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SIP - 2.0 TOWNSHIP 7 SUGARHOUSE CREAMERY


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR As each issue’s deadline rapidly approaches, I always look forward to reading our writers’ articles. Each is unique and no two are ever alike. Writing styles are different, photographs are different, and topics are, too. After reading all of the articles in issue three, it’s apparent the old saying, “change is the only constant,” is true. All people, or their artwork, interviewed for this issue seem to be going through a time of change. John T. Ward’s life is far from constant. He began his career in law enforcement but he now is a professional illustrator and painter. His work lives in the U.N. and Pentagon and has appeared in numerous publications. His medium has changed over the years and continues to change as he now designs houses, carves ice, and builds furniture. The only certainty is Ward will continue to explore new avenues for his creativity. The modern-American fusion restaurant in Plattsburgh, Sip, is constantly refining its dishes and now changing location to Margaret Street. Its owners are on a constant quest to learn more of their craft and bring people together over a tasty, simple meal. The owners of Dickinson Center brewery, Township 7, have a life that is far from constant. Nathan Drake has had many jobs including a jet engine mechanic and Alaskan fishing guide. Now, he and his wife brew beer with an ever-evolving, unique draft list.

Sugar House Creamer’s craft is one that balances the line between change and tradition. Cheese-making is an artful process with roots predating recorded history. But, the farm’s weather patterns, soil, animals, and changing process all require attentive minds to create a deliciously-creamy final product. Gary Peacock is a Plattsburgh legend: his musical influence in the area transcends time and space. A love of music remained constant in his life as he moved throughout the country. But, Peacock eventually opened a beloved record store in Plattsburgh that closed in 2006 but remains in the hearts and minds of countless people throughout the North Country. Issue three is dedicated to Damian Battinelli’s grandfather. Neil G. Battinelli, Sr. was a product photographer for Kodak. He influenced Damian’s view of the world and without his artistic lessons, this magazine would not have been possible. We’d like to thank all of our advertisers who continue to support North Volume. We hope you enjoy reading our third issue as much as we enjoyed interviewing, writing, designing, editing, and photographing it all.

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BIRDS OF A FEATHER GARRET K. WOODWARD

A conversation with Gary Peacock of Peacock Records

24-31

TAPPED

KODY MASHTARE Township 7 Small-scale brewing in the Adirondacks

19-23 4

14-17 THE ART IN FOOD

NICOLE NAVARRO

SIP 2.O A modern-American fusion restaurant in Plattsburgh creates a new social space in the Lake City

contents JULY - AUGUST 2018

NORTH COUNTRY ARTISAN

EVENTS (p.32-35)

TIM BEHUNIAK “CHEESE!” Sugar House Creamery

Calendar of events happening in the North Country. If you would like to add your event to our calendar next issue, please submit by emailing nvmageditor@gmail.com

NORTH VOLUME MAGAZINE / JULY- AUGUST 2018


R U O S I H T

EW R C

cover image Gary Peacock of Peacock Records By Damian Battinelli intandempro.com

layout & design by In Tandem Productions 75 Court Street Suite 2 Plattsburgh, NY 12901 intandempro@gmail.com intandempro.com (518) 310-0907

E

U SS

I

damian battinelli

timothy behuniak

creative director / photographer

editor / writer / photographer

Damian is a portraitist residing in Plattsburgh, NY. Every portrait Damian creates, he approaches them with a desire for the viewer to question the back story. He has had the honor of teaching photography and writing for magazines such as Rangefinder and Shutter Mag.

Tim is a landscape and adventure photographer, 46’er & rock climber. He’s a senior at SUNY Plattsburgh where he studies magazine journalism. When Tim is not wandering the woods with a camera in hand, he’s writing for the Fstoppers and other local magazines.

intandempro.com

timothybehuniak.com

nicole navarro

kody mashtare

garret woodward

contributing writer

contributing writer

contributing writer

North Volume Media

is passionately dedicated to uniting the North Country’s rich and diverse artisan culture with its citizens and local businesses. Through our magazine, podcasts and site content we hope to engage you - to support and grow together as a community.

contact us nvmageditor@gmail.com ADVERTISING northvolume@gmail.com CONTRIBUTE PHOTOS & WRITING northvolume.com/magguide

Our podcasts can be found:

Nicole is a local educator, public speaker and perpetual dreamer. She loves writing and the North Country where she lives with her little family on the shores of Lake Champlain. northvolume.com/hello-sexual-beings

Kody is the editor of the Lake Champlain Weekly. He is a journalist and photographer. Growing up in the Champlain Valley fostered his passion for adventure and the enviroment. kody.mashtare1993@gmail.com

Garret is an award winning journalist and a North Country native. He is the arts/entertainment editor for The Smoky Mountain News - based in Waynesville, North Carolina. Instagram: @garretkwoodward


translations by annie rochon FRENCH • ENGLISH • SPANISH 10 Hillside Drive Peru, NY 12972

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(518) 569-4590 annie.rochon@gmail.com


S O EX P

ARTIST

ED

JOHN T. WARD

After working in law enforcement for three years, one night John T. Ward of Saranac Lake had a realization that a life invested in the arts is what would really make him happy. So, he went back to school and got a masters degree with a certification to teach art through St. Lawrence and SUNY Potsdam. He also received a masters in illustration from Syracuse University. His illustrations have appeared in children’s books, Sesame Street magazine, National Review magazine, and more. Other paintings have hung or now hang in the Norman Rockwell museum, the U.N., the Pentagon, the U.S. Embassy in Swaziland, and more. So what makes his Norman Rockwell-esque paintings so unique? Perhaps it’s because Ward’s influences and style span across the board. “My favorite kind of paintings are impressionistic, but most of my work is realistic,” said Ward. “I love brush strokes, Van Gogh’s work, and Rockwell’s work. And I’m not a giant Jackson Pollock fan but find myself throwing paint at my canvas.” Looking at one of Ward’s paintings - usually a candid moment of someone’s life frozen in time with light, colors, and shadows captured beautifully on canvas - it’s quite easy to see a smattering of all these artists and more in the final piece. In addition to paintings and illustrations, the artist also carves ice, designs houses, and builds furniture. Ward says, “My surroundings often dictate in my mind how a certain subject should look.” To view Ward’s work or to order your own painting, visit his facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/John-TWard-Studio-168407456594470/ NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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BIRDS OF A FEATHER GARY PEACOCK OF PEACOCK RECORDS By Garret K. Woodward 8

