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january 2015

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COMMUNITY

Northside Teens Are Making It Happen!

volume 2 | issue 1

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EDUCATION

Chase Elementary Award

northsider.northside.net

9 SPOTLIGHT Tillie’s Lounge

a free publication

14 FOOD CULTURE

Looking Back, Looking Ahead

10 PEOPLE OF NORTHSIDE GIRLS IN THE [NEIGHBOR] HOOD 12 FEATURE WOMAN-OWNED PUPPY PREP SCHOOL


COVER ART | FEATURED ARTIST

LIVE MUSIC ALMOST EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK. SHOWS ARE FREE! CHECK INDIVIDUAL LISTINGS FOR SHOWTIMES. 4163 HAMILTON AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45223 (513) 542-3603 NORTHSIDE-TAVERN.COM HOURS: MON – SAT: 5:00PM – 2:30AM SUNDAY: 7:00PM – 2:30AM HAPPY HOUR: MON-SAT 5-8PM

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Sue Wilke

ue Wilke grew up in the suburbs of New York City and attended the College of New Rochelle and received her BA in History. She moved to Washington, DC ,where she decided she wanted to live after her 7th grade Girl Scout trip, received her MA in International Service from American University and did doctoral studies in Modern Chinese History at George Washington. She worked as an intelligence analyst in Far Eastern Affairs for the Defense Intelligence Agency for seven years before moving to Cincinnati where she had a 21-year career in logistics and human resources for Procter & Gamble. She took early retirement to work in the non-profit sector as Executive Director of the Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, the Alzheimer’s Association and the Leadership Council of Human Services Executives and COO of the Free Store Food Bank. She retired again in 2009 and in addition to her community volunteer work, has been working on writing her memoir and developing her photography skills. About the Cover: Title: The Goldfinch in Winter Last winter when it was so cold and snowy, I saw this little, yellow goldfinch perched on a very barren, dogwood tree. I was able to capture him, patiently waiting his turn at our bird feeder, through my front window. 2 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

Cincinnati’s independently owned community bank, guiding businesses and individuals since 1891…

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SPRINGDALE 11 6 2 8 S p r i n g f i e l d P i k e Cincinnati, OH 45246 (513) 671-3800 WEST CHESTER 8 6 1 5 S h e p h e r d F a r m D r. U n i o n C e n t r e B l v d @ RT 7 4 7 We s t C h e s t e r, O H 4 5 0 6 9 (513) 551-5000

A N D T R U S T C O M PA N Y Look to the North

Member FDIC

www.northsidebankandtrust.com life & culture 45223

EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER


VOLUME 2 ISSUE 1 | CONTENT

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COMMUNITY NEWS -JOIN THE CAIN SCENE IN 2015! -COMMUNITY DISCUSSION AND FILM ABOUT PRESCHOOL PROMISE -NORTHSIDE TEENS ARE MAKING IT HAPPEN!

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EDUCATION -COMMUNITY CONVERSATION -CHASE ELEMENTARY AWARD -WORDPLAY - IT TAKES A VILLAGE...

9 10 12

SPOTLIGHT -TILLIE’S LOUNGE

Wilke, Steve Sunderland, Livia Stinson, Brandon E. Niehaus, Libby Hunter, Nick Mitchell, Marie Knecht, Alisa Balestra, Ande Schewe, Cynthia Allen, TT Stern-Enzi & the Happen Film Critics.

Artwork: Sue Wilke, CAIN, Happen Inc., JC Diaz, Steven Metz, Marie Knecht, Jerome Wilson, Ande Schewe,

Volunteer advisory committee: Jeni Jenkins, James Kinsman, James Heller-Jackson, Barry Schwartz, Karen Andrew, Mark Christol

FEATURE -WOMAN-OWNED BUSINESS ELIZABETH GAUL OF PUPPY PREP SCHOOL

Jeni Jenkins of Uncaged Bird Design Studio

SCREEN | HAPPEN NORTHSIDE -HAPPEN’S FILM CRITICS FOOD CULTURE -LOOKING BACK, LOOKING AHEAD

HEALTH & WELLNESS -5 WAYS YOU CAN RESTORE YOUR INNOCENCE AND START ANEW NORTHSIDE SCENE -EVENTS CALENDAR-JANUARY

NORTHSIDE TIDBITS 2015 NCC board nominations

Judy Radina, Claire Darley, Remi Walz, Sue

Publisher, layout, Design and

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WRITERS:

PEOPLE OF NORTHSIDE -GIRLS IN THE [NEIGHBOR] HOOD

13 14 15

CONTRIBUTORS

management paper rollers Happen Inc. Volunteers led by Tommy Reuff

delivery team Riccardo Taylor, Sue Wilke, Stephen Davis, SaraLynne Thoresen, ThoraLynne McKinney, Mati Senerchia, Noeli Senerchia, Jacob Walker, Jared Walker, Isaac Hunter, Evan Hunter, Owen Hunter, Kirah Hickman, Margaret Roe.

