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“Moving Forward: Reaching New Audiences With the Past” Thursday through Saturday, May 29 - 31 The Davenport Hotel Spokane, Washington


Table Of Contents Welcome Messages

pg 3

Thank You to Our Vendors & Advertisers

pg 4

The Davenport Hotel, Area Map & History

pg 5-7

Floor Maps

pg 9

Schedule at a Glance

pg 12-13

Full Schedule

pg 14-23

Presenter Bios pg 26-32 The 2014 Northwest Archivists Conference is Co-Sponsored by: ArchivesSpace Hollinger Metal Edge

Other Sponsors Include: Eastern Washington University Gonzaga University Providence Archives Spokane Public Library Washington State University Whitworth University

Local Arrangements Committee Members: Program Committee Members: Janet Hauck (chair) Natalia Fernรกndez (chair) Steve Bingo Stacey Baldridge David Kingma Heather Hultman Pam Hedquist Jason Sylvestre Stephanie Plowman Charles Mutschler Riva Dean With Special Thanks To: Rose Krause Emily Hughes Dominick, Mark Meredith NWA Website Coordinator Arlene B Schmuland, Workshop Coordinator Eva Guggemos, NWA Treasurer Brenda Renecker, Conference Services Manager, Davenport Hotel Northwest archivists conference 2014

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Program designed by: Patch Leishman / Quill by: Paul Gracewski Image: Spokane - Whitworth College Yearbook - 1945

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Welcome Message From The NWA President On behalf of the Executive Board, I’d like to welcome you to Spokane and the Northwest Archivists 2014 Conference. Our annual conference is very important to members. It’s a chance to catch up with colleagues, meet new ones, and hear about all the great things happening in the Northwest. It’s also the result of a lot of hard work and planning behind the scenes. Therefore, I’d like to thank all those who helped make this conference happen, in particular the Program and Local Arrangements Committees. They’ve done a wonderful job, so if you see them walking around, tell them so. The theme of this year’s conference is “Moving Forward: Reaching New Audiences with the Past.” As someone who takes conference themes seriously, I don’t remember a time when all of the sessions have reflected the theme as perfectly as this year’s sessions do. There really is something for everyone this year. I’d also like to thank the speakers and session chairs who have provided such an interesting variety of sessions: I’m going to have some hard decisions to make. Outside of the conference, I hope you take some time to enjoy Spokane, a beautiful city with a history of its own. The Local Arrangements Committee has arranged some activities and tours to help get to know it. Last, but not least, I’d like to thank you for attending. You make this all possible and help make NWA the vibrant organization that it is. Josh Zimmerman, NWA President

Welcome Message From The Local Arrangements Committee Welcome to the Lilac City. We’re delighted to have the Northwest Archivists visit Spokane. Forty years ago, Spokane welcomed the world to Expo ’74, the World’s Fair. Founded as a commercial and industrial center, Spokane developed an early awareness of the value of open space and parks. Spokane’s industrial economy began to change by the late twentieth century. Sawmills, flour mills, and railroads hemmed in the river. Downtown had become a center for industry and commerce in the 1880s and 1890s, but the heavy industries were beginning to move elsewhere by 1960. The city re-imagined itself, looking forward to a less industrial downtown, Spokane hosted an environmentally themed world’s fair in 1974. Four decades later, the legacy of Expo ’74 is a revitalizing downtown centered on the open space along the Spokane River. The falls are worth seeing, even in late May. Riverfront Park is within walking distance from the convention site. Historic buildings including the Spokesman-Review building are also within walking distance of the Davenport Hotel. The major part of Spokane’s park system was designed by the Olmstead Brothers, leading landscape architects in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. These are easily accessible by automobile. Have a great time in Spokane! Northwest archivists conference 2014

The Local Arrangements Committee 3


Thank You to Our Vendors FLO O R PLA N A N D CAPACIT Y CH ART & Advertisers Vendors: Academy of Certified Archivists ArcaSearch ArchivesSpace Belfor Property Restoration Hollinger Metal Edge Preservation Technologies

First Street — One Way First Street - South Entrance

Private Dining

Espresso

Advertisers: Academy of Certified Archivists ArchivesSpace Atlas Systems - Aeon Hollinger Metal Edge University Products

Lobby Fireside

M

Lobby

Main Entrance Front Desk Davenport Flowers Store

Valet Parking

Special Thanks to: Washington State Digital Archives WESTPAS The Davenport Hotel

Concierge & Business Center

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Post Street — Two Way

Palm Court Grill

Isabella Ballroom

Private Dining

Peacock Room Lounge

Davenport Home Store Sprague Street - North Entrance

Sprague Street — One Way

First Floor

Please be sure to visit our exhibitors on the second floor! Marie Antoinette Balcony

Cutter Room

Flowerfield Room

Davenport Boardroom

Marie Antoinette Ballroom Porter Room

A

B

Roosevelt Room Matador Room

C Coat Check & Registration

Hall of the Doges Foyer Prefunction

Elizabethan Room B

A

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Worthy Room

State Suite B

Lincoln Room

Exhibitor Area

Grand Pennington Ballroom

State Suite A

Second Floor and Pennington Wing 4

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Downtown Spokane area map. 10 S Post St, Spokane, WA 99201 Davenport Hotel 800-899-1482

Contact Information for Local Arrangements and Program Committee Chairs Janet Hauck: 509-777-4751, jhauck@whitworth.edu Natalia Fernรกndez: 520-603-3042, natalia.fernandez@oregonstate.edu

Spokane - Whitworth College - McMillan Hall - 1916

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The Davenport Hotel

Spokane - Davenport Hotel - Creative Commons - Aidan Wakely 6

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The Davenport Hotel opened in 1914 under the auspices of Louis Davenport and designed by architect Kirtland Cutter. It was designed to be a destination in its own right and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It was the first hotel with air conditioning, a pipe organ, a central vacuum system, housekeeping carts and accordion ballroom doors. Over the years famous guests have included film stars, explorers, writers, politicians, musicians, and athletes. In 1985 the hotel shut down, but 15 years later, local entrepreneurs Walt and Karen Worthy bought the hotel, completed a multimillion-dollar restoration, and soon reopened it doors. ~ The Davenport Hotel Website, History and Architecture

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FLOOR

PLAN

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CAPACITY

CHART

First Street — One Way First Street - South Entrance

Palm Court Grill

Isabella Ballroom

Lobby Fireside

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Espresso

Lobby

Desk

Center

Davenport Home Store

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Main Entrance Concierge & Northwest archivists conference 2014 Business Front Valet Parking Davenport Flowers Store

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Post Street — Two Way

Private Dining

Private Dining

Peacock Room Lounge


Floor Maps Thursday workshops will take place in the Elizabethan Room and the Flowerfield Room. All conference sessions will be in the Earlybird, Flowerfield, and Lincoln Rooms. The Thursday night reception will take place in the Isabella Ballroom. All Friday and Saturday meals and general meetings will be in the Marie Antoinette FLOOR PLAN AND CAPACI TY CHART Ballroom. First Floor

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First Street — One Way First Street - South Entrance

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Isabella Ballroom

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Private Dining

ROOM

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Peacock Room Lounge

Davenport Home Store

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First Floor

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Davenpo Marie Antoinette Balcony

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Flowerfield Room

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Marie Antoinette Ballroom

Matador Lincoln

Porter Room

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State Su Roosevelt Room

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Grand Pennington Ballroom

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Hall of the Doges Foyer Prefunction

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Lower Lobby Lower SecondLobby Floor and Pennington Wing

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T H E DAV E N P O RT H OT E L A N D TOW E R 10 S . P O S T S T. S P O K A N E , WA 9 9201 W W W . D A V E N P O R T H O T E L C O L L E C T I O N . C O M • I N F O @ T H 4th E D AFloor V E N PRoof ORTHOTEL .COM PHONE 509 455 8888 • FA X 509 625 4 455

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The Burlington Northern Clock Tower and the U. S. Pavilion taken during Expo ’74. Courtesy of the Northwest Room. Spokane Public Library.