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A melodic world opened when crossing the threshold into Peacock Records. Thousands of albums appeared, and a friendly voice from behind the counter would suggest something to check out a few rows down or simply start a conversation about the mutual love of the records.


Photo provided by Randy Hart

Though the beloved North Country business closed in 2006, memories of the Plattsburgh store always seem to bubble up wherever music is played, heard, or simply triggered in mind through an interaction with a fellow kindred spirit of rock-nroll. The man behind Peacock Records was Gary Peacock himself. At 66, he now hides under the radar camping in the Adirondacks or working on his latest project: Mountain Stream Radio (www. mountainstreamradio.com). The station flips mainstream radio on its head amid a stream-ofconsciousness format that encompasses decades of songs and bands, not just what fits a corporate formula for mass consumption. Raised in Chateaugay, Peacock bolted for a trade school in Boston following his high school graduation in hopes of someday becoming a radio disc jockey. That dream was quickly snuffed out when he returned back to Upstate New York

and found himself spinning his wheels at a local station. But Peacock couldn’t shake his love of music, whether broadcast on-air or onstage at a nightclub. He started DJing at weddings and in bars which was a career move that would eventually parlay itself into Peacock Records. It was a 23-year endeavor that touched the hearts, minds, and souls of countless folks from around the North Country and across the country. Follow the store’s history in a Q&A with the man himself: So, you came of age during arguably the greatest era of music? Yeah, absolutely. I grew up listening to CHOM-FM (based out of Montreal) back when they were a real creative force in the industry. They were more like a pirate radio station. It’s harder edge rock now. They came on with a bang in 1969 and their creative juices stopped flowing NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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around 1976. You’ve probably read the book “Never a Dull Moment,” which talks about 1971 being the peak of rock-n-roll music. I was totally obsessed [with rock music]. Of course, back then it was only AM radio for the most part, until CHOM came on the air. So I was waiting until 9 o’clock [at night] when the transformers changed their power wavelength and I was able to get WABC in New York and WKBW in Buffalo, and the one in Albany, as well. But still, that was just Top 40. Why were you so attracted to rock-n-roll and great radio? What did it spark within you? What it sparked within me was the continuity with CHOM. The way they would program their music would be very much thematic sets. It could be a combination of where the lyrical content would create a streamof-consciousness through several songs, as well as the melody, the rhythm, and the beat. They were into classic rock of course, but they were [also] into the British folk scene — Fotheringay, Fairport Convention, The Incredible String Band. Their [disc jockeys] were also stream-of-consciousness.

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They’d get on some kind of roll and just go with it for like an hour or two on end. That really captivated me. This was right during the heyday of The Beatles, Donovan, and all of that. I remember being glued to the radio and listening to that interview with John Lennon at that hotel [in Toronto in 1969] — it was earth-changing. Was [music] as important to you as breathing and eating? Probably more. [Laughs]. In fact, I remember the summer of ‘66. I was 14 and talked my parents into letting me sleep on the front porch every single night of the summer, and I basically did it for the reason that I’d be able to listen to the radio all night. It all made me realize that music was the way I had to go. [Later], I had been working as a greenskeeper at a golf course down in Keene Valley, and I met this couple there from Sonoma County. They said, “If you ever come to California, look us up.” They lived on this little animal farm out there. So, I ended up moving there and got ready to enroll in Sonoma State. At the time, I acquired quite a large record collection. So, I bought a good


tape deck and started amassing this library. My record collection was enormous, and I couldn’t bring something like that around to DJ with, so I would put the music on these tapes where I had about 14,000 songs to choose from. I had what I called the “mobile unit.” I’d DJ at bars and clubs and play “head music” like CHOM did. The radio in California was nothing compared to what they were doing at CHOM at that time. I packed up and came back to Chateaugay. I spent about a month putting together this giant binder of index cards, and transcribe by hand the times and places where you could find the songs [on the tapes]. I’d put the binder on the bar and people could make requests — that’s how I got started at the Monopole. And now you’re in Plattsburgh DJing? I had a gig at the AuSable Club as the greenskeeper from May to October and would go to California in the winter. This went on for a few years [in the mid1970s]. When I finally came back, I would commute from the AuSable Club to the Monopole one night a week. It went over pretty well,

then they added a second night. Then, that winter [of 1976], I was put on four nights a week. So, I was crashing at people’s houses in Plattsburgh during the week and crashing in Keene Valley on the weekends. Then, I got my van and started sleeping in that. I worked in the Monopole for about 10 years, and opened the record store in1983. Was the original record store on Bridge Street? Yes, where the head shop [This & That] is today. What’s kind of interesting was that I didn’t really put a whole lot of thought into [opening a record store]. It was not the smartest decision in my life. [Laughs.] In ‘82-’83, there was a record store in town — Giant Records — and it was a local chain behind where Texas Roadhouse is now. I got wind that they were going out of business in October, 1983. I thought, “There’s a vacancy, maybe I ought to consider this.” So, I jumped on it. This was back before computers, and I remember sitting up in the Monopole office reading catalog numbers off [one at a time] to my vendors for placing my initial order for several thousand records. NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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When was the first day you opened? December 6, 1983. We were on Bridge Street for six years before we relocated near the Champlain Mall. We moved right after CDs started overtaking the shop. By 1988, CDs were pretty much full-tilt and I needed more space.

