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A D EC A D E IN FA S H IIOO N !


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HOW FAR CAN A ST. ANDREW’S EDUCATION TAKE YOU? THE MEMBERS OF THE ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL CLASS OF 2014 ARE PURSUING HIGHER EDUCATION IN MISSISSIPPI AND NATIONWIDE, MANY ON FULL SCHOLARSHIPS. Appalachian State University Auburn University Barnard College Birmingham-Southern College Carnegie Mellon University Claremont-McKenna College Colorado State University Emerson College Florida Atlantic University Fordham University The George Washington University Georgia Institute of Technology Harvard University Howard University Liberty University Louisiana State University Loyola Marymount University Millsaps College Mississippi State University Shackouls Honors College New York University Occidental College Ohio State University Rhodes College Sewanee: The University of the South Southeastern University Spring Hill College

Stanford University Trinity University Tulane University United States Military Academy at West Point University of Alabama University of Alabama at Birmingham University of California at Davis University of Central Florida University of Colorado at Boulder University of Mississippi Barksdale Honors College Center for Manufacturing Excellence Croft Institute for International Studies University of Notre Dame University of Southern California University of Southern Mississippi Vanderbilt University Washington University in St. Louis Wheaton College

St. Andrew’s students were also accepted at more than 85 other prestigious universities nationwide, including: Brown University Dartmouth College Davidson College Duke University Emory University Georgetown University Northwestern University Rice University University of California at Berkeley University of Chicago University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Pennsylvania University of Texas at Austin University of Virginia Yale University

TO FIND OUT HOW FAR A ST. ANDREW’S EDUCATION COULD TAKE YOU OR YOUR CHILD, VISIT GOSAINTS.ORG.


the

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CONTENTS

EDWARD O’CONNOR

CATHERINE CARTER SULLIVAN

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OCTOBER 2014 VOLUME

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NUMBER

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COMPASSION & GRACE

One of the only Northside Sun subjects to admit to taking a cigarette break before the interview, Catherine Carter Sullivan has a smoker’s laugh that almost makes one want to pick up the habit. She doesn’t have a smoker’s voice, though. Her inflections, her clothing, and even her mannerisms are all soft and gentle, radiating her compassion before you see it in action. Catherine is executive director of Grace House, a Jackson-based nonprofit that helps homeless people living with HIV/AIDS. Her grandfather and father, Hodding Carter II and Hodding Carter III, were two of Mississippi’s greatest civil rights journalists. They called for the fair treatment of African Americans at a time when such talk would get you a new burning lawn ornament – or worse. Now Catherine is carrying on their legacy in her work at Grace House.

THE CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. ANDREW

If nearly six generations make up 175 years, and 175 years make a dodransbicentennial, then it is reasonable to presume that the Cathedral Church of St. Andrew, in downtown Jackson, will enjoy an important anniversary celebration October 25-26. For two days, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral will come together to celebrate in fine form its 175th anniversary.

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SPECIAL SECTION

COLUMNS 14

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EVENTS

WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS

PARTIES

DEPARTMENTS

Madison Gabriel Gould/ Conner Allan McCluer Jolie Marie Breaux/ Trenton McEvoy Nelson

Junior League of Jackson’s

Audrey Jane Gardner/ John Frederick Wilson Kimberly Patrice Peach/ Andrew Roberts Norwood Amy Corinne Armstrong/ Anders Pieter Wells Caroline Douglas Fox/ Tyler Scott King

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Jenny Markow

FoodWise Marlana Walters

FASHION

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MERCHANT CHAIR Rochelle Hicks STYLED BY Treehouse

(see page

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Tennis Advantage

M A R K E T P L A C E

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Jennifer Leeann Pittman/ Jack Ryan Weaver

MISTLETOE FASHION M I S T L E T O E

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Engagement Party

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An engagement party honoring Kayla Fondren and Breland Applewhite was held recently in the Montrose home of Mena and Vic Applewhite.

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MSU Alumni Extravaganza

Prep Young Alumni Party

The Central Mississippi Alumni Chapter of the Mississippi State University Alumni Association hosted its annual summer extravaganza at the Mississippi Coliseum.

Enchanted Evening Enchanted Evening, benefiting Friends of Children’s Hospital and Children’s Heart Center at Batson was held at the Jackson Convention Center.

UMMC Manning Family Archie and Olivia Manning announced the launch of the Manning Family Fund for a Healthier Mississippi, a campaign to boost the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s commitment to improving the health of the state’s residents.

Mississippi Chorus Summer Showcase The Mississippi Chorus kicked off its 2014-2015 season with the “Whistle Stop Cabaret” at the Union Station train depot ballroom.

FoodCorps Fund-Raiser FoodCorps is a nonprofit group of AmeriCorps leaders who connect kids to real food and help them grow up healthy. A fund-raiser was held to assist the leaders with the purchase of garden tools and seeds, and fresh foods for tastings in the classrooms.

Lottie Boggan Book Signing Author Lottie Boggan held a book signing and wine and cheese reception recently at Lemuria book store Dot Com Building for her book, “Redemption Ridge.”

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Jackson Prep hosted a Young Alumni After Hours party at Fondren Public.

Chaine Des Rotisseurs Food and Wine Society The Chaine Des Rotisseurs, a food and wine society, was founded in Paris in 1248 and was originally a guild for meat roasters. The Jackson chapter has quarterly meetings to sample menus at restaurants across the metro area.

Southern Artists Alliance Southern Artists Alliance hosted “A Tour de Force of Art and Sculpture” at the Mississippi Arts Center. A portion of the proceeds benefited the Mississippi Chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

The Mississippi Children’s Museum Partners Neon Nights The Mississippi Children’s Museum (MCM) Partners and their young professionals group, MCM Young Partners, hosted its first Neon Nights at the museum. The event was held in the recently unveiled Literacy Garden, MCM’s new outdoor gallery.

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A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE NORTHSIDE SUN NEWSPAPER P.O. BOX 16709 JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39236 601-957-1122

EDITOR Jimmye Sweat

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Holly Dean

ART DIRECTOR Wanda McCain

WRITERS Susan Deaver • Glenda Wadsworth • Anthony Warren • Jenny Markow Jenny Woodruff • Marlana Walters • Katie Eubanks • Judy Smith • Jana Hoops

PHOTOGRAPHERS Beth Buckley • Lonnie Kees • Christina Cannon • Chris Grillis David Johnston • Anthony Warren • Jenny Woodruff • Allison Muirhead

ADVERTISING Katy Agnew • Carly O’Bryant • Lauren Breazeale • Amy Forsyth • Misti Sims

PRODUCTION MANAGER Beth Buckley

PRODUCTION Jo Ann Ward Nikki Hodum

BOOKKEEPING Dani Poe

CIRCULATION Dottie and Jeff Cole • Kerri Hawkins THE NORTHSIDE SUN MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE NORTHSIDE SUN NEWSPAPER. ALTHOUGH THE MAGAZINE IS DISTRIBUTED FREE ON NEWSSTANDS, PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE FOR $25 ANNUALLY AND MAILED DIRECTLY TO YOUR HOME. FOR NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS, CHANGES OF ADDRESS OR OTHER SERVICES RELATED TO SUBSCRIPTIONS, CALL 601-957-1542. FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR CURRENT AD REP. FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING WEDDING SUBMISSIONS, PARTY COVERAGE OR FEATURES, CALL 601-957-1123 OR E-MAIL JIMMYE@NORTHSIDESUN.COM. THE MAGAZINE OFFICE IS LOCATED AT 246 BRIARWOOD DR., JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39206; THE MAILING ADDRESS IS: P. O. BOX 16709, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39236.

ABOUT THE COVER l`ql_bo=OMNQ =

Rochelle Hicks was photographed for our Mistletoe Marketplace Fashion by Allison Muirhead

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EVERYONE HAS AN ESTATE AND EVERYONE NEEDS A PLAN. For more information call

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Compassion Grace O KATIE EUBANKS

With that notoriety came danger. A few times, Catherine and her siblings had to rush under the stairs at home. “There was even a bungled cross burning. And there were certain plate dinners we didn’t go to. We kids would stumble in and not know why we were treated so coldly,” she says. Still, “I was encouraged to spend time with anyone and everyone who came into my orbit. I had the opportunity to interact with people who I now know were living in horribly substandard conditions.” In middle school, Catherine spent time with a white girl whom other kids gossiped about. “What I knew that they didn’t was what her house felt like. It was toxic. Her dad was on the couch. We slept on a pallet on the floor when I spent the night with her. “So from the age of 12 or 13, I’ve been less prone to judge people. What I criticize is folks having easy answers for why people are the way they are. And I spent time in poor black people’s homes, wealthy black people’s homes, wealthy white people’s homes, and the stories were different everywhere.” Since childhood, Catherine has gravitated toward grassroots efforts that serve the poor and marginalized. She volunteered with the Mississippi Head Start Association as a kid. When her father was joining President Jimmy Carter’s administration in 1977, Catherine was heading off to Princeton. She majored in politics, but “by the time I was 25, I had so much dirty laundry, there was no way I was going into politics,” she says with a laugh. “I was out there from a young age, defending the defenseless but also getting into a whole lot of trouble. Because of how I was raised and youthful indiscretions, that continues to my attitude on the people I serve.” She went on to get

a juris-doctorate at Tulane University Law School and clerked for two Mississippi Supreme Court justices in Jackson. She ended up marrying another justice, Mike Sullivan. “I would’ve done legal services, criminal defense, housing issues, civil rights issues. Or I would’ve been lobbying against stupidity like [the Religious Freedom Act]. But I married a sitting justice. All the organizations I was interviewed with, they couldn’t risk losing his vote.” So she stayed home, unable to pour herself into the advocacy work she loved. “[But] it didn’t threaten the marriage. I loved being pregnant and loved being the mother of babies and watching