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Schedule At a Glance Thursday, May 29th 9am-5pm

Workshop 1: DAS course “Basic Electronic Records” Located in the Elizabethan Room

9am-4pm

Workshop 2: “Creating and Funding Preservation Projects To Enhance Collection Care” Located in the Flowerfield Room

3-5pm (depart 2:30pm)

Digital Archives Tour at the Washington State Archives

4-7pm Registration Located outside the Isabella Ballroom 6-8pm

Reception, The Davenport Hotel Located in the Isabella Ballroom

Friday, May 30th

8am-noon Registration Located outside the Marie Antoinette Ballroom 8:30-10am

Breakfast, Welcome & Plenary Speaker Located in the Marie Antoinette Ballroom

10-10:30am Break

Sessions Begin 10:30-noon

Noon-2:30

Session 1 Primary Source Literacy: Special Collections and Archives in the Classroom Flowerfield Room

Session 2 Viewing Archives Through an Artist’s Lens

Session 3 Projecting Our Past: Bringing Films to the Forefront

Early Bird Room

Lincoln Room

Session 4 One bourbon, one wine, one beer: academic alcohol archives that document the cultural history of a community

Session 5 The Washington State Archives - Reaching New Audiences with the Past

Session 6 Lightning Talks Part I

Early Bird Room

Lincoln Room

Flowerfield Room

Lunch and NWA Visioning Project Marie Antoinette Ballroom

2-3pm

3-3:15pm

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Break

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3:15-4:15pm

Session 7 Latino Voices: Preserving and promoting Oregon Latino history

Session 8 Spokane Historical: A New Way to Present Archives-Based Research

Session 9 Lightning Talks Part II

Lincoln Room

Flowerfield Room

Early Bird Room

Session 11 Congressional Image: Strategies for Processing, Promoting and Doing Outreach Using Photograph Collections of Twentieth-Century U.S. Congressmen Lincoln Room

Session 12 Bringing the long lost “Grays Harbor Happenings” back to the community: or how we became “archival rock stars”

4:15-4:30pm

Break

4:30-5:30pm

Session 10 What Happened to Handwriting?: The Decline of Cursive Writing and the Implications for Archivists and Scholars. Flowerfield Room

5:45-6:30pm

6:30-8pm

Early Bird Room

Film: Grays Harbor Happenings: The News Reels of C.D. Anderson Early Bird Room Ghosts of Spokane Tour Davenport Hotel Lobby

Saturday, May 31st 8-10am

NWA Membership Meeting and Breakfast Marie Antoinette Ballroom

10-10:30am

Break

10:30–noon

Session 13 Training on the Archival Fringes: Projects, Programs, and Professional Value

Session 14 Imagination at Work: Reaching New Users with Innovative Instruction and Outreach

Early Bird Room

Flowerfield Room

Noon-1:30pm

Lunch on Your Own

Lunch Meeting: Native American Collections Roundtable

1:30-2:30pm

Session 16 Using the SAA Digital Archives Specialist Certificate (DAS) Program as a Continuing Education Opportunity for Library and Archives Staff Flowerfield Room

Session 17 Archives and Special Collections in Discovery Environments

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Early Bird Room

Session 15 Challenges and Opportunities: Creating Digital Indigenous Cultural Heritage Resources Lincoln Room

Session 18 Collaborative Stewardship of Cultural Heritage Archives: The Theodore Stern Papers at the University of Oregon Libraries and the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute Lincoln Room 13


NWA 2014 Conference Full Schedule Thursday, May 29th 9am-5pm

Workshop 1: DAS course “Basic Electronic Records”

Increasingly, archival records are created in electronic formats. As a result, archives of all types need to be responsible for the preservation of electronic records. After a review of the fundamental principles of archival appraisal and appraisal policies, you’ll be introduced to the unique issues that need to be addressed when appraising electronic records.  Location: Elizabethan Room

9am-4pm

Workshop 2: Creating and Funding Preservation Projects to Enhance Collection Care by Gary Menges, Librarian Emeritus, University of Washington (UW)

This workshop begins with identifying and setting priorities among collection needs followed by reviewing sources of grant funding available to your institution. Then the workshop addresses the key preservation questions asked on grant applications with participants answering the questions on behalf of their institutions, building the elements of a proposal for their own collection. By the end of the workshop day, participants will have: outlined a preservation project proposal specific to their institution, identified possible funding sources, and tested their ideas with other workshop participants. Location: Flowerfield Room

3-5pm

Tour of the Digital Archives at Washington State University (pre-registration required, 30 people max)

Tour the Washington State Archives facility in Cheney, home of both the Eastern Region Branch of the State Archives and the Digital Archives. This cutting-edge facility holds everything from 19th-century death sentences to the websites of former governors. Departure Location & Time: Meet at 2:30pm to carpool from the Davenport Hotel, drive to Washington State Archives · Digital Archives, 960 Washington Street, Cheney, WA.

6-8pm

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Opening Reception, Isabella Ballroom, The Davenport Hotel

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Friday May 30th 8am-noon

Registration

8:30-10am

Breakfast

8:45-10am

Welcome, Announcements, and Plenary Speaker Jim Kershner

Kershner will speak on the subject of “Questions that Archivists Dread the Most” as well as a brief account of his own adventures in archives. Jim Kershner is an author, historian, and journalist in Spokane, Wash. He was born in Denver in 1953 and received a BA in History from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Ore., in 1975. Kershner has been a journalist for 38 years and his duties have included: humor-opinion columnist, feature writer, theater critic, arts editor, entertainment writer, restaurant reviewer, and history writer. He has won seven awards from the National Society of Newspaper Columnists. Kershner retired from The Spokesman-Review two years ago, but continues to write a daily history column and other stories for the paper. He is also a staff historian for HistoryLink.org, the Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History, for which he has written more than 160 historical essays. Kershner is the author of three books including his most recent book, Carl Maxey: A Fighting Life, published by the University of Washington Press. It was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award in 2009. Location: Marie Antoinette Ballroom

Friday 10:30-Noon

10:30-noon

Morning Sessions

Session 1:

Primary Source Literacy: Special Collections and Archives in the Classroom

Location: Flowerfield Room

Engaging students with primary sources in the classroom can enrich curriculum and inspire learning at all levels, however, introducing students to primary sources can be a daunting task for archivists and special collections librarians. This session will offer insight into the core knowledge and skill sets needed by students to understand original materials held in special collections and archives. Individual presentations will address recent efforts toward the standardization of primary source literacy skills, the impact of standards on teaching objectives, development of exercises and curriculum, instructional collaborations, and assessment techniques. Presenters will offer examples of targeted instruction programs aimed at teaching students how to find, understand, and interpret primary source material, while also developing their reasoning, critical analysis, and problem solving skills. Presenters: Elizabeth Joffrion, Western Washington University; Anne Bahde, Oregon State University; Trevor Bond, Washington State University; Rozlind Koester, Western Washington University Friday 10:30-Noon

Session 2:

Viewing Archives through an Artist’s Lens Location: Early Bird Room

The City of Portland Archives and Records Center worked with the Regional Arts & Culture Council to create an artist-in-residence program within the archives as a means to reach out to atypical researchers. The first team of artists started working in the Archives in early 2013 and will complete their project in 2014. This endeavor is a collaborative approach to exploring new ways to interact with archival collections, and for introducing Northwest archivists conference 2014

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archives to new audiences in non-traditional ways. The session will provide the background for the artist-inresidence program, and discuss the specific collaboration happening between the archivists and artists for the current project. The artists will talk about their experiences working with the materials and the archivists, describe their project, and will share some of the artistic outcomes. Presenters: Diana Banning, City of Portland Archives & Records Center; Kaia Sand, Portland State University; Mary Hansen, City of Portland Archives & Records Center; Brian K. Johnson, City of Portland Archives & Records Center, Garrick Imatani, Lewis & Clark College

Session 3:

Projecting Our Past: Bringing Films to the Forefront

Location: Lincoln Room

Friday 10:30-noon

Film and other forms of visual media have long been important parts of archival collections, and the last five years have seen sea changes both in digital preservation and in public sharing of these resources. Working with films is moving from something costly and complex to something an archive can do at minimal expense. These media resources can provide their institutions with powerful resources to engage their constituents and to entice researchers and add new collections. The presenters will share programs and projects from their institutions and others in the northwest, looking at the historical, cultural, and educational value of our collections, physical and digital preservation issues, project planning, sharing your materials out to your public, and outreach to users ranging from donors to fellow archivists. Presenters: Mark O’English, Washington State University; Hannah Palin, University of Washington; Elizabeth Peterson, University of Oregon

Noon-2pm

Lunch and NWA Visioning Project

What is your vision for NWA? The NWA Visioning Project is focused on asking each of you to share what you think the future of NWA should be. Ultimately, the goal is to step outside of the NWA of now and to envision the NWA as we’d like it to be by asking ourselves what is important to the profession, to the region, to colleagues and to ourselves. The information collected throughout the process will be used to formalize a mission statement and will help guide the NWA Board in creating a strategic plan. Project Lead: Diana Banning Location: Marie Antoinette Ballroom

2:00-3:00pm Afternoon Sessions Session 4:

One bourbon, one wine, one beer: Location: Early Bird Room

Friday 2-3:00pm

Academic alcohol archives that document the cultural history of a community through collaborative projects aren’t new for archivists. We work with our colleagues, creators, and researchers to bring together collections and people. Community archiving projects are also becoming much more mainstream, allowing archivists to work with content creators to save, preserve, and share their histories to curate collections for preservation and access. It also allows us to explore varied opportunities for engagement, content creation, funding, sustainability, privacy, and access, as well as how we define collecting scope in academic archives. The beer, bourbon, and wine industries bring together communities that blend regional identity, engagement, agriculture, business, and pleasure. This session will explore panelists’ experiences establishing an academic archive dedicated to preserving the cultural history of a community that has formed around alcohol, creating an archive from scratch, and working with communities and corporations to tell their stories in a post-custodial archives world.

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Presenters: Tiah Edmunson-Morton, Oregon State University; Rachael Cristine Woody, Linfield College; Doug Boyd, University of Kentucky; Melissa Salrin, Whitman College and Northwest Archives (Session Chair) Friday 2-3:00pm

Session 5:

The Washington State Archives - Reaching New Audiences with the Past Location: Lincoln Room

The Washington State Archives is working to attract new audiences through a number of innovative programs and collaborations. Some of the topics we will discuss include: going global, the reach of the digital archives, crowd sourcing, returning to our roots, Archives Month, student audiences, and how technology keeps us moving forward. Presenters: Debbie Bahn, Washington State Archives; Amber Raney, Washington State Archives; Tracy Rebstock, Washington State Archives; Benjamin Helle, Washington State Archives; Frank Oesterheld; Washington State Archives Friday 2-3:00pm

Session 6:

Lightning Talks Part I Location: Flowerfield Room

Collaborations with Performing Arts Organizations: Collection Processing and Exhibit Curation In 2013 the Oregon Multicultural Archives (OMA) began work on processing two Portland based performing arts organizations’ collections: the Obo Addy Legacy Project, an African dance and music group, and Milagro (Miracle Theatre Group), a Latino/a theatre. Two interns and one and a half years later, the OMA curated a joint exhibit, hosted a reception, and the two collections became open to the public for research. Natalia Fernández, Oregon State University Archives Month Extravaganza In October 2013 the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives at the University of Alaska Fairbanks increased their archives month events from 1 the previous year to 4 events in 2013. It was fun, collaborative and very exhausting. This presentation shares what we learned. Rachel Seale, University of Alaska Fairbanks Taste of the ‘Chives-Hall of Fame Recipes An unconventional look back at the most memorable, tasty, and mysterious recipes prepared for Oregon State University’s “Taste of the ‘Chives” Oregon Archives Month event. Karl McCreary, Oregon State University Connecting Collections to the Classroom Research shows that enriching the classroom experience with relevant local and regional history improves educational outcomes. The trick is how to extend, engage, and ultimately educate wide diverse audiences. This poster session focuses on how to create educational outreach programs that meet the actual needs of classroom teachers and fit the mission of the institution. Renee Cebula, Graduate History Candidate Eastern Washington; Erin Pulley, Graduate History Candidate Eastern Washington University Engaging Undergraduates in De-Colonizing Research with Tribal Communities: The Northern Paiute History Project This session will highlight the experience of the University of Oregon Clark Honors College colloquium “Race and Ethnicity in the American West: Northern Paiute History,” taught in fall 2013 by Dr. Kevin Hatfield and Jennifer O’Neal, which engaged students with local tribal community members from The Confederated Tribes Northwest archivists conference 2014

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of Warm Springs and Burns Paiute to document previously unexamined or lesser known portions of tribal history utilizing primary sources and oral history. This course espoused the values of community‐based, inter‐ cultural, de‐colonizing, multidisciplinary research, and authentic discourse among Native and non‐Native students, historians, and scholars. Jennifer O’Neal, University of Oregon

3-3:15pm

Break

3:15–4:15pm Afternoon Sessions Session 7:

Latino Voices: Preserving and promoting Oregon Latino history Location: Lincoln Room