Contact us:

northsidermonthly@gmail.com FOR AD RATE INFO, SUBMISSION DEADLINES AND TO SUBMIT EVENTS/ANNOUNCEMENTS AND VIEW THE

VERSE & PROSE - STEVE SUNDERLAND, LIVIA STINSON AND BRANDON E. NIEHAUS

ONLINE VERSION, VISIT US:

northsider.northside.net

2015 Northside Community Council board elections will be held at the Annual Meeting on Monday January 26, 2015. (Community Council will meet 7:00 PM, at McKie Rec Center.) Nominees for Officer and Director positions must be resident members of NCC who have attended at least three council meetings in the previous twelve months. A list of eligible members was provided at the November and December meetings; nominations closed at the end of the December meeting. Nominees must accept or decline by January 7, 2015; therefore, at press time, the slate of candidates was provisional. Please see Bits & Pieces, Nextdoor Northside and the NCC Facebook page for the final slate. CURRENT SLATE: President: Oliver Kroner Vice President: Sue Wilke Treasurer: James Kinsman General Secretary: Fred Neurohr Board Secretary: TBA Membership Secretary: Mati Senerchia Directors: Martha Dourson, Mary Jo Minerich, Jonathan Sears, Heather Sturgill

oops! - Corrections In Volume 1 Issue 15, December 2014, Page 14, WordPlay’s Youth Poetry Program by Brian Shupe, editoral edits by our staff were left in the final print version. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused.

Needed: northsider management We are looking for one person to take over managing the Northsider Monthly each month. Preferably a Northside resident familiar with the Neighborhood. Duties Include: Managing Writers and Photographers, Managing Advertising Sales, Publication Layout and Design, Managing website content, Managing Newspaper Delivery. FOR MORE INFO: Please contact Jeni Jenkins, 513-885-0504 or by email: northsidermonthly@gmail.com

Do you have a northside event, class, program, or workshop you would like listed in the Northsider? Then submit that info:

www.northsider.northside.net

Mission statement: As an independent monthly communication, The Northsider’s mission is to engage and inform about life and culture in the Northside Neighborhood. As such, The Northsider is committed to providing timely, quality and informative community news and opinions while embracing the diversity of the neighborhood.

Organizational structure: Northsider, LLC. is a Nonprofit Limited Liability Company overseen by the Northside Community Council. The Northside Community Council is a volunteer, community-based organization that provides an opportunity for all individuals and groups in the community to participate in Northside’s present and to chart Northside’s future. As such, it is committed to bringing people of diverse backgrounds and opinions together in an atmosphere that fosters cooperation and communication.

The Northsider Monthly newspaper is published on the first Friday of the month and is distributed to businesses and residents in the 45223 zip code. life & culture 45223

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community news| JOIN THE CAIN SCENE IN 2015!

START THE NEW YEAR IN SERVICE TO YOUR NEIGHBORS AND NEIGHBORHOOD!

A summer day on the CAIN dock to invite you to join the CAIN volunteer team in 2015! Photo: CAIN

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ecoming a CAIN Volunteer is a great way to start this New Year. Read on to find a volunteer service opportunity that matches your talents and interests and warms your heart! Like people? Welcome guests to the pantry as a Welcome Desk volunteer. Greet guests and offer snacks, friendship and encouragement as a Hospitality Volunteer. Confirm guest needs and provide additional resources as an Intake and Service Facilitator. Assist guests with their pantry selections as a Choice Pantry Shopper. Pantry hours: Mon. 6:30-8:30pm; Tues. 10am-1pm; Thurs 10am-1pm. Weekly or monthly commitment needed. Want to make sure there is food

for our guests? Many of the items our guests need are provided through the generosity of local businesses and individuals. Use your vehicle to make local pick-ups of pantry items or food drive donation items as a Food and Donation Transporter. Help to display pantry items and manage inventory as a Pantry Stocker or Back Pantry Manager. Enjoy cooking? Use pantry items to prepare nutritious food samples for guests as a Pantry Food Sampling Coordinator. Offering yummy samples to CAIN guests gives them the opportunity to try new taste combinations then take home the food and the recipe to make a delicious dish for their family. CAIN’s Rainbow Choice Pantry reflects the USDA’s My Plate initiative to offer

and promote a variety of nutritious food choices. Really great at leading and organizing? The Choice Pantry relies on volunteers to serve our guests! Coordinate Volunteer Shoppers and pantry time activities as a Shift Leader. Staff the Wednesday evening Northside Farmers Market booth as a CAIN Ambassador. Welcome guests and assist local church volunteers on Monday evening for the weekly Phil’s Place dinner as a CAIN Liaison. As a CAIN Board Committee member, participate in monthly evening meetings with others committed to CAIN’s “behind the scenes” critical work that propels CAIN’s mission forward. Have a heart open to work with women and children who have experienced homelessness? Assist guests at Grace Place in the development of life skills and develop relationships as a listening companion supporting guests and helping with household duties as a Hospitality Volunteer. Four hour shifts available each weekday at CAIN’s College Hill location. Like to throw parties? As a Party with a Purpose Host you can plan a party to benefit CAIN. Help local organizations arrange food and personal products drives as a Donation Organizer. Many CAIN guests receive SNAP benefits (food stamps). Federal policy prohibits the purchase of personal care and household items with