PHOTO BY BETH BUCKLEY

ne of the only Northside Sun subjects to admit to taking a cigarette break before the interview, Catherine Carter Sullivan has a smoker’s laugh that almost makes one want to pick up the habit. She doesn’t have a smoker’s voice, though. Her inflections, her clothing, and even her mannerisms are all soft and gentle, radiating her compassion before you see it in action. Catherine is executive director of Grace House, a Jackson-based nonprofit that helps homeless people living with HIV/AIDS. Her grandfather and father, Hodding Carter II and Hodding Carter III, were two of Mississippi’s greatest civil rights journalists. They called for the fair treatment of African Americans at a time when such talk would get you a new burning lawn ornament – or worse. Now Catherine is carrying on their legacy in her work at Grace House. While she doesn’t believe AIDS is a civil rights issue, “it is no less compelling as a social justice issue,” she says. “Poverty, lack of information, and lack of access to care, these are social justice issues.” Attempting to address those disparities is a natural progression of her upbringing and her previous work, Catherine says. “This is the culmination of my life.” Growing up in Greenville, Catherine had experiences not many other kids were having, she says. She got to hear her dad talking with civil rights workers at the dinner table. She remembers being 10 years old during the Democratic National Convention of 1968, “when the Loyalist delegates were able to oust the regular delegates.” Nowadays, people say her father and grandfather were “progressive” journalists. “People use labels that tick me off. [My dad and grandfather] were liberals, not progressives, at least for the South. … They were bigger than life, for me and for others.”

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them learn,” Catherine says. “[And] Mike had the same spirit [as I do]: He was a populist and protector of the Constitution and constitutional rights.” Margaret Sullivan was born in 1990, and Sarah followed in 1992. Catherine waited until Sarah was four, and then tried being a working mother. She was the director of Parents for Public Schools in Jackson for a year, until she decided her daughters were still too young not to have their mom at home. “I wish – no, I don’t wish it. I’m not one of those superwomen. And I don’t even want to call them that. It’s not fair to them. But my personality couldn’t make it work. I’m a perfectionist,” Catherine says. Mike died in 2000. From 2002 to 2006, Catherine taught drama at Casey Elementary in northeast Jackson. Then in 2008, when Margaret was graduating high school and Sarah was a junior, “that’s when I really went full time. I again became an activist and a trench worker.” First, Catherine worked for Luthern Episcopal Services of Mississippi. She managed money allocated for incarcerated inmates and their families. “It gave

me insights on where money should be spent,” she says. By fall 2010, funding had dried up, and she had to leave the organization. It closed soon after. Just a few months later, she started working for the state hospital at Whitfield. She was a paralegal and investigator on the forensics unit. In other words, “my job basically was to research the lives of men and women accused of crimes who were arguing mental incapacity. I was helping the psychologist there to determine the status of the accused,” Catherine says. “This gave me even more insight and wisdom. Most of the stories [of the accused] had traumatic and horrible beginnings. Some had HIV. Some were seriously mentally ill. But all of them had trauma. “But that job didn’t make use of all of my strengths. I don’t sit still eight hours a day very well,” she says. “Then there was this job opening. I realized what I’d done before had prepared me for this.” Grace House is one of three organizations in Mississippi that provide housing for the homeless HIV/AIDS population. In addition, Grace House offers addiction counseling and HIV education at


its Millsaps Avenue campus, which currently serves 24 residents in six buildings. And at satellite facilities throughout central Mississippi, the nonprofit provides rental assistance and supportive services to HIV-positive clients representing a minimum of 26 households. “Mississippi is near the top in terms of AIDS statistics. In Mississippi, Hinds County has the highest percentage of HIV cases among African American males, and the largest percentage of HIV/AIDS cases per capita. HIV follows commerce routes,” Catherine says. “Getting people into treatment is complicated by a dearth of clinics, particularly in rural areas, poverty, and a stigma. This is particularly difficult in the African American community. The rising group of new HIV/AIDS cases in Mississippi is 13- to 24-year-olds, mostly African Americans.” However, “huge strides are being made. St. James does the interfaith service for HIV/AIDS awareness every year, and the number of black ministers keeps growing.” Some of Grace House’s residents and clients have AIDS, while others are just HIV-positive. It typically takes about 10 years for HIV to become AIDS, and the goal is to get people plugged into services before that change happens. One misconception is that everybody with HIV/AIDS is depressed all the time, Catherine

says. “Once they are receiving the encouragement and support of a place like Grace House [there is] normalcy and gratitude. Do people walk around here every day whistling? No. But they don’t stay in places of despair. They have a normal range of emotions.” As she rounds up her first year at Grace House, Catherine isn’t ready to leave anytime soon. There’s still so much work to be done, including a kitchen renovation that’s been on the Grace House to-do list since 2010. “We do have some Princeton University reunions, May 2000, Parade: Hodding Carter III (class of ‘57, money from Northminster 43rd reunion), Catherine Carter Sullivan (class of ‘80, 20th reunion), Patricia M. Derian; (front) Margaret Elizabeth Sullivan, 10 yrs old, cousin Carter Woodruff, Baptist Church and MAC Sarah Catherine Sullivan, 8 years old. Cosmetics. We will have meetMillsaps College graduate, is a visual artist and ings on how far we can stretch that money,” she poet. Sarah is about to start graduate school in says. Plus, “I’ve had tons of outside interests, but that’s still on the backburner – like caring what my psychology and is interested in being a prison psychologist or a psychiatric nurse practitioner. “They backyard looks like. I hope I can be here for years have the same heart [as Mike and I],” Catherine to come.” says. “That Carter fightingness, feistiness, it conAnd when she’s gone, her daughters will still be tinues generation to generation.” around to carry on the family legacy. Margaret, a

Carter family Christmas card, 1961. From left, back: Betty Werlein Carter, Philip Dutarte Carter, William Hodding Carter Jr., William Carter III, Margaret Peggy Wolfe Carter, Thomas Hennen Carter; (front) Elisabeth Fearn Carter and Catherine Ainsworth Carter. o c t o b e r

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St. Andrew

The Cathedral Church of

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OURDEAUX BETH BUCKLEY


I

f nearly six generations

make up 175 years, and 175 years make a dodransbicentennial, then it is reasonable to presume that the Cathedral Church of St. Andrew, in downtown Jackson, will enjoy an important anniversary celebration October 25-26. In the bitter winter of the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, a young deacon from New York arrived in Jackson, Miss. A missionary with the Domestic Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church, the Rev. Daniel S. Lewis, along with eight locals, formed St. Andrew’s Church. The Rev. Lewis was paid an annual salary of $400, which is equivalent to approximately $10,000 in 2014 dollars. Lewis also held services at St. Mark’s Church in Raymond and St. Matthew’s Church in Clinton. According to the late Sherwood Willing Wise, author of “The Cathedral Church of St. Andrew’s: A Sesquicentennial History, 1839-1989,” and devoted St. Andrew’s parishioner, Jackson had a population of 2,000 in 1839, and a number of the early citizens were already communicants of the Episcopal Church. Shortly after Lewis organized St. Andrew’s, he moved on to Louisiana, leaving his former flock under the care of the Rev. George Weller at Christ Church in Vicksburg. Eventually, in 1843, a resident priest was appointed to serve the congregants of St. Andrew’s. The first St. Andrew’s Church building, built of brick and sited on the southeast corner of President and Amite streets, was in use by early 1850. Along with the rest of the region, St. Andrew’s suffered mightily in the scourge of the yellow fever epidemic of 1855, wiping out 25 percent of the communicants. Even with the threat of death, the priest at the time, the Rev. A. D. Corbyn, who also served as head of St. Andrew’s College, ministered to the sick and dying. He contracted

“During my tenure here, I’ve discovered a people not only committed in helping Jackson renew her identity while helping to create abundance for all who live here; my experience has been and continues to be a people who understand much about the unconditional, undeserved love of God in Christ and who seek to make such Good News known to anyone seeking meaning and truth. It is my humble honor to serve such a dynamic, vibrant congregation.” -Edward O’Connor

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The Cathedral Church of

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the fever and perished in the autumn of 1855. Because of the epidemic, the college closed its doors forever. When the Civil War broke out, St. Andrew’s was under the steady guidance of the Rev. William Croes Crane, a native of New Jersey. Jackson was occupied four times. Residents suffered through the Battle of Jackson (May 1863) and the Siege of Jackson (July 1863) and was burned during both occupations. The church building was destroyed, and following the war,

St. Andrew’s worshipped for a while in a room called Odd Fellows Hall in City Hall, which, along with the Old Capitol and the Governor’s Mansion, survived the devastation all around. Prior to the war, in addition to St. Andrew’s Church tending to the spiritual needs of its parishioners, it also served those same needs to blacks and prisoners. During Reconstruction, St. Andrew’s, with its new priest, the Rev. Joseph Louis Tucker, became very active in Christian education, with three Sunday School initiatives: the parish Sunday School, a black mission school (which 400 to 500 newly-freed slaves attended every Sunday) and a penitentiary school, the penitentiary standing where the New Capitol is sited today. According to Wise, “Numerous convicts told the rector that the one view they had of anything besides walls and chains was the hour devoted to them on Sunday afternoon; this was filled with peace, kindness, and good will.” War decreased the number of communicants, from 113 in 1860 to 94 in 1870, but it had not diminished their enthusiasm. By 1873, St. Andrew’s second church building was complete, and in a mere 25 years, the body of the church would see substantial growth and became aware of the need of a new and much larger church building. The cornerstone of the third and current church building was laid in 1902, and in 1903, the new church across the street from the Governor’s Mansion came into use. Throughout the 20th century, St. Andrew’s helped establish mission churches throughout the area: St. Mark’s, St. Columb’s, St. James’, St. Philip’s; St. Matthew’s, Kosciusko; as well as the newest addition: St. Alexis on E. South Street, in downtown Jackson. The church, with some of its members, founded St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, and on September 8, 1947, 42 students enrolled for the first through the fourth grades. Last year, St. Andrew’s was ranked as the 18th best private day school in America by thebestschools.org There have been many notable priests to serve over the past 175 years. Some familiar names to