Friday 3:15-4:15pm

Latinos are the fastest growing population in the State of Oregon – jumping from 8 percent of the state’s population in 2000 to nearly 12 percent in 2010, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The University of Oregon Libraries, in conjunction with community organizations and other UO initiatives have formed an interdisciplinary, community collaborative, called the Oregon Latino Heritage Collaborative (OLHC). In this session, presenters will discuss initiatives to enable and promote the use of Latino primary sources within undergraduate curricula at the university, Latino communities in Oregon, and researchers at large. Presenters will also cover the decisions made while processing manuscript collections, look at ways of promoting the collections through finding aids and web exhibits, and review the alliances maintained with local Latino organizations to ensure the continued preservation of Latino voices in Oregon. Presenters: Stephanie Kays, University of Oregon; Sonia De La Cruz, University of Oregon, David Woken, University of Oregon

Session 8:

Spokane Historical: A New Way to Present Archives-Based Research Friday Location: Flowerfield Room

3:15-4:15pm

Have you ever visited a new city, or even a familiar one, and wondered about its history? Cities are living monuments to the past. But connecting a community to its city’s history can be a challenge. In a digital age, public historians are looking at new ways to engage people with their city’s past. Spokane Historical is a free app and website including over 250 historic sites with text, images, podcasts and videos, created for those who are curious about Spokane’s past. The “Ghosts of Spokane” is a Spokane Historical project that documents the many still-visible painted advertisements found on brick buildings in Spokane’s Historic Downtown. In addition to the digital tour of these signs in the digital application, the project seeks to engage the community by providing walking tours within the city. Presenters: Larry Cebula, Eastern Washington University; Anna Harbine, Eastern Washington University; Frank Oesterheld, Eastern Washington University

Session 9:

Lightning Talks Part II Location: Early Bird Room

Friday 3:15-4:15pm

Maps as Archival Materials: Enhancing Context and Improving Access The Special Collections & Archives Research Center at Oregon State University has undertaken an extensive project to identify appropriate historic maps in the OSU Libraries’ collections, transfer them to the Center’s collections, and describe the collections following archival descriptive practice and standards. This talk will describe OSU’s project and explore the advantages (and possible disadvantages) of treating historic maps as archival materials – from the perspectives of description and cataloging; preservation; and reference. Elizabeth Nielsen, Oregon State University 18

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Archive Engine West: Outcomes and Next Steps Over the last four years, the Northwest Digital Archives program at the Orbis Cascade Alliance has developed and created Archive Engine West (formerly known as the Cross-Search and Context Utility), a demonstration project to create an integrated presentation of digital content and associated finding aid metadata from across the region. With the end of IMLS funding this winter, the program is summarizing project findings and considering possible next steps. The NWDA Program Manager will present the project’s outcomes and report on the Alliance’s decisions about future directions. Jodi Allison-Bunnell, University of Alaska Fairbanks Opening the Digital Door to Hidden Collections at the C.M. Russell Museum As a lone arranger, Kathryn Kramer’s duties include both processing the Frederic G. and Ginger K. Renner Special Collection and establishing a functional, accessible archives that will serve staff members and academic researchers in perpetuity. In this talk she will share her work writing and enforcing policies and procedures, creating publicly accessible finding aids, and implementing the museum’s plan to digitize archival materials and create a “virtual research center” that can be accessed through a dedicated website. Kathryn Kramer, C.M. Russell Museum The Kimble Northwest History Database: Fulfilling the Spirit of the WPA Ten years ago, Washington State University libraries initiated the digitization of a WPA clipping project. The Wallis and Marilyn Kimble Northwest History Database currently hold 100,000 records; the finished database will have 400,000 records. To highlight access and relevancy of the database, the digitization team resolved to use storytelling to promote the collection and the digitization team foregrounded the narratives of Washington State depression era men and women. Lipi (Israt) Turner-Rahman, Washington State University Speech Recognition Software in the Archives This talk will examine the uses and limitations of voice recognition software, Dragon Naturally Speaking, in the archive. An example use for this software in archival work is indexing. The voice recognition software allows the archivist to dictate to his/her computer while keeping their hands free to navigate through folders or boxes. There are also limitations to this software. For example, voice recognition software is usually quite accurate except when it comes to places and names. Many records deal heavily with names and places making the software difficult to use. The information presented will further expose archivists to the possibility of using this software. Cory Carpenter, Eastern Washington University

4:15-4:30pm Break 4:30-5:30pm Afternoon Sessions Friday 4:30-5:30pm

Session 10:

What Happened to Handwriting?: The Decline of Cursive Writing and the Implications for Archivists and Scholars. Location: Flowerfield Room

Young students are routinely taught touch-typing instead of cursive in school. They communicate through text messages, tweets, and email instead of handwriting. As a result, novice scholars in college today often do not know how to read cursive, the predominant penmanship script used until the late 20th century. The implications for new historical research are becoming apparent. For one thing, historical methodology will likely change, because students will first have to be taught how to read cursive in order to conduct primary source research. Handwritten documents permeate collections in archives across the country, and access to these documents requires an understanding of cursive script in its many variants. Today we will discuss the history of Northwest archivists conference 2014

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penmanship, the enduring value of original handwritten documents, and the impact that the decline in cursive handwriting could have on historical research. The audience will also get to try writing Spencerian script, the principal penmanship style of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Presenters: Geoff Wexler, Oregon Historical Society; Linda Long, University of Oregon; Marianne Nelson, Portland Society for Calligraphy

Session 11:

Congressional Image: Strategies for Processing, Promoting and Doing Outreach Using Photograph Collections of Twentieth-Century U.S. Congressmen

Friday 4:30-5:30pm

Location: Lincoln Room

This session will explore the processing of two twentieth-century U.S. Senators’ photograph collections: Senator Ted Stevens (R-AK) and Senator Lee Metcalf (D-MT). Around the country, photograph collections of U.S. congressmen who served after World War II to the 2000s are being processed. However, a lack of informational and written historical context for many of these images exists due to the relatively recent nature of the congressmen’s service. To overcome these challenges, the presenters will discuss their approaches to the organization of the collections; the difficulties encountered in image identification; the benefits for processing photographs utilizing information learned through new digital tools, databases, and online archival records from across the U.S.; the strategies employed to conduct outreach to the public in order to assist in image identification and description; and their work in developing public programs around the senators’ photograph collections. Presenters: Matthew M. Peek, Montana Historical Society; Elsie Eckman, University of Alaska-Fairbanks

Session 12:

Bringing the Long Lost “Grays Harbor Happenings” Back to the Friday Community: Or How We Became “Archival Rock Stars” 4:30-5:30pm

Location: Early Bird Room

The session will discuss the Grays Harbor Newsfilm collection project to preserve a rare collection of nitrate news film at the University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections and “Grays Harbor Happenings,” a documentary film produced by University of Washington Libraries and UWTV as part of that project. The documentary depicts the effort to preserve the film, shows the community as it was in the 1920s and as it is now, and discusses why it is important to save our historical film. The session shows how archives can successfully partner with local communities to bring their history back (and how you too can be an “archival rockstar.”). Presenters will discuss how the collection came to the University of Washington Libraries; finding funding to support work on the collection; efforts to preserve and create access to the films; and the ways in which the Grays Harbor community was involved in efforts to identify the content of the films. Presenters: Nicolette Bromberg, University of Washington; Hannah Palin, University of Washington; Joyce Agee, University of Washington