The only parts that was planned [in the store] was if anybody came in and asked for something we didn’t have, we’d write it down. The other thing was telling our employees, “When that customer comes back in, I don’t expect you to know their name, but I do expect you to know what music they bought the last time they were here.” That kind of Do you ever realize how much of an impact that communication and openness to conversation is store had on people in the North Country? what made the store so successful. People came I think I do - I hear it almost in knowing that they would be daily. Every time I do a wedding able to get good information or something, five or six people and that somebody would be will come up to me and say, there to listen. Music heads “I bought my first tape at your put a whole lot of thought into love to spout what they know, store,” or, “I miss the store so and if somebody is there to [opening a record store]. much.” It’s very heartwarming. listen, it makes for such a warm It was not the smartest It makes me feel really good experience. about what I did. Though, I feel decision in my life. strongly that I got as much out You had and continue to have a of it as my clientele. They don’t life in music. You made it work. realize it was a two-way street. I probably made Yeah, it did work. I just can’t believe it when I out better from a musical knowledge point-of-view. think about it. How in the hell did I get this far? A Somebody would come [into the store] and talk lot of it is stubborn determination. [Laughs.] But, it’s about something, pique our interest, and we’d run all of you out there in the North Country that made out and buy it ourselves. Peacock Records what it was.

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STORY BY NICOLE NAVARRO PHOTOS BY DAMIAN BATTINELLI

THE ART IN

FOOD 14

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SIP, 2.0 Sip, a modern-American fusion restaurant in Plattsburgh, is the creation of former bandmates Kyle Dyer and Dean Jolly. When their musical endeavors fizzled, the two combined their food service backgrounds and artistic flair to create a new social space in the Lake City.


The duo’s food philosophy is easily summed up in three words: less is more. One or two powerful ingredients aren’t going to steal the spotlight in any of the dishes at Sip. “We really want our food to be simple, clean, and fresh. Almost everything we serve here is homemade,” Jolly said. Their concept matches the city’s vibe. “It’s a simple life in Plattsburgh,” Dyer said. “This is a working-class town where the dollar matters.” After one year operating at a funky side street location, the pair has secured new, expansive

digs on Margaret Street. While originally aiming for an atmosphere focused on shared plates and beer, the new space will offer a full restaurant menu and bar. It’s a fresh start, and a chance to change up the décor. The walls will be covered in mural art by local artist Liz Allen. Allen describes her artwork as graffiti art meets children’s book: “I’m obsessed with color and texture and layering. It is illustration meets messy Subway. My style always was greatly influenced by the trains and murals I’d see in NYC.”

Mural art is popping up all over downtown thanks to the Outside Art Organization. Allen’s work will fit right in with the city’s burgeoning arts scene. “With Plattsburgh really opening up to murals, and downtown growing and embracing art and culture, it is helping the whole city bloom into a really cool place,” she explained. While Sip goes through a metamorphosis, it is important to note the level at which they cater to customers’ needs will remain the same. Sip accommodates all dietary and lifestyle preferences.

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Vegetarians can finally enjoy poutine with meatfree gravy, while carnivores can get their fix eating the mouth-watering Korean beef tacos. “We like to start all of our dishes with a simple base that we can add to,” explained Dyer: “You can always add meat to a dish, but you can’t take it away. I understand what it is like to be sensitive to certain ingredients, but still want to dine out. If someone has a special request, we have designed our menu to be able to accommodate it, and almost always can.” Sip’s most popular starter came from Jolly’s insistence on including one of Grandma’s classics. His red pepper jam with cheese and crackers offers a curious surprise that strikes a chord with their patrons. Munching on this uncanny appetizer will remind even the coolest hipster to call his Grandma in the morning and tell her he loves her. Jolly’s career trajectory has been eye-opening: he went from line cook to an employer overnight. Having a personal stake in their business has made

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working in the food industry more meaningful for the co-owners. “You have to be a special type of twisted weirdo to be a line cook. My goal is to never stop learning,” Jolly said. “Everyone in this field can learn from each other - it doesn’t matter where you went to school or what your specialty is.” With a huge kitchen to work from, new menu items will appear alongside original favorites. Jolly is excited to finally have space to expand on his drive to cook as much as possible from scratch. His sweet potato nachos offer a honeyed take on the old standard, with sweet potato chips that are made to order. Shrimp corn dogs are fried in a batter that’s dotted with jalapenos and served with a spicy mayo dipping sauce. Their dishes are simple, yet tweaked to just the right degree, which adds interest in texture and flavor. The variety of tacos offered make for a safe bet for any customer mood or preference. Choose the smoky chicken, the fried fish topped with pickle


slaw and chili aioli, or the mushroom taco with feta if you’re a veg head. Carnivores mustn’t pass up the opportunity to try the Korean beef tacos. Once a daily special, the Korean beef tacos have earned a full-time spot as a menu standout. Savory and tender, the beef is marinated just so. Its succulent texture makes a perfect pair with the crunchy, raw veggie toppings. The balsamic drizzle is the cherry on top of this yummy delight wrapped up in a soft and warm little tortilla - as if it was wearing a winter coat. With a new location, atmosphere, and some tweaks in the concept, Dyer seems almost surprised at how well their first years as restaurateurs has

unfolded. “Consider all the horror stories you hear, our first year has gone really well,” Dyer said. “We get a lot of support from the community and we are grateful for that.” Although going through a metamorphosis, Sip will still be recognizable to its clientele. “We like to think of this as a social atmosphere and that will definitely be carried over into our new space,” explained Dyer. At Sip, it’s always been about more than good eats. “Food is a great reason to bring people together,” Jolly said. “All of my best memories are around food and friends. Bringing that to others is a cool feeling.”