Rev. Walter Capers 28

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current-day Jacksonians might be the Revs. Walter Capers (whose daughter was Charlotte, after whom the Mississippi Department of Archives and History named one of their buildings); Vincent Franks, who, as a young child in the Canadian hinterlands, was kidnapped by a childless Algonquin squaw and was later found by his parents in the middle of a cornfield; Edward Harrison, who, as Wise wrote, “held a deep commitment to the concept of Christian love as he saw it and paved the way for those who continued to lead the church [in the 1960s] toward complete reconciliation.” The 1960s brought tumult and racial struggle. In 1963, St. Andrew’s made national news when four young black women quietly entered the church and remained there for the duration of the service. They were the first to be admitted to a white Protestant church in Jackson. Wise wrote that the Rev. Christoph Keller Jr. reminisced about that service, saying, “Looming in my own vivid recollection of that event is the fear and determination expressed in the face of one of these women as I shook her cold and trembling hand at the door of the church and attempted to reassure her.” In 1966, St. Andrew’s became the Cathedral Church for the Diocese of Mississippi, and throughout the

Rev. Vincent Franks

Rev. Edward Harrison


’60s and ’70s, acted as an agent for charity, change and reconciliation. Other deans, the term to which the priest at a cathedral church is referred, included the Very Revs. John Jenkins, Robert Gordon Oliver, Sid Sanders, Rod Murray, Ed Bacon, Joe Robinson and Edward O’Connor, the current dean. In the more recent past, St. Andrew’s, as well as many churches in Jackson, across Mississippi and the nation, responded in earnest to the needs of the Mississippi Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina. The church has many outreach ministries such as the Tuesday Morning Breakfast Club for the homeless and residents of local shelters; Meals on Wheels; Stewpot Community Services; Grace House for people living with HIV-AIDS; Mississippi Food Network; Operation Shoestring; Mission Mississippi; Working Together Jackson and Habitat for Humanity, as well as several others. There are also significant in-reach programs, too. For two days, Saturday and Sunday, October 2526, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral will come together to celebrate in fine form its 175th anniversary. From 10 to 11:30 a.m., Saturday morning, Dean Edward O’Connor will moderate a panel discussion with former clergy. Dean O’Connor says, “I will ask open-ended questions to each of our panelists. I envision a light-hearted yet substantive discussion with regard to memories about St. Andrew’s.” Also at 10 a.m., there will be cathedral birthday party fun for the children. On the agenda are face-painting, moon jumps, basketball contests and bean bag tosses. There will be more fun with hula hoops, bubble machines, sidewalk chalk and the old pick-a-duck game. Add cotton candy, balloons, popcorn and craft activities to commemorate the birthday celebration. As music is an important part of worship at St. Andrew’s, Dr. John Paul is busy planning his contributions with the organ and carillon. He says, “My plan is to have celebratory organ music

(pieces which have been specially admired by the parish family in the past five decades) every hour on the hour, and carillon peals from the bells throughout the Saturday celebrations.” Outreach has been, and continues to be, a major component in which the Cathedral of St. Andrew makes manifest the love of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the larger community. There will be displays of all outreach ministries connected to the cathedral. The displays will be exhibited as part of a cathedral tour to show the congregation, former deans and clergy what’s been happening over the years, possibly work the visiting former clergy initiated. Also on view will be a pictorial timeline of St. Andrew’s over the past 175 years. The carnival will culminate with a casual lunch of hamburgers, hot dogs, cake and ice cream, and the singing of “Happy Birthday, Dear St. Andrew’s.” Plans are in motion to remove the cornerstone and open the time capsule at some point during the weekend. On Sunday, October 26, at 9:30 a.m., a coffee with current and former clergy will be held in the Parish Hall. At 10:30 a.m., Paul, with both the parish and cathedral choirs, will present a half-hour special musical program, with selections by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Martin How and others. Paul says, “There will be one major church service at 11 a.m., and the choirs will wear their magnificent new robes from England for the first time, in honor of the 175th.”

Dean O’Connor will lead the service and the ecumenical celebration for the anniversary. The anniversary festivities will conclude at the end of the service, whereupon St. Andrew’s Cathedral will return to its divinely-inspired work to love and serve the Lord. For the past 175 years, as Jackson’s history has been formed, St. Andrew’s has responded to the needs of its congregants and to the needs of the citizens of its community and diocese. St. Andrew’s heart is always full of the Lord’s will and work. Where there is the Episcopal Cathedral of St. Andrew in Jackson, there is dynamic worship, fearless giving and a radical welcome to all.

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CHAMPIONSHIPS CONTINUE

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by JENNY MARKOW

nd the 2014 USTA Championships continue. The Tri Level championships were played in Tupelo, August 8 -10. The weather was scorching hot, but that’s better than getting rained out, which has happened too. More than 450 tennis players from across the state came to compete during the weekend tournament. On Sunday, nine teams were crowned champions and they will compete against teams from Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee during the USTA Southern Section Regional Tri Level event held at Ridgeland Tennis Center October 17-19. Leah Warren’s 3.5-3.5 ladies 18 and over, Brad Castle’s 3.0-4.0 men’s 18 and over, Steve Garrett’s 3.04.0 men’s 40 and over, and Brian Tolley’s 3.5-3.5 men’s 40 and over teams all won from the Northside. Best of luck at the regional championship. Next up are Oxford and Hattiesburg for the USTA League Mixed Doubles Championships. McKeever Huen is the captain for the 3.0 men’s 18 division team from Desoto County that recently went to Auburn for the USTA League Sectional Championships. Huen captained his men all the way to the finals where they won and now will head to Tucson October 10-12 to compete in the USTA League National Championships. Best of luck to you all. Members of the team playing out of Tunica National Resort are Garrett Trautman, Scott Lawhorn, Edwin Gilless, Justin Yelverton, Rusty Volmer, Jim Green, Mckeever Huen, Melton Worsham, Jed Hale, Chip Wiggins, and Joe Summers. Virginia Walcott and her 4.5 ladies traveled to Asheville, N.C., in late August to vie for a spot at USTA Nationals as well. They had a great tournament, making it to the finals where they fell just shy of the victory. This team goes back to 1997 when they all first competed together on a USTA League team where they made it to state, sectionals and nationals, finishing in second place. Sitting out the following year, they regrouped in 1999 and returned to sectionals that year. After several different seasons of not playing they won sectionals and went to nationals again in 2008, where they finished in fourth place. They went to sectionals in 2013 in 18s and 40s. This year’s trip to sectionals in the 40s was their 12th time to go in the 14 years they have competed. Captain Virginia has this to say about her team, “We are a group of lifelong friends, and we have a blast preparing and competing together. We have always especially loved the challenges and experiences of competing at USTA Southern Sectionals, where there is the opportunity to meet and play against so many different great teams and players. And it goes without saying that we have just as much fun together off the court.” Team members are Virginia Walcott, Cindy Hannon, Gayla Elliott, Michelle Jennings, Melanie Billman, Colleen Roberts, Beth Rogers, Debra Byrne, Elizabeth Caldwell, Cami StoneHill and Emillia Viljoen. Just like the Davis Cup for professional tennis, the Southern Junior Cup represents excellence among top-level, competitive junior players from the USTA Southern Section. The Mississippi team consists of some of the top boys and girls in each age division, competing in singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. Three boys and three girls make up a team. Team Mississippi competes against teams from the other eight states in the Southern Section during this premier event. Not only is it quite an honor to be selected for this team, it is one of the most fun events in junior tennis because of the team spirit and camaraderie. Before heading to Chattanooga for the Southern Junior Cup, the team coaches sponsored a “Southern Junior Cup Warmup Clinic” at Ridgeland Tennis Center. The two-day training camp included live ball drills, mental toughness, doubles tactics and match play. On Saturday night, they were all invited to Megan Humphrey’s home for a team barbecue. Coaches for the 2014 Southern Junior Cup are Levis Patton, 12s division, and Justyn Schelver and Kevin Gillette for 14s, 16s and Girls 12 players. Here is the 2014 Team Mississippi, best of luck to everyone. Girls 12: Christina Danforth, Laurel; London Breedlove, Madison; Emma Roberts, Ridgeland; 30

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JLTA gives a college educational scholarship to a local female entering her freshman year. Carly Causey is this year’s recipient.

Carly Causey is a freshman at Ole Miss and she received the 2014 JLTA College Educational Scholarship.

The Matchpoints keep this precious picture of Hallie Keyes in their tennis notebook.

The JLTA “Matchpoints” have been playing together for 20 years.

Getting ready for a match at Ridgeland Tennis Center are the Matchpoints (from left) Sharon Jernigan, Mary Anne Lefoldt, Lea Anne Stacy, Jean Medley, JoAnn Burke, Kaye Donald and Linda Cook. Not pictured: Michelle Adcock, Joan Damiens, Teresa Tiller, and Kathleen Gaines.

Off the court fun and fellowship are the Matchpoints (from left, back) Joan Damiens, Sharon Jernigan, Lea Anne Stacy, Stacy Sharp, Mary Anne Lefoldt and Michelle Adcock; (front) Jean Medley, Nancy Batson, Linda Cook, Peggy Earwood, Jo Ann Burke


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Boys 12:Humphreys Mathis Billman, Brandon; Andrew Jackson; Owen,won Tunica; David is the captain for the USTA JuniorSweat, Team Tennis TeamMac that recently at sectionals and will represent Mississippi at nationals in October.