5:45-6:30pm

Film: Grays Harbor Happenings: The News Reels of C.D. Anderson

The film discusses the preservation of a collection of rare 1920s nitrate film newsreels from Grays Harbor County, Washington. The newsreel film which came to the University of Washington from a donor who obtained it at a storage locker sale, contains rare views of everyday life in Grays Harbor during the 1920s. The documentary discusses how the University of Washington preserved and created access to the film collection and shows the community in then and now vignettes. A poignant moment in the film shows just how important 20

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it can be to save our historical films. Location: Early Bird Room

6:30-8pm

Ghosts of Spokane Tour (pre-registration required, 25 people max)

In this field session, we will take conference attendees to the street for a walking tour of the city focused on the many ghost signs still visible in Spokane. These faded but often colorful displays offer testimony of a vanished world. After weeks of strolling back alleys and exploring side-streets, students from the Eastern Washington University Public History program discovered over eighty legible signs, most from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Dr. Larry Cebula and graduate students Anna Harbine and Frank Oesterheld will conduct a walking tour featuring the best of the ghost sign research. The tour will take about an hour and a half and can accommodate up to twenty five people. Departing Location: The Davenport Hotel Lobby

Saturday, May 31st 8:00-10:00am Breakfast & NWA Member Meeting Location: Marie Antoinette Ballroom

Saturday 10:30-noon

10:30-noon

Morning Sessions

Session 13:

Training on the Archival Fringes: Projects, Programs, and Professional Value

Location: Early Bird Room

Through a series of presentations, panelists will explore various training programs or projects situated on the fringes of the archival profession, a space where audiences are not primarily archivists, but the skills imparted relate to archives or are archives-related skills. Furthermore, these trainers are not necessarily archivists, in any traditional sense; they are librarians or hybrid professionals charged with much more than the care of archival records. Through this look at training happening on the fringes of the profession, we can ultimately examine the value of our work and our profession as well as the way that we convey that value to others. Presenters: Ross Fuqua, Washington State Library; Lindsay Zaborowski, Ballard Historical Society; Tony Kurtz, Western Washington University; Caitlin Oiye, Densho; Joshua Zimmerman, Archdiocese of Seattle (Session Chair) Saturday 10:30-noon

Session 14:

Imagination at Work: Reaching New Users with Innovative Instruction and Outreach Location: Flowerfield Room

In a college or university setting, archivists are often charged with developing innovative ways to inspire campus users to think expansively and creatively about primary sources. Individual presentations will address developing a fictional collection that can be mobilized and expanded to fulfill learning objectives across multiple disciplines; adapting an interactive game from NYPL to promote and generate interest in archives during Northwest archivists conference 2014

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New Student Week; and collaborating with faculty and French majors on a grant-funded project to build and promote collections. Other presentations will extend the conversation to assessment and will consider integrating primary source literacy in first-year library instruction classes and employing the ARCS Model for Motivational Design in composition classes to create a classroom of engaged learners. By highlighting the challenges and rewards of these strategies, panelists aim to provide attendees with practical suggestions and creative ideas that they can adapt and immediately implement at their home institutions. Presenters: Erin Passehl-Stoddart, Western Oregon University; Tiah Edmunson-Morton, Oregon State University; Janet Hauck, Whitworth University; Eva Guggemos, Pacific University; Melissa Salrin, Whitman College and Northwest Archives (Session Chair)

Session 15:

Challenges and Opportunities: Creating Digital Indigenous Cultural Saturday 10:30-noon Heritage Resources Location: Lincoln Room

A 2013 report by the Association for Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATALM) suggests a digital divide between TALMs and their non-indigenous counterparts. The report cites a number of reasons why digital projects and tools are not more widely implemented by tribal archives. These range from lack of staffing and funding to prioritizing more essential needs above digitization and the implementation of digital workflows. This panel will present digital projects as case studies to explore the story inside the numbers in order to flesh out the unique challenges faced by tribal archivists and discuss how specific constraints and opportunities are negotiated. Within these specific case studies, the panel will discuss keys and barriers to success, which in turn, should help illuminate the possibilities and limitations of digital technology to address the preservation and access needs related to indigenous cultural heritage materials. Presenters: Michael Holloman, Washington State University; Larry Cebula, Eastern Washington University and Washington State Digital Archives; Guy F. Moura, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Stacey Baldridge, Alaska Native Language Archive; Steven Bingo, Washington State University (Session Chair)

Noon-1:30pm Lunch on Your Own Lunch Meeting: Native American Collections Roundtable, meet in the Davenport Hotel Lobby

1:30-2:30pm Afternoon Sessions Session 16:

Using the SAA Digital Archives Specialist Certificate (DAS) Program Saturday as a Continuing Education Opportunity for Library and 1:30-2:30pm Archives Staff. Location: Flowerfield Room

While investigating the new SAA Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) certificate program in Spring 2012, Eastern Washington University staff noticed that once you have purchased a DAS webinar, SAA allows you to invite anyone you want to view it. Potential was seen in the DAS webinars for a continuing education opportunity that would benefit people beyond just the Archives, and help staff begin to understand what would be involved in the coming Institutional Repository, staff submitted a proposal to EWU Libraries to have the institution purchase the DAS webinars to make them more widely accessible. The presenters will discuss how the proposal was presented to the library administration, how the program was administered and expanded for people interested in pursuit of the DAS certificate, how we arranged three mandatory on site workshops, and the results of the project.

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Presenters: Charles V. Mutschler, Eastern Washington University; Doris Munson, Eastern Washington University; Justin Otto, Eastern Washington University Saturday 1:30-2:30pm

Session 17:

Archives and Special Collections in Discovery Environments Location: Early Bird Room

A panel of Washington State University librarians discuss issues that arise when experienced archives and special collections researchers who are accustomed to searching for known and unique items traditionally represented in the OPAC by localized metadata attempt research fulfillment in an information environment designed to facilitate user discovery. Questions addressed include: What is a discovery environment and how is it different from an OPAC? How does highly customized metadata describing manuscripts, archives, and special collections work in a discovery environment designed to fulfill user needs by means of shared, standardized metadata? What are some of the best practices for working in discovery environments that archivists and manuscript and special collections professionals can share with their users? How might archival initiatives like NWDA and Western Waters provide models for standardizing specialized metadata for use in information environments? Presenters: Greg Matthews, Washington State University; Ray Henry, Washington State University; Alex Merrill, Washington State University Saturday 1:30-2:30pm

Session 18:

Collaborative Stewardship of Cultural Heritage Archives: The Theodore Stern Papers at the University of Oregon Libraries and the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute Location: Lincoln Room

This session will examine the collaborative stewardship of the Theodore Stern Faculty Papers between the University of Oregon and the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute. Stern was an Anthropology professor for over 20 years at UO during the 1960s - 1980s and he studied various tribal communities across Oregon, including The Confederated Tribes of Umatilla and the Klamath Tribe. This presentation will highlight the information contained in the collection, why it is important to tribal communities, how UO has engaged in a collaborative processing project with the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, and provide next steps. The session will also detail lessons learned thus far and will provide the detailed perspectives of the holding institution and the tribal community. Presenters: Jennifer O’Neal, University of Oregon; Katie Barry, Tamástslikt Cultural Institute

A marmot, Spokane’s official mascot. Courtesy of Gonzaga University Archives and Special Collections.