SNAP funds. Local drives are critical to meet the needs of CAIN guests. Love detailed work? Assist guests in completing forms to apply for a variety of programs covering food, healthcare, household energy and student aid as well as tax filing as an Ohio Benefit Bank Counselor (training provided). Contribute needed services such as mailings and information management as an Administrative Assistant. Advance CAIN’s growth as a Social Media Promoter. Enjoy making a big splash?Lead or participate in special summer events: Freestore Foodbank Memorial Day Hunger Walk and the Northside July 4th Parade MORE INFO:

Ready to take the next step? Volunteer Applications available on CAIN website www. cainministry.org or contact Judy Radina at 513-591-2246, ext. 4 or volunteers@ cainministry.org CAIN - Churches Active In Northside 4230 Hamilton Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45223 (513) 591-2246 Visit: www.cainministry.org

Judy Radina Judy serves CAIN as the Coordinator of Volunteers. In her leisure time Judy enjoys serving as a Healing Touch hospital volunteer and going on “Adventure Days” with her granddaughter.

community news|COMMUNITY DISCUSSION AND FILM ABOUT PRESCHOOL PROMISE BUILDING SUPPORT FOR QUALITY PRESCHOOL

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orthsiders are invited to view a film and participate in a community discussion highlighting the importance of preschool for Cincinnati children. The event will be held Sunday, January 25 from 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. in the auditorium of North Church, 4222 Hamilton Avenue (opposite the Library). Hosts are North Presbyterian Church and World Outreach Christian Church in partnership with the AMOS Project. 4 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

Dr. Troy Jackson, director of the AMOS Project asks, “Imagine a city where every child has the same fair start. Attending quality preschool gives every child a strong foundation for achieving future success.” Currently 53%, over half, of all children living in Cincinnati live in poverty. “Are We Crazy About our Kids”, the 30-minute film, focuses on both the social and economic impact preschool (or its lack) has on children personally and the long-term costs to the com-

munity. Research conducted nationally over the last 10 years uncovers some dramatic and cost-saving impacts of preschool. World Outreach and North churches have undertaken a number of projects together including the neighborhood Block Party, weekly prayer walks around Northside and hosting Phil’s Place meals. Both are supporting member churches of CAIN food pantry. A broad community awareness

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effort is underway to build support for quality preschool. You are invited to view the film, share your insights and focus attention on this crucial issue. FOR MORE INFO: Contact Claire Darley (513) 462-8958 or North Church (513) 681-1400.

Claire Darley


community news| NORTHSIDE TEENS ARE MAKING IT HAPPEN!

NORTHSIDE TEEN HALL PROGRAM CREATES OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOCAL KIDS

Photos: Happen Inc.

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ummer 2014, Happen, Inc. started the Northside Teen Hall program with a goal of creating opportunities for local kids to get involved in their neighborhood. Happen staff and volunteers met with Northside teens once a week for eight weeks to listen, learn, and help organize a program that kids could design from the ground up. The Teen Hall motto is “Have Fun and Make a Difference,” and in 2015 kids are taking their motto to heart. Teen Hall now has a dinner meeting once a month where they discuss ways to bring teens together in the neighborhood, and provide a positive outlet for making Northside a better place to live. During the week, teens

also meet as part of committees developed from their monthly meetings. Several kids expressed an interest in learning to build computer code for video games and other projects. Now thanks to local business Ellanet and owner Bruce Demske, his son Cecil Demske and volunteer Dave Schwinn, Happen now offers computer code building sessions twice a month at Happen’s Toy Lab. Teens are developing their own video games that soon anyone will be able to come in and play at Happen’s Toy Lab. They also wanted to get more involved in the neighborhood decision-making, and two of teens have been appointed to serve as members in local organizations. Start-

ing in January, one teen from Teen Hall will serve as a teen member of the Northside Business Association, and another teen will serve on the Northside Community Council Education Committee. The teens also wanted to dance, so they started a teen event committee that meets twice a month on Monday nights. This committee wanted to focus on having fun and organizing kids to give back to Northside. They are currently planning a summer riverboat dinner dance for fifty Northside teens and Saturday, January 10 is the first Northside Teen Trash Social. The kids will be picking up trash with Cindy Sherding and other members of Northside’s Citizens on Patrol starting

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at 10:30 AM. Their efforts will be rewarded with a pizza lunch and a meet-and-greet social with local engineers from the organization Engineers without Borders. This get-together will promote STEM activities for children at Happen in February that coincide with the national celebration of Engineers Week. For More Info: Art Activities For Parents & Children 4201 Hamilton Ave (& Chase) HOURS: 3:30 - 7:30PM (Tue.-Thu.) 10am - 5PM (Sat.) www.happeninc.org (513) 751-2345

Remi Walz

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education|FINAL COMMUNITY CONVERSATION ON EDUCATION DEFINES PRIORITIES