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by north volume media

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NORTH COUNTRY

ARTISAN STORY & PHOTOS BY TIM BEHUNIAK

Sugar House Creamery It’s a word used often to prompt smiles in family photographs. It’s also a delicious snack, a great topping for virtually any meal, or even a dish of its own. But have you ever wondered how the cheese on your plate is made? Or how much devotion and long hours go into making that one perfect, creamy slice? Well just ask Sugar House Creamery - they’ve mastered the craft. NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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After graduating from St. Lawrence University and working on a dairy farm and creamery in Vermont, Alex Eaton and Margot Brooks wanted their own slice of heaven. In 2012, the couple bought a 23-acre farm in Upper Jay and converted it into a dairy farm, creamery, and Airbnb. “I was raised on a dairy farm,” Margot said. “I wanted to maintain my roots.” 20

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Anne Porter & Associates

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Rather than use an industrial fridge or cooling system, the two took the saying literally by constructing a cave on the property where their cheeses age. The cave creates an ideal temperature for the aging cheese. “We could’ve saved a lot of money by not making a cheese cave,” the two said. “But the passive cooling and underground environment adds a unique flavor to the final product.”

It’s often misunderstood that cheese making itself is a passive and handsoff process: most think it’s tossed into a cold environment and after a few weeks the cheese is ready to be eaten. But this is not the case - especially not at Sugar House Creamery.

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The farmers use a handful of Brown Swiss cows to begin the process. These cows were chosen over the traditional black-and-white and other species of cows because they’re native to mountainous environments and produce hard cheese rather than thick cream and thick cheese. After fine-tuning the cows’ food intake, udders are squeezed and milk is pumped directly to a stainless-steel vessel which delicately turns the milk at 35 degrees. The milk is then heated and culture is added to start the fermentation process. Calf rennet from a French producer is added to pull together the fat, protein, and calcium in the milk. Stirring stops toward the end of fermentation and flocculation occurs. Flocculation is the fine line when liquid turns into clumps, and the entire process - from spinning in the vessel to flocculation - lasts anywhere from 12-16 hours. 22

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The material is then put into the “concrete bunker” and ages for its allotted amount of time. Depending on the type of cheese, the product will age for as little as two weeks or up to an entire year. Throughout the process, Eaton, Brooks, and Creamery Manager Casey Galligan constantly take notes regarding specific tweaks made or even weather changes that occur. “Cheese-making is a utilitarian art,” Galligan said. Plus, the Sugar House Creamery’s cheeses don’t merely sit on a shelf while aging. A dedicated attentiveness is required during the maturing process as the farmers carefully tweak and create the perfect environment that’s conducive for the rind to develop. They even choose specific wood for the cheeses to sit on, which adds to the final product’s flavor. In order to maintain a tight production line, Sugar House Creamery pumps out only three different cheeses. “It’s hard to achieve perfection with a scattered focus,” said Brooks. Dutch Knuckle, Pound Cake, and Little Dickens are the final three products at the end of the creamery’s process. Dutch Knuckle ages for up to a year on

25-pound wheels and are “mouthwateringly meaty.” The farmers use a beer wash from the Ausable Brewing Company to add unique flavor to Pound Cake, a semisoft cheese that ages for about a month. Little Dickens, the creamery’s smallest cheese, takes about two weeks to age and is “super creamy” and “spreadable.” According to state law, customers have to buy raw-milk products directly from the producer rather than retail or grocery stores. Because of this, Brooks, Eaton, and Galligan are able to interact with their customers and provide first-hand and direct knowledge about the food they’re selling. “It’s important that people meet and trust the makers of their food,” Brooks said. In the end, the crew at Sugar House Creamery doesn’t just master cheese-making; they master a wellrounded understanding of our planet. In order to make such delicately-crafted cheese, a deep understanding of the farm’s soil, weather patterns, animals, and much more is required. “We essentially harvest the energy of the sun through mammals to create a final product,” Galligan said.“We’re trying to tell a story through the product we’re making.” NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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NATHAN DRAKE / OWNER & BREWER


TOWNSHIP 7

Small-scale brewing in the ADKs

BY KODY MASHTARE PHOTOS BY TIM BEHUNIAK

After seven years as a jet engine mechanic, Nathan Drake found himself guiding fishing tours in Alaska. But he grew tired of handling all the mundane tasks that come with the job. He taught people how to cast. He untangled snarled lines. He tied on lures. NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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“It seemed like a babysitting thing,” he said. “I wasn’t fishing. It’s not like fishing with your buddies.” Eventually, he and his wife, Jan, crossed the continent back to upstate New York, and Drake worked on the remaining two years of a food and nutrition degree he had started in Alaska. When he wasn’t in school at SUNY Plattsburgh, Drake worked as a surveyor with his father.