Coach Justyn Schelver (Reunion Country Club, Madison), Sebastian Rios (Tupelo), Eric Huey (Tupelo), Patrick Roth (Pascagoula) and Team Manager, David Humphreys (Madison); (front) Megan Humphreys (Madison), Grace Anne Jones (Oxford), Lailaa Bashir (Jackson), Callie Billman (Brandon)

Girls 14: Lailaa Bashir, Jackson; Megan Humphreys, Madison; Callie Billman, Brandon; Boys 14: Sebastian Rios, Baldwyn; Eric Huey, Tupelo; Patrick Roth, Pascagoula; Girls 16: Sylvia Viljoen, Jackson; Abbie Vaughn, Pheba; Grace Ann Jones, Oxford; Boys 16: Mason Vice, Ocean Springs; Larry Qu, Ridgeland; Stedman Strickland, Jackson; Girls 18: Victoria Roberts, Ridgeland; Meredith Roberts, Ridgeland; Mia Kent, Ridgeland; Boys 18: Noah Rowell, Wiggins; Andrew Hildebrand, Tupelo; Chris Wilkins, Hattiesburg. Mississippi has a USTA Junior Team Tennis team headed to nationals for the third year in a row. David Humphreys took his 14 Advanced JTT team to Cayce, S.C., to compete during the 2014 USTA Southern Sectional Junior Team Tennis Championships. And compete they did. There were five teams in their division and this group of young tennis stars marched their way, undefeated, to the USTA League 18 and over 3.0 men, captained by Mckeever Huen, won at Sectionals and will represent Mississippi during USTA Nationals in Tucson in October. The 40 and over 4.5 women, captained by Virginia Walcott, made it to the finals during sectionals at Auburn.

3.0 MEN’S SECTIONAL CHAMPS Garrett Trautman, Scott Lawhorn, Edwin Gilless, Justin Yelverton, Rusty Volmer, Jim Green, Mckeever Huen, Melton Worsham, Jed Hale, Chip Wiggins, and Joe Summers

4.5 WOMEN 40 AND OVER FINALISTS Elizabeth Caldwell, Gayla Elliott, Cindy Hannon, Melanie Billman, Virginia Walcott, Colleen Roberts, Cami Stone-Hill, Debra Byrne, Beth Rogers.

championship finals where they finished on top. Not only did they go undefeated, they didn’t lose a single court during the entire tournament, going 20-0. Next up is the USTA National JTT Championships, which will be back in Cayce, S.C., October 16-19. A couple of the team members aren’t rookies to the national scene, Megan Humphreys and Patrick Roth played last year on a MS 14 Advanced team that finished fourth in the nation. They have high hopes for nationals this year. Team Mississippi will march in the opening ceremonies carrying a banner they designed to represent Mississippi and their team spirit. A new twist to the JTT National Championship in 2014 is the Adopt-a-Unit effort during the championships. This is a national program supporting our troops in Afghanistan by sending care packages of necessities to anywhere between 25 and 100 service members deployed there. Team members are Megan Humphreys (Madison), Grace Anne Jones (Oxford), Lailaa Bashir (Jackson), Callie Billman (Brandon), Coach Justyn Schelver (Reunion Country Club, Madison), Sebastian Rios (Tupelo), Eric Huey (Tupelo), Patrick Roth (Pascagoula) and team manager, David Humphreys (Madison). Best of luck to all of you. More than 450 tennis players played in the 2014 USTA Tri-Level Championships held in Tupelo. After all the play was completed, nine teams were crowned champions, four are from the Northside. They will all compete in the Regional Tri-Level Tournament in October at Ridgeland Tennis Center and Bridges Tennis Center in Jackson. Brian Tolley was the captain for the 40s men’s 3.5-4.5 team that won, no picture is available.

Winning in the women’s 3.5-4.5 18s are (from left, back) Cindy Hannon, Laura Carman, Jaime Fisher, Debra Byrne; (front) Jane Pillow, Audrey Thomas, Leah Warren, Lisa Chesney

3.0-4.0 MEN Winning in the 3.0-4.0 men’s 18s are (from left, back) Judd Jones, Graham Bucciantini, Alex Boyd, Cole Mockbee; (front) Brad Castle, Sean Merchant, Stephen Langley, Tommy Taylor

3.0-4.0 MEN Winning in the 3.0-4.0 men’s 40s division (from left) Steve Garrett, Justin Ewing, Jake Warren, Jeff Hollingshead, Jim Page, Nat Whitten, Michael Christy. Not pictured: Hunter Hatten, John Lovertich o c t o b e r

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In 2004 the Jackson Ladies Tennis Association’s (JLTA) board of directors established a college educational scholarship for one entering female freshman at a twoyear or four-year community college, college or university. In the spring of each year, a committee comprised of two members of the JLTA board of directors and two members of the association as a whole will choose a recipient from among the qualified applicants. The scholarship is awarded annually and is renewable for four years at an amount of $750 per year, for a total scholarship amount of $3,000. Those applying must live in the tri-county area, performed with distinction during their school years, both academically and community service, and played varsity tennis for their high school. Any student receiving a full tennis scholarship isn’t eligible. Carly Causey is the 2014 recipient of the JLTA scholarship. Carly is the daughter of Rachel and Ken Causey and is a 2014 graduate of Jackson Prep. She was a member of the Jackson Prep tennis team for five years, and was the number one Girls Doubles (partner: Bray Koury) State AAA Champion in May 2014. She was also a varsity cheerleader for three years, a member of the varsity swim team for three years, and a member of the Jackson Prep showchoir “Revellion” for four years. She is a freshman at the University of Mississippi where she is a Provost Scholar. Carly and her family are members of Highlands Presbyterian Church. Longtime JLTA player, Mary Anne Lefoldt, recently shared some JLTA history along with her team’s story. Mary Anne started playing JLTA at Colonial more than 30 years ago. When she started, there were only five colors; red (highest), gold, white, blue and green. Two more levels were added several years later, platinum (highest) and bronze. As the demand for more teams continued, another level was added, yellow and eventually green (lowest) was dropped. Mary Anne and her teammates named their team the Matchpoints and started at the bottom level, green. Over the years, ladies have had to leave the team, new ones have been added, but the present team has been playing together for more than 20 years. Now that’s something. There are so many bonds between these ladies, that’s one thing that makes playing tennis on a team so special. “We have had several extended family member deaths but nothing as heartbreaking as losing one of our team members. Hallie Keyes was the matriarch of our team and when she became ill with cancer, we rallied around her. Hallie had been on our team for 12 years and she was such a wonderful person. After her death in April 2010, we have kept her memory. We talk about her. She gave us matching towels with Matchpoints on it. She gave each of us a Christmas ornament and every year I think of Hallie when I decorate our tree. She loved tennis and her warmth was felt wherever she went. We carry a picture of her in our tennis book to help keep her memory alive. “Hallie Keyes, a great lady and a wonderful tennis enthusiast, we miss you terribly. I have seen so many changes over the years. JLTA is a great avenue for tennis in the tri-county area.We are fortunate to have such a well-organized association. I have served as treasurer, color secretary and disciplinarian. It takes great dedication to be an officer and due to the commitment of so many intelligent women, JLTA continues to be a huge success and a well-organized association. Anything that lasts 35 years, in this day and time, is very well operated. Jackson women are very lucky to have JLTA.” During the 2014 US Open, tennis fans from the Northside were spotted all over the grounds. One lucky fellow, Brad Castle, actually sat in the president’s box, thanks to Daniel McFadder, via Mitch Peters. The Tri-County Tennis Association received two tickets to raffle off for seats in the president’s box. Each year, USTA Mississippi receives these tickets to award to a CTA to use to raise funds for their organization. Daniel was the lucky winner, but he wasn’t able to attend. He asked around and Peters knew that Brad was going and hooked him up with the tickets. “Oh my gosh, what an experience we had,” says Castle. “I really wasn’t sure what to expect, but it was incredible. “The hospitality, food, seats, everything was over the top, it sure was hard to go to our regular seats the following day,” continues Brad. Not only did Brad have great seats in the box, a gentleman from Clemson, S.C., gave him front row seats in Armstrong Stadium for the evening match, where they saw the Williams sisters playing doubles. “This is a trip we will never forget, I hope I can win these next year too,” finishes Castle. Some other Northsiders seen milling around the grounds were Jane Tubbs, Carolyn Dumas, Billy Williams, Pat Bunkley, Julie Jackson, Jennie Mullen, Sabrina Sutherland, Rhoda Maloney, Jill Siler and Jane Turner. There is a lot of tennis left to be played before the winter months set in. Grab a buddy, head to the courts and enjoy some great tennis and fall weather. As always, for all of your tennis needs, go to www.mstennis.com; you can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as well, ustamississippi. Happy fall, y’all. 32

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New York City becomes a second home to many Northside tennis enthusiasts in late August and early September. There are always lots of people heading there to watch tennis during the US Open, while taking in the sights and eating some good food. Seen around the grounds and in the presidents’ box were several tennis players from our area.

Getting your picture made with a tennis professional is always big. Seen here are Carolyn Dumas, Mary Jo Fernandez, Jane Tubb, Pat Bunkley

Even during the US Open, tennis fans take in the sights of N.Y.C., like the Empire State Building, (from left) Jane Tubb,, Carolyn Dumas, Pat Buckley, Billy Williams

Northsiders Julie Jackson and Jane Turner enjoying the US Open

On the grounds of the US Open are local players, Julie Jackson, Sabrina Sutherland and Jennie Mullen

Hobnobbing with the USTA president in the president’s box during the US Open are Mandy Moody and Brad Castle.