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Spokane Falls with the iconic clock tower to the left, about 1900. Courtesy of Gonzaga University Archives and Special Collections. 24

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Presenter Bios Joyce Agee is a development officer doing fundraising for the University of Washington Libraries. Previously she worked in London leading community, cultural development projects including exhibitions, arts festivals, public art projects and special events. Later in Australia, she was a consultant to local government developing special projects. She established the first oral history center in the country outside of Melbourne working with the multicultural community to collect, preserve and promote their stories through exhibitions. ageejoy@uw.edu Jodi Allison-Bunnell is the Program Manager for Northwest Digital Archives at the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a position she has held since 2007. Her previous positions were at the University of Montana and the University of Maryland at College Park. She holds an MA and MLS from the University of Maryland at College Park and a BA from Whitman College. jodiab@orbiscascade.org Anne Bahde is a special collections librarian and assistant professor in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center, Oregon State University, where she curates the rare book and history of science collections and fosters their use through instruction and outreach. She holds an MLIS from University of Illinois, an M.A. from Central Washington University, and a B.A. from the University of Chicago. anne.bahde@oregonstate.edu Debbie Bahn is the Electronic Records Archivist for Washington State Archives and works at the Digital Archives branch in Cheney. She earned a Master’s in History from California State University Sacramento and spent three years doing post graduate work in the Master’s in Archives and Records Administration and MLIS programs at San Jose State University. Before joining Washington State Archives in 2008, Debbie worked for the California State Archives. debbie.bahn@sos.wa.gov Diana Banning is the City Archivist for Portland and manages the Archives & Records Center. diana.banning@portlandoregon.gov Katie Barry currently serves as a Research Library Aid and Analyst for the Tamastslikt Cultural Institute (TCI). She assists with a variety of projects for the TCI Library, as well as assists the TCI Director with special projects. She received her Bachelor’s degree in History and Anthropology from the College of William and Mary. katie.barry@tamastslikt.org Stacey Baldridge has been working at the Alaska Native Language Archive for almost four years as the assistant archivist, and now collections manager. She is also enrolled in the Certificate of Advanced Studies; Archives and Records Management program through the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and intends to finish the program in May 2014. She earned her B.A. in History from the University of Akron (Ohio) 2007, and her M.A. (Northern Studies; oral history) from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska) in 2009. smbaldridge@alaska.edu Steve Bingo is currently a project archivist at the Washington State University where he is splitting time between processing and an IMLS grant-funded project to facilitate collaboration between tribal libraries and archives seeking to digitize their collections. He has also worked on a processing and digitization project focused on the experiences of Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II. Before his time on the Palouse, Steve processed literary manuscripts at The University of Montana. steven.bingo@wsu.edu Trevor James Bond received his MIS in 1998 with a specialization in Archives and Preservation Management and a MA in Ancient History in 1996 at UCLA. He earned his undergraduate degree in 1992 at San Diego State 26

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University in Classics with a Minor in Art History. Bond is the Special Collections Librarian at Washington State University Libraries and has also held positions at the Department of Special Collections at the Getty Research Institute and the Department of Special Collections at UCLA. tjbond@wsu.edu Doug Boyd directs the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries and is a recognized leader regarding oral history, archives, and digital technologies. He holds a PhD in folklore and ethnomusicology from Indiana University; authors the blog Digital Omnium: Oral History, Archives and Digital Technologies; and is the author of the book Crawfish Bottom: Recovering a Lost Kentucky Community, published in August 2011 by the University Press of Kentucky. doug.boyd@uky.edu Nicolette Bromberg is the Visual Materials Curator for Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries and has been working with historical visual materials in archives for 30 years. Previously she was the Visual Materials Curator for the Wisconsin Historical Society and Photo-Archivist for the Kansas Collection, University of Kansas Library. She co-authored the Washington State Film Preservation Manual and participated in the production of the film, “Grays Harbor Happenings” based on a collection of newsfilm in Special Collections. nxb@uw.edu Cory Carpenter is originally from Colville, Washington. He received his Bachelor’s degree in History from Eastern Washington University in 2012. Carpenter is currently enrolled as a graduate student at Eastern Washington where he is pursuing a Master’s degree in History with an emphasis on Public History and archives. He is a volunteer at the Eastern Regional Branch of the Washington State Archives and works as the Video Coordinator for the University’s football team. ccarpenter40@eagles.ewu.edu Larry Cebula is an Associate Professor of History at Eastern Washington University and Assistant Digital Archivist at the Washington State Digital Archives. Cebula’s professional interests include public history, new media, and Western History. Cebula is the author of a book titled Plateau Indians and the Quest for the Spirit Power and is collaborating with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Spokane Tribe of Indians on an interactive website sharing Native stories about the Upper Columbia River. larrycebula@gmail.com Renee Cebula is a veteran social studies teacher with degrees in education, history, and government. She holds an Evaluation Practice Certification from George Washington University. She has served on a Missouri Department of Education review board for student evaluation instruments; American Bar Association Public Education Committee; and as an evaluator, project director, and consultant on numerous federal Teaching American History Grants. Renee’s current research focus is best practices for museum education outreach. renee.cebula@eagles.ewu.edu Sonia De La Cruz is a doctoral candidate at the School of Journalism and Communication and graduate fellow for the Oregon Latino Heritage Collaborative at the University of Oregon. Her research combines theoretical and practical approaches to understanding how the Latino diaspora shapes identity and builds community through media space. Additionally, for a number of years, Sonia has been involved in documenting and preserving Latino history in the state of Oregon. delacruz@uoregon.edu Elsie Eckman is the project archivist for the Senator Ted Stevens Papers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. eeeckman@alaska.edu Tiah Edmunson-Morton has worked as an archivist at OSU for seven years. She is also the curator of the Oregon Hops & Brewing Archives. She has served as president of Northwest Archivists, is the Editor of the NWA publication Easy Access, and led the Northwest Digital Archives Usability Group. She holds her MLIS from San José State University, MA in English Literature from Miami University, and is a Certified Archivist. tiah.edmunson-morton@oregonstate.edu Northwest archivists conference 2014