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As graduation approached, Drake began to think about his next move. “I didn’t want to work in a hospital or nursing home prescribing tube feedings or something,” he said. Drake has done a lot of things, but he has brewed beer since age 18. Back then, he brewed “out of necessity,” he said. “I couldn’t find anyone to buy me beer.” So after his graduation, trying to avoid the hospitals and nursing homes, Drake began writing a business plan for a brewery: “Quite honestly, I got half-lit one night and started figuring out how much it costs to make a batch of beer, how much I would have to make to pay my bills. That was the start of my business plan.” In August 2016, amid the patchwork of fields and rolling foothills of Franklin County, New York, Drake and Jan officially opened their newly-built Township 7 Brewing Company on the 144-acre


plot of land Drake grew up on in Dickinson Center, just 17 miles west of Malone.The brewery’s name came as Drake and Jan sat around after dinner one night with Drake’s father, who suggested Township 7. “It just rings,” Drake said. “It hit me right in the head.” In 1791, Alexander Macomb purchased most of the land currently in Franklin, St. Lawrence, Jefferson, and Lewis counties. The massive purchase was divided into tracts and townships, and Dickinson Center fell into Township 7. Drake now finds himself back in the place he first began writing and tweaking beer recipes. But his new brewing equipment, with a total capacity of roughly 220 gallons per batch, is far from the 3-gallon stovetop kettle he started with in the mid-90s. Last year, Township 7 produced roughly 9,703 total gallons of beer, enough to fill about 77,624 pint glasses. That production volume might not have been possible without Drake’s cousin Kyle Henderson, who now brews full time at Township 7 after homebrewing for seven years. About the time the brewery opened in 2016, when the gleaming new stainless steel equipment was finally in place, Drake and Henderson started a 100-gallon batch of pale ale and began learning how to use the equipment together. “Homebrewing was the same process, but there’s a learning curve,” Henderson said. “I’m pretty smooth with it now, but I occasionally take a beer shower from time to time when I forget something.” When Drake started homebrewing 24 years ago, he produced mostly hop-heavy beers, but NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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eventually, he branched out to brew other styles. “I think there’s a natural transgression through wanting to experience what other styles of beer taste like, something like a brown, a stout, porter, or something roasty. It’s almost like coffee or chocolate. It starts to open your brain up a little bit,” he said. Drake has weaved that sense of variety into the philosophy of Township 7. “Jan and I have been to a lot of breweries where their beer tastes almost muddled, or they’re just brewing IPAs. I didn’t want that.” Drake and Henderson keep eight or nine beers on tap at a time, offering light, easy-drinking brews such as Two Bottom, Drake’s take on a pre-prohibition ale brewed with corn, as well as bold, rich options such as Freight Train, a barrel-aged brown ale. Both Freight Train and Train Wreck, an aged imperial American stout, spend four months soaking in oak, vanilla, maple and other flavors 28

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from charred bourbon barrels, which once stored whiskey at Heaven Hill Distillery in Kentucky. After their time at Heaven Hill, a sugarhouse in Ogdensburg, New York, bought the barrels to age maple syrup, and Drake eventually bought them from the sugarhouse. “When they pulled their maple syrup out of it, there was obviously a little left in there, and we put our beer right on top of it,” Drake said. Because none of Township 7’s beer is filtered or pasteurized, it’s a live product: some yeast remains after the brewing process. That leftover yeast ferments the sugars left in the barrel by the maple syrup, spiking the alcohol content of Freight Train to a dizzying 10 percent by volume and Train Wreck to 8.5 percent. Pasteurizing and filtering “strips out a lot of the characteristics from the yeast,” which contribute to the brew’s overall flavor. Some of his beers, such as Deerfly IPA, have


been in the works for years. He and Henderson blend four varieties of hops in Deerfly to mimic the flavor profile created by Simcoe hops, which are hard to get and expensive. After a batch of Deerfly has finished primary fermentation, Drake and Henderson add hops twice more, a technique known as dry hopping. “It really brings out the flavor of the hop rather than it going up in steam,” Drake said. To fit the flavor profiles Drake strives for, he orders all of Township 7’s hops straight from Washington’s Yakima Valley. “If you have a cabernet from Washington, Oregon, California, New York, France, or Italy, you can have that same strain of grape, and it’s going to taste different based on the soil it’s grown in,” he said. “Hops are no different.” Drake began brewing Raspberry Haze on a homebrew scale as well. This wheat ale is loaded with 50 pounds of raspberry puree per batch, lending a “more subtle, more real” raspberry flavor. He recently purchased a chardonnay barrel he plans to fill with Raspberry Haze and inoculate with lactobacillus bacteria to sour the beer for a few months. Drake draws ideas for new brews from many different places. “It could be inspired by what I’m eating or the weather,” he said. “It’s a lot like how a chef conceptualizes a new recipe.” Sandals, a light ale brewed with about 10 pounds of lemon peel per batch, is a relatively new recipe. “I wanted something citrusy and bright,” he NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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said. “The recipe just came to me.” The name just came to him, too: Drake and Jan sat at a nudist resort in Florida as the first batch of what would be Sandals bubbled in the fermenter back in New York. They racked their brains for a name. “We were sitting there butt naked on our patio,” Drake said. “The only thing I had on was sandals, so that’s where that came from.” When it comes to executing those recipes, Drake and Henderson put their own twist on the brewing process. When mashing — steeping the malted barley in hot water — Drake and Henderson keep the temperature a bit lower than other craft breweries, which leads to “a thinner beer.” The lower temperature results in the production of fewer unfermentable dextrins that give beer a full, creamy body. “I’ve had a lot of beers you can almost chew on.,” Drake said. “I don’t like that necessarily.” Township 7’s process produces, in his opinion, a more 30

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refreshing and drinkable brew. As for a non-alcoholic option, Township 7 keeps its house-made ginger ale on tap. Drake and Henderson bring water, ginger, sucrose and a bit of lactic acid to a boil, then kill the heat and let the steaming mixture steep. “It’s almost like making a tea,” Drake said. They pump the finished product into a keg, carbonate it, and connect it to a tap. Though the ginger ale is available only at the brewery, Township 7’s beers are now distributed to some bars and restaurants in Franklin, Clinton, St. Lawrence and Essex counties. Drake feels as if the brewery is “a boat that’s just come up on plane,” and wants “to ride that for a little bit.” His life has carved a meandering circular path, leading him back to brewing. “The best part of what I do is meeting different people and being able to socialize and open people up a bit,” he said. “That’s as rewarding as someone saying, ‘That Deerfly IPA is the best I’ve ever had.’” NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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EVENTS