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he last of four community conversations on education and how the Northside community wants to embrace and support the education of its children was held on December 2nd at St. Boniface. The meeting was designed so participants could confirm their priorities and decide how to organize to carry out chosen goals. Because the invitation was open to every community member, the first part of the meeting was spent briefly reviewing the history of the process up to this point using graphic facilitation developed by Mike Fleisch, a graphic facilitator and Northside business owner, who volunteered his time to help with the process. Mike also used his skills to graph the work of this final discussion. Participants suggested several new priorities to add to the six defined at the end of the third meeting. They then broke into small groups to discuss how to prioritize the work and what they personally would do to help achieve results. After report outs, participants chose which priority was most important to him/her and had a second group discussion on how to organize, including identifying who should be responsible, and who else should be invited to ensure success. The large group agreed the top two priorities were: HOW DO THE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY IDENTIFY AND COMMUNICATE ABOUT THEIR MUTUAL

Photos: Sue Wilke

NEEDS, CONCERNS AND RESOURCES and HOW DO WE ENGAGE AND INVOLVE PARENTS IN NORTHSIDE SCHOOLS. With these priorities in mind, a number of next steps were outlined. These included: calling together the LSDMCs (Local School Decision Making Committee), Board and Principals from the three Northside schools to set up an operational structure to carry out the first goal; engaging CPS to

learn more about the Community Learning Center model, to better understand what a Northside model might look like; exploring the Leadership Scholars program for parents; and having a team that would focus on teacher appreciation. A survey has been sent to everyone who participated at the meetings seeking feedback on the process and results achieved. After the holidays the steering team will meet to debrief, review the survey results and begin to move forward. On behalf of the Northside Community Council Education Committee, I would like to thank the more than sixty Northside community members who turned out over the course of this

process to think, vision and dream with us. I would also like to thank Mike Fleisch for volunteering his time, our facilitators, Eileen Cooper Reed and David Weaver for leading us through very meaningful discussions, CPS and Rolonda Smith for providing financial support and Council member Fred Neurohr for developing and administering the survey. Please watch this space for more information about next steps, future action meetings, and how to get involved. We encourage anyone who is interested even if you did not attend the conversations to plug in and help out. If you have questions, contact Education Committee chair Sue Wilke via email at suewilke@cinci.rr.com.

education|CHASE ELEMENTARY RECEIVES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AWARD

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n late October, Chase Elementary School was notified by Ohio’s Superintendent of Public Instruction that Chase had been named a High Progress School of Honor based on its 2013-2014 Ohio School Report Card data in reading and math. I recently sat down with Chase Principal Lynsa Davie and conducted the following interview:

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What does it mean to be a High Progress School of Honor?

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This means Chase students met the necessary targets to make one year’s progress or better and have done this over a three to five year period. This is what’s known as the value added requirement on the new state report card. Only five schools in Ohio received this award and Chase is the only CPS school to achieve the results needed for this honor.

Q

What grades, subjects and number of students were affected?

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Virtually 93% of our students achieved these results, which applies to both math and reading in grades 3-8.

Q A

How is Chase able to be so successful?

We used data driven instruction to identify where to improve and what to teach. This makes education individualized for each student since working on progress is based on each student’s own data. This approach was

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supplemented by the University of Virginia turnaround process with training for me as a principal assigned to a turnaround school, and a district driven elementary initiative for delivery of instruction in the classroom.

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Why is this value added approach important? It is important because it places less focus on whether children continued next page


pass the test and more on whether they are growing and making gains and progress. Many think that children are not learning if they didn’t pass the test, and this is not true. The value added approach has been in place for five years, focused on helping the whole child and making sure our children have the tools to learn. What do you want people to know about Chase receiving this award?

Q

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This award is a huge accomplishment coming from being seen as a school at the bottom and moving to the top. Our teachers have truly earned this award through their hard work and level of their commitment to Chase children. The State of Ohio agrees! The letter to Ms. Davie reads in part, “By showing consistent progress in raising math and reading skills for all student groups, you have proved that admin-

istrators, teachers and families who have high expectations and provide continual support can enable students from all backgrounds to achieve academically. Together, you are opening a world of opportunities for your students and building a wonderful legacy for your community.” The Northside community is proud of the entire Chase school community and applauds these outstanding results.

sue wilke Sue is a retired P&G and non-profit executive currently on the boards of the Northside Community Council and CAIN. A former school board member, she has a strong interest in improving education for all children.

education|WORDPLAY CINCY - IT TAKES A VILLAGE... come together with local children to create a better future for all. Our big-picture goal? Help children break the generational cycles of poverty by addressing their academic, creative, social and emotional needs. Teach children the power of the written and spoken word, and their stories can at last be heard. And we have a lot to learn from those stories. WordPlay is a safe and nurturing “third place” which forms a foundation along with the home and school from which children can develop the skills they need for success in and beyond the classroom. We believe in the power of community and that bridging social and economic divides serves the greater good. Build relationships with those in need, and both sides of the equation benefit. The human capital needed to WordPlay students applaud to a standing ovation from the sold-out audience after Enter Stage realize this vision could have been Write, an autobiographical spoken word performance in May, 2014. daunting. Photo: Broadcast Photo by Steven Metz Since this founding idea for WordPlay took shape, however, I safe, included, optimistic? ne late winter evening have marveled at the community rein 2011, a chance enTheir answers were consistent in a counter with a group of sponse. In the year of planning prior troubling way - they did not feel they rock-throwing children in to opening our doors for programwere part of the greater community, a Northside park set the wheels in ming in September of 2012, over didn’t feel others in the neighborhood motion that would lead to the found150 people gave of their time and could be bothered to care about ing of WordPlay Cincy the following talents to help us launch. Since then, them. Determined to find a way to year. A tense confrontation with the nearly 470 caring individuals have continue the connection begun that threatening group of youngsters and completed our volunteer training, and night, I teamed up with good friend teens that night evolved into to a another 50 donate their time beand fellow Northsider, Elissa Yancey, meaningful exchange of ideas and hind the scenes each year to ensure to create a space where connections feelings about our shared neighborwe have all the support we need to like this could grow and flourish, hood. Did they feel that they were deliver our programs effectively to as part of the community? Did they feel where regular, everyday people can many as 150 children each week.