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Natalia Fernández is the Oregon Multicultural Librarian for the Oregon Multicultural Archives (OMA)at Oregon State University’s Special Collections & Archives Research Center. The mission of the OMA is to assist in preserving the histories and sharing the stories that document Oregon’s African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and Native American communities. Fernández holds an M.A. in Information Resources and Library Science from the University of Arizona. natalia.fernandez@oregonstate.edu Ross Fuqua works as a Digital Projects Librarian for Washington Rural Heritage, a statewide collaborative digitization initiative based at the Washington State Library and funded through the IMLS. Previously, he has helped manage digitization processes for visual resources at the University of Washington School of Art, and has also worked closely with folklife and oral history collections at the Western Folklife Center (Elko, Nevada) and Northwest Folklife. rossfuqua@gmail.com Eva Guggemos is an Archivist and Instructional Librarian at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. She came to the Northwest in 2011, after eight years at Yale’s Beinecke Library, where she spent the last several years as their research services librarian. She regularly teaches sessions on archival research methods, social science research methods and general library instruction. Eva holds an M.A. from Yale in History and an M.L.S. from Simmons. guggemos@pacificu.edu Mary Hansen is an Assistant Archivist at the City of Portland Archives & Records Center and focuses her time on providing reference to city employees, students and members of the public. Mary.Hansen@portlandoregon.gov Anna Harbine is a graduate student at Eastern Washington University, interested in digital history, public history, and intellectual history. She works as an intern at the Washington State Archives Digital Archives and Eastern Region Branch and assists in editing and developing interpretive content for Spokane Historical. annaharbine@gmail.com Janet Hauck is the University Archivist at Whitworth University and is on the board of Northwest Archivists. She holds an MLIS from the University of Washington, and is a Certified Archivist. Janet’s publications include “Researchers at Work: Assessing Needs for Content and Presentation of Archival Materials,” and “How to Get More Product While Doing Less Process.” She has received and administered grants from ALA, NEH, NHPRC, IMLS, and the Washington State Library. jhauck@whitworth.edu Benjamin Helle is an archivist with the Washington State Archives in Olympia. Ben is responsible for promoting digital access to the State Archives collections through online resources and has co-chaired the Washington Archives Month activities for the past five years. Before coming to Olympia in 2006, Ben previously served as acquisitions archivist for the Ohio Historical Society and State Archives of Ohio. benjamin.helle@sos.wa.gov Ray Henry is the Web Services Librarian at Washington State University Libraries. ray.henry@wsu.edu Michael Holloman is an Associate professor of Art history at Washington State University where he currently serves as the Coordinator of the American Indian Studies program. He came to the university in 2010 as the Director of the Plateau Center for American Indian Studies. Professor Holloman maintains an ongoing commitment to Native American arts, culture, education and sovereignty which is exhibited in both his professional and personal endeavors. Michael is a registered member of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation. michael.holloman@wsu.edu Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses the language of artifacts, monuments, and pastimes to draw connections between performance, material culture, and recorded history. His work is frequently site-based and collaborative, and often evokes visual or temporal anomalies to suggest new fictions and truths. He is an Assistant Professor of Art and Studio Head of Foundations at Lewis & Clark College. garrick@lclark.edu 28

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Elizabeth Joffrion is the Director of Heritage Resources at Western Washington University where she leads the Western Libraries’ Special Collections, University Archives and Record Center, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Prior to this position, she was a Senior Program Officer at the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access. Joffrion received an MA in History from the University of New Orleans and a MLIS from the University of Maryland. elizabeth.joffrion@wwu.edu Brian K. Johnson is an Assistant Archivist with the City of Portland. Brian has degrees in History and Library Science and has been providing access to local history for over twenty years. Brian.K.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov       Stephanie Kays is the Archivist for Collections Management at the University of Oregon. Her main responsibilities include the management of accessioning and processing for Special Collections & University Archives. She previously worked in libraries and archives at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, UBC Botanical Garden & Centre for Plant Research and the Walker Art Center. She earned a MAS/MLIS from the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies at the University of British Columbia. skays2@uoregon.edu Rozlind Koester received her Master’s in History from Western Washington University’s graduate program in archives and records management in 2008. She wrote her Master’s thesis on developing an “archives literate” population by introducing young audiences to archival material through a variety of outreach and instructional programs. Roz currently works for Western Washington University Libraries Heritage Resources Division where she coordinates outreach and instruction. She is also the Assistant Archivist for the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, a program of Heritage Resources. Rozlind.Koester@wwu.edu Kathryn Kramer, a Colorado native, completed a Master of Science degree in information studies at the University of Texas, Austin in 2012. Prior to joining the C.M. Russell Museum, Kramer worked as a government records archivist at the Montana Historical Society in Helena, Montana. She has also worked at the Dickinson Research Library at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. kkramer@cmrussell.org Tony Kurtz is Archivist and Records Manager at Western Washington University (WWU), where he’s worked since 2006. He also teaches a class on Records and Information Management as part of the WWU graduate program in Archives and Records Management. Prior to WWU, Tony worked at the Central Washington branch of the Washington State Archives. His BA and MA are both from WWU. Tony.Kurtz@wwu.edu Linda Long received her B.A. History from Seattle University in 1978; an M.A. in History and Archives Administration at Case Western Reserve University in 1979; and an MLS from BYU in 1987. She has served as an Assistant Archivist with Consumers Union; Public Services Librarian at Stanford University Libraries; and currently serves as Manuscripts Librarian at the University of Oregon Libraries. llong@uoregon.edu Greg Matthews is the Metadata Librarian and Photographs Curator at Washington State University Libraries. greg.matthews@wsu.edu Karl McCreary is the accessioning archivist for Oregon State University’s Special Collections & Archives Research Center, a position he has held since 2000. karl.mccreary@oregonstate.edu Alex Merrill is the Interim Assistant Dean of Operations, Washington State University Libraries. merrilla@wsu.edu

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Guy F. Moura is Program Manager, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, and Traditional Cultural Property Coordinator at the History/Archaeology Department for the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. Moura currently oversees many programs dealing with Colville cultural heritage including those dealing with Cultural Resource Management, NAGPRA, the Colville Tribal Museum, and the Fort Okanogan Interpretive Center. Moura has also worked as Records Manger for the History/Archaeology Department and as an investigator for several archaeological investigations. guy.moura@colvilletribes.com Doris Munson is the Systems Librarian at Eastern Washington University. She is involved in digitization of archival materials and organization of the Institutional Repository. dmunson@ewu.edu Charles Mutschler is University Archivist at Eastern Washington University. He has been employed by the university since 1983. cmutschler@ewu.edu Marianne Nelson won the Oregon Historical Society 2013 Diary Contest. She learned the Palmer Method of handwriting, and then calligraphy in her high school art classes. She always carried a calligraphic edged pen, and was proud of her handwriting. After retiring she moved to Oregon, discovered the calligraphic legacy of Lloyd Reynolds, and began taking calligraphy courses. She served on the Board of Directors of the Portland Society for Calligraphy and chairs their K-12 Outreach Committee. manelson316@yahoo.com Elizabeth Nielsen oversees arrangement and description activities in the OSU Special Collections & Archives Research Center. She has worked as an Archivist at Oregon State University since 1990. Nielsen has undergraduate and graduate degrees in geology and has a long-time affinity for maps. elizabeth.nielsen@oregonstate.edu Mark O’English is the University Archivist at Washington State University; combined with his northwest degrees this makes him the rare Beaver-Husky-Cougar mix. His responsibilities include the care and feeding of the WSU Libraries’ audio/video digitization programs, where 2013 saw $10,000 in new grant money, several hundred hours of film preserved, and over 60,000 online viewings. markoe@wsu.edu Frank Oesterheld is a graduate student at Eastern Washington University, where he is a teaching assistant in the history department, an intern at the Washington State Archives Eastern Region Branch and Digital Archives, and an editing assistant for Spokane Historical. His research interests include digital archivy, the history of the Digital Archives, and local public history. franknhannah@gmail.com Caitlin Oiye is the Photo and Document Collections Manager at Densho. She graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in History and received an MA in History/Archives and Records Management from Western Washington University and an MLIS from San Jose State University. Before joining Densho, Caitlin worked at King County where she focused much of her time on developing and implementing electronic records management systems. caitlin.oiye@densho.org Jennifer R. O’Neal serves as the University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon Special Collections and Archives. Previously, she served as the Head Archivist for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. She received a Masters in Library Science from the University of Arizona and a Masters in History from Utah State University. She currently serves as the Co-Chair for the SAA’s Cultural Heritage Working Group and is member of The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in Oregon. joneal@uoregon.edu Justin Otto is Social Science Librarian and Faculty Chair at Eastern Washington University. He has been one of the leaders of the Institutional Repository project. jotto@ewu.edu