FOODWISE

SLOW COOKING L

text and photography by

marlana walters

photo by Lonnie Kees

STRESS FREE

Marlana Walters, Proprietor The Everyday Gourmet

ife is filled with stressful moments. Like most people, our family has experienced some nerve-racking events that brought about a rally of supporters and other times the sound of crickets replaced the ringing of our doorbell. I recall having more food brought to us when we had no appetite and when we were really hungry there was no covered dish waiting for us in the refrigerator. Why is it that certain life changes and circumstances are worthy of a casserole and others are not? I have a theory that there are casseroles-are-coming situations and nocasseroles-in-sight conditions. Uncontrollable stressful moments like death, illness and babies bring about an immediate emotional response and are typically marked with arrival of flowers and casseroles. While self-induced stressful moments like getting married or divorced, changing jobs and moving have a smaller selection in the card aisle and are not usually acknowledged with baked goods. When we announced that The Everyday Gourmet was moving to the old O’Charley’s Restaurant, I got an immediate message from a friend con-

gratulating us on our new location and a notice that he would be out of town on moving day. I found it odd that he didn’t even know the date that we were going to move the store when he gave notification that he would be unable to help. I am confident he won’t be sending a casserole either. I get it, I am the person who would rather do just about anything than get involved in someone else’s mess. Self-induced stressful situations bring about a whole different emotional response, and people often stay away from you until you work through whatever is going on in your life for fear that you might ask them for something. I have never run by Primos Café to pick up a casserole for a friend whose husband ran off with someone half his age or delivered a gift basket to a neighbor whose sister is going to jail for failure to file payroll taxes for the last 10 years for her herb farm in California, and likewise I have never willingly offered to make dinner for a friend or family member while they are moving for fear that I might be asked to help lift something heavy when I show up with the meal. When someone dies or has a baby, the offerings of help are abundant. However, once you’re married (happily or not), lose your job, or decide to change the location where you reside those times when you need a helping hand, no one ever asks, “What can I do for you?” If they do (in a moment of complete insanity) extend an offer of assistance in your time of need, ask them to make you dinner. I think you will both be surprised by the awkward pause that is certain to follow. Sometimes the most stressful of events are totally self-induced. Regardless, the process of moving is physically and emotionally exhausting. The past month of remodeling, and transferring the entire contents of The Everyday Gourmet to a new location has been quite a task. The last thing I’ve wanted to do is cook dinner after a long day of fetching and toting boxes. For people like me who are busy and stressed out, the Crockpot is almost as essential as having a dolly around on moving day. When you are facing one of those stressful life moments and no one has offered to drop off a meal, I suggest you pull out the Crockpot and pretend that someone whipped up dinner for you. A slow cooker is a fix-it-and-forget way to make dinner without the stress. You can also make cleanup easy by adding soapy water to the slow cooker and turning on high for an hour.

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FOODWISE

Whatever stressful situation you’re facing, dinner doesn’t have to be complicated. Bring out the slow cooker and try this hearty chili and surprisingly simple peach cobbler. We all know that a slow cooker can make a tasty meal, but did you know that dinner and dessert could cook in the same pot at the same time? Until now, I never tried to make multiple courses in one pot. I was a little stressed in the beginning, but just like all other self-induced stressful situations – the outcome was worth the anxiety.

SLOW DOWN CHILI INGREDIENTS 1 package Frontier Soups Ski Country Chili 1 ½ pound London Broil*, trimmed and cubed 4 cups beef broth 2 cans Rotel tomatoes 1 can diced tomatoes 2 tablespoons peach juice 2 mini Hershey’s Special Dark chocolate bars

DIRECTIONS Rinse beans and place in slow cooker. Add beef broth and contents of chili seasoning packet (I remove the chili peppers and bay leaf from the seasoning.), cubed meat, Rotel tomatoes, and peach juice. Stir, cover and cook on low for eight to 10 hours. Add dark chocolate and allow to melt before serving. Top with sour cream, cheese, green onions or tortilla chips *London broil is an umbrella term that refers to a 1 1/2 to 2-pound top round, shoulder or flank steak

COCOTTE PEACH COBBLER INGREDIENTS 1 small can Pillsbury Cinnamon Rolls, cubed 1 can sliced peaches with juice, (less 2 tablespoons)

DIRECTIONS In a 1-quart cocotte gently combine cubed cinnamon rolls and icing. Carefully move cinnamon rolls to the side of the dish and pour peaches and juice in the center. Cover with lid or leave the top off the cocotte to allow the chili aromatics to permeate the cobbler and give it a more complex flavor. Position cocotte in center of chili. (I place a shallow ramekin in the chili under the cocotte to give it a lift.) Cook for eight to 10 hours. Serve with vanilla ice cream.

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Junior League of Jackson’s

M I S T L E T O E

M A R K E T P L A C E

FASHION MISTLETOE MARKETPLACE CHAIR Rochelle Hicks STYLED BY Treehouse


Make A Statement At

A SOUTHERN AFFAIR PREVIEW GALA

MISTLETOE CO-CHAIRMAN Bethany Johnson STYLED BY Treehouse A Southern Affair--Preview Gala & Auction Wednesday, November 5, 2014 | 7 - 11 p.m.

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Make A Statement At

GENERAL SHOPPING

PLACEMENT CHAIR Allison Muirhead STYLED BY Hemline


Make A Statement At

A FASHION SHOW LUNCHEON

FRIENDS OF MM CHAIR Brenda Williams STYLED BY Maison Weiss A Fashion Show Luncheon Friday, November 7, 2014 | 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.


Make A Statement At

SOLID GOLD FEATURING SUPER T

FOOD AND BEVERAGE CHAIR Shelley White STYLED BY Lee Michaels Solid Gold Featuring Super T Friday, November 7, 2014 | 7:30 - 11 p.m. o c t o b e r

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Make A Statement At

MARKETPLACE BRUNCH

STAGING CHAIR Heather Crawford MAKEUP BY Maison Weiss Marketplace Brunch Friday, November 7, 2014 8 - 11 a.m. 44

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Make A Statement At

SOLID GOLD FEATURING SUPER T

DECORATIONS CHAIR Heather Wilkins STYLED BY Blithe and Vine Solid Gold Featuring Super T Friday, November 7, 2014 | 7:30 - 11 p.m.

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Make A Statement At

SOLID GOLD FEATURING SUPER T

MERCHANT CHAIR Lauren Lester STYLED BY Hemline Solid Gold Featuring Super T Friday, November 7, 2014 | 7:30 - 11 p.m. 46

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Make A Statement At

SOLID GOLD FEATURING SUPER T

PROMOTIONS CHAIR Leigh Reeves STYLED BY 4450 Solid Gold Featuring Super T Friday, November 7, 2014 | 7:30 - 11 p.m.

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Make A Statement At

SOLID GOLD FEATURING SUPER T

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CORPORATE SPONSORS CHAIR Clare Dowe STYLED BY Maison Weiss Solid Gold Featuring Super T Friday, November 7, 2014 | 7:30 - 11 p.m. o c t o b e r

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Make A Statement At

A SOUTHERN AFFAIR -, PREVIEW GALA & AUCTION

SUSTAINING ADVISOR Lori Quarles JEWELRY BY Juniker Jewelers A Southern Affair - Preview Gala & Auction Wednesday, November 5, 2014 | 7 - 11 p.m. 50

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Make A Statement At

THE RUDOLPH RACE

SUSTAINING ADVISOR Lucy Gault STYLED BY Sportique Rudolph Race Saturday, November 8, 2014 | 7:30 a.m. o c t o b e r

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Make A Statement At

ALL THAT GLITTERS GIRL’S NIGHT OUT

SPECIAL EVENTS CHAIR Melanie Burrow STYLED BY Blithe and Vine All That Glitters Girls’ Night Out Event Thursday, November 6, 2014 | 6 - 8 p.m. 52

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Make A Statement At

MISTLETOE MORNING

FINANCE CHAIR Neeli Graham STYLED BY Taylor Collection Mistletoe Morning Thursday, November 6, 2014 | 8 - 11 a.m. o c t o b e r

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Make A Statement At

MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT MISTLETOE MARKETPLACE

MISTLETOE CHAIR ELECT Lindsay Hamm STYLED BY 4450 Making Spirits Bright Thursday, November 5 - 8, 2014 54

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AN ICON JUST GOT LARGER

THE NEW NAVITIMER 46 mm


the northside sun magazine our wedding policy IS PL EA SED TO A NNOUNCE

F O R C OV E R I N G W E D D I N G S & E N GAG E M E N T A N N O U N C E M E N T S

E

Please type, double space, your article in story format. No forms are used by the Sun.

All write-ups should be submitted by the first day of the month for the following month’s publication. (i.e. November 1st is deadline for the December issue)

Please include photos. At least one photo will be featured with each wedding and engagement announcement. More will be used as space permits. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope is enclosed, every effort will be made to return photos.

Please include a daytime phone number on all releases. Payment is due with submission.

Wedding announcements are $150 and are full page. Engagement announcements are a half page for $90. Mail to Northside Sun Magazine, P.O. Box 16709, Jackson, 39236; or e-mail to jimmye@northsidesun.com. Deliveries are also accepted at our office at 246 Briarwood Dr. For more information,

call 601.957.1123.

The Sun accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs.

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Madison Gabriel Gould & Conner Allan McCluer

WEDDINGS

M

MAY 17, 2014

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH • JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

adison Gabriel Gould and Conner Allan McCluer were united in marriage at 6 p.m. May 17 in the sanctuary of Saint James Episcopal Church. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev.