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To these outstanding, passionate individuals who understand the power of “it takes a village;” to those who are inspired to reach out and find common ground, sharing their time and wisdom to help a child, I give my heartfelt thanks. To Elissa and her fiercely protective, skillful stewardship as founder and Board Chair, to WordPlay’s incomparable board of directors and staff who have guided the organization through the whirlwind startup years with such dedication; to our committee members, community partners, schools, funders, and our WordPlay families, I offer my deepest gratitude for your invaluable part in this equation. Northside, you have welcomed us with open arms; your vibrancy and spirit have nourished and shaped our growth and given the children of our shared village new hope. We are, after all, in this together. Let’s continue to make it better for everyone. For More Info: If you would like to know more about WordPlay and how you can get involved, email info@wordplaycincy. org, or call 513-541-0930. Our next volunteer training is Saturday, January 17th at 10:30 am.

Libby Hunter WordPlay Co-Founder and Executive Director and long-time Northside resident. vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

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spotlight|TILLIE’S LOUNGE

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM (Left) Tillie, Northside’s biggest celebrity. (Right) Tillie’s Lounge Logo. Photos: provided by JC Diaz.

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s you may have heard, there’s a tackle and bait shop coming to our neighborhood. Local fishermen will be disappointed to learn, though, that this rumor is false. Put your fishing poles away because OTR’s Below Zero Lounge co­owners Nigel Cotterill and JC Diaz have announced the inception of Tillie’s Lounge in Northside.

“Tillie’s will offer a more­classic lounge atmosphere with a cozy arrangement of seating for friends to sip and socialize,” Cotterill explains. “We have always been supporters of Northside and seen the recent revitalization for ourselves, and we determined it was the right time to get involved in a neighborhood we love.”

Cotterill and Diaz are working with the famed local interior design group Dwellings on Madison to create an early 20th­century feel with historical decor for their new lounge. The fact that their building has stood since 1881 only adds to the historic concentration. Tillie’s will utilize it’s music parlour (complete with baby grand piano). “We are going to be having live music on Saturday evenings to start, and that may be extended to other nights. We are open to almost anything. Jazz, classical, open mic format, or even a sing along or two,” Cotterill elaborates. The lounge will book local and national acts to perform at the bar, while also utilizing TVs for sports games and other special television events. Though Tillie’s Lounge is not a sister/ brother bar for Below Zero Lounge, Cotterill and Diaz believe Northside shares the same opportunities to be successful focusing on progressive community events. “We are looking for groups and organizations to partner with and host fundraisers, or even just social events,” Cotterill emphasizes. “We are excited to see if we can help bring some new and fun ideas to

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Northside. We have been involved at committee level with several downtown events such as Macy’s Downtown Dazzle, Second Sunday on Main, Drag Races, and Pride. Northside has great potential to host neighborhood events.” Vast rumors of Tillie’s theme have been spread around Northside, including claims that a San Francisco­ style rave bar or taco bar was opening up. “We have heard several rumors,” understates Cotterill. One can only concede that the excitement and anticipation surrounding Tillie’s imminent opening has greased the wheels of what has now become a rumor machine. There is also a rumor floating around that the bar’s namesake came from a local circus elephant. Surprisingly, that rumor is true. Tillie was a circus entertainer of the pachyderm variety, performing on the corner of Blue Rock and Hamilton Avenue, as part of John Robinson’s Circus. Most of the press garnered thus far by Tillie’s opening has been fixated on this unique tribute, though Tillie’s future looks just as bright as it’s storied past. Tillie’s Lounge is certainly a boost to the neighborhood.

nick mitchell Nick is a touring musician and the co-founder of Grasshopper Juice Records. He and his wife moved to Northside three years ago in appreciation of its alternative culture. vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

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People of Northside | GIRLS IN THE [NEIGHBOR] HOOD Welcome to the “People of Northside” a monthly column where each month we feature different members of our eclectic neighborhood to remind you why you call Northside home. If you would like to see an article published on a member of the community or to write your own article on a person that interests you email us at Northsidermonthly@gmail.com.

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spent the first day of 2015 walking through Parker Woods with six of Northside’s biggest personalities. We talked about their favorite memories from 2014, what they hope for in 2015 and, of course, what they like most about their neighborhood. Did I mention that these ladies were ages 8, 8, 11, 11, 12, and 12? What better way to start the New Year than to get to know some of our young, bright community members. Didn’t someone once say that children are the future?

