Page 1

10,428 Circulation; 34,412 Readership www.northsidesun.com

Home delivery as low as $8 a year Call 957-1542

northsidesun the weekly

For 44 Years, Covering Northeast Jackson, Madison and Ridgeland

Vol. 44, No. 47

Three Sections, 44 Pages, Thursday, September 8, 2011

Sunshine Act

Legislation could limit AG’s ability to hire political allies

By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer FORMER GOV. RONNIE MUSGROVE is living proof that political alliances can be lucrative financial investments. Members of Musgrove’s law firm, Copeland Cook Taylor & Bush PA, have contributed nearly $15,000 to Attorney General Jim Hood’s re-election campaign in the last year and a half: And the firm has received $10 million over the past eight years since Hood hired them to represent the state in a series of lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies.

This is just the latest in the saga of statefunded no-bid contracts, in which the attorney general hires outside legal counsel without a competitive bidding process. Instead of advertising for bids and choosing the firm with the lowest and best bid, Hood awards multimillion-dollar contracts to those firms he favors - many of which have been campaign contributors. No-bid contracts are nothing new: In 1994, then Attorney General Mike Moore hired his friend Dickie Scruggs to represent Mississippi in its suit against big tobacco. Scruggs is now in prison on an unrelated

bribery conviction, but the no-bid contracts have continued under Hood’s administration. Much of this hotly debated practice is documented in Curtis Wilkie’s 2010 book, “The Fall of the House of Zeus: The Rise and Ruin of America’s Most Powerful Trial Lawyer,” i.e. Scruggs. It’s all on the record and it’s all legal.

Foundation names officers to help with One Lake

By ANTHONY WARREN Sun Staff Writer A DIVERSE group of Jacksonians and Rankin County leaders have been selected to help get the One Lake project off the paper and into the water. BUT SOME STATE LAWMAKERS, The Pearl River Vision Foundation (PRVF) including District 41 Sen. Joey Fillingane, has named its board of directors. The group hope to change that. includes business and government leaders from See Sunshine Act, Page 11A both sides of the Pearl River. Continued from Page One The board is made up of Chairman Joe Lauderdale, Vice Chairman Howard Catchings, Secretary/Treasurer Breck Hines, Rodney Chamblee, Joe Haney, David Russell and Leroy Walker. Sam Begley has been selected to act as the foundation’s legal counsel. Members were chosen “on the basis of who has respect in the community,” said John McGowan. “These are decisive people, people who can exercise judgment in dealing with something of this size and nature. “They’re just doers,” McGowan said. McGowan is the originator of the Two Lakes and smaller One Lake projects. He played a major role in selecting the foundation’s directors. Lauderdale served as Hinds County supervisor from 1996 to 2000, and owns and operates Sunbelt Sealing Inc. He and his family have lived in the capital city since 1971. He serves on the Metro Parkway Commission, the Hinds County Economic Authority board of directors and as director of the Mississippi Roadbuilders Association. Catchings owns Catchings Insurance Agency and employs 24 individuals. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Jackson State University and is a former Jackson school teacher. He has served as chairman of the board for the Metro Jackson Chamber of Commerce, Junior Achievement of Mississippi and First American Bank. Hines is executive vice president and principal of Duckworth Realty. Previously, Hines was an acquisition analyst with Parkway Properties. He holds degrees in banking and finance, real estate and managerial finance Services. Tickets are $100 each and may be purchased by from the University of Mississippi. calling Callie Golden, director of development at SCSCY, at Chamblee founded the Chamblee Company 601-354-0983. Shown are (from left) Golden; Barbara in 1979 with one employee. Today, the comEngland, arrangements chair; Lee Bush, vice president; Don mercial real estate brokerage firm has over 225 Meiners, featured artist; Sue Cherney, executive director. associates. Chamblee was recently named See One Lake, Page 15A

BOTTOM LINE

Bottom Line for Kids planned The annual Bottom Line for Kids dinner will be held September 15 at the Country Club of Jackson at 6 p.m. The proceeds of the dinner will benefit the programs of Southern Christian Services for Children and Youth Inc. The event will feature entertainment, silent and live auctions, dinner and a presentation about Southern Christian

GREEN SPACE

RESIDENTS AND GRANT SUPPORT THREE PARKS IN BELHAVEN

Photos by Beth Buckley

GBNF Executive Director Virgi Lindsay at Belhaven Park

BELHAVEN PARK will soon be home to a new performing arts series on the Northside. The Greater Belhaven Neighborhood Foundation (GBNF) recently was awarded a $3,000 grant from the Mississippi Arts Commission to help fund the program. The series, along with the grant, are two examples of how three public green spaces contribute to the quality of life in Belhaven and Belhaven Heights. “Parks are gathering places and town centers for us,” said GBNF Executive Director Virgi Lindsay. “They are the heartbeat of the community.” Greater Belhaven has three city-owned

parks: Belhaven Park on Poplar Boulevard, Belhaven Heights Park on Madison Street and Laurel Street Park. Each of the parks is unique. Belhaven Park has no playground equipment, but rather park benches and open green space. The idea behind it was to create a quiet oasis to break away from the hustle and bustle of urban life. Laurel Street has open green space as well, but also plenty of playground equipment for kids and families. Tara Ellis, member of the Friends of Laurel Street Park, said the areas are frequented by people from all walks of life:

parents and children, college students, professionals working downtown and residents from surrounding communities. The parks are also home to major Northside events. Last year, GBNF put up a stage at Belhaven Park for Bright Lights, Belhaven Nights. Lindsay said the stage got a strong reception from those in attendance in 2010 and was there again for the festival in August. Bright Lights is also part of GBNF’s performing arts series. Lindsay said the series will likely include music, plays and movies. The foundation is now working with New Stage Theatre in hopes of havSee Belhaven Parks, Page 10A


Page 2A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Meeting on gates scheduled

St .

And rew sD

r.

Those in attendance were By ANTHONY WARREN E County Line Rd Whitwell, Ward Two Sun Staff Writer WHETHER OR NOT pubCouncilman Chokwe Proposed Entrance Gate lic access gates will be Lumumba, Ward Three allowed in the capital city Councilman Kenneth Stokes, Avery Circle could be determined at a meetWard Five Councilman ing today. Charles Tillman and Ward Six And the future for the Councilman Tony Yarber. devices designed to prevent “My phone is jumping off crime while keeping neighborthe hook from people who Northpointe Pky hoods open to the public would love to have gates with seems promising. public access,” said Yarber. The Jackson City Council “This is a good ordinance, but Intergovernmental Affairs I would love for it to be Committee is expected to meet at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, opened up to the entire city.” September 8, to vote on an ordinance that would allow Lumumba agreed. “I have no problems with (Avery neighborhoods to install public access gates as a means of Gardens) having a gate, but we should let everyone have reducing traffic and prohibiting criminal activity. it,” he said. Last week, the same committee turned down an ordiThere were also concerns about who could apply for the nance to allow Avery Gardens to erect a gate at its County gates, and whether or not the city would provide financial Line Road entrance, not because members opposed Avery assistance to less affluent neighborhoods to install the Gardens having a gate, but because they wanted a gating devices. ordinance that was more inclusive. Yarber said he was uncomfortable with language stating Ward One Councilman Quentin Whitwell was expected that only homeowners associations could apply for the to introduce an inclusive ordinance at the council meeting gates. New language will allow for individuals, as well as on August 29. Whitwell expected it to be placed in inter- unorganized groups to petition the city. governmental affairs, the committee he chairs. Stokes appeared to be the lone dissenting voice, saying He agreed with his colleagues that he would like to have he didn’t support the ordinance because it wasn’t inclupublic gating as an option for all residents. In fact, the sive enough. After Whitwell addressed those issues, first-term councilman introduced two ordinances to allow Stokes didn’t like the measure because it would lead to a public access gates, one specifically for Avery Gardens “gated city.” and another to allow public gates across the city. Whitwell believes his colleagues raised good points and However, he asked another council committee chairman said the new ordinance reflects that. “Their comments are to hold off on bringing the issue up until the Avery all level-headed, but I don’t think it will lead to a gated Gardens ordinance was addressed. city,” he said. “The very reason I worked to craft this ordinance was because Avery Gardens is a neighborhood in my ward and THE AVERY GARDENS Homeowners Association they needed it,” Whitwell said. has been working for more than a year to have a public The Avery Gardens ordinance, though, ran into trouble access gate installed at the neighborhood’s County Line from councilmen who argued that their constituents would Road entrance. Residents argued that motorists running like to have the option of installing public gates as well. from the police turn into the neighborhood, not realizing Intergovernmental affairs tabled the measure indefinitely that it has only one entry and exit point. last week so a new all-inclusive measure could be crafted. Resident Edley Jones said previously that they can’t Based on the August 30 meeting, an all-inclusive gating install a private gate, because it would cut off access to a ordinance appears to stand a good chance of making it to cemetery located to the rear of the neighborhood. Jackson the full council for a vote. does not allow for public gates under current code.

Storm damage Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney, after returning from the damaged Gulf Coast, spoke to the North Jackson Lions Club about the severity of the damage in Mississippi from tornadoes and flooding. Shown are (from left) Chaney, and Program Chairman Harold McDonald.

BUYING LINES By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer THE CITY OF RIDGELAND is buying more than 1,000 feet of water line from the city of Jackson, officials say. “Down by the Logan’s restaurant and Drury Inn right there on County Line Road, we never did put a water line down there, and the city of Jackson had the closest water at the time they were built,” said Ridgeland Public Works Director Mike McCollum. “Now we’re finally in a position where we can run our own water there.” McCollum said the city would be installing 2,500 feet of its own water line starting near City Hall on Highway 51 and going south before connecting with the line currently owned by Jackson. “Right now we have no water line on the west side of 51, and we’re buying some line from Jackson so we don’t have to tear it up when we get there.” He said the city was paying $75,477 for 1,083 feet of Jackson’s water line, and the entire project including the new water line would cost about $300,000.


Page 3A

a conversation with

Tonkel on the church, community Over the years, United Methodist Church Minister Keith Tonkel has become a mainstay in the community. The son of a nightclub entertainer and a debutante, Tonkel has led Wells Church in Jackson for more than four decades, helping the church maintain a strong membership and raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for local charities through an annual event known as WellsFest. Sun Staff Writer Anthony Warren recently spoke to Tonkel about the festival, his career and the church.

“A good Methodist is someone who loves God, neighbor and self, doesn’t think

EVERYONE else is wrong.” -Keith Tonkel

As the son of a nightclub entertainer, how did you end up in the ministry? “I was not raised in a religious family until later, when my mother had a mental breakdown. She went to a psychiatrist, and he said ‘Louise, you don’t need me, you need God.’ My mother was looking into a lot of different churches, but later became a good, strong Methodist. I went with my Scout troop to a Methodist church and the preacher talked about asking questions. I asked him several questions, and I become more interested in the church. He was a very interesting mentor because he would guide gently and not push anything. There were two pastors that were influential in my early spiritual development: Charlie Schultz and Bufkin Oliver.”

How old were you when you realized you wanted to go into the ministry? “I was 17 when I had an experience where I felt I needed to preach. It took 18 months before I said ‘yes.’At Bay High School, in Bay St. Louis, we were given vocational cards with 28 slots. I put ministry as the last vocation that I would go into. I put everything else - housewife, mother, sanitation worker, etc. - all before clergy. I knew I was lying when I did it. It provided a great advantage when I went to Millsaps, because I knew what I wanted to do, and many kids didn’t. I went up there (to Millsaps) with no money, became a janitor in the sports dorm and got a job at a filling station.”

When did you start at Wells Church? “I came here in 1969. I wrote the cabinet, the bishops and district superintendents (Our church is governed by a bishop and superintendent in the United Methodist Church.) saying that I felt led to serve a church like this one. It was an inner-city church in a blue-collar neighborhood. People were moving away because the nature of the neighborhood was changing. We felt moved, instead of moving, to stay. The end result is unique. I’m one of the longest-serving elders of a congregation in the state, and one of the longest-serving in You metioned earlier that your mother the church worldwide. became a good Methodist. What is a “That simply means that we (Methodist good Methodist? ministers) usually move every four to six “A good Methodist is someone who loves years and I’ve been at Wells for 43.” God, neighbor and self, doesn’t think everyone else is wrong. John Wesley said, How have you been able to stay so ‘Think and let think. On the essentials, let’s long? agree, and on everything else, let’s be char“Because I have asked in writing to stay. itable.’” I felt moved in my heart to stay, but told the bishops that I would go wherever they

wanted, but felt led to stay. There was not a lot of desire for people to work here when I started. There was no set salary, but members always cared for us.” What ministries does the church have? “We have all kinds, but the most well known to the public is WellsFest. We have been doing it 27 years and it was the first festival of its kind in the area. It’s the only ‘stated’ drug and alcohol-free event with no admission charges. Vendors intentionally keep all of their prices low, so people who can’t normally afford to go to festivals can go. We have the best musicians who come to play as a gift to the community. The church gets nothing out of it. We have given approximately $1 million to deserving charities over the years.” Who is the money benefiting this year? “The Mustard Seed from Brandon. They’ve given us a great gift of work, too.” How are groups chosen to donate the proceeds to? “We have a committee that chooses a charity each year. Charities are invited to make application and give presentations to the committee, and then we visit the site and pray about it. There’s a lot of prayer. We tend to support charities where our small contribution of $25,000 to $50,000 will make a difference. All of this is a story in itself. We have a closing circle that takes 500 vounteers to make it happen. We can recruit about 300 members from the church.” What is a closing circle? “Several hundred volunteers come See Keith Tonkel, Page 10A


Page 4A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

from the publisher to learn that Darwinian evolution is experiencing huge problems as science progresses. If you are interested in fascinating scientific and philosophical debate, Google and You Tube “problems with Darwin’s theory of evolution.” This is truly turning out to be one of the more interesting discussions of our age. I believe in science. Science is God’s gift to mankind so we can gradually gain insight to his glory. Newton, Einstein, Planck and most of the great scientists of our age were believers. By Physics, the most exacting and empirically verifiable science, has now led us to the Big WYATT Bang. Our entire universe, it appears, arose EMMERICH from nothingness. That sounds a lot like Genesis to me. Granted, the time element is off, but a day is the amount of time the earth takes to rotate on its axis. What is the length of a day before the Earth was created? Obviously, this is metaphorical, which doesn’t surprise me. Our most direct communication from God was through Jesus, who spoke mainly in parables. Parables are metaphors on steroids, so I have no problem reconciling religion and science. But I digress. I AM SKEPTICAL of fanatics claiming they It should not be surprising that Darwin is losknow the absolute truth. The chief tactic of ing his luster. Many profound theories fanatics is to attack opponents with vague emerged around the turn of the century: insults that don’t address the meat of the issue. Marxism, Freud’s theory of the unconscious, So it appears to be with the renewed debate classical physics and many more. All these over “evolution.” theories had significant merit, but none have Evolution is in the news with the dramatic remained without fundamental modification. rise of Texas Gov. Rick Perry as the new So it should be with evolution. It was a good Republican front-runner for president. Perry theory, but the scientific method must prove its has questioned evolution and suggested that ultimate merit. But there is a problem. Many “intelligent design” should also be taught in scientists who dare to question the “random schools. Now elements of the established chance” element of evolution are labeled “cremedia are portraying him as an ignorant flatationists” and harassed in a manner not fitting lander who doesn’t believe in dinosaurs. open scientific debate. Perry is being asked, “Do you believe in This is not surprising. Human nature clings evolution?” as some type of litmus test for his desperately around conventional wisdom. suitability to be president. Smartly, he Sadly, this is just as true within the scientific answered “yes,” which may satisfy the media community as in other fields. What breaks the horde. Ask a stupid question, get a stupid ice is overwhelming empirical data and logic answer. The real answer to such a simplistic that cannot be denied by believer or nonquestion is vastly more complicated than that. believer ideology. Like most people in this country, I was The pendulum of history never fails to taught that Darwinian evolution is established swing. Originally, the fanatic naysayers were scientific fact. This never interfered with my those who denied the indisputable reality of faith because I always believed God could do dinosaur bones, radioactive aging, tectonic anything he wants. How interesting at age 53 plate theory and the like. That’s not what I’m

Evolution must be tested using scientific method

Protecting residents from crime is not a black-white issue MAYOR HARVEY JOHNSON’S claim that public access gates are a form of modern-day segregation doesn’t hold water. That fact was evidenced at the August 30 meeting of the Jackson City Council Intergovernmental Affairs Committee. The meeting was called last week to discuss an ordinance authored by Ward One Councilman Quentin Whitwell to allow Avery Gardens to have a public access gate at its County Line Road entrance. The gates are designed to prevent crime while keeping neighborhood streets open to the public. Motorists wanting to go into a neighborhood with the devices simply have to drive up, press a button and wait for the gates to open. Not a problem, really, unless you’re trying to make a quick getaway from a crime scene or police cruiser. Johnson doesn’t want the gates because it would create the same type of atmosphere, he feels, that existed in the Jim Crow South, something he told the Sun in a previous interview. However, black members of the city council have a different opinion. The members wouldn’t support Whitwell’s Avery Gardens ordinance not because they didn’t like gates, but because the ordinance didn’t allow other neighborhoods to install the gates as well. Councilmen Tony Yarber, Frank Bluntson and Chokwe Lumumba said residents in their predominantly black

wards also want gates. In fact, Yarber said his phone has been “jumping off the hook” from people who want gates. THE SUN ASSUMES that everyone, whether they're white or black, wants to segregate themselves from the criminal element. The people who have fallen victim to kick-ins and house burglaries recently in Fondren don’t care what color the burglar is. They just want him off the streets. The only council member that seems to be in opposition of the gates is, of course, Kenneth Stokes. But then again, Stokes doesn’t really know what he wants. That fact, too, was evidenced at the committee meeting. Stokes, at first, said he had no problems with public access gates, but would like neighborhoods like the Virden Addition and Georgetown to have access to them as well. Whitwell, Lumumba, and Yarber agreed and changed the proposed ordinance to allow any neighborhood to have them. Then Stokes, who thankfully won’t be on the council after January, said he didn’t want the city to become gated. Naturally. Many people, whether they’re white or black, don’t want to live in a gated city. The only solution to that is getting rid of crime. Once that’s taken care of, then gates, whether they’re public access or private, can come down.

talking about here. Now the pendulum has shifted to the other extreme. If a scientist postulates “intelligent design” as a hypothesis to explain gaping holes in existing evolution theory, he is derided as a religious fanatic. End of debate. That is not science. That is a witch hunt. THERE ARE MANY atheists who believe we are here by random chance. Others, like me, believe we are here by intelligent design. Either one should be a working hypothesis subject to the scientific method. To label intelligent design as mutually exclusive with valid scientific method is to pre-suppose a fundamental aspect of one of the great inquiries of mankind. Such atheistic fanaticism is as detrimental to science as the creationist fanaticism that assaulted Darwin’s theory when it was first introduced. If a scientist finds a perfectly functioning Swiss timepiece in an empty field, what hypothesis would that scientist use to explain its existence? Random chance or intelligent design? The human body is infinitely more complex than a watch. It is beyond the scope of this column to go into all the many technical problems confronting Darwin’s theory. But I will highlight just a couple of the many issues facing evolution. Darwin lived prior to our understanding of molecular biology. Today, we know about DNA and mutation rates. Mutations are overwhelmingly damaging to an organism. Think cancer. Our complex biological systems work on the principle of “irreducible complexity.”

dis and dat

By HENRY MOUNGER

Great season in the making for Prep team ON SATURDAY THE 27TH of August I attended the 80th birthday party for Libby Mounger Roland, my sister, at Cock of the Walk. The hosting couple was Olivia, daughter of Libby, and Cornell Malone. Her brothers, Malcolm and Sessions Roland and their respective wives, Leah and Kathryn, were in attendance as well as an entire room of relatives and guests. Libby's siblings were also at her side, Veronica Mounger Ross, W.D. Billy Mounger, and this writer. After dining on huge plates of fish, potatoes, onions, turnip greens, and fried pickles, a hugemongus (is that a real word - no matter I love slang words) cake was presented to Libby, and, of course we all sang Happy Birthday. In addition, one of the servers sang the same song solo. It was quite the festive occasion. For the record, some people have beautiful names such as Christiane Amanpour and Olivia de Havilland. Libby does not take a back seat to anyone with the formal name of Olivia Rosealma Roland. The name Rosealma is a combination of her grandmothers’ names - Rose and Alma. Speaking of names, her son, Dr. Malcolm Roland, is practicing medicine in Oxford, and named his son Eli. Of course, the residents of Oxford all believe that he was named after Eli Manning. Not so - as the child was named after one of our Revolutionary War hero grandfathers, Gen. Elijah Clark, whose daughter married Edwin Mounger, another Revolutionary War soldier who fought under

That means one part of the system cannot function unless all the system functions as a whole. We’re talking about literally millions of integrated moving parts, each one dependent on the other. Random mutations in our DNA act to tear down such systems, not build them up. Information theorists, molecular biologists and geneticists are currently grappling with this fundamental paradox. It is a complex, spirited debate among highly skilled academics. The other biggie is - ta da! - the fossil record. Darwin himself said that the fossil record should show a gradual transition from one species to the next. Otherwise, Darwin wrote, his theory is bunk. One hundred million fossils later, the very thing Darwin said is needed to prove his theory is the very thing that is missing. Ever heard the term “missing link”? We’re still looking! The fossil record shows the sudden emergence and disappearance of new species, not the gradual change predicted by Darwin. Indeed, the fundamental design of most advanced life forms arose in the “Cambrian explosion,” an extraordinarily brief period of time on the evolutionary scale. I opened my son’s textbook and read about evolution. Sure enough, it presented the party line on Darwinian evolution, hook, line and sinker. The book did note the fossil record has failed to show inter-species links, but the textbook chalked that up to poor paleontology. It’s time for our classrooms to get back to the basics of science. Random chance or intelligent design? It is a shame our schools do not expose our children to all sides of mankind’s greatest scientific, philosophical and moral debate.