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Hannah Palin has been working on grant-funded moving image projects at the University of Washington for almost twelve years. In her work as the Film Archives Specialist at the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections, she managed the Washington Film Preservation Project, co-authored the Washington State Film Preservation Manual with Nicolette Bromberg, and is currently working on a two year project funded by the NEH to preserve the Mountaineers Film Collection. filmarc@uw.edu Erin Passehl-Stoddart is the University Archivist and Digital Collections Librarian at Western Oregon University. She co-teaches a course in archives management for undergraduate and graduate students and social science library instruction classes. She is the chair of the Northwest Digital Archives Steering Team and serves on the board for Northwest Archivists. Erin holds an MSI with a focus in archives from the University of Michigan and a BA in history and political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. passehle@wou.edu Matthew M. Peek is a photograph Archivist on the Lee Metcalf Photograph and Film Collections CLIR Project at Montana Historical Society. Peek is a Certified Archivist. He holds a M.A. in Public History (archival studies) from Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio; and is completing an MLIS in Library Sciences/Digital Archival Preservation from Kent State University. Peek has worked with the Ohio Historical Society, Kentucky Historical Society, Wright State University Special Collections, and was corporate archivist for Airstream, Inc. mpeek@mt.gov Elizabeth Peterson is a Humanities Librarian and Curator of Moving Images at the University of Oregon Libraries. She has an MLIS from San Jose State University, and is currently a doctoral student in Film Studies at the University of Oregon. emp@uoregon.edu Erin Pulley is an experienced classroom teacher with a Masters in Teaching from Louisiana State University in Secondary Education-Social Studies. Her research is focused on archives and education outreach. She is currently working with the Washington State Archives and local educators to create digital education outreach tools for classroom teachers. epulley@eagles.ewu.edu Amber Raney has been with the Washington State Archives since 2013 as the Historical Records Project Coordinator. Prior to this, she was the Curator for the Lacey Museum in Lacey, Washington for eight years. She received a B.S. in History from Oregon State University and an M.A. in History/Archives and Records Management from Western Washington University. amber.raney@sos.wa.gov   Tracy Rebstock is a native of Newark, Ohio and has lived in Olympia, Washington since 2013. Tracy joined the Washington State Archives team as an intern at the Digital Archives in Cheney, Washington. Tracy has a Bachelor of Arts in History from University of Cincinnati, a Master’s in Library and Information Science from Kent State University, and a Master’s of Arts in History from Eastern Washington University. tracy.rebstock@sos.wa.gov Melissa Salrin is Archivist and Special Collections Librarian at the Whitman College and Northwest Archives in Walla Walla, Washington. She is also an adjunct lecturer for GSLIS at the University of Illinois. Salrin earned her M.A. in history and her M.L.I.S. with a focus in special collections from the University of Illinois. She is especially interested in examining the archives as a political space. salrinmm@whitman.edu Kaia Sand is artist-in-residence, in collaboration with Garrick Imatani, at the City of Portland Archives. She is the author of two collections of poetry and one book on poetry and public space, and she is the resident poet at the Portland State University Honors Program. sand@kaiasand.net

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Rachel Seale has been working at the Alaska & Polar Regions Collections & Archives at the University of Alaska Fairbanks since December 2009. She began as an Assistant Archivist, and is now the Associate Archivist, Associate Curator. Her responsibilities include accessioning, collection management, donor relations and processing. Rachel also represents her institution as a committee member of the Northwest Digital Archives, is Secretary of the SAA Security Roundtable and Alaska representative for Northwest Archivists, Inc. rmseale@alaska.edu Israt ( Lipi ) Turner-Rahman is the Kimble Northwest History database coordinator at Washington State University Libraries. and Lipi’s PhD is in Anthropology and her scholarly interests focus on the history of Islam and Qur’anic interpretation, feminist Islamic exegesis, the cultural and historical process of the creation of Islamic orthodoxy, South Asian Islam vis-à-vis Middle Eastern Islam, and diaspora Muslim communities in the West. Ilipi@wsu.edu Geoff Wexler has a BA in History from UC Berkeley, 1977; an MA in History from the University of Wisconsin, 1984; and an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin, 1986. He has served as the University Archivist / Manuscripts Librarian at UC San Diego; Retrospective Conversion Project with the Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley; and Archivist at the Byrd Hoffman Water Mill Foundation, New York City. He is currently the Library Director of the Oregon Historical Society. Geoff.Wexler@OHS.org David Woken is the History and Latin American Studies Librarian at the University of Oregon. He has Master’s degrees in Latin American History from Indiana University-Bloomington and Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and he was a Fulbright scholar for Argentina in 2005. David’s research interests include labor history, anarchism, print culture, and open access publishing, especially in the global South. dwoken@uoregon.edu Rachael Cristine Woody is an archivist at Linfield College and holds a BA in History from Pacific University and an MSLIS from Simmons College. She spent four years as an archivist at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., before returning to Oregon to create the Oregon Wine History Archive at Linfield College. Woody is most recently published in Oregon Historical Quarterly, Fall 2013, “Following the Roots of Oregon Wine.” rwoody@linfield.edu Lindsay Zaborowski is Archives Coordinator for the Ballard Historical Society in Seattle. She received her MSIS (Archives and Preservation) and MA in History from SUNY Albany in 2009. From 2011-2013, she served as Project Manager for Washington County Heritage Online, a cooperative grant project which drew together cultural organization from Washington County, Oregon. lindsay.ann.prescott@gmail.com Joshua Zimmerman is Archivist/Records Manager at the Catholic Archdiocese of Seattle, 2010-present. He has also worked as Records Analyst for the City of Bellevue and Assistant Archivist for the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. He received an MA in History/Archives and Records Management from WWU in 2008 and a BA in Medieval Studies from Penn State University in 2004. joshua.zimmerman@seattlearch.org

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517 Main Street, PO Box 101, Holyoke, MA 01041-0101

Ph: 1.800.628.1912 Fax: 1.800.532.9281 Email: info@universityproducts.com

www.universityproducts.com

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Notes

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Northwest archivists conference 2014


Archival Certification: Validate your achievements, knowledge and skills The 2015 Certified Archivist examination will be held August 19 in Boise (ID), Buffalo (NY), Cleveland (OH), Jacksonville (FL), Little Rock (AR), and Sacramento (CA) -- and wherever 5 or more candidates wish to take it. In 2013, nearly 200 candidates took the examination at 17 sites throughout the country. The 2015 application and more information will be available at www.certifiedarchivists.org on January 1, 2015. You can also contact the Academy of Certified Archivists (aca@caphill.com or 518-694-8471). The application deadline is May 15, 2015.

Northwest archivists conference 2014

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NWA 2014 Conference Program  
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