MEET MY FRIENDS: AMIRA Age: 11 Grade: 6 School: Cincinnati Waldorf Amira is sweet and thoughtful – very intentional when expressing her thoughts. Her family hosts a neighborhood dinner. It used to be weekly, but has fizzled a bit due to busy schedules. For 2015 Amira wants to restart “Family Dinner” with the neighborhood because she says it’s a “great way to connect with people you never knew.” When I asked her what she liked about living in Northside she said that everybody is family and that everyone is always willing to help. If Northside had a mayor, this kid would be a shoe in. AIYANA Age: 8 Grade: 2 School: St. Vivian This little girl is something else! If you have a few hours to kill – Aiyana has stories for days. If you close your eyes, you’d swear she was 25. For 2015 Aiyana wants to spend as much time as possible with her nice big family. Also, more time with her friends, that is a must. She loves Northside because “I’ve basically lived here my whole life.” She went on to say, “Northside has all my friends and it’s easy to move around here because the houses are kinda all smooshed together. I just love my neighborhood!” Ahhh… precious Aiyana, your neighborhood loves you too. 10 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

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VICTORIA Age: 8 Grade: 3 School: Parker Woods Montessori Victoria could someday be a fantastic singer/songwriter. In a mature and sultry voice, she sang a song she created on the spot about ringing in the New Year. This year she would like to see her mom (she lives full time with her aunt) and she hopes that her grandmother starts feeling better. On the lighter side, she also wants her garden to bloom, and would like it to snow. This big-hearted little lady feels connected to Northside because she likes the trees and pretty houses. SWEET PEA Age: 11 Grade: 6 School: Cincinnati Waldorf The name says it all and this kid has commitment. In 2015 she said, “I’m going to try really hard to be the best person I can be.” Her parents told me later that she also included, “not acting like a jerk.” Awe, sweet Sweet Pea, I don’t believe you have it in you to be a jerk. She cares deeply for the people around her. She likes that people in Northside are always doing community projects for kids and families.

KAYLA Age: 12 Grade: 7 School: Parker Woods Montessori Kayla is creative and smart – She is a little on the quiet side, but in a mysterious and interesting way. She likes to crochet and she’s hoping that in 2015 she’ll be able to get more yarn and some new hooks. She loves playing outside and being silly with her friends. She told me that she likes Northside because it is a “nice, tiny town.” She also likes living close to her friends.


SAIGE Age: 12 Grade: 7 School: Cincinnati Waldorf Saige is another wild one! Headstrong would be the understatement of the year and I’m confident saying that even on January 1st. In 2015 she wants to work hard in school to be prepared for Walnut Hills for high school. Her description of Northside says it best, “I like that me and my mom can go to the store in like, footed pajamas. We can wear that to UDF and be like ‘hi everyone.’ Or we can grab something for breakfast, still in the same pajamas and nobody even cares… they think it’s normal.” It’s our own kind of normal Saige – and we love that you’re a part of it. Writing about these kids was fun! As a parent, it was so interesting to listen to their thoughts about the neighborhood. We frame our children’s attitudes and opinions and it was clear that all of the girls have phenomenal families, active in and supportive of Northside. Rock on!

Just let Liberty prepare your taxes and we’ll give you $50 on the spot! Get another $50 for every new Liberty customer you refer. Liberty provides fast and friendly tax preparation services with a money back guarantee!

Deal Ends February 13th, 2015

4152 Hamilton Ave, In Northside; Opp. to KFC Cincinnati, OH-45223

PH: 513-827-9258 916 Hempstead Dr, Near Winton, Rd; Behind AT&T Cincinnati, OH-45231

marie knecht Marie Knecht is a Communication and Marketing Professional and lives in Northside.

PH: 513-522-4829

With paid tax preparation. Valid at participating locations. Referred friends must have their taxes prepared at Liberty Tax. Cannot be combined with other offers or used toward past service. One coupon per customer and per return. Other exclusions may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Valid 1/2-2/13.

3416 Clifton Ave 513-961-2998 www.cliftonumc.com The people of Clifton United Methodist Church believe God’s love is expansive and unconditional. and that through Christ God has called us to love one another as God loves us. We welcome all people regardless of gender, race, age, culture, ethnic background, sexual orientation, economic circumstances, family configuration, or difference of faith perspective. We celebrate the worth, dignity, and gifts of every person as a child of God. - Our Reconciling Statement

facebook.com/CliftonUMC @CliftonUMCOhio

We will be exploring our reconciling statement throughout January. We invite you to join us for worship Sundays at 10:30 AM and our latest events:

END OF LIFE SERIES Our parish nurse is leading a series on end-of-life issues, following worship on first and third Sundays. (ETA 11:45 AM). Topics include:

SAVING JESUS

MLK SUNDAY

Ever feel like Jesus has been kidnapped by the Christian Right? “Saving Jesus” is a revolutionary DVD-based small group. We will begin this journey on Thursday, Jan 8, 4 - 5:30 PM, for twelve weeks.