Gen. Clark. THE NIGHT BEFORE, I attended the Jackson Prep game with Greenwood Pillow and watched a dramatic game. The first half ended zero to zero. Pillow scored first in the third quarter, but Prep countered with 28 unanswered points. The superior depth for Prep was the difference. Pillow has a great team and should make the playoffs. The Prep fans were told to wear red for the game. Fortunately, I have a red shirt emblazoned with the name “Big Daddy” on the front and BD of the back. That shirt, which was given to me by a California friend, Daniel Moreno, caused a bit of a stir. Only in LA LA land could you find a shirt like that. The shirt, however, was appropriate for me since one of my nicknames is "Big." Collins Mounger is a Pacer, and she also plays in the band. So after dancing she moved over to the band, thus, she performed twice during the halftime. Sitting next to me was Gina Adams, the mother of Haley Adams, a Pacer. Kelsey Jones visited with Patsy Mounger during the halftime. So after their performances, we were able to enjoy seeing three beautiful Pacers on our row in the stands, Collins, Haley, and Kelsey. These girls parade around like movie stars in their Pacer regalia. The announcers introduced the precision dance team as the "World Famous Jackson Prep Pacers." The Pacers performed in the Sugar Bowl one year and this year they are scheduled to perform at the national championship game in NOLA. Watch this on the Tele-Tube. You will certainly be able to spot the Pacers as if they were the only group out there. Finally, an alum group of singers led by Dick Brown sang the National Anthem. That alone was worth the price of admission. The anthem was beautifully performed in the manner that it should be without the exaggerated tones so commonly used by so-called super stars. The same may be said regarding the excellence of the Precision Prep Pacers. What a show. The cheerleaders and the band also presented great performances. The Prep football team after misfiring a bit eventually got untracked and showed the finesse, speed and power that they are normally known for. A great season is in the making. For superb entertainment, don't miss watching an exciting football team led by Ryan Buchanan, Sean O'Hara, William Mounger, Hamel McGraw, Cooper Simmons, Austin Churchill, Zack Newman, Grayson Lamb, Charlie Pringle, Ben Puckett, Whit Kendall and a host of other great players plus a halftime show second to none. You will have a lot of fun and not regret attending. That is a promise. Henry Mounger is a Northsider.


Page 5A

performed and jobs less than well-done), just might be a rediscovery and return to values that have become diminished or compromised made for the sake of savings, of corners cut, for the fattening of bottom line profits ... you get the idea. ... And the result is a restless American populace, who has seen compromise go simply too far, with the abandonment of principles, we all held at one time to be very dear. ... When we could "stand for something substantial," without being scoffed at, when we could By march to the beat of our own drum, without being deemed "crazy," and out of touch, when we could BILLY place pride in work completed well, over amount NEVILLE of work completed... I think we’ve all been sold a “bill of goods,” ... and I don't know about you, but I'm mad as hell, and I’m not going to take it anymore. Join me, and at least there will be two like-minded individuals of one accord. What do you say? Just look around, as our very foundations seem to have been "shaken by the events of late"... mistrust, greed, disappointment, compromise. All the things about which we all know better have consumed and enveloped us all, like a deep I AM A LUDDITE of sorts, and to save you a fog. The reality of what is on the horizon is simply trip to the dictionary, I am actually going to make it "not a pretty picture, at all." easy (just in case you do not remember): I expect that overpaid, insensitive, supposed Seems as though a number of us anyway, are financial geniuses, who just "stole your hardreconsidering the sanity of one, Ned Ludd (1779), earned money, and with some amount of newpurported to be a half-witted English worker, whose followers of workmen combed the country- found legitimacy" are going to have a lot of difficulty sleeping soundly or looking at themselves in side destroying labor saving machinery, as a the mornings, squarely in the face, as they shave. "protest." Scoffed at for too many years, and surrounded by BUT THIS I FIRMLY BELIEVE: Individuals a world of current-day layoffs, where we've purare sick and tired of being sick and tired, and our ported to become a "service economy," in a throwaway world, of anything goes, cut quality to save a choices are now crystal clear. dime. Some are beginning to rethink if the time just We can wallow in the quagmire of frustration and of hopelessness, or we can step up and step out, might not be right to reconsider whether old Ned and begin right now, to rediscover our own "grit Ludd might not have been correct, after all. and pluck" once again. Though it has taken almost 200 years to prove this theory, perhaps it's time to reintroduce the theo- I've found my new hero, and he is Elbert Hubbard of the Roycroft Movement, who so aptly ry that what we've done (and where we've ended up) is not the utopia it was supposed to be after all. and vividly identified it all, when he spoke these Time was, people, workers, and individuals, took words: pride in their craft, and while that entire concept “One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary seems to be "so out of touch with the (current) men; no machine can do the work of one extratimes." ordinary man.” The "flip-side" of today's modern world, of shodWant to join me in that effort; at the very least, dy workmanship, and mass production (where peo- there will be two of like mind. ple inevitably are left with a loss of pride in tasks Billy Neville is a Northsider.

my thoughts

Everything new is not necessarily better than old

northsidesun the weekly

USPS 598 760

Wyatt Emmerich, Publisher Jimmye Sweat, Editor Published weekly on Thursday by Sunland Publishing Co., Inc. Offices at 246 Briarwood, Jackson, MS, 39206. Mailing address is P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, MS, 39236. Phone is 601-957-1122. Subscription price in Hinds, Madison and Rankin counties, $20 per year. Long distance rates vary slightly higher. Single copy price is 75 cents. Issues over a month old are 75 cents. Periodical postage paid at Jackson, MS. The Sun

accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs. Photos are filed according to the week they appear. Usually those that are not published are not kept on file. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope is enclosed, we will try to return such photos, if possible. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Northside Sun, P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, MS, 39236. E-mail: sun@northside sun.com

neighbors

By RITA MARTINSON

Linda’s place had more than haircuts WHENEVER I DRIVE by the former location of the Hair Company, in the Oak Place shopping center on Highway 51, I almost have to blink back tears. As many know, it burned last month. Linda Tapley and all the ladies who worked with her there had to relocate immediately. Linda’s clients reacted immediately upon learning of the disaster. Many reacted with sympathy and offers to help move what little could be salvaged, but all had to wait for the fire marshall and insurance investigators to look into the cause for the fire, etc. It never has been determined

what caused the fire, but the damage was great and it was necessary for Linda and staff to move. Fortunately, they found another location, got phone systems working, bought new scissors and equipment, and are happily back at work. What can never be salvaged is the great ambience the Hair Company had in its old location. Many a child had his/her first haircut there. Many an elderly lady had permanents there, many of us shared stories and coffee in the presence of very caring ladies. Many young girls were trained on the job to sweep up the trimmings, answer the phones, collect money and wash up the smocks and towels. There was an understood order from Linda that malicious gossip wasn’t to be tolerated. She and her husband made numerous repairs and re-painted, constantly changing the décor and always propping up the old construction. It was always welcoming and peaceful. LINDA WAS A FRIEND to all, and not just people. She befriends not only those who need a shoulder to lean on, but cats and dogs as well. It was well known that when a stray was found, Linda would care for it until she could find it a home. The new place has little of the welcoming feel of the old, but it’s the people that make the place, and Linda and her friends are unchanged and that’s the good news. Rita Martinson is a Northsider.

We are always looking for story ideas. Call 601-977-0470 or e-mail wyatt@northsidesun.com

We Want Letters, Columns and Articles The Northside Sun encourages readers to write letters and guest columns. Letters of diverse viewpoints are welcome. Just because a letter appears in the Sun does not imply a Northside Sun endorsement. In the interest of freedom of the press, we run many letters with which we strongly disagree. You can send letters to the Northside Sun, P.O. Box 16709, Jackson MS 39236. Or email letters to wyatt@northsidesun.com. Please e-mail or mail a photo if you can. All letters must be signed and we reserve the right to edit them.


Page 6A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

New authority turns to county for help with hire By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer MADISON COUNTY’S NEW solid waste management authority wants a $100,000 loan from the county to hire an enforcement officer. The authority recently requested the “seed money” during a recent board of supervisors meeting. Jim McNaughton, who has been acting as the authority’s general manager since its incorporation in February, said a solid waste officer would promote programs to stop and prevent illegal dumping, promote recycling and clean up illegal dumps. “We would also apply for grants,” McNaughton said. “There are grants available for this position, up to 50 percent. “We’d like to do this as soon as funding is available ... Within 30 days I’d like to see us hit the ground running.” Though he said the authority would repay any money it borrowed from the county for the job, District 1 Supervisor John Bell Crosby questioned why McNaughton was asking for a loan at all. “I know y’all intend to pay it back, but I was under the impression that this authority wouldn’t cost the county anything,” Crosby said. The board of supervisors formed the authority to oversee sustainable, low-cost recycling and trash pickup in unincorporated parts of the county, explore alternative energy options, and maximize the use of the county’s landfills - ultimately saving the county money.

customers and generating more money.” He didn’t explain how, but he has said other counties could be recruited as additional customers. Most solid waste authorities in Mississippi make their money from “tipping fees,” which are paid by cities and counties that haul their trash to the authority’s landfill. The request was taken under advisement. “We had a similar issue with the West Madison Water Association. We couldn’t even loan them the money,” board attorney Eric Hamer. said. “I’ll take a look and see if it’s the same with solid waste authorities.” At press time, Hamer hadn’t yet found out whether the loan would be legal.

SUPERVISORS APPOINTED three commissioners to serve on the authority: Godwin Group CEO Philip Shirley, Madison County Road Manager Lawrence Morris, and Volunteer Fireman Robert Bilbrew. Shirley will serve a four-year term, Morris will serve a two-year term, and Bilbrew will serve a one-year term. The commissioners elected Shirley as chairman and Bilbrew as vice chairman. Another of the county’s goals for the authority was to coordinate with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) and other regional partners on programs. Mark Williams, an MDEQ administrator of solid waste programs, said he hadn’t heard anything from the authority yet. “I think they’re still trying to decide the role of that authority and what they’ll be working on,” Williams said. “I’m assumDISTRICT 5 SUPERVISOR Paul ing at some point they’ll engage us about Griffin asked when the authority would how that authority’s going to function.” take over trash pickup. Though Madison County will likely be “The best way I can think of … is the authority’s first customer for recycling through a cooperative agreement with the and waste pickup, McNaughton has county,” McNaughton said. “We would emphasized that the county could always take over the executive and managerial side and still rely on the county for opera- back out and contract with another provider if they were unsatisfied. tional support. “Then we would work on getting more

DR. ALEXANDER P. AUCHUS, professor and McCarty Chair of Neurology, has been elected to the American Neurological Association, the world’s oldest neurological society and one of the earliest academic societies in the United States. Auchus also has been certified in the subspecialty of geriatric neurology by the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties. He is the only physician in the South so certified, and is one of only several dozen in the nation.

City moving to accept credit card payments for fines, tickets By ANTHONY WARREN Sun Staff Writer SHORT ON CASH? Credit cards could soon be accepted at Jackson Municipal Court. The city is considering hiring a third-party firm to take credit card payments in lieu of cash, checks or money orders for fines and tickets. The city is setting aside funding in its 2012 fiscal year budget for court upgrades. The upgrades will clear the way for bringing on a firm to handle credit card transactions. It’s a move that city officials say is needed to save residents time when visiting the courthouse. “We need to provide a mechanism to make it easier for people to do business with the city,” said Deputy Director of Finance Rick Hill. “Allowing credit cards is the way to do it.” Hill said a third-party firm will have to be hired, because the municipality can’t legally conduct the transactions itself. Credit card companies charge a fee to the entity for each transaction made, meaning that if a person came in to pay a $21 parking ticket, the city would not get the full $21.

Hill said that under state law, the city can’t use money from tickets to pay transaction fees. The city can hire a firm to accept the payments for it, and charge customers a small “convenience fee” for paying with plastic. A portion of the convenience fee will pay the credit card company, while the other portion will compensate the third-party agency for its service, Hill said. As a result of the convenience fee, the city would still receive the full amount of the fine. If a third-party group was hired, residents would still have the opportunity to pay with cash, check or money order. (Residents without cash can now use their debit or credit cards to withdraw funds from an automated teller set up in the courthouse.) After Mayor Harvey Johnson returned for a third term in 2009, the administration brought on Paymentus, a company with offices in Altanta, Ga., to accept credit card payments for water and sewer. Hill said the “convenience fee” is between $3 and $5, depending on the size of the bill. So far, the system has been well received by customers.


Page 7A

REACHING OUT Two Broadmoor Baptist classes provide wells for Malawi By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer THE PLAQUE ATTACHED TO the water well cites Jeremiah 29:11. “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the LORD, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” Fifty-one families in Chiweza, a rural village in the nation of Malawi in southeast Africa, have hope and a future thanks to the efforts of a Madison-based Sunday school class and a nonprofit in Jackson. Two “life groups” at Broadmoor Baptist Church have raised enough money for three water wells to be dug in Malawi, one of the poorest nations on Earth, through Clean Water for Malawi, founded by Northsider Victor Smith last fall. “We believe that it’s scriptural to try to meet the physical needs of people, and if you look at the life of Christ, what you generally see is a meeting of physical needs before He addresses the spiritual, in most of the New Testament,” said Ronnie Smith (no relation to Victor), whose life group donated the money for the Chiweza well and looks to raise more. Clean Water for Malawi, a registered 501(c)(3) organization, has drilled 21 wells in Malawi since January with donations from Rotary clubs and other groups and individuals. “I first heard of the project through Victor because of being

THE CIA’S WORLD FACT book ranks Malawi among the world’s most densely populated and least developed countries. More than half of its 15.8 million people live below the poverty line, and 80 percent of them live in rural areas meaning they’ve had to hang-dig for water, and the holes aren’t deep enough. “In the dry season, the well they Pastor Jefali Kaliyala at one of the wells were using [in Chiweza] would dry up, and the women had to walk involved in Rotary,” said Ronnie, bricks out of clay over there, and who works as a regional president they’re wanting to get some money more than five miles to get water from the river,” Victor Smith said. for Regions Bank. “And as time for a tin roof.” “We have a lady who’s 60-somewent on, Victor and I became Another organization Victor is thing years old - and [when we built friends. We started talking about the involved in, Here’s Life Mission to a well in her village] she said, ‘This need to continue to drill water wells Africa, has provided nifty devices is the first drink of clean water that throughout Malawi, and [my life called “proclaimer boxes” for vilI’ve ever drunk in my whole life.’” group and I] talked about how we lages in Malawi. Even in the wet season, dirty could take a look at different [mis“It is basically [a recording of] water - which becomes stagnant sions] projects. the New Testament in their lan“There are so many needs. This is guage that is played as if you were when the holes are left uncovered one that I raised as a possibility. having a conversation, not as if it’s carries a high risk of major waterAnd the group really took this on being read,” Ronnie said. “They’re borne or food illnesses such as bacterial or protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis and wanted to be a part of it and put near the wells and are also A and typhoid fever, the CIA says. quickly [was] very generous in giv- handed out. [People are] able to But with just over $3,000 and ing.” take their boxes back to whatever about a week’s time, Clean Water small village they’re from. for Malawi can dig a well that will THEY ALSO WANTED TO “The boxes are very small, but last at least 10 years and help premake sure people’s spiritual needs loud,” he said - adding that he vent those sicknesses. were met. As it turned out, a hoped interest in the boxes would “While we’re there, we also set Malawi native named Noah Banda lead to new churches and strengthup a basin for people to wash their was helping plant churches near en village communities. clothes,” Victor said. Clean Water each well on his own time, when he But it all starts with clean water. teams teach people about maintewasn’t overseeing well rig opera“People have died in the past year nance of the wells, water testing tions. and years before drinking bad and personal hygiene to ensure that “They built a church [building in water,” Victor said. “The other the water remains drinkable in the Chiweza] that will hold 300 peoalternative is you don’t drink any long run. ple,” Victor said. “They’re building water and you just die.”

OF THE 21 WELLS the organization has dug, 13 have been funded by various groups and individuals - including one well from Ronnie Smith’s life group and two wells from another life group at Broadmoor. Three metro-area Rotary clubs have paid for the other eight wells and have raised enough money for 10 more. “We’re going to drill a well a week until that has transpired,” Victor said. “And then we will drill other wells as money comes available, you see. But once we get through with these [currently funded wells], it probably is going to take maybe till the end of the year to start a new Rotary round. “I think eventually our goal will be to have three rigs running in north, central and south [Malawi] and drill 150 wells a year. And we would train personnel who live in the area. “We appreciate people praying that we can do that.” Water wells won’t solve all of Malawi’s problems. But it’s a good start. “We think the [average] life expectancy, instead of being 50 years, will be 60,” Victor said. “[One of our supporters] said it really well: The poorest state in the United States is helping one of the poorest countries in the world. We can make a big difference.”


Page 8A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

White Honda continues to elude Lack of funds keeps police; house burglaries continue developer from By ANTHONY WARREN Sun Staff Writer TWICE THE JACKSON POLICE have given chase to a white Honda that they say is involved in a string of house burglaries on the Northside. And twice police have let the vehicle slip through their fingers. On August 25, officers gave chase to the two-door Accord near Manhattan and Meadowbrook roads, but called off the pursuit when the vehicle entered a school zone. When the burglaries began earlier this summer, police spotted the vehicle in the Meadowbrook area, but lost it on a nearby neighborhood street, said Precinct Four Cmdr. Wendell Watts. Watts said the suspected vehicle was about a quarter of a mile away when the officer spotted it. The vehicle is linked to burglaries and attempted burglaries on Glenway Drive, Buckley Drive, Kings Highway, Oak Ridge Drive, Galloway Drive, Douglas Drive, Highland Park Drive, Ridge Drive and possibly others. The most recent incidents occurred in late August, days after police told the Sun that the suspect involved in the burglaries was behind bars. (On August 17, police arrested Timotheus Brandon, of Jackson. Authorities are now saying that the suspect was involved in separate kick-ins on Kings Highway, East Hill Drive, Ridgeway Drive and Crane Boulevard.) Watts discussed the August 25th pursuit at last month’s Community-Oriented Policing Strategies (COPS) meeting. The chase occurred hours before the 5:30 p.m. meeting. “We had to cancel it when the driver went into a school zone,” he said. “I’m all for a good pursuit, but when it put lives in danger, it’s a different story.” A resident contacted police when he heard a house alarm go off in the 1200 block of Buckley. The resident told police that the Honda was slowly rolling away from the scene. A patrolman attempted to pull the driver over near the intersection of Manhattan and Meadowbrook, but the suspect fled, he said. Watts said the house had not been broken into, with

the alarm apparently scaring him off. THE VEHICLE is said to be a 2000 to 2003 Accord coupe with dark tinted windows. The first three letters on the tag are HTT. (Watts, who was driving when he spoke to the Sun, couldn’t recall the last three numbers.) The department has the tag number, the owner’s name and address, but has been unable to track her down. “She is nowhere where we can pin her down,” Watts said. He said tracking down the owner could lead to a break in the case. Watts said the woman lives in Jackson, but declined to offer additional details. He said police have been to the woman’s house, but the woman was not there. The precinct has not staked out the house. Watts said the vehicle or tag has not been reported stolen, meaning that the owner could know the suspect involved in the incidents. Asst. Police Chief Lee Vance said the house hasn’t been staked out because the police don’t have the resources to do it. “The only way we don’t arrest someone for committing a crime is when we don’t have the evidence or can’t locate them,” he said. “We have no problem arresting people. The jail situation in Hinds County is a testament to that.” Holly and Alan Lange’s home in the 100 block of Glenway was broken into around 11:55 a.m. on July 25. Video cameras in the Woodland Hills neighborhood captured the suspect kicking in the front door and running outside with a flatscreen television before fleeing in what appeared to be a white Honda. A second vehicle, that Holly Lange said appeared to be a blue Lexus, was also involved. Cameras in the Fondren community also spotted a white Honda at an August 18 break-in in the 200 block of Ridge. Lange is concerned by the fact that the suspect is breaking into homes in broad daylight. “It says they can do whatever they want and not get caught,” she said.

finishing Avonlea By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer FOR ONE BUILDER in Madison, the city’s growth isn’t enough to get houses built in a subdivision that is otherwise ready to go. The lots are finished and the final wearing course will soon be applied to the streets in Avonlea, a 17-lot neighborhood just off Old Canton Road - but builder James Ellington says he can do nothing but try to find someone to buy the development. “[The bank was] supposed to make me the construction loan for the houses. And they defaulted on doing that,” Ellington said. He declined to name the bank but said it was one of the “big three” in the Jackson area. “The loan officer that was mine there, he’s gone. They’ve closed their lending agency in the Jackson area.” ELLINGTON SAID the bank has been working with him because they think he has a good chance of selling the 50’ x 145’ lots at a reduced price. But it hasn’t been working. “And what [houses] were worth at one time, I can’t even sell them for two-thirds of that right now. “I’ve been building for more than 30 years, built over 400 homes, this is my fourth subdivision, and I don’t know if I can finish it or not. I’m 60 years old and fixing to have to look for something else to do.” He also said Mayor Mary Hawkins-Butler told him he wouldn’t get final plat approval with homes smaller than 2,400 square feet. The mayor’s office confirmed that 2,400 was the agreed-to minimum home size. “The people wanting those houses are retirees, and they want 2,000 square feet instead of 2,400.” Ellington has not yet filed a final plat.