Mr. and Mrs. Conner Allan McCluer

Jamie McElroy. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lovett Gould Jr. of Madison. She is the granddaughter of Benjamin Erskine Gandy and the late Mary Frances Gandy of Madison, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lovett Gould of Jackson. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Allan McCluer of Madison. He is the grandson of James Allan McCluer and the late Mabel Wiygul McCluer, of Brandon, the late Roy Smith and the Neva Smith of Jackson. Given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father, the bride wore a vintage-inspired, two-piece ivory gown featuring a silk charmeuse slip beneath an all-lace overlay that closed at the plunging back with covered buttons. A champagne, satin sash accented the chapel-length gown at the waistline. In lieu of a veil, the bride wore a braided floral hair design. The bride carried a hand-tied bouquet of David Austin patience roses with white ranunculus, bouvardia, white parrot tulips and Viviane spray roses. Embroidered handkerchiefs belonging to the bride’s maternal grandmother and the bridegroom’s fraternal grandmother were attached to the bouquet. Matron of honor was Britton Rhoden, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Nicole Jordan, Jessica Peacock and Morgan Tyner. Grade Williams was the junior bridesmaid. They wore tea-length, charcoal dresses featuring a V-neckline and full skirt. They carried bouquets of cream roses, silver brunia and plumosa. Jeffrey Rhoden was the scripture reader. Ring bearer was Noah Rhoden, nephew of the bride. Lola Rhoden was the flower girl. Program attendants were Lily Rhoden and Sophie Rhoden. Nuptial music was provided by Don Messer, organist. The bridegroom’s brother, Matthew McCluer, was best man. Groomsmen were Steven Andrews, Douglas Cruise, Tyler Jordan, and Kyle Langston. Dustin Hughes, Bryan Roberts, and William Vance were ushers. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at Duling Hall, where guests enjoyed a variety of Italian-inspired food while music was provided by The Krackerjacks. The bride’s cake featured alternating layers of strawberry and silky, white cake with buttercream icing topped with a crown, roses and greenery. The bridegroom’s cake was chocolate with chocolate icing, displaying the Ole Miss logo in red and blue on the top tier. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Strawberry Cafe. A bridesmaids luncheon was hosted on the eve of the wedding in the home of Britton Rhoden. Co-hosts were Nora Michael and Ruthie Courtney. After a wedding trip to Isla Mujeres, Mexico, the couple is at home in Madison.

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be your most

Beautiful Downtown Brookhaven • 800.676.1093 • www.imaginationsbridal.com

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Jolie Marie Breaux & Trenton McEvoy Nelson

WEDDINGS

J

APRIL 26, 2014

SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH • CANTON, MISSISSIPPI

Mr. and Mrs. Trenton McEvoy Nelson

olie Marie Breaux and Trenton McEvoy Nelson were united in holy matrimony April 26 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Canton. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Philton Breaux of Vancleave. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Billy Mitchell of Vancleave, and Mr. and Mrs. Hector Brumat of Pascagoula. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl ‘Skip’ Nelson of Madison. He is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Earl Nelson of Hattiesburg, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Ray Zasoski of Clinton. The Most Rev. Kevin Slattery officiated. Nuptial music was provided by Gail Madden, pianist. Given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father, the bride walked down the aisle to “Arioso,” by J.S. Bach. She wore a classic designer ivory gown sewn with lace and English net. The lace bodice featured a sweetheart neckline and cap sleeves, with crystals accenting the fitted waistline and sewn along the train of the gown. The bridal bouquet was a hand-tied mix of blush and ivory roses with white hydrangeas. Matron of honor was Kimberly Ferguson, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Lyndsey Dill, Lindsey Ferguson, Ashley Fincher, Amanda Hodges and Kate Nelson. They wore mint-colored chiffon gowns with varying complementary necklines and carried bouquets of pink and ivory-colored roses. Flower girl was Georgia Anne Ferguson, the bride’s niece and goddaughter, who wore a crown of babies’ breath, along with an ivory, custommade tulle gown with satin cap sleeves and chiffon roses made to resemble the bride’s dress. Kate Weston was the program and guestbook attendant. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were Justin Gauthier; Matthew Gilmer; Lee Hardy; James Jones III; Michael McDermott; Paul Nelson, cousin of the bridegroom; Tyler Nelson, brother of the bridegroom; and Jared Shotts. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at the Jiggetts Home, where guests were greeted with coordinating sprays of spring flowers, vintage monograms featuring the couple’s new initials and a three-layer white and strawberry-flavored bridal cake framed by pearl buttons and ivory hydrangeas. Upon arriving, the couple danced their first dance to “To Be with You,” by Mr. Big. The bride and her father danced to a traditional Cajun folk song, “Jolie Blonde,” by Zachary Richard, and the bridegroom and his mother danced to “What a Wonderful World,” by Louis Armstrong. Reception music was provided by Mike Robinson and the 601 Band. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Signa’s Grill. A bridesmaids luncheon was hosted by the bride and her mother at the Strawberry Cafe. Following a wedding trip to Ocho Rios, Jamaica, the couple is at home in Gluckstadt, where the bridegroom is a lending assistant at BankPlus, and the bride is a registered nurse at Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children.

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Jennifer Leeann Pittman & Jack Ryan Weaver

ENGAGEMENTS

M

NOVEMBER 15, 2014

BLACKLIDGE HOME • GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI

Jennifer Leeann Pittman, Jack Ryan Weaver

r. and Mrs. Ronald Wayne Blacklidge Sr. of Gulfport, along with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clarke Pittman of Louisville, Ky., announce the engagement of their daughter, Jennifer Leeann Pittman, to Jack Ryan Weaver, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Morgan Weaver of Newton. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Charles Sidney Brock and the late Katherine Kirk Brock of Gulfport, and the late Mr. and Mrs. James Garland Pittman Sr. of Pascagoula. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Rev. and Mrs. Bruce Vardaman of Brandon, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Jack Weaver of Newton. Miss Pittman is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi with a bachelor’s degree in child and family studies, emphasis in family relations. At USM, she was a member of the Alpha Omicron Chapter of Phi Mu. She is currently associated with Landscape Management Group and is a member of First Baptist Church Gulfport. Weaver was graduated from Mississippi State University with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering technology and business. He is associated with Landscape Management Group and Greenthumb Outdoors. He is a member of Newton United Methodist Church. The couple will exchange vows in an evening ceremony November 15 at the Blacklidge home on the bay in Gulfport.

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Audrey Jane Gardner & John Frederick Wilson

ENGAGEMENTS

M

OCTOBER 18, 2014

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH • SENATOBIA, MISSISSIPPI

Audrey Jane Gardner, John Frederick Wilson

r. and Mrs. Phillip Michael Gardner of Senatobia announce the engagement of their daughter, Audrey Jane Gardner, to John Frederick Wilson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Wilson of Jackson. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Patricia Hodges Means and the late Allin Mack Means and Charles Philip Gardner and the late Marlyn Horne Gardner, all of Memphis. Miss Gardner is a 2007 graduate of Magnolia Heights School and received a bachelor of business administration from Mississippi State University in 2011. She is associated with Turkoyz of Jackson. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Elizabeth Bright Robertson and the late Cohen Everett Robertson of Ridgeland and the late Mr. and Mrs. Ermis Carroll Wilson of Greenwood. Wilson was a 2007 graduate of Jackson Academy. He was graduated from Mississippi State University in 2011 where he earned a bachelor’s degree in wildlife and fisheries. He is a member of Kappa Alpha Order. Upon graduation he worked as a fisheries observer with the National Marine Fisheries Service and is presently associated with Forestry Suppliers Inc. in Jackson. The couple will exchange vows October 18 at First Baptist Church Senatobia with a reception to follow at 211 in Como.

Kimberly Patrice Peach & Andrew Roberts Norwood

M

DECEMBER 20, 2014

TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH • JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

Kimberly Patrice Peach, Andrew Roberts Norwood

r. and Mrs. Mark Patrick Peach announce the engagement of their daughter, Kimberly Patrice Peach, to Andrew Roberts Norwood, son of Malcolm Mark Norwood of Cleveland and the late Suzanne Blalock Norwood. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Thomas Rowe of Colorado, and Mr. and Mrs. Gary Patrick Peach of Tennessee. Miss Peach was graduated from Jackson Academy in 2008 and was graduated cum laude from Mississippi State University in 2012 with a degree in bio-chemistry. At State she was a member of Chi Omega fraternity, a Roadrunner, and an orientation leader. She is in physician assistant graduate studies at Mississippi College. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Harold Burnett Blalock of Oklahoma and the late Francis Blalock of Jackson, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Mark Norwood of Cleveland. Norwood is a 2008 graduate of Oak Grove High School in Hattiesburg. He attended Mississippi State University where he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity and served as treasurer and then president of the fraternity. Norwood is a 2012 summa cum laude graduate from the Mississippi State School of Accountancy. He is a third-year law student at Mississippi College School of Law. The couple will exchange vows the evening of December 20, at Trinity Presbyterian Church.

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ENGAGEMENTS

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Amy Corinne Armstrong & Anders Pieter Wells OCTOBER 18, 2014

EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF OUR SAVIOUR • ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Amy Corinne Armstrong, Anders Pieter Wells

r. and Mrs. James Sidney Armstrong of Jackson announce the engagement of their daughter, Amy Corinne Armstrong, to Anders Pieter Wells, son of Dr. Lisa Kaufmann of Boone, N.C., and Dr. William Kent Wells of Jamesville, N.Y. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John T. Armstrong of Hazlehurst, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Sykes of Corinth. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Col. and Mrs. Alfred Stephens of Diamondhead, formerly of Ocean Springs, the late Dr. Berwind Kaufmann of Ocean Springs, and the late Mr. and Mrs. William Lamar Wells of Aberdeen. Miss Armstrong is a 2001 magna cum laude graduate of Smith College, where she was elected Phi Beta Kappa. She received a master’s degree in theology from Harvard Divinity School in 2004 and a master’s degree in nursing from Emory University in 2008. She is associated with the Dekalb County Board of Health in Atlanta, as a public health nurse-practitioner and nurse-midwife. Wells is a 2008 magna cum laude graduate of Davidson College, where he received a bachelor’s degree in biology, was elected Phi Beta Kappa, and was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He is an expansion manager at McMaster-Carr Supply Company in Atlanta. The couple met in Atlanta at their church, the Episcopal Church of Our Saviour, where they will exchange vows October 18.