7/15/2018 - Amazing Grace Vineyard & Music Location: 9839 Rt 9, Chazy, NY 12921 Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. The Duo in the vineyard. Menu to be announced. Call 518-215-4044 or amazinggracevineyard.com 7/15/2018 - Sunday On The Valcour Island Historic Lighthouse Tours Location: Peru Dock, Rte. 9, Plattsburgh,NY Time: 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Public is invited to RSVP by June 30 for a round trip boat shuttle & guide trip to the Bluff Point Lighthouse. $25 per person, under age 16 must bring their own life jacket. Visit: https://www.clintoncountyhistorical.org/ 7/17/2018 - 7/22/2018 - Clinton County Fair Location: 84 Fair Grounds Rd, Morrisonville, NY Visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/ 181931835781709/?active_tab=about 7/18/2018 - The Gossip Tour of Fort Ticonderoga Location: Log House Welcome Center At The Fort Time: 6:30 p.m. Go beyond the battles to get the real story of life at Ticonderoga. Visit: http://www.fortticonderoga.org 7/19/2018 - Ticonderoga Guns By Night Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 7:30 p.m. Experience the flash of musketry & roar of cannon fire by night in this unique 90-min tour at Fort Ticonderoga. Visit: http://www.fortticonderoga.org 7/20/2018 - 7/22/2018 - The 39 Steps At The Depot Theatre Visit: http://www.depottheatre.org Location: 6705 Main St, Westport, NY Time: 3:00 - 8:00 p.m. Join the Depot Theatre for the two time Tony and Drama Desk award winning show “The 39 Steps”. 32

NORTH VOLUME MAGAZINE / JULY- AUGUST 2018

7/21/2018 - Glenn Miller Orchestra Strand Center for Arts Location: 23 Brinkerhoff St. Plattsburgh, NY Time: 7 p.m. $30 for general seating advanced ticket. Visit: www.strandcenter.org 7/21/2018 - 7/22/2018 - Defiance & Independence Battle Re-enactment At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Join Fot Ti for this 2-day battle re-enactment & witness the epic siege of American-held Ticonderoga. Visit: http://www.fortticonderoga.org 7/21/2018 - Sunset Boat Cruise On Lake Champlain At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 6:00 p.m. Enjoy a relaxing summer evening aboard the Carillon tour boat. Let this 1920s style vessel take you away with stories of Lake Champlain from armed schooners to prohibtion-era rum running. Cash bar available! Visit: http://www.fortticonderoga.org 7/21/2018 - Secret Garden Tour At Kent-Delord House Museum Location: 17 Cumberland Ave, Plattsburgh, NY Time: 12:00pm - 4:00pm Fee charged. Info, visit: http://www.kentdelordhouse.org 7/21/2018 - 7/22/2018 - Amazing Grace Vineyard Annual Adk Coast Wine Trail Location: 9839 Rt 9, Chazy, NY 12921 Tickets required. Call 518-218-4044 for more info. Visit: http://www. amazinggracevineyard.com

7/21/2018 - Amazing Grace Vineyard Hosts Murder Mystery Dinner Location: 9839 Rt 9, Chazy, NY 12921 Time: 6:00 - 9:00 p.m. Adk Regional Theatre present their Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre. Reservations necessary. Call 518-215-4044 for more info. Visit: http://www. amazinggracevineyard.com 7/21/2018 - Airborne Park Speedway Spectator Races Location: 70 Broderick Rd, I-87, exit 36, turn left 518-561-3208 or visit: http://www. airborneparkspeedway.com 7/21/2018 - Adirondack Experience - Made In The Adirondack NC Fair Location: 9097 State Rte 30, Blue Mt. Lake, NY 12812 A celebration of locally produced arts, crafts, jewelry, home goods, food and more! Visit: http://www.theADKX.org 7/21/2018 - Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market Location: Durkee Street Parking Lot, Plattsburgh Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Visit the Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market every Saturday from May to October for local goods, fresh fruits & vegetables, live music, kids activities & so much more!

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EVENTS

7/22/2018 - The Wild Center - Family Yoga On Wild Walk Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 8:30-9:45am Create family memories as you experience yoga on wild Walk, the pathway through the forest canopy. Registration required. Visit: http://www.wildcenter.org

7/26/2018 - Ticonderoga Guns By Night Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 7:30 p.m. Experience the flash of musketry & roar of cannon fire by night in this unique 90-min tour & demo of 18th century guns, big & small. www.fortticonderoga.org

7/25/2018 - The Greatest Show on Dirt At Airborne Park Speedway Location: 70 Broderick Road, Plattsburgh Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. The World of Outlaws Craftsman Sprint Car Series brings www.airborneparkspeedway.com

7/26/2018 - Meadowmount School Of Music Visits Saranac Location: Saranac Methodist Church, Rt 3, Saranac Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Advanced students - strings with piano. Free Concert. Visit; www.hillandhollowmusic.org

7/25/2018 - The Gossip Tour Of Fort Ti Location: Log House Welcome Center At The Fort Time: 6:30 p.m. Go beyond the battles to get the real story of life at Ticonderoga. Scandals, peccadilloes & controversies to unsolved crimes to stolen wives. Tour involves stairs & walking, not for young audiences. www.fortticonderoga.org

7/26/2018 - The Wild Center - Afternoon & Evening Photo Tour Location: 45 Museum dr Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 1:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Grass River waterfalls & full moon over Oswegatchie River flow with Carl Heilman. Registration required. Visit: www.wildcenter.org

7/25/2018 - Airborne Park Speedway - World Of Outlaws Craftsman Sprint Car Location: 70 Broderick Rd, I-87, exit 36, turn left 518-561-3208 or visit: http://www.airborneparkspeedway.com

7/28/2018 - Streetfest 2018 In Ticonderoga Location: Montcalm St, Downtown Ticonderoga Time: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Including a variety of local businesses offering promos, specials, sidewalk sales & an array of food options, street vendors, arts & crafts, live music & more! Free, open to the public. Vendor applications visit: www.timainstrret.org

7/25/2018 - Completely Stranded at Olive Ridley’s Grill & Taphouse Location: 37 Court Street, Plattsburgh, NY Time: 7:30-9:00pm Every fourth Wednesday of the month join us for a night of musical comedy. 7/26/2018-7/29/2018 -39 Steps At The Depot Location: 6705 Main St, Westport, NY Time: 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m Visit: http:// depottheatre.org/ Join the Depot Theatre for the two time Tony and Drama Desk award winning show “The 39 Steps”.