For advertising information call 601-957-1125


Page 9A

Awarded scholarship The Rotary Club of Jackson recently announced the winners of their four-year college scholarships for 2011. Each year, the club interviews applicants and awards college scholarships to a number of deserving students. Since 1989, more than $1.6 million has been contributed to the scholarship fund by the membership and 147 students have received support. Shown are (from left) Gail Evans, mother of the recipient; Lauren Nicole Evans; and Mike Larson.

business notes

included in the Lawyers World Global Awards 2011 edition of Lawyers World magButler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens and azine. Also, Butler Snow has won two Cannada, PLLC has received international Corporate INTL Magazine 2011 Global awards and recognition from two global Awards for “Mississippi Environmental Law publications. Butler Snow was recognized by Firm of the Year” and “Mississippi Corporate Lawyers World Global Awards 2011 as “Law Law Firm of the Year.” The firm will appear Firm of the Year” in the categories of both in the 2011 Global Awards Magazine proproduct liability and management labor and duced by Corporate INTL. employment. As a result, the firm will be

To subscribe to the Northside Sun call 601-957-1542


Page 10A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Keith Tonkel

Belhaven Parks Continued from Page One ing a performance there in the spring. GBNF was notified of its award recently. The grant is a 50-50 match, meaning that the foundation must put up $3,000 in self-generated dollars. Lindsay was quick to point out that the program was still in the planning phase. “It’s too early to tell what all we’ll do,” she said. LAUREL STREET has also been hopping, in terms of park activity. About two years ago, Belhaven residents gathered to take in the AlabamaOle Miss football game on an inflatable big screen, Ellis said. Laurel Street is also home to an annual Easter Egg Hunt and intramural sports for the Mississippi College School of Law. “We see people using the parks year ’round,” Lindsay said. “When it snowed last year, we saw people build snowmen in our parks. People are there all the time.” In addition to giving residents another location for enjoying the outdoors,

Ellis said the parks also build community cohesiveness. “They are places where people get to know their neighbors, and as a result become more dedicated to the places where they live,” she said. She pointed to the fact that the parks have been used by generations of families. Some people, she said, went to Laurel Street Park when they were children, and they’re now taking their children and grandchildren there. KNOWING THE VALUE of the parks, Northsiders have invested a good bit of time and money to ensure that they remain viable for years to come. GBNF raised approximately $150,000 for the first round of improvements for Belhaven Park. And a recent fund-raiser called Art for the Park netted the Laurel Street friends around $15,000 for upgrades. Ellis said that money will be used to make the park safer for families. Farther south, the Belhaven Heights Community Association (BHCA) worked with the city of Jackson to install a new walking trail at Belhaven Heights Park.

Lindsay said the foundation had little to do with the project and referred questions to BHCA President Clarence Webster. Webster couldn’t be reached for comment. Funds raised for Belhaven Park were used to install an ornamental iron fence and a brick column entrance along Poplar. Also included in the upgrades were new street lights, benches and a brick sidewalk. Laurel Street friends committee member Christine Barron said money raised from Art for the Park will also be used for new sidewalks, adding steps and a handicapped-accessible ramp. The group also is planning to pour a new driveway to provide city vehicles with better access to the property. To provide children with less access to the street, gates will be installed at the park’s main entrances. “The main gate will have a latch to keep kids from getting out,” she said. “Our main goal is to keep kids from finding their way into the street.”

Continued from Page 3A together at the end of the event to hold hands and say a prayer. We could have a Hinds County inmate holding the hand of a cheerleader from Jackson Prep, and someone high-ranking in state government standing next to someone who’s receiving help at Harbor House. It’s a true kingdom of God circle, representing so many types of people.” Are the charities that benefit involved in helping with WellsFest? “They don’t have to be, but are invited to. Mustard Seed has been wonderful about it. They’ve helped with everything, from marketing to making ceramics to sell. They will also have their bell choir play at WellsFest this year as well.” What is The Mustard Seed using the money for?

“They are expanding their ceramic workshop and program, which is how they support themselves.” How many members does Wells Church have? “We have around 850 to 900 members, of that about 600 are active. We have strong attendance, with three services on Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.” Has membership grown over the years? “It has grown over the years. Last year, we’ve had several baptisms that were adults. It’s unusual to baptize someone over 40 years of age, very unusual. We are a slow-growth church. I don’t push joining, because so many people have felt pushed by other churches. We also don’t require tithing. We feel that money will follow purpose.”


Page 11A

Sunshine Act Continued from Page One Fillingane, chairman of the Senate’s Judiciary A committee, authored SB 2618, a bill that would require the attorney general to bid out all contracts for outside legal counsel when the anticipated fees exceed $500,000. “We call it the sunshine act, basically,” Fillingane said, noting that the bill number changes with every legislative session since it hasn’t been passed yet. “The bill has passed the state Senate now for I think the past three or four years, and it’s always died in the Democrat-controlled House.” But he said there is hope for the House, which has been getting more conservative and more Republican. “And I think that trend will continue this year.” Though many of the bill’s supporters are Republicans and Hood and his friends are Democrats, “it wouldn’t matter if we did [have a Republican attorney general],” Fillingane said. “I don’t think any of us would want a Republican, Independent or Democrat attorney general to pick his friends and campaign contributors to handle the state’s legal work. “If it’s important enough to go outside the attorney general’s office itself, it ought to be important enough to go through a bid process, so you don’t get into this cronyism. I just think that it makes sense ultimately,” he said. “Everything else is going to transparency in government. You hear that all the way from federal down to the municipal level.”

not a good idea to bid out these types of contracts [because] these attorneys bring a certain level of expertise and maybe novel legal theories to the table about how to sue someone and get money back for the state,” Fillingane said. “And if they had to bid the contract out, [the attorneys] would divulge too much of their intellectual property rights to the legal theories [in the bidding process]. They say if they tell too much, then every other attorney in the world…figures out their hard-earned theories. “I simply don’t buy that. You can simply say, ‘We have a novel idea about how to correct $100 million in back taxes that MCI/WorldCom owes us.’” And even if attorneys have to reveal a little more than that, the alternative - not bidding out legal contracts at all - will be unhealthy for the state in the long run, Fillingane said. Also, “none of our bills have ever said you have to go with the lowest bidder. It’s lowest and best, and that discretion is left to the AG’s office.” He said such discretion could certainly be abused: The attorney general could still hire his friends regardless of who’s actually the best man for the job. “But I think that outcome is much better than when you have nobody else but Ronnie Musgrove [or Hood’s other allies doing the state’s legal work]. “[The bill is] not necessarily to control what the AG does, but simply to make citizens aware of what the AG is doing. And if they’re okay with that, they’ll keep electing them. The people will decide which process they like the best.” SECTION 91-3-69 OF THE Fillingane said Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, the Mississippi Code says certain “professionRepublican nominee for governor, has al services” - including those of statebacked the sunshine act. licensed attorneys, accountants, physicians, engineers, architects and appraisers “I don’t know if [Democratic candidate can be retained without a bidding process. Johnny Dupree has] made a stand on it, but I know where [Bryant] stands on it.” “I think what they tend to say is…it’s

District 64 Rep. Bill Denny authored a similar bill in the state House several years ago - and like Fillingane’s bill, it has died in House committees every year since. “A bill of that sort obviously would go through the judiciary committee, which is generally - well, in all cases, is handled by attorneys. So you can see how that goes,” Denny said. He said a lot of states have adopted such bills, “and it makes sense. We ought to have some control. We want to put clarity on what outside attorneys are hired and how much they’re being paid.” MUSGROVE, A LONGTIME Hood ally, is listed as “of counsel” on Copeland Cook’s Web site. According to the American Bar Association (ABA), “of counsel” denotes “a close, regular, personal relationship” between an attorney and a firm. Though the firm employs the attorney, he or she is not an associate or partner with that firm. But the connection between Musgrove and the Ridgeland law firm was enough to nab $8.5 million in legal fees (plus $1.5 million in expenses) for the firm’s work on the pharmaceutical lawsuits. Copeland Cook attorneys have given $15,000 to help Hood win re-election this year. A 2008 article from the American Tort Reform Association’s annual “Judicial Hellholes” report said Hood had hired 27 firms in a five-year period to work on 20 separate lawsuits. Partners in those firms gave more than $500,000 to his re-election campaigns. Hood’s then list of contributors included Dickie Scruggs and attorney Joey Langston - who, like Scruggs, also pleaded guilty of conspiring to bribe a judge. Langston’s firm split $14 million in legal fees in 2005 after facilitating a $100 million settlement for the state with MCI/WorldCom.

First stage of work involves moving lines

Utilities being relocated as project gets started on Fortification Street NORTHSIDERS LIVING NEAR Fortification Street shouldn’t worry if their lights go out in the coming weeks. It’s a sign that work is progressing on the much-anticipated Fortification Street Improvement Project. The Jackson City Council recently approved contracts with Entergy Mississippi and AT&T to relocate electric and communication lines in the project’s path. Miller Pipeline, a contractor hired by Atmos Energy, began moving natural gas pipelines last month. Miller’s work is expected to wrap up by October 1. Entergy will receive a $743,655 payout for the service; AT&T will get $107,480 from funds set aside for the project, said Chris Mims, director of communications. Mims said the utility firms will notify residents if service is to be temporarily interrupted as a result of the relocations. “The companies will be responsible for sending notices to the public,” he said. The $12 million project calls for transforming Fortification from a four-lane thoroughfare into a twolane street from Jefferson Street to Greymont Street. It calls for grading the street, repaving it and reducing the height of a hill near Madison Street to improve visibility for motorists. New lighting and signalization will also be added at five Fortification intersections:Jefferson, Greymont, Lamar, West and Short Farish streets. Construction is being paid for with state, local and federal dollars.


Page 12A Thursday, September 8, 2011

DEVOTIONAL PAGE MISSISSIPPI’S FASHION & COSMETICS LEADER 4 locations to serve and 24 Hour Towing Service Ridgeland 601-856-0700 Lakeland 601-939-9700

Highland Village 601.981.4621

THOMAS “TICO” HOFFMAN

Richland South

601-664-9770 601-372-0042

“Regardless” 601-825-2801 • TOLL FREE 1-800-489-FORD HWY 80 & CROSSGATES BLVD. • BRANDON, MS 39042

1536 E. County Line Rd. • P.O. Box 16875 Jackson, MS 39236 • 601/956-1030

115 Highland Village Jackson, MS 39211 Store (601) 366-2557 info@buffalopeak.net Toll Free 1-800-232-2503

www.buffalopeak.net

This Devotional and Directory Is Made Possible By These Businesses Who Encourage All of Us to Attend Worship Services.

PLACES OF WORSHIP

McDade’s Market 1220 E. Northside Dr. Jackson, MS 39211 601-366-8486

904 E Fortification Jackson, MS 39202 601-355-9668

653 Duling Ave. Jackson, MS 39216 601-366-5273

2526 Robinson Rd, Ste 5 Jackson, MS 39209 601-353-0089

mcdades-markets@bellsouth.net

ANGLICAN

BAPTIST (Cont.)

CHRIST THE SAVIOUR 6014 Floral Dr., 209-5910 HOLY APOSTLES 3169 W. Tidewater Ln. Madison, 829-2113 HOLY TRINITY (AMiA) 604 Goodridge Dr Ridgeland, 601-956-1616 ST. MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELS 12586 Midway, Raymond, 857-2545

TWIN LAKES BAPTIST 673 Lake Cavalier Rd., Madison, 856-2305 VICTORY BAPTIST 420 Hoy Rd., Madison, 856-4260 WOODLAND HILLS BAPTIST 3327 Old Canton Rd., 981-1441 WOODMAN HILLS MB 468 Kearney Park Rd., Flora, 879-8347 GREATER MT. MORIAH 3672 Medgar Evers Blvd. 362-9088

ASSEMBLY OF GOD RIVER OF LIFE 101 Parkway Rd., Brandon, 919-1700

“Mississippi’s Photographic and Digital Headquarters Film or Digital Developed at the Same Place, Same Way! I-55 North Serving Mississippi DEVILLE PLAZA 601-956-9283 Since 1977!

601.939.8810

High at North West Street • Jackson • (601) 352-3632 106 Cynthia Street • Clinton 201 Hinds Blvd. • Raymond 1161 Highland Colony Parkway • Ridgeland

Southern food for city folks 2323 Lakeland Drive Ste A Flowood, Ms 39232 601-936-3398 515 Lake Harbour Drive Ridgeland, Ms 39157 601-898-3600

T

H

E

ORCHARD

600 Pear Orchard Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 601-856-2205

www.orchardretirement.com

619 Highland Colony Parkway | Ridgeland, MS www.waterfordonhighlandcolony.com

BAPTIST BRIARWOOD DRIVE 245 Briarwood Dr., 956-4561 BROADMOOR BAPTIST 1531 Highland Colony, Madison, 898-2345 CALVARY BAPTIST 1300 W. Capitol St., 354-1300 CASTLEWOODS 175 Castlewoods Blvd., 992-9977 COLONIAL HEIGHTS 444 Northpark Drive Ridgeland, 956-5000 CROSSGATES BAPTIST 8 Crosswoods, Brandon, 825-2562 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF JACKSON 431 N. State St., 949-1900 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF MADISON 2100 Main St., 856-6177 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF RIDGELAND 302 W. Jackson St., 856-6139 FLOWOOD BAPTIST 1649 Old Fannin Rd., Flowood, 992-6464 GREATER RICHMOND GROVE BAPTIST Complex Road, Ridgeland, 856-2209 GREATER ROSS CHAPEL BAPTIST Gluckstadt Road, Madison, 856-8778 HIGHLAND COLONY 1200 H.C. Pkwy., Ridgeland, 856-4031 HORIZON COMMUNITY CHURCH 4711 I-55 North, 982-8889 MOUNT CHARITY 964 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland, 956-1767 MOUNT PLEASANT Gluckstadt Rd. Madison, 856-5862 NEW HOPE GROVE Old Agency Rd., Madison, 856-5279 NEW LIFE BAPTIST 385 N. Old Canton Rd., Madison, 209-9500 NORTHMINSTER 3955 Ridgewood Rd., 982-4703 PARKWAY BAPTIST 802 N. Frontage Rd., Clinton, 924-9912 PEAR ORCHARD 5725 Pear Orchard Rd., 957-2086 PILGRIM’S REST BAPTIST 409 Main St., Madison, 856-2609 PINELAKE BAPTIST Lakeland Drive RIDGECREST BAPTIST 7469 Old Canton Rd., Madison, 853-1090 RIDLEY HILL BAPTIST 1034 N. Livingston Rd., Madison, 853-1068 RIVERCREST FELLOWSHIP 21 Northtown Dr., 991-0046 ROCKY HILL BAPTIST Rocky Hill Rd., Madison, 856-0759 SIMON HILL BAPTIST 139 W. Ridgeland, Ridgeland, 853-2669 TRACE RIDGE BAPTIST 238 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland, 856-2529

BIBLE GRACE BIBLE CHURCH 380 Highland Colony Pkwy. 991-1910 RIVERWOOD BIBLE 5228 Old Canton Rd., 956-5694

CATHOLIC ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC 4000 W. Tidewater Ln., Madison, 856-5556 ST. PETER’S CATHOLIC 123 N. West St., 969-3125 ST. RICHARD CATHOLIC 1242 Lynnwood Dr., 366-2335

CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN 543 Eldorado Rd., Pearl, 936-9618

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST FIRST CHRISTIAN 645 Briarwood, 977-9477 NORTHEAST CHRISTIAN 3169 W. Tidewater Ln., Madison, 856-7399 UNITED CHRISTIAN 1730 Florence Ave., Ridgeland, 354-1177

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST 731 S. Pear Orchard Rd., Ste. 9, 952-0307

CHURCH OF CHRIST MEADOWBROOK CHURCH OF CHRIST 4261 I-55 N., 362-5374 SOUTH MADISON CHURCH OF CHRIST 338 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland, 856-2165

CHURCH OF GOD CHRISTWAY 1501 Old Fannin Rd. 992-7474 COBBLESTONE CHURCH OF GOD 444 Pebble Creek Dr., Madison, 853-6910 FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 829 Hwy. 51 N., Madison, 856-0652

EPISCOPAL CHAPEL OF THE CROSS EPISCOPAL 674 Mannsdale Rd., Madison, 856-2593 ST. ALEXIS EPISCOPAL 650 E. South St. stalexisjackson.org ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 305 E. Capitol St., 354-1535 ST. COLUMB’S EPISCOPAL 550 Sunnybrook Rd., Ridgeland, 853-0205 ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL 3921 Oakridge Dr., 982-4880 ST. LUKE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH N. College, Brandon, 825-5836 ST. PETER’S BY-THE-LAKE EPISCOPAL 1954 Spillway Rd., Brandon, 992-2691 ST. PHILIP’S EPISCOPAL 5400 Old Canton Rd., 956-5788

EPISCOPAL (Cont.) ST. STEPHEN’S REFORMED EPISCOPAL 5049 Lakeland Dr., 992-4317 JEWISH BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION 5315 Old Canton Rd., 956-6215

LUTHERAN ASCENSION LUTHERAN Old Canton Rd./E. County Line Rd., 956-4263 CHRIST LUTHERAN 4423 I-55 North 366-2055 GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN Hwy. 25, 992-4752 NATIVITY LUTHERAN 495 Crossgates Blvd., Brandon, 825-5125

METHODIST ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 655 Beasley Rd. 366-6630 ANDERSON UNITED METHODIST 6205 Hanging Moss Rd., 982-3997 BELLWETHER, Flowood JA Performing Arts Center BRIARWOOD UMC 320 Briarwood Dr., 956-4035 BROADMEADOW UNITED METHODIST 4419 Broadmeadow Dr., 366-1403 CHRIST THE WAY FREE METHODIST 978-3423 CROSSGATES UMC 23 Crossgates Dr., Brandon, 825-8677 CHRIST UNITED METHODIST 6000 Old Canton Rd., 956-6974 EAST JACKSON UMC 855 S. Pear Orchard Rd., 957-0515 EMMANUEL UNITED METHODIST 100 Shands St., 372-9424 FIRST INDEPENDENT METHODIST CHURCH OF MADISON 1556 Hwy. 51N, 672-1240 FIRST UNITED METHODIST Ridgeland, 856-6456 GALLOWAY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST 305 N. Congress St., 353-9691 MADISON UNITED METHODIST 2050 Main St., Madison, 856-6058 PARKWAY HILLS UNITED METHODIST 1468 Highland Col. Pky., Madison, 856-2733 RIVERSIDE INDEPENDENT METHODIST 1127 Luckney Rd Flowood, 919-8311 ST. LUKE’S UNITED METHODIST 621 Duling Ave., 362-6381 ST. MARKS UNITED METHODIST 400 Grants Ferry Rd., Brandon, 922-2131 ST. MATTHEW’S UNITED METHODIST 7427 Old Canton Rd., Madison, 856-9581 WELLS CHURCH UNITED METHODIST 2019 Bailey, 353-0658 WESLEY BIBLICAL SEMINARY CHAPEL 787 E. Northside, 366-8880

NAZARENE FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 5416 Lakeland Dr., Flowood, 992-8680

ORTHODOX ST. PETER’S ORTHODOX 180 St. Augustine Dr., Madison, 856-3894 HOLY TRINITY, ST JOHN THE THEOLOGIAN GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 5725 Pear Orchard Rd., Jackson, 601-355-6325

PENTECOSTAL APOSTOLIC REVIVAL CENTER-UPC 301 W. Washington St., Ridgeland, 856-2385 DAVIS TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1700 Dalton St., 969-9519 FIRST PENTECOSTAL 5000 I-55S, 373-9000 LANDMARK CHURCH Springridge Rd., 372-7761 PARKWAY 1620 Mannsdale Rd., Madison, 853-2607

PRESBYTERIAN BRIARWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 620 Briarwood 956-4553 COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN 4000 Ridgewood Rd 981-7236 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 1390 N. State, 353-8316 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF MADISON 7717 Old Canton Rd., 856-6625 FONDREN PRESBYTERIAN 3220 Old Canton Rd., 982-3232 GRACE CHAPEL Hwy. 463, Madison, 856-7223 HIGHLANDS PRESBYTERIAN 1160 H.C. Pkwy., Ridgeland, 853-0636 LAKELAND PRESBYTERIAN 5212 Lakeland Drive, Brandon, 992-2448 LAKESIDE PRESBYTERIAN 2070 Spillway Rd., Brandon, 992-2835 NORTH PARK PRESBYTERIAN 4624 Old Canton Rd., 362-2886 PEAR ORCHARD PRESBYTERIAN 750 Pear Orchard Rd., Ridgeland, 956-3283 TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN 5301 Old Canton Rd., 977-0774 REDEEMER CHURCH 640 E. Northside Dr., 362-9987

www.bellwetherchurch.org • Sunday, 10:30 at Jackson Academy

www.BankPlus.net Member FDIC

I can do all things thru Christ which strengtheneth me. Philippines 4:13

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST COLLEGE DRIVE ADVENTIST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