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Caroline Douglas Fox & Tyler Scott King NOVEMBER 22, 2014

ONE AND ONLY OCEAN CLUB • NASSAU, BAHAMAS

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r. and Mrs. Henry Creed Fox of Hattiesburg announce the engagement of their daughter, Caroline Douglas Fox, to Tyler Scott King, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Carroll King of Ridgeland. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Willie Hugh Dickerson of Hattiesburg, and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Oneal Lassetter of Clarksdale. Miss Fox is a 2011 graduate of the University of Mississippi with a bachelor’s degree in business hospitality management. At Ole Miss, she was an active member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority and the Ole Miss Ambassadors of Southern Hospitality. Miss Fox lives in Jackson and is associated with the Face and Body Center. She is the owner of Events by Caroline, LLC. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lee Clark of Clinton and the late Mr. and Mrs. Carroll D. “Buck” King of Jackson. King is a 2005 honors graduate of Jackson Academy. He attended the University of Mississippi where he received the Lewis and Frances Graeber Scholarship and was graduated with a bachelor’s degree in physics and mathematics. He is the vice president of Triangle Construction in Madison. The couple will exchange vows November 22 at the One and Only Ocean Club in Nassau, Bahamas.


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PARTIES AND CELEBRATIONS

Kayla Fondren and Breland Applewhite engagement party

Bob and JoAnn Burke, Nina and Carey Johnston

Kayla Fondren, Breland Applewhite

engagement party

An engagement party honoring Kayla Fondren and Breland Applewhite was held recently in the Montrose home of Mena and Vic Applewhite. Co-hosts and hostesses were Brenda and Mike Alford, Marsha and Ray Beasley, Memrie and Jim Bruce, Lisa and Pat Busby, Paula Garner, Janice and Chris Guckert, Catherine and Ronnie Hames, Glenna and Jeff Hartsog, Sheila and Allen Hudspeth, Nina and Carey Johnston, Carolyn and Kirk King, Charlotte and Richard McNeel, Bette and Bill Poole, Jane Roper, Cathey and

James and Memrie Bruce, Mena Applewhite

Allen and Sheila Hudspeth, Tori and Colin Applewhite 74

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David Russell, Kathryn and Lee Sams, Becky Tann, Brenda and Jimmy Thames, Rebecca and Robert Watson, Cheryl and Dow Welch, and Nancy and Tom Wright. Parents of the couple are Paula and George Fondren, and Melissa and Ron Applewhite. The wedding is planned for December 27 in Oxford. Shown are scenes from the party.

Wes and Christina McManus

Stephanie Evans, Justin Robinett

Peggy Stroud, Martha Kate Brumfield, Lacey, George W., Paula, George and Kayla Fondren, Breland, Melissa, Brad and Ron Applewhite


Tommy and Mary Scott Shepherd, Sharon and Johnny Maloney

George W. and George Fondren

Tom and Kelly Wright, Joyce Corbett

Anna Leggett, Amber Brandon, Jean Holmes, Allie Lind, Kayla Fondren, Lora Blount

Heath and Marlana Walters, Joseph and Lindsay Naegele

Jane Roper, Marsha Beasley, Catherine Hames

Nicholas Bagnato, Tammy McDaniel, Claire Burkes, Abby Clement, Landri McIntosh

Melissa Applewhite, Nancy Wright

Vic and Mena Applewhite

Landri and Steven McIntosh, Andrew Burkes, Wes and Christina McManus, Mike Herrington o c t o b e r

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TIC8395 25th Anniv Ad Northside Sun.indd 1

8/1/14 4:22 PM


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EVENTS MSU ALUMNI EXTRAVAGANZA The Central Mississippi Alumni Chapter of the Mississippi State University Alumni Association hosted its annual summer extravaganza recently at the Mississippi Coliseum. This year’s event featured head football coach Dan Mullen and some of the players signing autographs for fans; numerous vendors selling MSU-related merchandise; a children’s area with inflatables; and a formal program including remarks from Mullen. Shown are scenes from the event.

Terri and Jim Davis, Jonathan Fitzhugh

Makayla, Kylan and Michael Brister

Thomas and Walt McMahon

Mike, Michael and Renee Nemeth; Mary Lowry and Kevin Vollema

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Kevin, Abby, Blake and Bethany Watkins

Mary Parker Plunkett, Allyson and Charles Plunkett

WC McClendon, Lara Bowman, Erron Flowers


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EVENTS ENCHANTED EVENING Enchanted Evening, benefiting Friends of Children’s Hospital and Children’s Heart Center at Batson was held recently at the Jackson Convention Center. The evening included food and libations, a silent auction and music by 2 Hipnotic. Shown are scenes from the event.

Ashley Baldwin, Jennifer Waits, Kristy Jent

Pam and David Allen

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Susan and Bill Osborne

Alyson Jones, Lauren Marshall, Natalie Arnemann

Bill Martin, Sherry Vance, George Alan, Jamie Gray, David Spurk, Julie Middleton

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Bill Ray, Pam and Jon Turner

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Jeanne and John Scarbrough

Dan and Judy Grafton, Jill and David Landrum, Johnny Donalson

Wesley and Lauren Clay

Rhea and Steve Bonasia


ENCHANTED EVENING

Morgan and Aaron Samuels

Joe and Becky Schneeberger, Cindy Emery

Carrie and Nick Henderson, Ali and Jannika Dodge-Khatami

Alan and Holly Lange

Alan and Lisa Purdie, Cathy and Joel Havens

Tena McKenzie, Donna Windsor

Kevin and Shana Cooke, Terri and Michael Gillespie

Brian and Lindsay Hamm

Vaughan and Nora Frances McRae

Bo and Wendy Bounds

Clare Dowe, Leigh Reeves, Reed and Anna Nelson o c t o b e r

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ENCHANTED EVENING

Robert and Lynda Lesley, Susan and Steve Erickson

Kara and Guy Giesecke

Doug and Blair Hederman, Jennifer and John Waits

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Rob and Tamyne Armour

Edwin and Libba Vickery, Lisa and Alan Purdie


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EVENTS UMMC MANNING FAMILY Archie and Olivia Manning announced the launch of the Manning Family Fund for a Healthier Mississippi, a campaign to boost the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s commitment to improving the health of the state’s residents. This new partnership between the Mannings and UMMC will raise money to battle a variety of health-care challenges frequently confronted by the Medical Center. A medical center event to formally introduce the fund was held recently at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Charles O’Mara, Suzan Laney, Grady Jolly

Tommy and Suzan Thames, Robbie Hughes

Kara and Guy Giesecke

Dan Jones, LouAnn Woodward, Oliva Manning, Gov. Phil Bryant, Archie Manning, James Keeton

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Jeanne and Paul Moak

Ivory and Debra Bogan

Marty and Robin Tucker, LouAnn Woodward

John and Becky Hall, Gay and Steven Case, Mart McMullan

Saul Keeton, Cathy Strauss

Kevin and Shana Cook


UMMC MANNING FAMILY

Rick and Gloria deShazo

Kitty Cook Ramsey, Alan and Holly Lange

Julianna Woodward, Bailey Ellis, Jack and LouAnn Woodward, Ryan Ellis, Laura Leigh Woodward

Frank, Emily and Caden Porter, Ann and Rob Fryant

Nicole and Mike Reese

Susan Shands, Howard Jones

Mary and Alex Purvis

Kane Ditto, Elise and Gov. William Winter, Betsy Ditto, Lynn Fitch

Jane Anna and Bryan Barksdale

John and Gail Pittman

Sarah Asmuc, Tangelia Kelly, Kristin Gorney, Sheri Pape o c t o b e r

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UMMC MANNING FAMILY

Catherine and Scott Gatewood

Ralph and Millie Didlake, Krista and Michael Estes

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Natalie Hutto, Ronald and Dee Moses

Marilyn and Riley Collins

Jill Conner Brown, Kyle Jennings, Duane and Donna O’Neill


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EVENTS MISSISSIPPI CHORUS SUMMER SHOWCASE The Mississippi Chorus kicked off its 20142015 season with the “Whistle Stop Cabaret” at the Union Station train depot ballroom. The event included entertainment in cabaret style, a cocktail buffet, wine, beer and soft drinks, as well as a raffle with items from overnight getaways to New Orleans, Memphis and Vicksburg, to spa packages, jewelry and more. Shown are scenes from the event. Michael and Chrissy Hrivnak, Sherry and Royce Boyer

Brenda Murphy, Judi May, Judy Smith

Alasdair and Cecilia Roe

Vivian Williams, Billy Mounger, Charlotte Turner, Jan Mounger, Montell Watkins, Tom Turner, Billy Watson

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Sandy McKellar, Juanaree Solop, Robert Shivers

Judy and Bobby Quarles

Tom Abernathy, Debbie Broadway, Eddie and Shirley Foster, David O’Steen, Debbie Thompson

Jon Anderson, Eric Henderson

Mandy Alexander, Steve Anderson


MISSISSIPPI CHORUS SUMMER SHOWCASE

Mary Helen and Bo Bowen

Ellen Wise, Chrissy and Maren Hrivnak, Jennifer and John Christopher

Bebe Wolfe, David Weidemann

Connie Smith, Sherry Boyer, Montel Watkins, Cindy Scott

Katie Sanders, Vick La Garde

Mitchell and Lauren Hobbs, Kathleen Moffitt

Barbara and Barry Plunkett

Michael Hrivnak, Kathy Accera, Cindy Scott, Jerry Morgan

Claire and Molly Sanders

Brenda DiFatta, Jim Rivers

Pro Metts, Marsha Williams, Debbie Thompson o c t o b e r

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D o i n g w h at yo u l ov e

wh e re you live.