SUN 1/4: Dr. Rebecca Bechhold, OHC How To Talk To Your Doctor SUN 1/18: Jenny Essell, Goldstein Family Grief Center Life After Loss SUN 2/1: End of Life Planning

As part of citywide conversations about race, led by United Methodists, Sunday January 18 will feature a guest message by Curnell Graham of Gaines UMC.


feature | WOMAN-OWNED BUSINESS

Elizabeth Gaul Puppy Prep School

Helping Dogs And Their Owners In Northside Since 2008

H

aving previously worked as a chef privately and for a variety of restaurants in Cincinnati, Philadelphia native Elizabeth “Betsey” Gaul now offers Northside residents private training and services with their puppies and/or young dogs through the Puppy Prep School. Gaul opened Puppy Prep School in 2008 after having spent years working in kennels and witnessing firsthand the stress animals experience due to boarding. Creature Comforts, the in-home pet-sitting service Gaul began while employed by the kennel, provided an alternative to the kennel and its “noise and chaos.” As well, the business provided Gaul the experience to work for a large pet-sitting company in Pennsylvania; while there, Gaul attended a pet sitter convention and learned more about canine behavior and learning theory – skills she brought back with her to Cincinnati in 2008. In addition to the in-home pet-sitting she provides Northside residents, Gaul offers private lessons, board and train, puppy daycare, and other specialty services through Puppy Prep School. “Since every dog, and every family, is different,” Gaul tailors private lessons to meet the needs and goals of dog owners, with housetraining, leash pulling, children/dog issues, counter-cruising/jumping up/door dashing, mouthing, hyperactivity, and coming when called the most common issues with which Gaul deals. Board and train services include both a 17 and 30 day program for puppies and young dogs where dogs stay with Gaul for training. “Board and Train is a good option for people who may not have time to teach their puppy or dog al the behaviors they’d like for them to know,” Gaul said, noting that she works with dogs, brings them home, and then teaches owners how to “maintain and build on training.” Owners may also opt for Puppy Daycare – a day boarding program for young puppies – for housetraining support, midday feedings, and companionship for puppies while busy owners are away during the day. As well, Gaul works with shy and fearful dogs to build and their confidence, and with newly adopted or shelter dogs to help them adjust to new environments. The only business of its kind in Northside, Puppy Prep School draws on Gaul’s relationship-based method of dog training – “that training is best done with your dog rather than to your dog.” For Gaul, helping people focus on good communication, trust, respect, and understanding with their canine companions is a goal and business practice. To learn more about Gaul’s work or how she can assist in your dog needs, visit the Puppy Prep School online at www.puppyprepschool. com, or contact Gaul at betsey@puppyprepschool.com. Gaul may be also reached at 513-541-4217.

Alisa Balestra Alisa is a Specialist-Project Management and Clinical Research Professional at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. You can find Balestra running the streets of Northside, hiking in Parker Woods, biking in the Spring Grove Cemetery, or eating delicious vegan eats around the neighborhood. 12 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

Betsey working with Parker, a 12 week old Pug, at Northside Grange Pet and Urban Farm Supply. Photo: Jerome Wilson life & culture 45223


screen|HAPPEN NORTHSIDE: HAPPEN’S KID FILM CRITICS NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB “Night at the Museum was awesome! I think the weirdest part was when the monkey kissed Larry.” -Gwendolyn

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB [PG] We all know that Hollywood studios love trilogies, so why not make one (an original idea, no less) for the kids. With Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb, the magic that brings the museum experience to life is on the verge of fading, and it is up to security guardturned night-time exhibition director Larry Daley (Ben Stiller) to gather

his ragtag collection of re-animated historic wax figures around the world (well, to England for a museum rendezvous with Rebel Wilson as another hapless security guard) to reboot the mojo and see if everyone can enjoy this latest Night at the Museum franchise adventure from director Shawn Levy. The spirit of Camelot gets incorporated into the proceedings here with Sir Lancelot (Dan Stevens) joining in on the fun, along with a couple of familiar

cameos, but the message involves Larry attempting to bond with his teenage son Nick (Skylar Gisondo) who is on the verge of growing up (which is unsettling to dear old dad). Of course, Secret of the Tomb, despite the father-son issues on display all over the place, likely be remembered as one of the final screen appearances by the great Robin Williams, but did Happen’s Kid Critics think the movie was as zany as classic Williams performances from the past?

“Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb is similar to the previous two movies of the series. This film tops the first two comedy wise. The casting was much better, especially Rebel Wilson as the the British museum security guard and Dan Stevens as Sir Lancelot. The one negative comment I have is the story was a little boring. It’s one thing after another, but overall this film is good for the whole family and it cooks up a lot of laughs. I would give it 3 out of 5 stars. ” -Henry “I liked the film. It had a more complete story. It had a lot of jokes, though most (all of them) were corny. Also, I liked it because there was a lot more sacrifice than the others.” -Maxwell

- TT Stern-Enzi, Cincinnati Film Critic

Each month, Happen’s Kid Film Critics received their own official Happen film critic packet and a press badge. TT Stern-Enzi, Cincinnati film critic, provided insight about the film and guided the children as they wrote this month’s film reviews. Read the reviews, and be sure to watch NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB playing in theaters now. life & culture 45223