110 College Dr., Pearl 664-1408

NONDENOMINATIONAL CALVARY CHAPEL 109 Jetport Dr., Pearl, 932-9673 CONGREGATION BEIT LECHEM - MESSIANIC 110 Jones Ln. Ste F, Flowood 601-933-4913 CORNERSTONE CHURCH 2460 Terry Road, 371-3323 RIDGELAND FAMILY CHURCH Old Agency Rd., Ridgeland, 856-2101 CHURCH TRIUMPHANT 731 S. Pear Orchard, 977-0007 UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST 4872 N. State, 982-5919 UNITY OF JACKSON 4660 McWillie, 981-9412 VINEYARD CHURCH 600 Grants Ferry Rd., 919-1414

But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus Philippians 4:19


Page 13A

Dedication date set for October 16

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH

Services scheduled for October By KATIE EUBANKS Sun Staff Writer THE PEWS HAVEN’T BEEN installed yet, but the new St. Joseph Catholic Church building in Gluckstadt is nearly finished. “We will start services [in the new building] sometime around the first part of October,” said Pam Minninger, lay ecclesiastical minister at St. Joseph. October will mark a year since construction began on the white church, located just west of I-55 on Gluckstadt Road and designed by the late Michael Barranco. “We worked real closely with Michael in designing it so it would look like a traditional church,” Minninger said. “It fits the personality and the history of our community out here. It’s got the Gothic architectural features, the Gothic windows, that type of thing. “And of course it’s bigger,” she added. “We’re very rapidly growing. The bishop named us a

full parish five and a half years ago. At that time we had 90 families. Now we have right at 400, with more coming every week,” she said. “The church that we’re in now comfortably seats about 150, and this [new] one will seat about 450. We also have seven classrooms in this one.” MINNINGER SAID BISHOP Joseph Latino would be with the church October 16 to dedicate the new building, constructed by George Malouf. In the meantime, Gluckstadt’s 25th annual Germanfest will be held on the church grounds Sunday, September 25. “Germanfest will be reconfigured a little bit, and there will be less room for parking, so we’ll have to redo that. But it will basically be in the same area - just rearranged a bit.” Minninger said the building cost $2.9 million to construct, and the church has an ongoing capital campaign.

in memoriam

Obituaries Alice Barnes Carroll Services were held September 3 at St James Episcopal Church for Alice Barnes Carroll of Jackson. Mrs. Carroll, 75, died peacefully at home August 31, surrounded by her loving family. Mrs. Carroll was born May 14, 1936, to Thelma W. and Floyd C. Barnes. She grew up in Drew, and considered herself a Delta girl all her life. She was predeceased by an infant brother, Clark, who died before she was born. The Barnes family moved to Jackson when Mrs. Carroll was nine years old. During her years at Bailey Junior High, she became one of a group of 14 young girls who named themselves the JUGS (Just Us Girls). The group remains lifelong friends to this day. Mrs. Carroll was graduated from Central High School in 1954 and later graduated from the University of Mississippi. At Ole Miss she pledged Chi Omega, and she served as president of Tau chapter. Chi Omega continued to be a love of her whole life, and she continuously gave back as she served on the National Chi Omega Board and the State Day Board. She nurtured a lifetime of friendships made through her sorority. Some of her happiest Chi Omega moments occurred when her daughters pledged, as well as last fall when her granddaughter Caroline pledged as a new member of Tau chapter. Mrs. Carroll was a member of the Junior League of Jackson and enjoyed her years of service in the league. She particularly enjoyed meeting with her bridge club regularly. She was quick to state it was her

bridge club that did not play bridge; rather it was an opportunity to gather with friends. In 1961 she married Robert A. (Bob) Carroll and they have lived happily in Jackson for 50 years. She was a loving wife and devoted mother to her three daughters, Barrett, Rivers and Anne Robb. Later in life her grandchildren brought her great pleasure. She spent countless hours choosing books to give the children. She attended the various sporting events of her grandchildren and always brought a competitive spirit to the games. She created a special family tradition by having Sunday lunch at her house every weekend, enabling the family to gather weekly. Mrs. Carroll was an avid reader and enjoyed lending and borrowing books from a great number of friends. She always enjoyed the discussions they shared about the books. She was a great conversationalist, but more importantly, she was a great listener. She was a steadfast friend and was always very grounded in giving her advice, opinion and support to her family and her friends. One could always count on her to speak the truth and get right to the heart of the matter. Survivors are her husband, Robert A. Carroll, and her daughters and their families, Barrett and Trip Brown and their children, Walker, Caroline and Matthew; Rivers and Bobby Mounger and their children, Robert, Anne Rivers and Patrick; and Anne Robb and Jo Jo Adams and their children, Joseph, Daniel and Rosemary. Memorials may be made to St. James Episcopal Church or to Chi Omega Tau chapter, P.O. Box 8047, University, 38677.

Obituary Policy The Sun publishes obituaries of Northsiders and their families. Typically, we receive obituary information from the funeral homes. For a small charge, we invite readers who are so inclined to supplement this with more descriptive text capturing the spirit of the person’s life.


Page 14A

Thursday, September 8, 2011

northside facts

Crime Report Madison Crime The Madison Police Department received the following reports for: Beechwood Lane, petit larceny, August 8; Clark Farms Road, larceny, August 9; Grandview Boulevard, petit larceny, August 3; Grandview Boulevard, petit larceny, August 9; Highway 51, petit larceny, August 1; Highway 51, petit larceny, August 9; Long Cove Court, identity theft, August 4; Main Street, grand larceny, July 29; Mannsdale Road, grand larceny, August 11; North Valley Common, house burglary, August 10; Strawberry Hill, grand larceny, August 12; Wildwood Pointe, car burglary, August 9;

Ridgeland Crime The Ridgeland Police Department received the following reports for: Adcock Street, 800 block, petit larceny, August 21; Arbor Drive, 300 block, burglary - dwelling, August 18; Brame Road, 400 block, burglary - dwelling house, July 29; County Line Road, 1200 block, identity theft, July 28; County Line Road, 1200 block, petit larceny, August 20; County Line Road, 1200 block, petit larceny, July 28; I-55, 6000 block north, auto burglary, August 18; Pear Orchard Road, 500 block, armed robbery, August 16; Pine Knoll Drive, 100 block, burglary - dwelling, August 15; Pine Needle Court, 500 block west, petit larceny, August 20; Sunnybrook Road, 500 block, grand larceny, August 16; Township Place, 200 block, petit larceny, August 15; Wheatley Street, 800 block south, credit card fraud, two counts, July 28; Wheatley Street, 800 block south, petit larceny, August 20;

Jackson Crime The Jackson Police Department received the following reports for: Northview Drive, 4000 block, larceny, July 1; Northview, 3900 block, larceny, August 14; Oakridge Drive, 3800 block, larceny, August 11; Oakridge Drive, 3900 block, house burglary, July 29; Old Canton Lane, 3900 block, auto burglary, July 26; Old Canton Road, 4400 block, auto burglary, June 21; Old Canton Road, 5100 block, house burglary, July 30; Old Canton Road, 5100 block, stolen license plate, August 2; Old Canton Road, 5500 block, auto burglary, June 22; Old Canton Road, 5600 block, auto burglary, June 21; Old Canton Road, 6200 block, auto burglary, August 16; Ridge Drive, 200 block, house burglary, August 18; Ridgewood Court Drive, 6300 block, auto theft, August 20; Ridgewood Road, 5800 block, auto burglary, August 21; Ridgewood Road, 6100 block, auto burglary, August 17; Ridgewood Road, 6300 block, larceny, August 17; Sedgwick Court, 5700 block east, house burglary, August 18; Sheppard Road, 200 block, house burglary, August 17; Southwood Road, 2000 block, house burglary, August 16; St. Andrews Drive, 300 block, auto burglary, July 8; St. Mary Street, 1800 block, auto burglary, August 21; State / Sheppard, auto burglary, August 13; State Street, 1200 block north, auto burglary, July 18; State Street, 1200 block north, auto burglary, July 18; State Street, 1200 block north, larceny, June 29; State Street, 1700 block north, auto burglary, July 10; State Street, 2300 block north, auto burglary, August 15; State Street, 2300 block north, auto burglary, August 16; State Street, 2300 block north, larceny, August 2; State Street, 2800 block north, auto burglary, July 16; State Street, 2800 block north, auto burglary, July 19; State Street, 2800 block north, auto burglary, July 19; State Street, 3000 block north, business burglary, Treehouse, August 22; State Street, 3000 block north, business burglary, Wells Cleaners, August 12; State Street, 3500 block north, aggravated assault, July 5; State Street, 3600 block north, robbery - individual, August 11; State Street, 3700 block north, business burglary, Sun Gallery, July 23; State Street, 3800 block north, auto burglary, June 30; State Street, 4000 block north, auto theft, June 25; State Street, 4400 block north, larceny, August 12; State Street, 4500 block north, larceny, July 15; State Street, 4500 block north, robbery - carjacking, August 11; State Street, 5300 block north, auto burglary, July 28; State Street, 5300 block north, business burglary, June 25; State Street, 5300 block north, stolen license plate, July 27; State Street, 5400 block north, business burglary, Gas Stop, August 23; State Street, 5500 block north, auto theft, July 24; State Street, 5600 block north, auto burglary, June 21; State Street, 6000 block north, house burglary, July 5; State Street, 6100 block north, business burglary, June 26; State Street, 800 block north, auto burglary, four counts, June 28;

Twin Lakes Circle, 2300 block, larceny, July 30; Tyrone Drive, 3800 block, auto burglary, July 23; Venetian Way, 5400 block, house burglary, August 5; Watkins Drive, 4800 block, business burglary, Community Store, July 11; Watkins Drive, 5000 block, auto theft, June 25;

I Gave

Watkins Drive, 5000 block, house burglary, July 5; Wayneland Drive, 5000 block, auto burglary, August 5; Wayneland Drive, 5000 block, auto burglary, July 27; Wayneland Drive, 5200 block, house burglary, August 4; Woodland Way, 2100 block, house burglary, July 28; Woodvale Street, 4100 block, auto burglary, July 5.

F IRST C OMMERCIAL

My VISION and They GAVE ME The SUPPORT

To See It THROUGH. “When I approached First Commercial about financing to redevelop a dilapidated building in the heart of downtown Jackson, they didn’t hesitate. Eager to build a relationship with me, their optimism and enthusiasm were refreshing. Even after I had secured the funding, my banker remained interested and involved throughout the process. I can’t say enough about the genuine care and concern the bank has displayed. It’s what sets them apart.” As Mississippi’s first and foremost bank for businesses and professionals, First Commercial offers a rare blend of professionalism and intensely personal service.

At First, You Do Succeed. (601) 709-7777 • 1300 Meadowbrook Rd. • Jackson, MS 39211 firstcommercialbk.com • Member FDIC

ARNEL BOLDEN Real Estate Investor

© 2011 First Commercial Bank. All rights reserved.


Page 15A

Police issuing parking tickets One Lake By ANTHONY WARREN Sun Staff Writer PARKING IN a handicapped zone or forgetting to put money in a meter downtown could cost you more than a handful of quarters. The Jackson Police Department (JPD) is out in full force issuing citations for parking violations. Parking enforcement officers (Don’t call them meter maids.) have handed out a 14,210 parking tickets since January 1. The majority were handed out in Jackson’s central business district. The tickets are given for violations ranging from being parked at an expired meter to parking in a handicapped zone. Tickets can range from $21 to $200 depending on the severity of the violation, said Precint Five Cmdr. Allen White. Precinct Five is bordered by Court Street to the south, Fortification Street to the north, Gallatin Street to the west and the Pearl River to the east. The lion’s share of parking citations are given out in the metered areas by the precinct’s parking enforcement division. The division has four officers who are responsible for scoping out parking violations downtown. The officers have full policing powers and serve as an extra set of eyes and ears for the precinct. “They relay information to dispatch that needs immediate attention,” White said. Parking enforcement officers can also respond to crimes themselves. Enforcing parking has other benefits as well, such as ensuring that traffic flows smoothly and that meters are fed on a regular basis. The meters are a revenue generator for the capital city. White didn’t know how much money the devices bring in each year.

Parking Enforcement Officer Walter L. Mangum III issues ticket

time runs out. Other violations include parking in certain areas, such as handicapped zones, loading zones, mail drop zones or fire zones. Vehicles are also ticketed for blocking sidewalks, and for parking in front of bus stops and fire hydrants. OFFICER COLENDULA Green, JPD spokesMotorists can also be ticketed for parking in onewoman, said residents who accumulate three tickets or two-hour zones. “Officers will come by and mark or fines of more than $100 can face warrants for the sidewalks where the tires are, document the time their arrest or additional fines. and come back later to see if the vehicle has been However, Court Administrator Jeanette Banks said moved,” he said. “If they haven’t, officers give them more than half of those who receive parking citaa ticket.” tions pay their fees by or before the date on their tickets. POLICE PLACE THE TICKETS under the Citations are given for a variety of reasons. The windshield wiper on the driver’s side of the vehicle, most common, obviously, are issued for parking at White said. expired meters or being parked at a meter after its

Continued from Page One Flowood’s Entrepreneur of the Year. Haney is a senior project manager for McGowan Working Partners. The Brandon resident graduated from Pearl High School and Mississippi State University. He holds a degree in civil engineering. Russell has been working in the oil and gas industry for more than 30 years. He is currently president of McGowan Working Partners. He is on the board of directors for the Mississippi Association of Land Men, the McLean-Fletcher Center and Young Life Inner City in Jackson. Walker’s career and community service highlights include serving as president of LTM Inc., a franchisee of McDonald’s restaurants. He has been director of the Trustmark Corporation and Trustmark National Bank since 2009. He is also chairman of the board of trustees for Tougaloo College and founding member of the 100 Black Men of Jackson. PRVF REPLACES the Two Lakes Foundation, which was established by McGowan and supporters of the Two Lakes project years ago to see the project built on the Pearl. The vision foundation supports the One Lake plan and hopes to work with local and federal officials to see it built. In April, the Rankin-Hinds Pearl River Flood and Drainage Control District (levee board) moved One Lake closer to reality, authorizing PRVF to work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to study the One Lake project.

The study will cost approximately $4 million, according to corps estimates, and be funded by PRVF and McGowan. Dallas Quinn, PRVF spokesman said conceptual plans for One Lake include building a 3,500-acre lake from just north of Lakeland Drive to south of I-20. “It will be located primarily along the channelized area of the Pearl, which was altered from its natural state in the early 1960s when the corps built the current levee system,” he said. The lake will be approximately seven miles long and include developable shoreline on the Hinds and Rankin sides of the Pearl. The lake will also help protect residents in the event of a major flood. In 1979 and 1983, floods devastated the Jackson metro area. McGowan said One Lake would reduce floodwaters in a similar event by 95 percent, keeping dry about 3,000 homes and properties that would otherwise be inundated with water. At press time, the foundation has yet to meet with the corps. Corps officials had scheduled two meetings, both of which had been cancelled.

business

notes

Dr. April Ulmer of GI Associates and Endoscopy Center has been fellowship trained in pillcam technology and its usage and applications for pediatrics.


Page 16A

Thursday, September 8, 2011


social news

Thursday, September 8, 2011

David, Courtney, Cheryl and Camille Allen, Drew, Marilyn and Ed Snyder

Jean Williams

section B

Brittany Allen, Angela Forester, Camille Allen, Claire Brabec

Engagement celebration Camille Allen, Drew Snyder honored in Williams home Camille Allen and Drew Snyder, both of Washington, D.C., were honored recently with an engagement celebration in the home of Jean and Kelley Williams. Miss Allen is the daughter of Cheryl and David Allen. Snyder is the son of Marilyn and Ed Snyder of Madison. Co-hosts and hostesses were Carolyn and Barry Aden, Rebecca and Marion Black, Suzanne and Bill Boone, Cathy and Jeff Davis, Betsy and Kane Ditto, Lynn and Jim Grenfell, Jeri and Lucian

Harvey, Annette and James Hitt, Clara and Colton Joorfetz, Connie and Tom Kossen; Also, Gloria and Jim Martin, Linda McGehee, Marcia and Chuck Poole, Gayla and John Purvis, Kandy and Joe Sims, Geri and Preston Smith, Jan and Johnny Wade, Rebecca and Mark Wiggs, Jean and Kelly Williams, and Cindy and Jeff Wilson. The couple will wed October 29 at Northminster Baptist Church. Shown are scenes from the party.

Cathy Davis, Emily Jones, Jane and Bill Smith

Drew Snyder, Camille Allen

Haydn and Morgan Roberts, Will Bardwell, Jamie Holcomb

Becky Ivison, Courtney Allen

Jim Martin, Betsy Ditto, Gloria Martin


Page 2B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

social news

Ben and Courtney Boatwright

Lisa Edmonson, Julie Hardy Ollie Armstrong, Shelley Waites, Margaret Luckett

Night on the Town Gala benefits Down syndrome society

Patrick Harkins

The Central Mississippi Down Syndrome Society recently hosted “A Night on the Town.� The event began at the King Edward Hotel with a corporate sponsors reception. Live and silent auctions were held and the Patrick Harkins Band performed. Shown are scenes from the gala.

Millicent McKee, Aaron Higgs, Ryan Hall, Britney Peoples Nickey Cook, Elizabeth Sanders, Julie Reiprish, Stacy Scott

John and Claire Windsor, Christie Simmons, Christine Barnes

Colin and Maureen Harrison, Shannon and Charles Plunkett

Dancy Watson, Terra Ingalls

Allison and Andy Tally, Raina and Shoutng Wu


Page 3B

Calendar

the northsidesun

To include an event, e-mail sun@northsidesun.com by 5 p.m. Thursday

September SUNDAY

MONDAY 6

5

4

New Stage Theatre Season ticket packet

Jackson Zoo Hours

SUNDAY

CelticFest MS Festival

Ag museum Hours

SUNDAY

MONDAY 19

18

Woman’s Hospital Seminar

8 MDAH History is Lunch

14

Mystery readers Meeting Millsaps College Arts and Lecture Series New Stage Theatre Production

MS Farmers Market, Greater Belhaven Market Old Capitol Museum Civil War re-enactors CelticFest MS Festival

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Southern Christian Services Bottom Line for Kids New Stage Theatre Production

New Stage Theatre Production

MS Farmers Market, Greater Belhaven Market Beth Israel Congregation Concert New Stage Theatre Production

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY 20

CelticFest MS Festival

21 WellsFest Art night

16

15

MDAH History is Lunch New Stage Theatre Production

17

23

22

MDAH History is Lunch

10

9

Eudora Welty Library Production

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY 13

12

New Stage Theatre Season ticket packet

SIDS Support group Parkinson’s Support group Ridgeland Garden Club Meeting

MONDAY

11

7

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

MARL Fur ball Ridgeland chamber Ladies night MSO Symphony at Sunset

VSA MS Art Group Showing

24 MS Farmers Market, Greater Belhaven Market WellsFest

September events September 7, Wednesday

September 19, Monday

• Mississippi Department of Archives and History program, Sen. Hillman Frazier, “My Long Journey Home.” Noon - 1 p.m. in the William Winter building.

• Woman’s Hospital seminar Red Hot Mamas, 11 a.m. at Fitness Lady, Ridgeland. 877-907-7642.

September 8, Thursday

September 20, Tuesday

• Story Pirates perform John Grisham’s “Theodore Boone & the Thrill of Rights,” 4 p.m. at Eudora Welty Library. • The Cedars ‘Outdoor Splendor’ art show, 5 - 8 p.m. Free. • Delta Delta Delta alumnae Deltas After Dark, at The Treehouse. bfreeman@christunitedjxn.org.

• WellsFest Art Night and Auction at Duling Hall. Preview party, 5:30 p.m.; live art auction, 7 p.m. www.wellsfest.org.

September 9, Friday • CelticFest Mississippi September 9, 10 and 11 at the ag museum. www.CelticFestMS.org.

September 10, Saturday • Mississippi Farmers Market and Greater Belhaven Market, corner of High and Jefferson streets. Most Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 601-359-1159.

September 10, Saturday (continued) • Old Capitol Museum Muster at the Museum, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Civil War reenactors. www.oldcapitolmuseum.com.

September 11, Sunday • CelticFest Mississippi September at the ag museum. www.CelticFestMS.org.

September 12, Monday • MS Agriculture and Forestry Museum / National Agricultural Aviation Museum, open Monday - Saturday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 601-432-4500.

September 13, Tuesday • Millsaps College, Brunson Green and MS Film Commission, “The Help: Movie-Making in Mississippi.” Ford Academic Complex Recital Hall, 7 p.m. Tickets $10. 601-974-1130. • Madison County Mystery Readers meeting, 10:30 a.m. at Ridgeland Public Library. 601-853-8392. • Millsaps College program Brunson Green discusses “The Help,” 7 p.m. in the Academic Complex recital hall. • New Stage Theatre production of “Driving Miss Daisy,” September 13 - 25. www.newstagetheatre.com.

