Balzan Foundation

Eric Neilson, medicine, fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Teri Odom, chemistry, fellow, Materials Research Society Anne Marie Piper, communication studies, CAREER Award, National Science Foundation Mark Ratner, chemistry, Peter Debye Award, American Chemical Society James Rondinelli, materials science, Presidential Early Career Award, National Science Foundation Selim Shahriar, electrical engineering, Special Breakthrough Prize, Breakthrough Prize Samuel Stupp, materials science/chemistry, fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry Peter Voorhees, materials science, fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Michael Wasielewski, chemistry, fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences


Office for Research Northwestern University Rebecca Crown Center, 2-574 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208-1108

Photo by Jim Ziv

ISGMH eHEALTH INNOVATION: PIONEERING HIV PREVENTION Brian Mustanski, medical social sciences, psychiatry

Photo courtesy of ISGMH

and behavioral sciences, psychology, and director of Northwestern’s Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing, was awarded $9.3 million from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities for an innovative study of eHealth interventions to prevent HIV among adolescent men who have sex with men (AMSM). AMSM age 13-18 experience a dramatic health disparity: they represent 2 percent of young people but account for almost 80 percent of HIV diagnoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Racial/ethnic minority young gay and bisexual males are disproportionately affected by HIV; 55 percent of those diagnosed are black and 23 percent are Hispanic/Latino. At the same time, young people are not getting the sex education that they need in school, according to CDC reports. Mustanski’s study, the Sexual Minority Adolescent Risk Taking Project, emphasizes inclusion of racial/ ethnic minority groups and starts with a proven online sex education intervention. Those who would benefit from a more intensive intervention will be enrolled in online programming, such as personalized therapy via videochat.

Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing team members, from left: George Greene, Gregory Phillips, Michelle Birkett, Thomas Remble, Francesca Gaiba, Brian Mustanski, Kathryn Macapagal, and Michael Newcomb

POLICY EXPERTS TACKLE SOCIAL DISPARITIES Social disparities create hurdles to equitable education access, employment opportunities, and even clean drinking water. Northwestern’s

Institute for Policy Research (IPR) scholars Diane Schanzenbach, economics

examined these and other issues over the past year. For example, long before the news of Flint, Michigan’s water crisis, economist and IPR associate Joseph Ferrie was exploring how lead affects human cognition and outcomes. Early education, too, is an issue on lawmakers’ minds: In May, at a policy research briefing on Capitol Hill, three IPR experts (Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, economics; and Terri Sabol and Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, both developmental psychology) addressed key issues of early education, including cost effectiveness, quality, and preschool program design. IPR also tackled social disparities in a Global Inequality Workshop, organized with the Buffett Institute for Global Studies. Ahead of the US election, IPR interviewed 10 of its experts on what their research reveals about key features of elections. “Twenty-first century policy solutions require creative thinking and insights from many disciplines, and policymakers need to learn about those insights. That’s where IPR comes in,” says David Figlio, IPR director and Orrington Lunt Professor of Education and Social Policy.

Northwestern | Office for Research Impact Report  
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