How do you define luxury?

Learning to ride is a treat. Getting to ride every day after school and most weekends is pure luxury. It’s exactly the lifestyle your family can enjoy at Reunion, with Reunion Farms Equestrian Center just down the street. For those more at home on the green or tennis court, Reunion Golf & Country Club puts the option of everyday play conveniently within reach. Lakes and lush nature trails, community festivals and fun— all await you at Reunion, where luxury can be defined as everyday life. Learn more by calling Reunion at ⁽  ⁾ - , or visiting reunion ms.com.

Madison, MS | reunion ms.com

A Wickedly Creative Week of Activities Presented by The Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi

Go to WitchCrafted 2014 on Facebook for details or visit www.craftsmensguildofms.org.

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EVENTS FOODCORPS FUND-RAISER FoodCorps is a nonprofit group of AmeriCorps leaders who connect kids to real food and help them grow up healthy. The leaders are schoolbased and teach hands-on lessons about food and nutrition. They build and tend school gardens and teach cooking lessons so kids can taste the fresh food they have grown. Leaders also change what is on children’s lunch trays, giving them food from local farms. Judy Wiener, Carol Taff, Morella Henegan

Cheryl Welch, Frances Morse, Charlotte McNeel

Janie Hildebrand, Sarah Jane Alston, Nancy Stevens

Food Corps Fellow Liz Broussard, Dollie Goings, Dana Larkin, Judy Wiener

northsidessun un FoodCorps service members with Cheryl Welch - Lauren Rhodes, Claire Brown, Cheryl Welch, Mariel Parman, Rebecca Rosenthal, and Liz Broussard. These service members work at Magnolia Speech School, Pecan Park Elementary, Johnson Elementary, Brown Elementary, Rowan Middle School, Dawson Elementary

the the

Food Corps Service Member Rebecca Rosenthal, Suzanne Glemot, Grace Williams

Paula James, Jacque Planck, Cecile Wardlaw, Carol Taff

oh ave your your p arties, To have parties, T e vents, weddings, weddings, events, happenings included happenings included iin no our ur magazine, magazine, please please call call

magazine magazine We’ve W e’ve G Got ot Yo ou uC Covered! overed! 6 601-957-1123 01-957-1123 o c t o b e r

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EVENTS LOTTIE BOGGAN BOOK SIGNING Author Lottie Boggan held a book signing and wine and cheese reception recently at Lemuria book store Dot Com Building for her book, “Redemption Ridge.� Shown are scenes from the event.

Willard and Lottie Boggan, Bryan Boggan

Coleman Lowery, Billy Beard, Ann Dunbar

Ed and Nell Wall

Bryan Boggan, John David Cole, Pat Monsour; (front) Aiden and Ed Ayers, Peyton Boggan, John Caldwell, Michelle Ayers, Jody Monsour

Christian Boggan, Carter Ayers 98

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Binnie Jo Boggan and Becky Brent; (front) Pat and Jody Monseur

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Billy Beard, Charles Williams

Tommy and Marilyn Blair

Mindy and John Kitchings, Dolores Watkins

Kelly Howard, Betsey Pryor

Jeff and Cathy Davis


LOTTIE BOGGAN BOOK SIGNING

Bill Boggan, John Caldwell

Janet Hester, John Evans, Todie Jones

Paulene Cochran, Judy Tucker

Subscribe to the Northside Sun Magazine and have it delivered right to your mailbox. Be one of the first to see what’s going on in your neighborhood and around the town. It’s so convenient!

Call 601.957.1123 for more information! o c t o b e r

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Ä‘Ĺ? Ĺ?ÄŒĹ? Ĺ?Ä’Ĺ? Ĺ? ÄŒĹ? Ĺ?Ä‘ 1421 N. State Street, Suite 304 Ä‘ Jackson, MS 39202 601 . 355. 9537 Ä‘Ĺ?MS E Y E P L AST ICS .CO M

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EVENTS PREP YOUNG ALUMNI PARTY Jackson Prep recently hosted a Young Alumni After Hours party at Fondren Public. Shown are scenes from the party.

Meg and Andrew Lake, William Crim

Lou Frascogna, Walker Tann

Marley and Randall Roberson, Ryan Perkins

Carmen Keys, Mary Lucia Smith, Natalie Arnemann, Harper Jones

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Lawrence Coco, Lucia Jones

Mary Benton, Lindsey Bell

Ryan Bell, Matt Benson

Scott Wilson, Robert Aiken, Chris Kimmel

Wilson Hood, Read Meadows

Lauren Lomex, Rob Stockett


PREP YOUNG ALUMNI PARTY

Elizabeth and Read Meadows

Lauren Lomax, Crisler Boone, Lucia Jones

Chris Kimmel, Christopher Johnston

e love a good party

and so do our readers!

Don’t let your party end when the guests go home. Keep it going by submitting pictures from it to The Northside Sun Magazine. It’s Easy. Just make sure when using a digital camera to have the setting at the highest resolution possible and e-mail them to us or submit a CD. Or the old fashioned way using film prints still works great!!! Type up something about the fun event and identify everyone in the photos and it’s done. And remember we like photos exclusive to us.

Still have questions? Gives us a call: 957-1123 or e-mail jimmye@northsidesun.com o c t o b e r

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EVENTS CHAINE DES ROTISSEURS FOOD AND WINE SOCIETY The Chaine Des Rotisseurs, a food and wine society, was founded in Paris in 1248 and was originally a guild for meat roasters. The group disbanded following the French Revolution but was re-started in 1950, according to Chaine’s Web site, as a group dedicated to fellowship and fine foods. The Jackson chapter has quarterly meetings to sample menus at restaurants across the metro area. In April, the group met at Table 100. The group also has a wine focus component, called the Mon Diale.

Alex and Susan Allenburger

Kim Rogers, Sarah Knight, BC and Randy Rogers

Billy Walker, Carol and Fred Parker, JD Fly

Sylvia Walker, Melissa and Jonathan Daniel

Susan and William Jeanes

Ben Rogers, Knox Ross, Marlin and Barbara Rains, JD Fly

Rhonda and Rowell Saunders, Susan and Alex Allenburger

Ralph Daniel, Tommy James, Troy Majure

Ralph Daniel, Norm Rush, Greg Schulmeier

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EVENTS SOUTHERN ARTISTS ALLIANCE Southern Artists Alliance hosted “A Tour de Force of Art and Sculpture” recently at the Mississippi Arts Center. The event featured live auctions, silent auctions, and door prizes. A portion of the proceeds benefited the Mississippi Chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

JJ Haight, Morgan Daniels, Cooper Haywood

Tammy Mesheimer, Tuesday Tauchen

Ashley Evins, Shambe Jones, Chuck Jett

Ritchie, Pam, Lisa and Jonathan Berry

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David Horton, Latricia Jones

Bob Pieczyk, Jill Headings

Mary Lou Israel, Trish Bruce, Lottie Bell, Pat Bell

Gee-Wei Lee, Grace Orsulak

Marcia DiAnn, Adriann Conerly

Tammy Golden, Carrie Roebuck


SOUTHERN ARTISTS ALLIANCE

Judy Mangum, Ruth Mayhew

Etta Rester-Hicks, Jane Barefood, Lisa Hollenstein

Mike and Hardy Katzenmeyer

Bob and Jan Forbes

Tim, Stacey and Morgan Daniels

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EVENTS THE MISSISSIPPI CHILDREN’S MUSEUM PARTNERS NEON NIGHTS The Mississippi Children’s Museum (MCM) Partners and their young professionals group, MCM Young Partners, recently hosted its first Neon Nights at the museum. The event was held in the recently unveiled Literacy Garden, MCM’s new outdoor gallery. Chris Frascogna, Elizabeth Connor

Trey Roberts, Cathy Joyner, Judge James Graves

Russell and Betsy Turley

Matt and Krista Loeb, Erin Hutchens

Wally and Stephanie Cummins, Logan Roberts, Molly Moak

Preston Dowell, Lane Bobo, Scott McVey, Ben James, Jordan Cantrell, Adam Griffin, Bee McNamara, Jack Strahan, Andrew Kehoo, Zack Hutchens; (front) Cathy Joyner, Abby James, Lauren Cantrell, Patti Reiss, Douglas Strahan, Erin Hutchens, Molly Griffin

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Willem and Mary Jordan Lamar

Abby and Ben James

Douglas Strahan, Bee McNamara, Molly Griffin

Parke Smith, Alley Moore


THE MISSISSIPPI CHILDREN’S MUSEUM PARTNERS NEON NIGHTS

Max Markley, Caroline Church

Charley Frye, Judge James Graves, Chavai McDonald

Scott McVey, Lindsey White, Preston Dowell, Jarrod Shore

Will and Swazye Pentecost

Stephanie Candy, Adam Weathers, Fatina Chase, Chelsea Gainey

and so do our readers! Don’t let your party end when the guests go home. Keep it going by submitting pictures from it to the Northside Sun Magazine. It’s Easy. Just make sure when using a digital camera to have the setting at the highest resolution possible and e-mail them to us or submit a CD. Or the old fashioned way using film prints still works great!!! Type up something about the fun event and identify everyone in the photos and it’s done.

And remember we like photos exclusive to us.

Still have questions? Gives us a call: 957-1122 or e-mail jimmye@northsidesun.com o c t o b e r

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Northside Sun October 2014