September 21, Wednesday • Mississippi Department of Archives and History program, author Norma Watkins, "The Last Resort: Taking the Mississippi Cure," about the art colony Allison's Wells. Winter Building. Noon - 1 p.m. in the William Winter building.

September 22, Thursday • MS Animal Rescue League fur ball Pets and the City. 7 p.m. at the Renaissance. $60 per person / $110 per couple. • City of Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce Denim and Diamonds, a Ladies’ Night Out, Country Club of Jackson. Reception and silent auction, 6 p.m.; dinner and entertainment, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $65. 601-991-9997. • MS Symphony Orchestra, “The Red, White and Blue - Symphony at Sunset,” 7 p.m. at The Cedars. Free. 601-981-9606.

September 23, Friday • Municipal Art Gallery art showing of VSA Mississippi art group through September, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

September 24, Saturday • Mississippi Farmers Market and Greater Belhaven Market, corner of High and Jefferson streets. Most Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 601-359-1159. • WellsFest at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park. Includes live music, food booths, children’s activities, arts and crafts, plant sale, silent auction, pet parade, 5K run and walk, one-mile fun run. www.wellsfest.org.

special days

September 17, Saturday

HAPPY BIRTHDAY September 8: Charles L. Miller, Herman J. Hines, Stephanie Davis. September 9: Presley Hill, Joanne Hartwig, Jerry Maxwell, Ernestine Powers, Tracy Rowland, Parker Powers. September 10: Bradley Hagan, Susie Baldwin, Karen Freeman, Odessa Lee, Tillman Lyle, Haller Magee, Dennis Meador, Mathew Thibodeaux. September 11: Dr. Richard Birdsong, Stacy Regan, Hank T. Ware, Jim Myers, Betty Ratliff, Robert Hobbs, John Connolly. September 12: Barry McCorry, Burns Bishop, Ryan Chandler, Gene Henson, David Hervey, Connor Chase, Conor Smith. September 13: John Day Sr., Leah Henley, Leslie Petrus Kennedy, Pauline Derrington. September 14: Richard G. Wilkinson, C. Ray Scales Jr., Charlotte Harvison, Charles Campbell, Kristen Garcia, Wayne Gilbert.

• Mississippi Farmers Market and Greater Belhaven Market, corner of High and Jefferson streets. Most Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 601-359-1159. • Beth Israel Congregation 150th anniversary concert, 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Center. Tickets $30. 601-353-0603.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY September 11: Betty and Jim Blackwood. September 12: Bob and Ann McElroy, Mr. and Mrs. Pat Somers, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mayfield.

September 14, Wednesday • Mississippi Department of Archives and History program, Larry Morrisey talks about his Mississippi Senior Cultural Leaders Oral History Project. Noon - 1 p.m. in the William Winter building.

September 15, Thursday • Southern Christian Services for Children and Youth, Bottom Line for Kids, 6 p.m., Country Club of Jackson. Tickets $100. 601-354-0983.

September 18, Sunday • New Stage Theatre offers “Your Passport to a Theatrical Journey,” season ticket packet.

To add your ‘Special Days’ call 601-977-8122, write to P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, MS 39236 or e-mail sun@northsidesun.com.


Page 4B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

happenings Arts and lecture Millsaps College Arts and Lecture Series will feature Brunson Green, producer of the movie “The Help,” September 13, 7 p.m., in the Academic Complex Recital Hall. For information on this program and season tickets for the series call 601-9741132 or visit www.millsaps.edu.

Bible study

Treehouse. For more information contact Betty Lynn Freeman at bfreeman@christunitedjxn.org.

Diabetes walk The Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi will host its annual Jackson Walk for Diabetes, October 2, 1 p.m., at the Southern Farm Bureau building on Watkins Drive. For details call 601-9577878.

Wild child

The Jackson Zoo invites families to add a wild child to their family tree by adopting an animal. Adoption packages include an adoption certificate, an animal fact sheet and a photo of the animal. Funds raised will help with the zoo’s animal care needs. Zoo memberHawk watch Jackson Audubon Society’s ships are also available for purchase. For more informaannual hawk migration watch will be September 17, tion call 352-2582. 9 a.m. to noon, at Vicksburg Support group Military Park. Park entrance The Metro Jackson fee, $8. For details call 601Parkinson’s Support Group 956-7444. meets every first Tuesday, 2 at Redeemer Tri-Delta event p.m., Presbyterian Church. For Jackson area Delta Delta Delta alumnae are planning more information call 601845-6340. Deltas After Dark, September 8 at the A new Explorers Bible Study ladies group will meet Wednesdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m., at Christ United Methodist Church. For details call Becky Howell at 601-9241373 or Martha Holt at 601956-1052.

Solution for this week’s puzzle next week. This solution for September 1 puzzle

Big Reach! Small Price! Run this size ad in over 100 newspapers statewide for less than $11 per paper.

Call your local newspaper or MS Press Services at 601-981-3060.

FATBOY jr

48 GUN SAFE

$99900 In Home Delivery Available

PUBLIC AUCTION Annual Fall Contractors Public Auction Friday, Sept. 16 and Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011 Begins 10 A.M. Each Day! Day 1 Will Feature: Construction Equipment, Attachments, Trucks One Ton & Larger, Trailers. Day 2 Will Feature: Farm Tractors, Farm Implements, Cars & Trucks, Campers and Miscellaneous Items. 80 Campers sold Saturday Absolute!

Hwy 49 South of Hattiesburg, Brooklyn, MS

www.mmaofms.com

MARTIN & MARTIN Auctioneers of MS, Inc.

Jeff Martin, MSAL# 1255

601-450-6200


Page 5B

social news

Gardening Glimpses Advantages abound with container gardening WHETHER YOU’RE A suburban farmer on a small scale, or a flower fancier who likes landscaping in a controlled and simpler setting, you know the values of raised bed gardening: soil to suit particular crops or ornamentals, ease of fertilizing, watering to suit individual types of plants, in different micro-climates without your garden, and most importantly, no digging into impossible soil in impossible weather. All of the advantages of raised bed gardening can apply to container gardening, as well, with some plusses to consider. Containers are smaller and easy to move around, to follow sun or shade, easier to change out as crops mature or flowers live out their bloom cycle, and simple to relocate as the spirit moves you. Something to think about, in this summer of ours when thinking creatively about our gardens is a whole lot easier than actually getting out for long periods and doing anything about it. I’VE BEEN DABBLING in container gardening for a couple of years, faithfully sticking to terra cotta, with a preference for those which look like genuine antiques because of crusting of fertilizing chemicals on the surface. Suddenly, this year I became focused on acquiring a really big container, one that was really blue, just the right blue. I couldn’t tell you from a color chart, but I knew I’d recognize it when I saw it. Big containers aren’t cheap, but I had some birthday gift money to

play with. So I started observing, whenever I was in a nursery, a garden center, a home improvement store, anywhere they might have big pots for sale. I didn’t know what I wanted to plant in it, and at first didn’t know where I wanted to put it. I just knew I wanted to look at it, every day, and it had to be just the right blue. They were there, and blue aplenty - variations of attractive, striking cobalt blue, in different shapes and sizes. Very shiny, ceramic, very trendy. But nothing really struck a spark with me, and the price tags were a deterrent Then one morning, looking for something else (the best of all times to find anything) and waiting for a program to begin, I was prowling among the stacks of ubiquitous shiny ceramic pots when I happened to look up, really up. This is a well-established nursery, and the storage was four shelves high, four tall shelves high. And at the very top was a pair of blue pots. Really big, beautifully not shiny but decorated with carvings of wreaths and swags, like a genuine Grecian urn. And really big - I just went outside a few minutes ago to measure 16 inches high and 19 inches wide. Knowing the price on the trendy pots at floor level, I didn’t want to start dreaming an impossible dream, so I asked, and persisted in finding out the price tag. Quite reasonable, all things considered. But heavy, so they had to wait until our son was home for a brief visit to make a purchase.

EVENTUALLY TIME and muscles came together and we went back. Nobody had bought them. (Somehow I suspected they would not have - if they hadn’t, all this time, even been the cause of a price check.) The same clerk helped me, but had to call on a tall strong agile young worker to clamber up and bring both of them down. (By now I had begun to wonder, the price being reasonable, if I hadn’t better get both of them, or else regret it endlessly.) Turns out there was a crack in the rim of one of them, but otherwise I liked them even better, color and decoration and antique finishing, than I had at a distance. As I hesitated, the clerk, possibly thinking of the effort in getting one back up to that fourth shelf, offered a discount because of the crack. A sale. When we got home, I knew exactly where one of them was to go, its forever location. But I hadn’t planned on two. I couldn’t push my luck with my son and the lifting required if we moved it around, so we put the second one in a possible place. That place is where I intended to plant a Japanese maple, if it ever gets to be tree-planting time again. (I have some gift money left.) So I thought, maybe I’ll plant the tree in that container. Each day I have walked by the two blue pots many times, and now I think the route would not look right, if either one were moved. To put a five-gallon plant in a big, big container requires building up with rocks,

By Mrs. Herman McKenzie and smaller rocks, and then soil. You can even leave the tree in its plastic nursery pot for a year, while you consider things. Careful watering and minimal fertilizing help here. And I still have no clue about what I want to plant in the pot in the original location. Nineteen inches in diameter means that I could plant three five-gallon plastic pots and squeeze them into the top 10 inches (with a support system beneath of big rocks, small rocks, and sand or dirt). For instance, tulip bulbs which bloom in spring, and can be replaced with summer pots full of coleus or trailing shade-tolerant annuals. In other words, experiment until I have a more definite idea. WITH CONTAINER gardening, nothing is ever carved in stone. And it turns out that these pots aren’t either. When we got home, accidentally thumping on them, we realized they were metal. Whatever caused the crack we’ll never know, but it’s not likely to crack any further. And I surely do enjoy the way they look.


Page 6B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Weddings & Engagements Purvis, Frame say vows at Tucker Plantation

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Davis Frame

ANNA CATHERINE Purvis and Andrew Davis Frame were united in marriage at 6 p.m. June 18 at Tucker Plantation in Colbert, Ga., close to Athens. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. John Milton Martin III of Macon, formerly an assistant minister at Northminster Baptist Church. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Purvis. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sullivan Frame Sr. of Savannah. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a gown of ivory tiered French Alencon lace over Italian silk satin with delicate ribbon embroidered bodice. The ivory satin sash was secured with a vintage pearl brooch. Her hand tied bouquet made of esperance, ambiance, and garden roses as well as peonies, hydrangea, and freesia was secured by a hand embroidered handkerchief belonging to her greatgrandmother Purvis. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Abby Coker Lechthaler of South Londonderry, Vt. Bridesmaids were Margaret Cagle Jones of Macon, and Virginia Cole Stanley of Mt. Pleasant, S.C. Their strapless dresses of matisse blue were enhanced with vintage brooches, a gift from the bride. Flower girl was Catherine Ballard Purvis of Jackson, niece of the bride. She wore an ivory silk chiffon dress with lace inserts. Attached on the bodice was an antique gold and cameo pin which had belonged to her great-great-great-grandmother Mitchell. Readers were Mary Largent Purvis of Jackson and Emy Watson Vernier of Nashville. The guest registry

was attended by Mary Mitchell Purvis of Washington, D.C. Greeters were Taylor Morse Davis of Jackson; Susan Blair Leake of Washington, D.C.; Katy Morgan Neely Pulvere of Birmingham; Rita Roxanne Rollins of Chicago; and Cameron Egan Seward of New York. The bride’s proxy was Samma Faye Harper Bromley of Knoxville. THE BRIDEGROOM’S father was best man. Groomsmen were John Alexander Purvis of Jackson, and Spencer Ballard Purvis of Golden, Colo., brothers of the bride. Ringbearer was John Largent Purvis of Jackson, nephew of the bride. Seating guests were Zachary Brendel of Athens, Ga.; James Catts of Charleston; Tripp Collins of Gadsden, Ala.; Adam Cone of Birmingham; Knox Gale of Decatur, Ga.; and Sam Rodgers of Ketchum, Ind. A luncheon for the bride, bridesmaids, close friends and family was held June 17 in an antebellum house at The Hill in Athens. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the bridegroom’s parents on Friday night at Farm 255 in Athens. The dinner was followed by a meet and greet with drinks and live music at Farm 255 hosted by family friends of the bridegroom. Wedding guests were invited for brunch and bocce at The Hill on Saturday morning which was hosted by friends and family of the bride. Following a wedding trip to Watercolor, Fla., the couple is at home in Jackson.


Page 7B

social news

Weddings & Engagements Miss Jordan, Fahrenkopf to marry on October 8 MR. AND MRS. MARK Stephen Jordan announce the engagement of their daughter, Meagan Marie Jordan, to Collin John Fahrenkopf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fahrenkopf of Germantown. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Alton Pierce of Madison and the late Mr. and Mrs. John William Jordan of Carter. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Bryce Griffis and the late Beverly Griffis of Starkville, and Louise Fahrenkopf and the late Charles George Fahrenkopf of Atlanta. Miss Jordan is a 2004 graduate of Madison Central High School. She attended Mississippi State University where she was graduated cum laude in 2009, earning a bachelor’s degree in interior design and a minor in art. She was a member of the Kappa Delta sorority. Fahrenkopf is a 2002 graduate of Christian Brothers High School. He attended Mississippi State University, where he was graduated in 2007 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. He was a member of Meagan Marie Jordan Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. He is associated vows the evening of October 8 at Cameron with Miller Tabak Roberts in New York in Plantation, the bride’s family home in global credit sales. Canton, with a reception to follow. Following the wedding the couple will THE COUPLE WILL EXCHANGE make their home in New York City.

Miss Whatley, Vaughn to marry October 15 MR. AND MRS. STEVEN Arthur Whatley announce the engagement of their daughter, Jennifer Lauren Whatley, to Jacob Lee Vaughn, son of Mr. and Mrs. Grady P. Vaughn Jr. of Pleasant View, Tenn. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Irving Melichar of Laurel, Josephine Potts Whatley of Brandon and the late Mr. Arthur Finus Whatley Jr. of Brandon. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Grady P. Vaughn of Cordova, Tenn., and the late Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lee Olley of Millington, Tenn. Miss Whatley is a 2006 graduate of St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. She is a 2010 graduate of Rhodes College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and environmental science. At Rhodes, she was an all-conference member of the varsity softball team and a member of Tri-Delta sorority. She is associated with Cardno-Entrix as a field technician. Vaughn is a 2005 graduate of Sycamore High School, and a 2009 graduate of Centre College with a bachelor’s degree in anthropology. He was a linebacker on the Centre football team where he earned all-conference Jennifer Lauren Whatley, honors. Vaughn is stationed at Air Station Jacob Lee Vaughn New Orleans with the United States Coast October 15 at Madison United Methodist Guard. Church. Following the ceremony, a reception will be held at the Jiggetts House. The couTHE COUPLE WILL exchange vows ple will make their home in New Orleans.

The Northside Sun’s wedding and engagement policy --All write-ups need to be submitted at least a week prior to publication date; Color photo (vertical please) should be submitted at the time the write up is. --Priority is given to write-ups that appear in the Northside Sun first. If announced first in the Sun, the picture and as much of the story will be used as soon as possible; --Copy and photo must be submitted together; --Coverage is restricted to residents in the Sun’s prime circulation area - North Jackson, South Madison County, the Reservoir - and former Northsiders; --The Sun accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs. All photos published are filed according to the week they appear. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope is enclosed, every effort will be made to return such photos, but this cannot be guaranteed; --Please include a daytime phone number on all releases;

For more information, call 601- 957-1123

For advertising information call 601-957-1125


Page 8B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

social news

Plan reunion The Jackson Prep Class of 2001 will hold their 10-year reunion September 23-24. Planning the event are (from left) Amanda Manning Markow, Sidney McLaurin, Natalie Lefoldt Arnemann, Jennifer Brooks, Allison Bowie, Jamey

happenings

Fluffy Fleece Fun

Night out Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce presents “Denim and Diamonds,” featuring Vince Vance and the Valiants, September 22, at the Country Club of Jackson. Reception and silent auction, 6 p.m., dinner and entertainment, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $65. Call 601991-9996 for reservations.

Fur ball The Mississippi Animal Rescue League will hold their annual fur ball “Pets and the City,” September 22, 7 p.m., at the Renaissance. $60 per person, $110 per couple. Contact rebeccaezell@bellsouth.net for more information.

Elkin, Hayley Hayes, Jay Liles, and Caroline McKibben Upchurch. For more information, contact Lucia Jones at Prep - ljones@jacksonprep.net.

“Owl” Two-Dees by North American Bear TM

Come see our new shipment of toys!

Find Your New Friend at...

The Toy Place Fondren Village • 2941 Old Canton Road • 601-362-6524

WellsFest Wells United Methodist Church will hold their annual benefit, WellsFest, September 24, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park. Proceeds benefit Mustard Seed. Event features 5K run and walk, one mile fun run, live music, food, pet parade, children’s activities and a silent auction. For details call 601-353-0658.

Golf tournament The Mississippi Community Education Center will hold their annual fund-raising golf tournament October 7, 11:30 a.m., at Lake Caroline. Entry fee $85. For details call 601366-6405 or visit www.mscec.org.

History is lunch Mississippi Department of Archives and History upcoming History is Lunch programs include Sept. 14, Larry Morrisey on the Mississippi Senior Cultural Leaders Oral History Project. Meetings are held noon - 1 p.m. in the William Winter building.

To advertise in the Northside Sun, call 601-977-0470


Page 9B

social news sunbeams Thomas Grayson Stringer Jamie and Susan Stringer of Brandon announce the birth of their son, Thomas Grayson Stringer, July 21 at Baptist Medical Center. Grandparents are Jim and Nancy Woods of Indianola and Jimmy and Jan Stringer of Ridgeland.

Paxton Clark Berry Sarah Beth and Cole Berry of Madison announce the birth of their child, Paxton Clark Berry, July 6, at Woman’s Hospital. Grandparents are Ted and Peggy Clark, the late Ann Clark, Doug and Lisa Berry, Carolyn Berry and Retta Stockwell.

Chancellor’s cup Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority at Ole Miss received the 2011 Ole Miss Chancellor’s Cup for Best Overall Sorority on Campus and Best Philanthropy Award. Shown are sorority Northsiders (from left) Liles Ingram, Ainslee Johnson, Adriana Mercier, Kristen Wilson, Elizabeth O’Connell, Samantha Shepard.

New families First Presbyterian Day School families welcome new parents at the new parent luncheon. Shown are (from left) David and Annnette Jones, Adam and Stephanie Dungy, Roy and Emily Butts.

luncheon clubs

Camelia Noblin, Teena Noland, Julie Renfrow, Martha Smith and Sylvia Steel. Continental Other members present were Marcia The Continental Club met in August at Arthur, Pauline Bailey, Donna Beach, Jean the Country Club of Jackson for luncheon Bennett, Anna Box, Edith Bridges, Teenie and bridge with President Ann Marble pre- Dale, Billye Dallas, Mavis Dickerson, siding. The invocation was offered by host- Katherine Fowler, Posey Freeman, Lolita ess Sue Lucas. Co-hostesses were Nadine Hannon, Robbie Hughes, Peggy Johnson, Williams, Mary Clayton, Nita Fanning and Ann King, Shirley Lucas, Lynn Lymberis, Virginia Young. Polly May, Joye Miller, Marjorie Murley, Joyce Britt won high score at bridge; Alyce Palmore, Mary Lou Portner, Martha Jeanne Caldwell, second; and Joy Nause, Jean Ray, Anne Robertson, Letha Smith, bingo. Mary Ann Snyder, Delta Walton and Judy Guests were Doris Brickell, Ethel Watts. Coleman, Mary McKee, Ann Minton,

New Classified Ad Rates

977-8122

Reach 11,144 homes in the most affluent area of Mississippi.