7/28/2018-Fife & Drum Corps Muster At Fort Ti Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Experience martial music at its best at Fort Ti during the Fife & Drum Corps Muster! Learn the practical purpose of fifes & drums. Visit: http:// www.fortticonderoga.org

7/28/2018 - Fife & Drum Corps Evening Concert At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Set inside the stone walls of Fort Ticonderoga, enjoy the stirring rhythms & tunes of fifes & drums during evening Fife & Drums Corps performances. Visit: www.fortticonderoga.org 7/28/2018 - Sunset Boat Cruise On Lake Champlain At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 6:00 p.m. Enjoy a relaxing summer evening aboard the Carillon tour boat. Let this 1920s style vessel take you away with stories of Lake Champlain from armed schooners to prohibtion-era rum running. Cash bar available! Visit: www.fortticonderoga.org 7/28/2018 - 26th Annual StreetFest Location: Montcalm St, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 For more info & schedule, please contact 518-585-6619 7/28/2018 - Celebration Of Youth & Morgan Horse Event - Almanzo Wilder Farm Location: 177 Stacy Rd, Burke, NY 12953 Time: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Morgan horse show presented by Miner Institute, a Childen’s Art Show, Honorary Laura & Almanzo announced , Craft & Food Vendors & Entertainment. Visit: http://www. almanzowilderfarm.com

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EVENTS

7/28/2018 - 7/29/2018 - East Coast Watercross Back On The Adirondack Coast Location: Plattsburgh City Beach, 4 Beach Rd Time: 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Admission $8 per car -beach pass holders are free- A variety of class levels, amateurs to free stylists, ages 8 & up can compete in a race around a 30-buoy course, providing entertainment & suspense for spectators. 7/28/2018 - Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market - Every Saturday May-October Location: Durkee Street Parking Lot, Plattsburgh Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Handmade goods, fresh fruits & vegetables, live music, kids activities & so much more! 7/28/2018 - Adirondack Experience - Benefit Gala & Harold K. Hochschild Award Location: 9097 State Rte 30, Blue Mt. Lake, NY An evening of mountain magic to honor The 46ers. For RSVP & tickets, call 518-352-7311 xt 119. Visit:http;//www.theADKX.org 7/29/2018 - The Wild Center - An American Ascent - A Documentary Film Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. National Outdoor Leadership school is proud to present this film. North America’s highest peak, Denali, located in Alaska. Visit http://www.wildcenter.org 7/31/2018 - Airborne Park Speedway - Super DIRTcar Series Location: 70 broderick Rd, I-87, exit 36, turn left 518-561-3208 www.airborneparkspeedway.com 8/1/2018 - The Gossip Tour of Fort Ti Location: Log House Welcome Center At The Fort Time: 6:30 p.m. Go beyond the battles to get the real story of life at Ticonderoga. Tour involves stairs & walking, not for young audiences. www.fortticonderoga.org 34

NORTH VOLUME MAGAZINE / JULY- AUGUST 2018

8/1/2018 - Beyond Bullets & Blades At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY Time: 2:30 p.m. Learn all about 18th century weapons & receive training from museum experts. Classes held on Aug. 1, 8 & 15. http://www.fortticonderoga.org 8/2/2018 - 8/5/2018 - The 39 Steps At The Depot Location: 6705 Main St, Westport, NY Time: 3:00 - 8:00 p.m. Join the Depot Theatre for the two time Tony and Drama Desk award winning show “The 39 Steps”. Visit:http://depottheatre.org/ 8/2/2018 - Ticonderoga Guns At Night Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 7:30 p.m. Experience the flash of musketry & roar of cannon fire by night in this unique 90-min tour & demo of 18th century guns, big & small Visit: www.fortticonderoga.org 8/2/2018 - 8/4/2018 - Bassmaster Northern Open On Lake Champlain Location: Plattsburgh City Marina, 2 Dock St Time: 6:00 a.m. Launch site - Dock St Landing - 6 am each day, Weigh-ins - Plattsburgh City Marina - 2 pm each day. Top anglers will be competing for $200,000 in cash prizes. 8/3/2018 - 8/4/2018 - Amazing Grace Vineyard Hosts Adk Regional Theatre - Nunsense 2 Location: 9839 Rt 9, Chazy, NY 12921 Time: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. The Little Sisters of Hoboken are back! Reservations necessary. Call 518-215-4044 for more info. Visit: www.amazinggracevineyard.com 8/4/2018 - Sunset Cruise On Lake Champlain At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 6:00 p.m.