Ask for Beth

Published Weekly on Thursdays, Distributed by Mail to Paid Subscribers. Cash or Check in Advance or Credit Card Only. Deadline: Noon Thursday

Line ads - 50 cents per word, $5 minimum per run To submit an ad, e-mail sun@northsidesun.com Street Address: 246 Briarwood Drive, Jackson, MS 39206

The Northside Sun.... Mailing Address: P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, MS 39236 AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE: One (1) 1991 Dodge Ram Pickup Truck, fair condition, $1,600; One (1) 2001 Toyota Corolla, fair condition, $5,000. Contact 601-362-6234 after 5:00 p.m. (9/15) --------------------------------------------------PROFESSIONAL SERVICES RELIABLE CAREGIVER looking to sit with your loved one. Available day or night. References 601-502-0556. (9/15) ----------------------------------------------------STATEWIDE FREE Foreclosure Listings. Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800860-1332. (9/8) -----------------------------------------------------

DRIVERS - CDL-A EXPERIENCED DRIVERS. OTR Positions Available NOW! Up to 50 per mile. Class A CDL and Hazmat required. 800-942-2104 ext. 7307 or 7308. www.totalms.com (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------DRIVERS - WEEKLY HOMETIME! Part & Full-time. Daily or Weekly Pay. Steady Miles Means MORE MONEY! Excellent Benefits! CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-4149569. www.driveknight.com (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED!! Start up to 44 per mile!! Lease purchase available! Great hometime. Experience required. 800-441-4271 x MS-100. HornadyTransportation.com -----------------------------------------------------

CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Up to $10 per box. Most brands. Call Tom anytime toll-free 1888-785-2984. (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-455-4317. (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------DRIVERS-CLASS A-CDL Holders Needed in the Columbia, Meridian, Roxie, Taylorsville and Yazoo City areas. Home daily, paid by load. Paid orientation, benefits and bonuses. Forest Products Transportation. 800925-5556. (9/8) -----------------------------------------------------

DRIVERS - NEW Pet Policy! NO Touch Freight and NO forced NE/NYC! No felony/DUI last 5 years. Ask about our Lease Purchase Options! Call or text PTL1 to 424242. 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------PAID DRIVER TRAINING! Refresher course available for Regional Truck Drivers. Earn 35 to 37 cpm, home weekly and great benefits. Call 888321-1821 or visit AVERITTcareers.com. EOE. (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------SEC TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. CDL and refresher classes start every Monday. Financing available for those who qualify, jobs available now! Call 1-877-285-8621 Mon. - Fri., 8 am - 5 pm C#618. (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------PARKER DRILLING COMPANY is now accepting applications for experienced Drilling Floorhands with 2 years experience, Licensed Boat Skippers. We offer excellent pay and benefits. Candidates can apply online at www.parkerdrilling.com EOE. (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------ALLIED HEALTH career training. Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409. www.CenturaOnline.com (9/8) ----------------------------------------------------DIVORCE with or without Children $99.95. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (9/8) -----------------------------------------------------

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. Medical Business Paralegal Accounting Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-899-6914. www.Centura Online.com (9/8) -------------------------------------------------DRIVER - PAY RAISE JUST ANNOUNCED! Company, Owner Operators, Solos and Teams. Consistent miles, benefits, all new trucks. CDL-A and 15 months experience required. drivefortango.com 877-826-4605. (9/8) -------------------------------------------------HIRING 150 PEOPLE IN YOUR AREA!! Satellites Unlimited, DISH Networks #1 provider, is adding 150 service tech positions! NO EXPERIENCE-PAID TRAINING! $33,000$42,000 a year! We provide: Benefits, Tools, Vehicle, Uniforms, Career Stability! APPLY: www.SUICareers .com (9/8) -------------------------------------------------PUBLIC AUCTION. 150 Spec and Dealer Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding available. Saturday, September 10, 10 am. Philadelphia, MS. www.Henderson Auctions.com. 225-686-2252. License # 266. (9/8) -------------------------------------------------PUBLIC AUCTION. 300+ Travel Trailers, Camp Houses and Cottages. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available. Saturday, September 17, 10 am. Carencro, LA. www.Henderson Auctions.com. 225-686-2252. License # 136. (9/8) --------------------------------------------------

Order Newspaper Ads Statewide or Nationally Online...

mspress.org • Classified Ads • Small Display Ads Or Call Your Local Newspaper or MS Press Assn at 601-981-3060


Page 10B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

keeping up with lottie By LOTTIE BOGGAN

Imperfect world includes shrinking bathing suits

A TWO PIECE bathing suit I’d fought my way into and had bought at the discount store for a special occasion later on today dangled invitingly from the bathroom doorknob. It would be part of the planned and much anticipated program this afternoon. The youngest grandchild had completed a series of swimming lessons and I would be a proud participant in her ‘show and tell.’ There were other things to take care of first. Even though it was Saturday, the every morning ritual before the 6:17 departure time to walk our dog, June Cleaver, begins with a weigh-in and then a garbage toss. Stepping onto the bathroom scales, I watched in horror as the needle swept up to show a five pound weight gain. Surely these scales have gone berserk. Then it dawned on me. Earlier in the week I had eaten four desserts at the Down Home Buffet at the Jackson Country Club. And, last night, adhering to that old rule, food won’t cause you to gain weight if you eat if off someone else’s plate, I had stolen

most of my husband’s order of French fries before serving him. The good Lord’s in control and you do not have the luxury of a nervous breakdown today, I reminded myself. I looked longingly at the new, now too tight bathing suit. I had to think before I threw this into the trash; it would be painful. For the moment I satisfied myself by wadding up last night’s ‘Happy Meal’ bag holding leftover chicken strips, limp French fries and congealed ketchup and tossed it all into the trash. A tiny voice told me to save that glittery Dora the Explorer cardboard tiara, perhaps a little person I knew might want it later on today. But I ignored the warning, and pitched it too. SO THAT EVERYTHING would be all right in The Cleave’s world, we had to get on with our daily walk. I sucked in my stomach, and waddled to the front door where June Cleaver waited impatiently. About 45 minutes later, as we turned from Saint Andrews onto Old Canton Road, still in a snit over the lying bathroom scales, I spotted a gulleywasher of water boiling down the road toward us.

“Oh, glory, somebody’s pipes have burst.” I commiserated. “Poor soul. I’m glad it’s not ours.” As I punched in the Gleneagles gate code, a bad feeling crept up my spine. The Gleneagles swimming pool. You turned the water on yesterday. You didn’t turn the water off yesterday. Snatching on my dog’s leash, we raced toward the pool, splashing across drowning grass, wet concrete, and slippery tile to turn the faucet off. Be thankful for small blessings, I breathed gratefully. Everything around me was pretty much flooded, but it was a relief to see no bodies floating by, no neighbors treading water and no cars drifting along with the tide. It was just another reminder that I am an imperfect fixture in an imperfect world. “Let it go,” I said. “You have things to do. Time to get on with today’s program, which in spite of untruthful scales, a shrinking bathing suit and flooding the neighborhood, still promises to be a pleasant one.” Nothing else can possibly go wrong, I told myself. But I should have remembered, ‘every path has a few puddles.’


Page 11B

social news

PLAN REUNION

Members of the Jackson Prep Class of 1991 planning their upcoming 20th reunion weekend on September 23-24, include (from left) Keith and Adrienne Carter, Jennifer Smith Wooten, Mary Katherine Cole, Ellen Treadway, Lisa Lefoldt Nowell, and Jay McGehee. Not pictured are Tamyne Couch Armour, Lissa Middleton Kellum and Leigh Ann Cappaert Wilkins. For more information regarding the reunion contact Lucia Jones, ljones@jacksonprep.net.

Trail signs Dr. Clay Hays, immediate past chairman of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, presented the new “Heart of Mississippi” bike trail signs to representatives of metro area cities during a recent meeting. Accompanying Dr. Hays was David Pharr, representing the Jackson Chamber of Commerce. Shown are (from left) Hays, Pharr, Corinne Fox, David Williams, Gary Miller, Larry Smith, and Bill Owen.

Sun Wedding Policy --All write-ups need to be submitted at least a week prior to publication date; --Priority is given to write-ups that appear in the Northside Sun first. If announced first in the Sun, the picture and as much of the story will be used as soon as possible; COLOR PHOTOS ARE PREFERRED; --No forms are used. Please type, double space, the article in story form; --Coverage is restricted to residents in the Sun’s prime circulation area - North Jackson, South Madison County, the Reservoir - and former Northsiders; --Wedding must be announced no later than six months after the ceremony. Please include wedding date;* --The Sun accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs. --Please include a daytime phone number on all releases;


Page 12B

Thursday, September 8, 2011

social news

Claudia Hauberg, Pamela Prather

Jackie Petrus, Kent Peters

Karen Flowers, Jana Bell, Melanie McKinley, Nena Carmody, Anne Daly, Pam Anglin

Pearls of Mistletoe Former steering committee members honored

Beth Allgood, Mary Purvis

Lisa Magee, Gay Drake, Ouida Holland

The “Pearls of Mistletoe� party honoring all former Mistletoe steering committee members was held recently in the home of Nena Carmody. Shown are scenes from the party.

Jane Roper, Rebecca Collins, Cathy Joyner

Lindsay Buford, Rivers Walker, Caroline Grenfell, Maggie Waddell

Jennifer Walker, Nena Carmody, Suzy Everett


school news

section C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011 By ANTHONY WARREN and ADAM GANUCHEAU

Victor Andrews, Scott Montgomery, David LeMoine, Bob Pooley, Charlie Chastain, Gabe Phelan, Charlie Waddingham IV, Peyton Willoughby, David Trussell, Christian Bourn, Connor Wolf, Jeffrey Rucker, Greg Abadie, James Marshall; (third row) Athletic Director Flip Godfrey,William Lindsey, Blayne Jones, John Savell, Spence Howell, Bobby Tallant, William Fetherson, Alex Cosmich, Brett Burgess, Dylan Culberson, Griffin Kennington, James Simmons, James Orsborn, Eduardo Zuniga, Josh McClenty, Nicholas Beasley, Coach Nick Cason, Coach Kenner Purvis; (second row) Coach Bill Walberg, Jack Olstad, Jack Cottingham, Chase Best, Conor Crain, Andy Dorian, Pace McDonald, Chris Hanneke, Chuck Dorian, Blake Rueff, Josiah Paulding, Walker Burrow, Ian Vandevender, Nathan Gieb, Coach Miller Todd; (front) Andrew Luley, Ashton Brown, George Baladi, Jay Newman, Bailey Cole, Alex Blossman, Thomas Benson, E. J. White, Hunter Beene, DaJour Evans, Tyler Crotwell

Bruins St. Joseph W

ITH A 2-0 START, the Bruins’ chances of making the playoffs and winning the district crown in 2011 look promising. Last year, St. Joseph Catholic School went 7-5, played for the district championship and lost in the first round of the Mississippi High School Activities Association (MHSAA) 2A playoffs. The Bruins are flying high on the arm of quarterback Petyon Willoughby and on the speed and strength of wide receiver Nick Beasley and running back David LeMoine. Willoughby, a senior, completed 18 of 29 passes for 303 yards and two touchdowns in the school’s wins against St. Aloysius and St. Patrick. His favorite receiver appears to be Beasley, who caught the ball nine times for 165 yards and three touchdowns, according to MaxPreps.com. On the ground, LeMoine carried the ball nine times so far, for 112 yards, crossing the end zone once for six points. Coach Flip Godfrey looks to that experience to build on last year’s success. “We have been very young the last couple of years,” he said. “We had freshman and sophomore starters who are now junior and senior starters,” he said. On defense, the Bruins are relying on tackle James Marshall, guard Christian Bourn and end Charlie Chastain. In the first two games, Chastain had recorded five tackles and five assists; Marshall had put up four tackles and six assists; and Bourn had

logged five tackles and two assists. Another linebacker that has made it hard for the opponents has been senior Jeffrey Rucker. He had 16 tackles, one sack and one fumble recovery in the Bruins’ first two wins, according to MaxPreps. Godfrey and the rest of the coaching staff at St. Joseph look to meet specific goals for the season. The first and obvious goal is to win the district. St. Joseph is in Region 6, District 7 of the 2A classification of the MHSAA. In addition to winning the district, Godfrey wants to get a quick start on the season, something he believes will lead to a successful 2011 season. “Like every other team, we want to take it one game at a time,” Godfrey said. “The coaches and I know we have what it takes this year.” So far, the Bruins have done just that. The team averaged 37.5 points per game in the first two matches, and outscored their opponents 75 to 21. Signs that St. Joe might have a good season were evident during spring training. “Going into spring, we had a few question marks,” Godfrey said. “A few of those question marks were answered, but some still remain.” Godfrey is in his seventh year as head coach at St. Joseph, and is looking forward to this season as much as any season. “Going in as head coach [at St. Joseph], I knew it would be a several year process. We have had more successful seasons than others, but this season should be fun.”

2011 ST. JOE Varsity Football Schedule 8/19/2011

St. Aloysius

Away

7:30 PM

8/26/2011

St. Patrick

Away

7:30 PM

9/2/2011

St. Joseph

Home

7:30 PM

9/9/2011

St. Andrews

Home

7:30 PM

9/16/2011

Pisgah

Away

7:30 PM

9/23/2011

Union

Home

7:30 PM

9/30/2011

*Loyd Star

Away

7:30 PM

10/7/2011

*Puckett

Home

7:00 PM

10/14/2011

*Amite County

Home

7:00 PM

10/21/2011

Wesson

Away

7:00 PM

10/28/2011

Enterprise Lincoln (HC) Away

7:00 PM

* District Games

q Class/Division: MHSAA 2A Region Six, District Seven q Head Coach: Flip Godfrey q Defensive Coordinator: Miller Todd q Assistant Coaches: Nick Cason, Kenner Purvis, Bill Wahlberg, Kenny Willoughby q 2010 record: 7-5


Page 2C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011

Hamel McGraw, Cooper Simmons, Thompson Moore, Cade Hood, Wade Meena, Ross Renfrow, Westin Graves, Whit Kendall, William Mounger, Will Puckett, Wesley Kerce, Tyler Coleman, Richard Baird, Ryan Buchanan, Mac Baird, William Pringle, Carter Thigpen, Sean O’Hara, Eric Wegener, Charlie Pringle, Justin Renfrow, Jake Williams, Charles McEuen, Newell Simrall, Chris Johnson, Zach Williams, James Gathings, Jackson Gunn, Joseph Cook, Jay Vise, Ty Higginbotham, Kyle Kennedy, Conner Ball, Will Keeler, Grayson Lamb, Luke Simmons, Grant Lamb, Jesse Pound, Chandler Pride, Damion Bryant, Zach Newman, Andrew Davidson, Harrison Putt, Kyle Crotwell, Josh Samander, Wilson Williams, Austin Churchill, Jamie Finch, Parker Stevens, Robert Frey, Paul Vegas Ott, Austin Pinkerton, Hollis Burrow, Griffin Schrock, Gage Ray, Brady Eaves, Campbell Vise, Ross Hester, Joe Humphries, Brooks Davenport, Wilson Hays, Tyler Duckworth, Evan McKinley, John Gathings, Lance Martin, Carter Osborne, Ross Chandler, Clay Wooley, Jake Muse, Cossar Morgan, J.C. Davidson, Reid Patterson, James Young, Furlow Word, Williams Townsend, Gilbert Omobude

Prep Patriots L

AST YEAR was the first time in 12 years that Jackson Prep didn’t play for the state title. This year, the Patriots have taken out their frustrations on their first two opponents. On August 19, Prep crushed nearby rival MadisonRidgeland Academy (MRA) 35-13, beating the team that ended their streak of state title appearances last year. And on August 26, the Patriots handed Pillow Academy a 28-7 loss. Prep was 2-0 heading into its September 2 battle against Forest High School at 7 p.m. at Patriot Field. Prep is hoping to continue its winning streak and earn a chance to again play for the MAIS AAA Division I crown. “The expectations at Prep are high, and they are for this class as well,” said head coach Ricky Black. “Not being in the championship is a motivating factor.” The team is poised to have a strong season with 20 returning seniors, all of whom will play an important role, as well as experienced starters on both sides of the ball. Making their returns are junior all-district running back Hamel McGraw and senior running back Grayson Lamb. McGraw and Lamb will give the Patriots an edge in the

ground attack. McGraw was the team’s leading rusher in 2010, carrying the ball 94 times for 627 yards. Lamb posted good numbers as well, with 247 rushing yards on 69 carries, according to MaxPreps.com. Making a way for them will be senior offensive tackle Gage Ray. He was all-conference in 2010. On the other side of the ball, senior all-conference defensive ends Whit Kendall and Will Puckett are returning. Middle linebacker Chandler Pride is also returning. As a sophomore, he led the team with 17 tackles and 58 assists, according to MaxPreps. “We don’t have a lot of starters, but we have good, experienced (athletes) who have had playing time,” Black said. With former quarterback Dalton Welch graduating, Prep will rely on the arm of junior quarterback Ryan Buchanan. “We also have to build back the offensive line,” Black said. Buchanan did not start in 2010. Black likes to have a balanced attack, but will likely rely more on the ground game at the start of the season until Buchanan gets settled in. “That’s where we have the most experience, but we have to do both to be successful,” he said. No player stats were readily available for 2011.

q Class/Division: MAIS AAA I, Division 2

q Offensive Coordinator: Ricky Black

q Head Coach: Ricky Black

q Assistant Coaches: Chad Biggs, Nick Brewer, Rusty Burke, Brent Heavener

2011 JACKSON PREP Varsity Football Schedule Aug. 19

Madison-Ridgeland Academy Away

7:00

Aug. 26

Pillow Academy

Home

7:00

Sept. 2

Forest High School

Home

7:00

Sept. 9

Copiah Academy*

Away

7:00

Sept. 16

Pearl High School

Home

7:00

Sept. 23

Starkville Academy* (HC)

Home

7:00

Sept. 30

Presbyterian Christian School* Away

7:00

Oct. 7

Jackson Academy

Away

7:00

Oct. 14

East Rankin Academy*

Home

7:00

Oct. 21

Hillcrest Christian School*

Away

7:00

Oct. 28

Parklane Academy*

Home

7:00

Nov. 4

Play Off

TBA

7:00

Nov. 11

CHAMPIONSHIP GAME (Friday MS College) TBA

*denotes conference games

q Defensive Coordinator: Will Crosby q 2010 record: 9-3

GermantownMavericks F

OR A BRAND NEW football team, the Germantown Mavericks are off to a pretty good start. The team was 1-1 in its first two games, dropping its first season opener to Yazoo City High, and winning its second against Yazoo County High 27-14. The Mavericks represent Germantown High School, which opened its doors for the first time ever in August. The school split from Madison Central

High School and is playing Class 4A in the Mississippi High School Activities Association (MHSAA). Tim Shramek, former Madison Central defensive coordinator, took on the position of head coach. And for the first two games, the Mavericks had a better record than that of his former boss Madison Central head coach Bobby Hall. Shramek spoke to the Sun before the season started. This is the first time he’s ever

been at the helm of a team. “I’m really excited about this opportunity to be head coach,” Shramek said. “Working under Bobby Hall has thoroughly prepared me for this opportunity.” Shramek is accompanied by a seasoned group of assistant coaches, many of whom came from Madison Central as well. Shramek and his coaching staff have the difficult task of building the program from scratch.

“The way we want to measure success is not only by wins and losses, but also by accomplishing goals,” Shramek said. “The ultimate goal is to play in Memorial Stadium for the state championship in December, but there are smaller goals as well.” Possibly the smallest goal of all is the most important to Shramek: players handling adversity. He believes that if the players handle adversity, they will win district games, See Mavericks, Page 4C


Page 3C


Page 4C Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011

Germantown Mavericks Continued from Page 2C ultimately sending them to the playoffs and the championship. The Mavericks will open conference play on September 16, when they travel south to take on Port Gibson. After that, it’s conference play throughout, with Mendenhall, Raymond, Florence, Magee and Richland, according to MaxPreps.com. In Shramek’s mind, there are no key games or key players. Everyone must contribute for the new program to be successful. The Mavericks plan to field 85 to 90 players this season, something that Shramek is looking forward to. With many options at his disposal, Shramek will be able to field the best players. “I don’t like to classify any player being better than the other. We work as a team and we will play the best players.” The Mavs still have some work to do. In his first two games, sophomore quarterback Tyler Shell put up a commendable 64 yards passing, according to MaxPreps. On the ground, running backs Travis Singleton and Chester Lewis have done much of the work. Singleton, a junior, has carried the ball 24 times for 171 yards and a touchdown. Lewis, a sophomore, has touched the ball 26 times, pushing for 158 yards and one touchdown, reported MaxPreps. The team went through full spring practice together, so the coaching staff at Germantown has a feel for how the players will play together. “I have learned very quickly that these guys work extremely hard and are willing to do what it takes to win. We couldn’t have better coaches, players, or administration to allow us to be successful.” Amid the uncertainty of how the brand new team’s season will play out, one thing is

certain: The excitement on the part of the players and coaches is evident. The combination of brand new facilities, a great coaching staff, and talented players should allow the Mavericks to carry on the tradition of Madison County high school football success.

2011 GERMANTOWN Varsity Football Schedule Aug. 12 Jamboree

Away 5:00

Aug. 19 Yazoo City Aug. 26 Yazoo County

Home 7:30 Away 7:30

Sept. 2 North Pike Sept. 9 Presbyterian Christian

Away 7:30 Home 7:30

Sept. 16 Port Gibson Sept. 23 OPEN

Home 7:30

Sept. 30 Mendenhall Oct. 7 Raymond

Away 7:30 Home 7:00

Oct. 14 Florence (HOMECOMING) Home 7:00 Oct. 21 Magee Oct. 28 Richland

Away 7:00 Away 7:00

q Class/Division: MHSAA 4A, Region 6, District 6 q Head Coach: Tim Shramek q Offensive Coordinator: Steve Metz q Defensive Coordinator: Miller Todd q Assistant Coaches: Gregg Perry, Phillip Poole, Drew Wardlaw

Give a gift subscription to the Northside Sun for just $20 per year locally


Page 5C

Gridiron 2011

Coach Brock Angle, Coach David Sykes, Ryder Heath, Jake Barfield, Thomas Tardy, Austin Carroll, Hayden Speed, Andrew Hannebuth, Bryan Pittman, Adam Pond, Jake Williams, J.D. Maloney, Forrest Davidson, Jake Rawlings, Taylor Thomas, Frankie Cobbins-Bailey, Wil Moore, Coach Jason Williams, Coach Brian Madden, Coach John Smith (third row) Sam Thomas, Sam Berry, Hayes Walker, Carson Dobbs, Boyce Holleman, Matt Smith, Jackson Baumann, Wilson Nalty, Taylor Treece, Lamarr Banks, Connor Carmody, Caleb Cartwright, Jamaal Clayborn, Sam Rayburn, John Manning, Madison Coleman, William Hontzas, Graham Arinder, William Crasto; (second row) Michael Mordecai, Hull Bolls, Kevin Anthony, Nicholas Guy, Bradley Lewis, A.J. Arnold, Peyton Adams, Daniel Kennedy, Turner Maxwell, Asher Pickering, Duncan Maxwell, Cooper Reid, Hayden Tierney, Payton Wood, Bo Coleman, Jack Nail, Austin Ellis, Jacob Berry; (front) Will McDowell, Craig Edgecombe, Chris Young, Benton Kelly, Stephen Brown, Harper Stone, Matt Denny, Blake Weir, Zach Nethery, Jack Pickering, Colin Welsh, David Ford, Walker Fletcher, Jay Shell, Thomas Westbrook, Todd Brown

Raiders JA W

ILL THE RAIDERS THREE-PEAT? Head Coach David Sykes wouldn’t give a definite yes. But with two convincing wins already under their belts by August 29, it looks like the Jackson Academy (JA) Raiders have a pretty good chance of returning to the Mississippi Association of Independent Schools AAA title game. If they are to return, five returning starters on offense and four on defense will help them along the way. “We have a good nucleus coming, but they have big shoes to fill,” Sykes said. “If we stay healthy, I think we’ll have a chance.” Sykes has led the Raiders to a 24-2 record and backto-back state titles. The 2010 season was capped with a 45-14 drubbing of the Madison-Ridgeland Academy Patriots. Key to the Raider’s gridiron success is the arm of third-year starting quarterback Hull Bolls. Last year, the then junior connected on 101 of 180 passes for 1,480 yards and 15 touchdowns. Bolls completed eight of 10 passes for 75 yards in the team’s 36-7 win against Presbyterian Christian on August 19. Helping him will be senior wide receiver Michael Mordecai, who last year caught 18 balls for 315 yards for five touchdowns, according to MaxPreps.com. Against Presbyterian Christian defenders, he caught five passes for 32 yards, states Jackson Academy’s Web site. The Raiders won’t be relying on an air raid alone,

but will have to put up some impressive numbers throwing the ball to get the job done. “We have good talent, but inexperience at tailback and fullback,” Sykes said. “We don’t have a starter right now, but there’s good competition for it. The underclassmen are pushing for playing time.” That was before the Raiders’ game against Presbyterian Christian. On August 19, junior running back Nick Guy put up a strong case as to why he needs to start. He ran for 95 yards and scored three touchdowns, running them in from 19 yards, seven yards and five yards respectively. In 2010, the Raiders averaged 215.8 yards rushing per game, according to MaxPreps. Up front, Matt Smith, Lamar Banks and Jackson Baumann are returning starters on the offensive line. Coming back on defense are Jacob Berry, Madison Coleman, Matt Denny and Turner Maxwell. Berry also had a strong game to start the season. The senior linebacker posted 13 tackles to help hold Presbyterian Christian to one touchdown. Sykes said the toughest challenge is keeping the kids grounded after two back-to-back 11-win seasons. “We constantly talk about it every day not to be complacent. We can’t assume it will happen again. It’s tough to get on top, but harder to stay there,” he said. “Everything we do is building on this season with the ultimate goal of playing well in November,” he said.

Veritas Lions

THE VERITAS SCHOOL is off to a slow start this football season. In its first game, the Lions fell 50-18 to Kemper Academy (last year’s defending eight-man champions). The school’s second game against Mt. Salus Christian School in Clinton was forfeited. Mt. Salus forfeited the game. Veritas is scheduled to take on Sharkey Issaquena Academy September 9. Unlike larger private and parochial schools on the Northside, Veritas plays eight-man football. The game is just like 11-man matchups, but on a smaller scale, said Veritas head coach Steve Spinks. He said eight-man is popular with some institutions in the Mississippi Association of Independent Schools (MAIS) because of drops in attendance. Boys play both sides of the ball. “Most of it started in the Delta. They wanted to offer athletics for boys, but it’s hard to fill out an 11-man team when there are only 16 boys in the high school,” he

said. “The difference is not tremendous. You’ll have five men on the line of scrimmage at the snap. You lose two linemen and a specialty player,” he said. The field is also supposed to be smaller than a regulation size field to compensate for fewer athletes. However, some schools still play on the typical 11-man field. Veritas’ home games are on the old Pearl High football field. “Most of the schools we play are on a regulation field. It makes for long runs and tired athletes,” he siad. According to MaxPreps.com, Veritas went 6-4 in 2010 and 3-3 in the North Division. This year, Veritas has been moved to the South Division to make more room for schools in the Delta that are coming on board. The Lions have a relatively young roster, with nine sophomores, two seniors, two juniors and a freshman. “In the past two years, we’ve been

2011 JACKSON ACADEMY Varsity Football Schedule Aug. 11

A-AA Jamboree

JA

TBA

Aug. 12

AAA Jamboree

JA

TBA

Aug. 19

Presb.Christian

JA

7:30

Aug. 26

N.E. Lauderdale

Meridian

7:30

Sept. 2

River Oaks

Monroe

7:00

Sept.9

*Pillow

JA

7:30

Sept. 16

Lamar (HC)

JA

7:30

Sept. 23

*Heritage

Columbus

7:00

Sept. 30

*Lee

Clarksdale

7:30

Oct. 7

Jackson Prep

JA

7:00

Oct. 14

*Washington

JA

7:00

Oct. 21

*Magnolia Heights

JA

7:00

Oct. 28

*MRA

Madison

7:00

Nov. 4

Playoffs

TBA

7:00

Nov. 11

AAA Div. I Championship Clinton

7:00

*denotes conference games

q Class/Division: MAIS AAA I, Division I q Head Coach: David Sykes q Assistant Coaches: Brock Angle, Bryan Madden, John Smith and Jason Williams. q 2010 record: 12-1

blessed with talent. My hope for this year is that we play with heart,” he said. Last year’s top player was running back Ian Blakemore, who put up an impressive 350 yards rushing and nine touchdowns in one game. This year, the Lions are relying on senior running back and defensive back Tyler Wynn, senior tight end and defensive back Will Earnhart, junior running back and defensive back David Robertson, sophomore offensive lineman and defensive end Robert Hamil, and sophomore running back and linebacker Seth Spinks. Spinks is starting at quarterback as well. In his first game, Spinks completed five passes for 60 yards and one touchdown. Wynn also gives Veritas an edge on offense. In the team’s first game, Wynn carried the ball eight times for 173 yards and one touchdown. Despite an early loss, Spinks still has high hopes for the season. “I expect us to win. I always do. If we play with passion, we have as good a chance as any,” Spinks said.

2011 VERITAS Varsity Football Schedule 8/19/2011

Kemper Academy

7:00 PM

8/26/2011

Mt. Salus Christian

7:00 PM

9/2/2011

Clinton Christian Academy

TBA

9/9/2011

Sharkey Issaquena Academy

TBA

9/16/2011

Christian Collegiate Academy

TBA

9/23/2011

Central Academy

7:00 PM

9/30/2011

Brairfield Academy

TBA

10/7/2011

Rebul Academy

TBA

10/14/2011

Tensas Academy

TBA

10/21/2011

Franklin Academy

TBA

q Class/Division: MAIS District 2A (South Eight-Man) q Head Coach: Steve Spinks q 2010 record: 6-4


Page 6C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011

Doug Ball, Jazz Anderson, Arthur Thompson, Shauntez Ball, Chris Morgan, Kyle O’Keefe, Trey Bishop, Isaac Glenn, Jarred Wade, David Turner, Drew Rowell, Monquel Jones, Chris Cooper, Byrd Hillman, Jake Schwartz, Bryan Kendrick, Matt Thomas, Keith Williams, Xavier Watson, Nick Greenfield, Anton Johnson, Jacob Wooten, Mead Geary, Brandon Moore, Dillan Langley, Jayron Harness, Jourden Adams, Brandon Collins, Jordan Paige, Jake Hinkle, Westin King, Riley Warren, Daniel Goodspeed, Sam Martin, Jordan Parker, Nick Bracey, Ben House, Braxton Bartlett, Tate Kirby, Hugh Warren, Myles Pryce, Jamarian Roberts, Mason Warren, Anthony Wright, Stephen Collins, Chase Blossman, Mason Smith, Austin Sanders, Jeffrey Pate, Bailey Pepper, Auston Bailey, Clay Crossman, Brion Ballard, Aaron Tatum, Austin Tatum, Coty Meade, Maurice Bennett, Brandon Jefferson, Evan Chancellor, David Cooper, Hunter Embry, Devon Desper, Dre Lawson, Leonard Swilley, Nick Wooten, Blake Yarbrough, Josh Harris, Jeremy Washington, Drew Edgar, Christian Sumler, Donald Warren, Maurey Bland, Jereme Kennebrew, Hopkins Peyton, Jumorius Davis, Martez Simpson, Buck Covington, Bailey Breland, Josh Roan, Ferderrick Ross, Kelvin Williams, T.J. Toney, Barclay Angle, Trace Hamby, Alex Horton, Adam Buckley, Nolan Ellzey, Gage McCarty, Lee Lindsey, Jack Booth, Jamie Lee, Demonterius Dorsey, Keilund Cowan, Jimmie Lee, James Hollins, Devonte Burnett, Lederrion Johnson, Lemetrius Hollins, Adrian Jones, J.P. Higgins, Jackson Hoggat, Gemarta Jackson, Denzel Robinson, Jamie Flint, Tyler Holden, Patrick Rahaim, Justin Water, Triston Cunningham, Luke Simmons, Fred Gray, Tavarus Jackson, Joseph Green, Jimmie Terry

Madison Central Jaguars

P

OWERHOUSE MADISON CENTRAL will likely use this bye week to recoup following a rough start to the 2011 football season. The Jaguars didn’t appear to be in top form early on this year, dropping their first two games to Olive Branch and Starkville in squeakers. The usually strong Jags lost the games despite a long list of returning starters. On the plus side, the losses were against non-divisional rivals, meaning that Madison Central still has time to turn it around heading into region play on September 23. The Jags will have one more non-division game against West Monroe High School on September 16. On September 23, Region Two game play heats up when Madison Central will take on district 6A powerhouse Clinton High School. After that, the schedule doesn’t get any easier, with the Jags having to face Murrah, Warren Central, Vicksburg, Northwest Rankin and Greenville. Northwest Rankin gave the Jags their only regular season loss in 2010. (Madison Central returned the favor in the 2010 playoffs.) Madison Central certainly has the manpower to get the job done. Coach Bobby Hall, in his sixth season at Madison Central, told the Sun that the team had “10 starters returning, and we should be very well-rounded this season.” The Jaguars’ defense looks to be very athletic as well. It’s led by nose guard Maurice Bennett, end Martez Simpson, defensive back Shauntez Ball, and linebacker Isaac Glenn. The defense, which was one of the best in the state last year, returned numerous starters and replaced lost starters with very talented newcomers. The offense also appears to have the needed talent to get back to championship form.

It’s led by veteran quarterback Drew Rowell, fullback Hugh Warren, and wide receiver Keith Williams. Despite the losses, the Jags have had a strong ground game, averaging 261 yards rushing per outing, according to MaxPreps.com. Leading the ground assault are junior Moore Brandon, who’s carried the ball 23 times for 223 yards and a touchdown; Rowell, who’s rushed for two touchdowns and 144 yards on 33 carries; and Warren, who’s pounded out one touchdown and 108 yards on 25 carries. HALL IS ENTERING his sixth season as head coach for the Jaguars, holding a 51-15 record in Madison. He has coached high school football for 26 years, with an unbelievable 262-67 record. For the first time in his coaching tenure at Madison Central, Hall has gotten to select his own coaching staff. With the creation of Germantown High School in Gluckstadt, many Madison Central coaches took coaching opportunities at the new school. This opened the door for Hall to hand-pick his own coaches. Hall feels that he and the new staff are ready to take the next step and win a state championship. “We want to win the district and compete for a state championship this year,” Hall said. “That’s something we haven’t been able to do yet.” The Jaguars are dressing 114 players this fall. This year’s losses can be attributed, in part, to the opening of the new Germantown High School, which took a number of students out of Madison Central. When asked about the Jaguars’ foe South Panola, Hall laughed and replied, “Yeah, they’re good.” The Jaguars have been to the north state championship three consecutive years, losing two of the three to South Panola, who eventually became state champions both times. The Jaguars have won their district five consecutive years.

2011 MADISON CENTRAL Varsity Football Schedule Aug. 12

Jamboree/Pearl

Home

TBA

Aug. 19

Olive Branch High School

Home

7:30

Aug. 26

Starkville High School

Away

7:30

Sept. 2

Petal High School

Home

7:30

Sept. 9

Open

Sept. 16 West Monroe High School

Away

7:30

Sept. 23

*Clinton High School

Away

7:30

Sept. 30

*Murrah High School

Away

7:30

Oct. 7

**Warren Central High School

Home

7:00

Oct. 14

*Vicksburg High School

Away

7:00

Oct. 21

*Jim Hill High School

Home

7:00

Oct. 28

*Northwest Rankin High School Away

7:00

Nov. 4

*Greenville High School

Home

7:00

*denotes conference games

q Class/Division: MHSAA 6A, Region 2 q Head Coach: Bobby Hall q Offensive Coordinator: Doug Jones

Todd Mangum q Assistant Coaches: Jamie Everett, Todd Walker, Karlos Dillard, Brad Moody, Ronnie Smith q 2010 record: 12-1

q Defensive Coordinator:


Page 7C


Page 8C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011

Patrick Daniels, Steele Hardin, Will Trammell, Zach McCraw, Micah Thomas, Adam Sims, Michael Baxter, Alec Rawlings, Collins Pace, Parker Saxton, Brennon McNeese, Breland Parker, Matt Porter, Joel Love, Ryan Ward, JT Williamson, Corey Olinger, Kyle Gonseth, Nick Fulton, Hunter Gillon, Bradley Peoples, Dylan Propst, Carson Dean, Andrew Werhan, Bailey Tate, Joshua Jordan, Justin Simpson, Kalen Fowler, Kyle McCullouch, Zack Everhart, Christian Jayroe, Joseph Ray, Josh Daniels, Tyler Klaas, Michael Gordon, Sam Stevens, Bennett Yerger, Scott Douglas, Anthony Ray, Grey Shepherd, Austin Booth, Brett Nadalich, Mitch Phillips, Mitchell Bishop, Ben Shows, Leo Trejo, Sean Rawlings, Trey Sellers, Brendan Peden, Reid Kellums, Morgan Dean, Nick Everhart

MRA Patriots N

EW LEADERSHIP at Madison-Ridgeland Academy (MRA) hopes to bring home a state championship in 2011. But after a tough loss against one of the school’s biggest rivals to open the season, MRA’s newest head coach Forrest Williams still has his work cut out for him. The Patriots were 1-1 heading into their September 2 game against East Rankin Academy and were showing several inconsistencies on offense and defense. Against Jackson Prep, the Patriots fell 35-13 to the same team the school held to seven points in the playoffs last year. And on August 26, the Patriots soundly whipped Canton Academy 64-0. Last year, the Patriots lost in the AAA Mississippi Association of Independent Schools (MAIS) championship game to rival Jackson Academy. The Patriots’ record in 2010 was a mediocre 7-5, but a successful playoff run allowed them to advance to the championship game. This year, the Patriots have a completely new coaching staff. Williams will be in his first year with the Patriots. Assistant coaches John Weaver, Nathan Stamper, Tim Bell, Chris Manogin, and Chris Allen are also in their first year with MRA. Williams has definitely gotten a head start on preparing for this season. The entire coaching staff went through spring practices with the players, so they are already very acquainted with most of the team. Williams is optimistic that this season will be a complete turn-around from the 2010 season. “We are hitting the ground running right now,” Williams said. “We plan on attacking every opponent and improving each and every week.” Williams will have a plethora of players to choose from this season. There are 52 players on this year’s roster, many of whom are returning starters from last year. On offense, the Patriots will be loaded with weapons that could lead to many touchdowns. Quarterback Joel Love, running back Josh

Daniels, wide receiver Nick Everhart, and receiver Will Trammell will lead the Patriots in scoring. The Patriots’ offensive line will be key in the success of the offense, and all five linemen this year started in 2010. The Patriots’ defense looks to be very talented as well. Linebacker Bradley Peoples, defensive linemen Morgan Dean and Trey Sellers, and defensive back Steele Hardin will lead the defense for the Patriots this season. The linebackers will be the biggest question mark going into the season, mostly because of inexperience. However, the seasoned defensive line and defensive backs will allow the Patriots to hold opposing offenses in check. Williams has encouraged Patriot fans by doing a couple of non-traditional things this offseason. Williams and his coaching staff distributed a pamphlet to players and their parents this summer. In the schedule section of the handout, the season opener against rival Jackson Prep on August 19 was marked “BEAT JACKSON PREP.” Last season, the Patriots lost to Prep in the regular season but beat them in the postseason, knocking Prep out of the playoffs. In addition to firing up his team about the Prep game, Williams took the team on a rafting trip to boost team morale. “I noticed immediately that MRA has a very close-knit, family-like community,” Williams said. “The players, parents and fans have a great attitude, and anything I can do to contribute to that attitude will help our team in the long run.” The Patriots’ overall goal for the season is to win a state championship, and Williams and his coaching staff look forward to the season. “We are very ready,” Williams said. “We have all the tools to be successful, we just need to take it game by game and improve on our mistakes.”

2011 MRA Varsity Football Schedule 8/19

Jackson Prep

Home

7:00

8/26

Canton

Away

TBD

9/2

East Rankin

Home

7:00

9/9

Heritage

Home

7:00

9/16

Washington

Away

TBD

9/23

Pillow

Away

TBD

9/30

Scott Central (HC)

Home

7:00

10/7

Magnolia Heights

Away

TBD

10/14

Simpson

Away

TBD

10/21

Lee

Home

7:00

10/28

Jackson Academy (SN)

Home

7:00

11/4

First Round MAIS Playoffs

11/11

State Championship

q Class/Division: MAIS AAA I, Division I q Head Coach: Forrest Williams q Offensive Coordinator: John Weaver q Defensive Coordinator: Nathan Stamper q Assistant Coaches: Chris Allen, Tim Bell, Jim DeLaughter, Chad Lipscomb, Chris Manogin, Jeremy Packer, Allen Pavatte q 2010 record: 7-5, AAA State runner-up


Page 9C

Gridiron 2011

Rodney Boss, Charles Bowman, John Grady Burnett, Phillip Burnett, Peter Cooper, Riley Cooper, Parks Douglass, David Dulske, Luke Dulske, John Arthur Eaves, Jake Edlin, Ford Gibbes, Graham Grogan, Angus Harper, Ben Henry, Bennie Kirkland, Crawford Lee, Jacob Lockyer, John Long, Max Martin, Harrison McKee, Mark McMillin, Mark McMullan, Tanner Menist, Baylor Obert, Benton Parker, Wes Pearigen, Jaren Reeves-Darby, Joseph Rein, William Rowell, Michael Sanderson, Bruce Senter, Jackson Sharp, Harrison Smith, Josh Stambaugh, Ian Stonestreet, Seth Ury, Matt Warren, Alex Weisser, Alex Wilson, Thomas Wilson, Evan Womack, Connor Woodall, Daniel Yeh

St. Andrew’s Saints A

FTER FIVE WINS last year, the Saints are looking for a strong season in 2011. But losing starters on both sides of the ball, second-year head coach J.J. Plummer said St. Andrew’s Episcopal School might have a tough year. Heading into the 2011 season, the Saints had lost nine starters on offense and nine on defense. The losses were felt on August 19, when St. Andrew’s fell 383 to Starkville Academy. The Saints’ inexperienced team was held to just three points, while the defense couldn’t head off a charging Starkville offense. The Volunteers put up 38 points including 14 to cap the game in the fourth quarter. The Saints rebounded on August 26, handing Williams Sullivan High School a 49-14 loss to improve their record to 1-1. On September 2, St. Andrew’s took on Pisgah High School, and on Friday, the Saints will face in-town rivals St. Joseph Catholic School. “We have depth, but it’s sophomores and freshmen,” he said. “This year will be a rebuilding process.” Plummer took over the program in 2010 after the Saints finished just 3-8 in 3A Region Six under former coach Ted Taylor in 2009. Plummer turned the Saints around, leading them to a 56 record in his first year. Stats show that the team was better than its record indicated. Figures at MaxPreps.com show that the Saints had a strong ground attack and defensive game. The team rushed for an average of 311.5 yards per game. And the defense put up an average of 68.3 tackles per game and held their opponents to 214 total points. The Saints’ air game seemed deflated, with only 39.3 yards passing per game and 40 completed passes on the season. Passing for 2011 hasn’t fared much better. Junior quarterback Jonathan Taylor has averaged 58.5 yards passing per game, with

ACTOS

the longest pass being 22 yards. St. Andrew’s lost four straight in the second half of 2010, all by seven points or less. But the Saints capped their season on a strong note, handing McLaurin High School a 56-34 loss. Plummer said they were a few plays from being a nine or 10win team. “We had four games where we had the lead in the fourth quarter. It came down to the last two to three minutes,” he said. “Most of the losses came from turnovers.” The Saints rely on four seniors: running back and linebacker Jaren Reeves Darby, offensive guards Matt Warren and David Dulske, and linebacker and running back John Arthur Eaves. Last year, Darby was second on the team in rushing, carrying the ball 89 times for 583 yards and four touchdowns. In the first two games of 2011, Darby caught the ball five times for 55 yards. His longest catch was for 22. He’s carried the ball 23 times for another 109 yards on the ground, according to MaxPreps.com. In 2010, Eaves chalked up six tackles and four assists. On offense, he carried the ball 11 times for 68 yards. Plummer said the receiving corps also looks stronger, with receivers Tanner Menist, Connor Woodall and William Rowell. So far this year, the sophomore Woodall has rushed the ball for 129 yards on 18 carries, according to MaxPreps. The season will also mark the return of seasoned quarterback Jonathan Taylor. Last year, the then-sophomore’s season was cut short when he tore his ACL in game two. The Saints were down 12 to 7 in the fourth quarter but were driving for the score. “On third and 13, Jonathan scrambled for the first down. We got the first down, but he went out of the game,” Plummer said.