Enjoy a relaxing summer evening aboard the Carillon tour boat. Let this 1920s style vessel take you away with stories of Lake Champlain from armed schooners to prohibtion-era rum running. Cash bar available! Visit:http://www. fortticonderoga.org 8/4/2018 - Airborne Park Speedway - Sport Mod Trophy Dash Location: 70 Broderick Rd, I-87, exit 36, turn left Time: 518-561-3208 or visit: http://www. airborneparkspeedway.com 8/4/2018 - Forest Bathing For Your Senses Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 8:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. A unique 2-1/2 hr eco-trip through a series of brief sensory activities of an Adirondack forest. Registration required. Visit: www.wildcenter.org 8/4/2018 - Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market Location: Durkee Street Parking Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Every Saturday from May to October for local goods, fresh fruits & vegetables, live music, kids activities & so much more! 8/4/2018 - 8/14/2018 - The Wild Center Traditonal Paddle Making With Caleb Davis Location: 45 museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Carve your own tradtionally shaped paddle using

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EVENTS

only hand tools. Registraition required. Visit www. wildcenter.org 8/5/2018 - Ticonderoga Area Car Show Location: Ticonderoga, NY 12883 For more info & complete schedule, please contact 518-585-6619 or visit: www.ticonderogany.com 8/5/2018 - The Wild Center - Yoga And Mindfulness On Wild Walk Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 8:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Start your day with yoga & mindfulness with access to Wild Walk. Registratiion required. Visit: www.wildcenter.org 8/8/2018 - The Gossip Tour Of Fort Ti Location: Log House Welcome Center At The Fort Time: 6:30 p.m. Go beyond the battles to get the real story of life at Ticonderoga. Scandals, peccadilloes & controversies to unsolved crimes to stolen wives. Tour involves stairs & walking, not for young audiences. Info, visit: www.fortticonderoga.org 8/9/2018 - Ticonderoga Guns At Night Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 7:30 p.m. Experience the flash of musketry & roar of cannon fire by night in this unique 90-min tour & demo of 18th century guns, big & small, at Fort Ticonderoga. Visit: http://www.fortticonderoga.org

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. The 90-min concerts are free of charge & open to all. Lawn chairs & picnic blankets are welcome. No alcohol, smoking or glass containers are permitted. Info, visit: https://www.cvph.org/About-CVPH/ Summer-Concert-Series

Time: 6:00 p.m. Enjoy a relaxing summer evening aboard the Carillon tour boat. Let this 1920s style vessel take you away with stories of Lake Champlain from armed schooners to prohibtion-era rum running. Cash bar available! Visit:www.fortticonderoga.org

8/10/2018 - 8/12/2018 - Ain’t Misbehavin’ At The Depot Theatre Location: 6705 Main St, Westport, NY Time: 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Join the Depot Theatre for -Ain’t Misbehavin-, a celebration of legendary jazz great, Fats Waller! Visit:http://depottheatre.org

8/11/2018 - Airborne Park Speedway - Airborne - Mohawk Sportsman Series Location: 70 Broderick Rd, I-87, exit 36, turn left 50 Laps - 518-561-3208 or visit: www.airborneparkspeedway.com

8/10/2018 - 8/11/2018 - Adirondack Experience American Mountain Men Rendezvous Location: 9097 State Rte 30, Blue Mt. Lake, NY Discover the traditions, tools, skills & lifestyle of the 19th century trappers, explorers & traders. Visit:http://www.theADKX.org 8/10/2018 - The Wild Center - The Adirondack Pollinator Project Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Presenting Dr. Karen Oberhauser. Free lecture on Monarchs in a Changing world. Visit:www.wildcenter.org

8/9/2018 - 8/30/2018 Farmer Market Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Every Thursday until Sept. 13th - Farmers Market where you can meet local farmers & purchase local food grown in the Adirondack region. Visit: www.wildcenter.org

8/11/2018 - 8/26/2018 - Heroic Corn Maze - A Corn Maze Adventure At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd. Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Time: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Explore the 6-acre corn maze especially designed for Fort Ti. Visitors will find clues connected to our story as they make their way through the maze. Weekends only Sept 1 - Oct 21. Also open Labor Day & Columbus Day. Visit: http://www. fortticonderoga.org

8/9/2018 - Summer Concert Series - CVPH Thirty 1 & Mandolin Location: Front Lawn, Plattsburgh, NY

8/11/2018 - Sunset Cruise On Lake Champlain At Fort Ticonderoga Location: 102 Fort Ti Rd, Ticonderoga, NY 12883

8/11/2018 - The Wild Center - Wait Till It Gets Dark - A Kids’s Guide... Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Environmental educator & author, George Steele, leads the adventure of exploring the night. Registration required. Visit: www.wildcenter.org 8/11/2018 - Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market Location: Durkee Street Parking Lot, Plattsburgh Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Visit the Plattsburgh Farmers’ & Crafters’ Market every Saturday from May to October for local goods, fresh fruits & vegetables, live music, kids activities & so much more! 8/11/2018 - The Wild Center - Mushroom Growing Workshop With Birch Boys Chaga Location: 45 Museum Dr, Tupper Lake, NY 12986 Time: 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Garrett Kopp, NYS certified mushroom identification expert, hosts this interactive Blue Oyster mushroom growing workshop. Register, visit: http://www. wildcenter.org 8/12/2018 - Amazing Grace Vineyard Hosts Bruce & Bill & BBQ amazinggracevineyard.com Location: 9839 Rt 9, Chazy, NY 12921 Time: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. $15 per person. For more info, call 518-215-4044. NORTHVOLUME.COM / VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 3

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HOW TO LISTEN TO A PODCAST. A podcast: is essentially a radio show that you can listen to anytime you want. You can listen to a podcast through a website (this is called streaming). Or, you can download a podcast, which means you're saving it on your phone, tablet, or computer. You can listen to it anytime and anywhere, even without an internet connection and while using Bluetooth in your car, at home, or on a run. To Stream: Go to northvolume.com/podcasts, choose a show and click the play button on an episode. To Download: Get it delivered to your phone or tablet each time an episode is released. For iOS, use the Apple Podcasts app. Search for North Volume Network and then hit Subscribe to any show you like. For Android, use the Google Play app.

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Groovy people playing groovy music with groovy guests.

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