Has Been Linked To Bladder Cancer! If you or anyone you know has been diagnosed with bladder cancer and was prescribed Actos, ActoPlus met, ActoPlus met XR or Duetac (Pioglitazone), call for a free consultation.

1-888-662-9901 FrankHurdle@HurdleLaw.com Hurdle Law - Oxford, MS The Mississippi Supreme Court advises that a decision on legal services is important and should not be based solely on advertisements. Free background information available upon request. Listing of these previously mentioned areas of practice does not indicate any certification of expertise therein. For information on this office you may contact the Mississippi Bar at 601-948-4471.

LAW OFFICES OF

New Orleans, LA

Ocean Springs, MS 800-208-VISA (8472)

Over 25 years experience limited to the practice of immigration law including deportation defense, family immigration petitions, employment visas, work permits, naturalization and requests for prosecutorial discretion. Call us today, toll-free, for a consultation or visit our website at www.burnettlawoffices.com

Licensed in Louisiana and Mississippi

Hablamos Español

Free background information available upon request

Varsity Football Schedule 8/19/2011

Starkville Academy

Away

7:30 PM

8/26/2011

William Sullivan

Home

7:30 PM

9/2/2011

Pisgah

Home

7:30 PM

9/9/2011

Madison St. Joe.

Away

7:30 PM

9/16/2011

Enterprise Lincoln

Away

7:30 PM

9/23/2011

East Webster

Away

7:30 PM

9/30/2011

Bailey

Home

7:30 PM

10/7/2011

Morton

Home

7:00 PM

10/14/2011

Raleigh

Home

7:00 PM

10/21/2011

Forest High School

Away

7:00 PM

10/28/2011

McLaurin

Away

7:00 PM

q Class/Division: MHSAA 3A, Region Six, District Six q Head Coach: J.J. Plummer q Assistant Coaches: Dan Roach, Johnny Plummer, Mike Smith, Michael Callahan and Trace Baughn q 2010 record: 5-6

®

MALVERN C. BURNETT

2011 ST. ANDREW’S

FATBOY jr

48 GUN SAFE

$99900 In Home Delivery Available


Page 10C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Gridiron 2011

Randy Wallace, Antwan Bulley, Chad Dunson, Fred Murray, Demarius Brown, Chris Webster, Shaheed Green, Malik Dear, Jared Garner, Jarrod McEntee, Vonnie Howard, Edward Williams, Keith Berry, Jarveis Berry, Tredarius Coleman, Marquisian Chapman, Zachary Jackson, Scott Martin, Sebastian Sanders, Cedric Spencer, Glen Wiggins, Nathaniel Jackson, Fred Franklin, Mark Todd, Galloway Hall, Patrick Jackson, Alexander Price, Marquis Berry, Jonathan Calvin, Timothy Gipson, Daniel Drake, Raymond Carter, Malik Barrow, Devonta Anthony, Tony Williams, Christopher Franklin, Travis Williams, Joshua Murphy, Jordan Bush, Matthew Morrow, Keandre Shelton, Keith Simpson, Joseph Moore, Daquiri Cowan, Regenald Jones, Marzelle Day, Chrisvonta Smith, Robert Palmer, Joshua Johnson, James Davis, Marquis Allen, John McIntyre, Jazarian Bailey, D’Edward Proctor, Kevius Willis, Marquis Wade, Randell Bailey, Tamaz Felton, Deonte Shelton, Laylan Fuqua, Travion Rice, Willie Brown, Alex Thomas, Donathan Hawkins

Murrah Mustangs T

HE MURRAH MUSTANGS are off to a far better start than in 2010, with a 1-1 record heading into the third week of game play. Murrah High went 1-10 in 2010, its only win coming against Vicksburg in the second to last game of the season. Head coach Zachary Grady is optimistic that his team can have a bounce-back year. “Last season was not what we wanted it to be,” Grady said. “Looking back at those losses, I’m not terribly disappointed. We were very young last year.” Grady, who is in his fifth year at Murrah, was not wrong about that. The 2011 squad will be experienced, something Coach Grady is anticipating greatly. The Mustangs lost only five starters from last season on both sides of the ball: two on offense and three on defense. “I expect us to turn completely around this season. We have great talent and even greater speed. In all my years at Murrah, this is by far the best team I have ever had.” On offense, some key returning players will help the scoring chances tremendously. At press time, Maxpreps.com only had stats for Murrah’s first game. Senior quarterback Chris Webster completed seven passes for 74 yards and two interceptions. Running back Fredrick

Franklin had put up a team-leading 44 yards rushing, and wide receiver Randy Wallace had caught four balls for 50 yards through the air. On the other side of the ball, key returning players on defense will help keep opposing teams off the scoreboard and possibly even do a little scoring of their own. Cornerback Fredrick Murray, linebacker Jarrod McEnte, and brothers Tony and Travis Williams on the defensive line will all contribute to the defense of the Mustangs. Murrah is in Region 2 of the 6A classification of the Mississippi High School Activities Association (MHSAA), arguably the toughest district in the state. To make it to the playoffs this season, the Mustangs will have to defeat the likes of Madison Central, Northwest Rankin, Clinton, Warren Central, Vicksburg, Jim Hill, and Greenville. “Playing in this district is nothing we can’t handle,” Grady said. “In any high school football district in Mississippi, you have to be ready to play week in and week out. We just prepare for every game the same way as the last one.” Grady is embracing his fresh start in 2011. When asked about some key games this coming year, Grady glanced at the schedule and said, “All of them.”

q Class/Division: MHSAA 6A, Region 2

q 2010 record: 1-10

2011 MURRAH Varsity Football Schedule Aug. 12

Forest Hill

Home

7:30

Aug. 19

Hattiesburg

Away

7:30

Aug. 26

Lanier

Away

7:00

Sept. 2

Provine

Home

7:00

Sept.9

Callaway

Home

7:00

Sept. 16

OPEN

Sept. 23

Greenville

Away

7:00

Sept. 30

Madison Central

Home

7:00

Oct. 7

Clinton

Away

7:00

Oct. 14

Warren Central

Away

7:00

Oct. 21

Vicksburg

Home

7:00

Oct. 28

Jim Hill

Home

7:00

Nov. 4

Northwest Rankin

Home

7:00

q Head Coach: Zachary Grady

Ridgeland Titans RIDGELAND HIGH SCHOOL is looking to take the next step and win a state championship in 2011. However, the Titans have made that task more difficult after dropping their first two games to Mendenhall and Clinton. The good news is that the games are not divisional match-ups and Ridgeland can still capture the division and state crowns. The Titan’s first conference match-up is against Canton High on September 23. Despite the losses, Ridgeland is still putting up strong numbers on offense. Senior quarterback Tyler James has thrown for 361 yards in the first two games, including 255 in the Titans’ heartbreaking 39-32 loss to Clinton High. James has also tossed five touchdowns, making up 36 of the Titan’s 60 offensive

points. In all, the offense put up an impressive 60 points in the first two games, according to MaxPreps. The defense, though, left a little more to be desired. Against Mendenhall, the defense gave up 41 points, and only two fewer against Clinton. The losses are unusual for the Madison County powerhouse. Last year, the Titans posted a 13-1 record, including a 7-0 record in district play. The only loss last year came in the Mississippi High School Activities Association (MHSAA) Class 5A North State Championship against West Point High. West Point went on to win the Class 5A title. Despite their rocky start, the Titans have traditionally been a winning program, and fans are expecting no different

this season. Head coach Kenny Burton has been coaching at Ridgeland for 10 years, nine as head coach. He plans to continue that winning tradition by trusting and utilizing his coaching staff. “The key to our past success is our excellent coaching staff,” Burton said. “You have to establish trust between coaches before you start winning ball games, and we have that trust factor.” The success of a program is not reliant on just the coaches, however. This year, there will be about 75 players on the roster for the Titans. On offense, the Titans will be very young and inexperienced. In fact, the offense only has one returning starter. However, that returning starter is one of the best players in the state. Running back Quardarius Armour is a talented back that will run over opposing teams’

defenses this season. Coach Burton will rely heavily on Armour on the offensive side of the ball. Armour is already doing his part. He’s carried the ball 38 times for 237 yards on the ground, according to MaxPreps reports, and has taken the ball into the end zone three times. “Armour is probably the best back to ever come out of Ridgeland,” Burton said. “He is going to be our main scorer this season and we’re expecting him to step up big time.” The Titans will approach this season with the mindset of picking up where they left off in 2010. Burton believes that the overall team speed will contribute to fast-paced games with plenty of scoring. “We are ready to take that next step and win the state championship,” Burton said. See Titans, Page 11C


Page 11C

Gridiron 2011

Deon Fields, Xavier Marion, Bryce Williams, Quardarius Armour, Khalil Henderson, Gary Adams, Kameron Monroe, Darrian Harrington, Tomaaz Washington, Willie Sherman, Kris Givens, Parker Lohman, Xavier Rawls, Tyler James, Phillip Rafferty, Isaiah Johnson, Ben Culpepper, Fred Carter, Xavier Whisenton, Tre Taliaferro, Michael Holliman, Aundra Moore, Omar Wedlow, Quad Winder, Bashir Martin, Marcterrius Wilson, Keyderrick Jackson, Taylor Roden, Andrue Worthy, Andrew Fields, Jamal House, Kaylon Rutledge, Jymal Ellis, Troy Reed, Derrell Carter, Jonathan Singleton, Al Rawls, James King, Debreco Hamilton, Gabe Jones, Madison Davis, Dontellis Smothers, Chris Perry, Will Heskett, David Nicholas, Jayvin Johnson, Jeremy Robinson, Semaj Ficklin, Gary Plowden, Jackson Twitty, William Hooper, DeAnthony Sumrall, Matt Jurney, Brandon Carr, Sam Roberson, John David Bass, Stedman Capler, Jordan Odom, Spencer Dunning, Robert Richard, Lejarryan Blake, Kendall Watson, Jermon Johnson, John Warren, Adarrius Skinner, Puckett Jurney, Eli Haik, Terrance Stamps, Tyshun Mitchell, Alex Hawkins, Decourvus Pounders, Thomas Maisel, Demetrie Bennett, Joshua King, Xavier Keyton, Neil Andrews, Christopher Williams-Lopez, Charleston Littleton, Samuel Pope, John Taylor

Ridgeland Titans

Big Reach! Small Price! 2011 RIDGELAND Varsity Football Schedule

Continued from Page 10C Despite the early losses, “the coaching staff and (I) are looking forward to what this season will bring for us.”

Run this size ad in over 100 newspapers statewide for less than $11 per paper.

Call your local newspaper or MS Press Services at 601-981-3060.

Aug.12

Lawrence County - scrimmage

Away

TBA

Aug. 19

Mendenhall

Home

7:30

Aug. 26

Clinton

Home

7:30

PUBLIC AUCTION

Sept. 2

Terry

Away

7:30

Annual Fall Contractors Public Auction

Sept. 9

Kosciusko - Homecoming

Home

7:30

Friday, Sept. 16 and Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011 Begins 10 A.M. Each Day!

q Class/Division: MHSAA 5A, Region 2, District 6

Sept. 23

Canton *

Away

7:30

q Head Coach: Kenny Burton

Sept.

Lanier *

Away

7:30

Oct. 7

Starkville *

Home

7:00

Oct. 14

Callaway *

Away

7:00

q Assistant Coaches: Calvin Bolton, Terry Coggin, Doug Elkins, Pat Martin, Erik Stensaas, Ty Weems q 2010 record: 13-1

Oct. 21

Neshoba Central *

Home

7:00

Oct. 28

Yazoo City *

Away

7:00

Nov. 4

Provine *

Home

7:00

T R AY S • C A N D L E S T I C K S • D R A W E R P U L L S

R E P A I R S

L A M P S •

N E W

V A S E S •

C O P P E R

S E R V I C E S

L I G H T S

T E A

C U S T O M

S A N D B L A S T I N G

COPPER

FOUNTAINS

BRASS

BEDS

* Division Games

h c o s o o t l k c ba o time & n clean? to ! s u l l a C Magic Maids Gift Cards make great gifts! Whether its for elderly parents, baby, wedding, birthday or just because, cleaning service is always appreciated! Jackson’s Quality Residential & Commercial Cleaning Services

Since 1979.

INSURED BONDED

CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI

601-856-4100

Day 1 Will Feature: Construction Equipment, Attachments, Trucks One Ton & Larger, Trailers. Day 2 Will Feature: Farm Tractors, Farm Implements, Cars & Trucks, Campers and Miscellaneous Items. 80 Campers sold Saturday Absolute!

Hwy 49 South of Hattiesburg, Brooklyn, MS

www.mmaofms.com

MARTIN & MARTIN Auctioneers of MS, Inc.

Jeff Martin, MSAL# 1255

601-450-6200


Page 12C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

school news

Summer institute St. Richard Catholic School teachers recently attended the Whole Schools Summer Institute at MSU Riley Center. The week of professional development taught participants how to integrate the arts into the total curriculum. St. Richard teachers who were presenters at the institute include fifthgrade teacher Dena Kinsey; second-grade teacher Dorothy Spencer; Assistant Principal Lisa Geimer and four-year-old kindergarten teacher Sheryl Thomas. Shown are (from

left, back) speech and resource teacher Elisabeth Ely; (middle row) Spanish teacher Sarah Navoy; Kinsey; third-grade teacher Norma Thiel; kindergarten teacher Stacy Kaiser, special education teacher Julie Kehoe; St. Joseph Catholic School teacher Terri Cooper; (front) three-year-old kindergarten teacher Lari Sandel; Geimer; Principal Jules Michel; first-grade teacher Margaret Anzelmo; and Spencer.

Character water First Presbyterian Day School first-grade students began their first day of first grade with special bottled water personalized for each class. The water was bottled with enthusi-

am, determination, character, and teamwork for each student. Shown are (from left) Garner Adams, Jane Anne Sumrall, Josh Laird, and Rose Mary Matlock.

sunlanders in service Navy Hospitalman Tyrone R. Kidd, son of Michelle J. Houston of Jackson, and Tyrone Kidd of Madison, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Kidd is a 2007 graduate of Jim Hill High School.


Page 13C

school news

STUDENT GUIDES

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School eighth-graders who serve as student guides, who assist the admissions office with visiting students, back to school nights, and campus tours, are (from left, back) Ben Hearon, Ryan McCarty, Jake Waring, Wilson Montjoy; (third row) Lily Katz, Deeksha Mishra; (second row) Kathryn Walton Monroe, Simmy Vig, Ali Garriga, Charlotte Dunbar, Alexis Palmer, Ivanna Adams, Kristin Boykin, Lia Yeh; (front) Sohil Patel, Scott Kennedy, Jonathan Springer, Fikunmi Idowu, Jack Harth, Lauren Allen, Millie Morse, Tracy Rappai, Alison Chain.

happenings Diabetes support Baptist Nutrition Center hosts a free Diabetes Support Group at 1 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month. For more information call 601-973-1624.

Anniversary concert Beth Israel Congregation will celebrate their 150th anniversary with a concert September 17, 8 p.m., at the

Jackson Convention Center. $30 tickets can be ordered at Ticketmaster.com or at the Jackson Coliseum ticket office at 601-353-0603.

Sunset symphony The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra will present a patriotic program “The Red, White and Blue Symphony at Sunset,” September 22, 7

First day p.m., at the Cedars. Free, bring a picnic supper and lawn chair or blanket. For information on reserved tables or sponsorships call 601-981-9606.

Caregiver 101 The Mississippi Chapter Alzheimer’s Association will present “Caregiver Survival 101: Educating Families About Alzheimer’s” September 21, 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Ridgeland Library. To sign up call 601-987-0020.

St. Anthony Catholic School kicked off its third year on Monday when the school welcomed more than 280 students. Shown with grandfather Tommy Manning, (right) new student Marley Manning gets ready to start the first grade.

names in the news Jamie Bush, Murrah High School JROTC Cadet of the Year, was selected as Jackson Public Schools JROTC Cadet of the Year for 2011. He now attends the Navel Academy Prep School.


Page 14C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

school news

Ready to play The four-year-old kindergarten boys at Madison Ridgeland Academy are set for Friday night football. Shown are (from left)

Shepard Doty, Ross Cole, Parker Grimsley, Sam Harless, Alex Kinney, Eli LaBauve, Caiden Shows.

Tea party Preschoolers at Jackson Academy enjoy an annual tea party held the day before classes begin. Students visit their new classroom, meet their teacher and classmates, and

enjoy time on the playground to prepare for the new school year. Shown are (from left) Tate Averett, A’Miracle Owens, Ethan Schoeneck, Harper Griffin.

Metal Roofing and Pre-Engineered Building Manufacturer

Order Today... Pick Up Today! We Also Deliver!

22 Colors In Stock!

Buy Direct and $ave! Available In Five Profiles:

PBR

Standard Residential

Perma-Loc Standing Seam

Secure-Seam Standing Seam

5-V

1-800-581-4645

Brookhaven, MS * Tupelo, MS * Lake Charles, LA

Ad deadline Monday, 10 a.m.


Page 15C

JUNIOR HIGH CHEER

Celebration St. Andrew’s Episcopal School recently celebrated Saints Celebration 2011, an annual event during which all the school’s fall athletes are introduced to the school community. Attendees included (from left) Madeline Harris, Boudreaux Dulske, and Ali Garriga.

Wee croc The 2011-2012 Jackson Academy junior high cheerleaders attended a home camp where they were trained by National Cheerleading Association instructors and choreographers. The squad received blue ribbons and was given a bid to nationals in Dallas. The NCA instructors nominated the entire squad for All-American Cheerleader and selected were Beatty Carpenter, Kristen Clower, Bailey Wood, Turner Yates, Sarah French and Sam Rhodes. The cheerleader sponsor is Amy Etheridge and cheer manager is Rollins Parker. Shown are (from left, back) Sam Rhodes, Abby Miskelly, Turner Yates, Eliza Lundy, Kristen Clower, Avenell Newman; (middle row) Price Waltman, Bailey Wood, Beatty Carpenter, Ann Elizabeth Walker; (front) Candace Fielder, Mallory McCubbins, Hannah Hudson, Mary Ousley Owen, Sarah French, Maggie Cross.

Students (from left) Cooper Tucker and Adam Mahfous enjoy handling a young crocodile that Percy King brought to Wee Care Ridgeland.

Support your local community Shop with Northside Sun advertisers


Page 16C

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Cross country St. Joseph Catholic High School Cross Country Team saw its girls finish third in the state 2A championships last year. The Bruins hope to build on that success this year. Shown are (from left, back) Coach Aaron Reller, Tim Cook, Eric Diamond, Jack Hall, Anna Edge, Katherine Mangialardi, Jenna Bednarzyk, Gabriella Nuzzo, Natalie Younger, Shannon Harkins, Bailey Brilley, Anna Margaret McDonnell, Mary Reagan Baladi, Megan Vandevender, Halle Anderson,

Meosha Smith, Sean Himel, Loden Snell, Ethan Schuetzle, Josh Speyerer, Mitch Sypniewski, Chase Porter, Richard Brown, Coach David Wissel; (front) Katelyn Prager, Meredith Loper, Elise Sheldrick, Jordaine Piernas, Abbie Pitre, Walker Foggo, Riley Collins, Ryan Crandall, Brantley Bariola, Joseph Edge, Will Foggo, Catherine Burgess, Brennan Trask. Not pictured: MariMac Collins.

Girls soccer Members of the Jackson Prep 2011-2012 varsity girls soccer team are (from left, back) Head Coach Jon Marcus Duncan, Kathryn Bickerstaff, Falon Miskelly, Ann Hilton Buckner, Caroline Hannon, Georgia Dewey, Maggie Leech, Jonlyn Reeves, McKenzie Robinson, Madeleine Griffin, Elizabeth

Shapley; (front) Keavy Noblin, Kaylie Reeves, Mary Claire Burge, Grace Baird, Corrie Ray, Clayton Noblin, Beth Graeber, Morgan Reeves, Carson Easterling, Megan Dallas and Maley Lawrence.

Support your local community -Shop with Northside Sun advertisers


September 8, 2011  

SepteSeptember 8, 2011mber 8, 2011

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you