Art activities for parents & children 4201 Hamilton Ave (& Chase) HOURS: 3:30 - 7:30PM (Tue.-Thu.) 10am - 5PM (Sat.) www.happeninc.org (513) 751-2345

vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

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food culture| LOOKING BACK, LOOKING AHEAD AS TOLD BY FARM WAKER ANDE SCHEWE

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n 2008 the Northside Fall market was so exciting that it never did wind down. When our time ran out at the parking lot on Lingo and Hamilton, the vendors continued to set up at the Northside Village Green every Wednesday. As the evenings got longer and colder fewer vendors continued to set up. I remember holding a flashlight over my booth to show excited customers my different products such as Jerusalem artichokes and packages of dried herbs. Not many vendors persevered as winter progressed, and the mood shifted; the original excitement abated. Lauren and I then connected up with Steve Seta of Red Poly, which at that time was a vintage furniture store right on Hamilton Avenue. Along with Jim and Patty of Back Acres Farm, every week we set up our booth in 14 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

the Red Poly store. We brought a consistent product for the 75-100 people who strolled through until the outdoor market started up in the spring. We laughed how each week we had a different vintage couch to sit on. People enjoyed the music playing in the building, we were right at a bus stop, and we were pregnant for the first time. We felt like pioneers. We weren’t sure if there would be a demand for what we offered. Kale was still an item I had to explain to many. But the people of Northside came because they could see the difference we were making and wanted to support us. At that time, no other winter markets dedicated exclusively to locally produced goods were thriving in Cincinnati. “Local food” had just become a trendy phrase. When I wrote “local” on a sign, folks would

Top Left: Ande Schewe at Wind Dance Farm. Top Right: Ande with his kids. Bottom Right: Ande and Lauren. Photos: Ande Schewe

ask if I meant it was “low calorie”. The adventure of that winter led to the year round local food market in Northside. Six seasons later, Northside Market is a booming all-season market with around thirty vendors. Thanks to the joint effort and support of many, it has become a successful venture for many small farmers and a launching pad for a number of small businesses. As for me,

life & culture 45223

I now have two children growing up healthy and chemical-free, and I’m producing a wide range of botanicals for Northside and the greater Cincinnati -Indianapolis area. Thanks to all who have been there this whole time. Winter of 2014-2015 Enjoy!“

Ande schewe


health & wellness|5 WAYS YOU CAN RESTORE YOUR INNOCENCE AND START ANEW

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don’t know about you, but there are many times when I would like to have a do-over and wipe my slate clean. One of my teachers, Ruthy Alon, the creator of Bones for Life and Walk for Life, calls it erasing the prejudices of our body and mind to restore a state of innocence. Mmmm. I like the sound of that—a state of innocence. Having some way to do this regularly is vastly important. This is what we are all hoping for at midnight on December 31st: the clock strikes and the dawn of a new year equals the dawn of a new day in our lives. Unfortunately, most of us continue to carry our past around as a personal cross to bear. Here are 5 ways you can restore your innocence and start anew. 1. Letting Go Ritual. One that I like, adapted from the Inca tradition, is the burning of

a death arrow. Select a stick and place into that stick, through intention or decoration, all the past junk that you are ready to release. Build a fire outdoors or in your fireplace. Reflect on the past and when you are ready, place the death arrow in the fire. Use your hands to cleanse your body with the smoke. Smudging is a very old clearing technique in many native traditions. Of course the original Inca ritual is more detailed, but make it your own. 2. Massage. Schedule a massage just for the purpose of erasing the history of last year (or month). Tell your massage therapist that it is your intention that the old will just slide off onto the floor so you can leave it behind. He/ she will be very pleased to help you. 3. Energetic session. There are many forms of energetic sessions available these days: Reiki, craniosacral, Healing Touch and more. They all differ but have the same goal of restoring your natural energy flow. These deeply relaxing sessions also provide a deep reset. 4. Movement. No surprise here, this is a favorite of mine, having chosen movement as my field of expertise. More precisely, my field is about helping the brain and body release the history of past challenges or traumas and truly learn a new way of being in the world. What might that be like?

I have recorded a movement lesson that you can do at home. All you need is computer access. So check it out at www.FutureLifeNow.com/ CleanSlate. 5. Creative process. Our innate capacity to change our outlook through coloring, drawing, sculpting or making a collage is often overlooked. You can overcome your art-related fears by grabbing a glue stick, some magazines and a piece of poster board. Start by finding images/words that evoke the challenges of the past year. Tear them out and paste them on. Give yourself about 20 minutes maximum for this part of the process. Then look for images of what you want to bring into your life. Rearrange and

Free New Year’s classes

glue these over top of that which you are letting go of. Put on some upbeat music, dance around a little while you do it and watch your attitude do a 360. Voila, you are ready for 2015!

Cynthia M. Allen Cynthia Allen is a partner in Future Life Now which specializes in well-being and growth. She is an expert in walking, joint health and just about anything related to movement as a Certified Bones for Life Trainers and Feldenkrais Practitioner. Reach her at 513.541.5720, www.futurelifenow. com, or email at CynthiaAllen@ futurelifenow.com.

Restoring the Soul for 2015: A weekend day retreat

Registration encouraged: call 513.541.5720

Experience Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement

January 31 and February 1. Begin the year right by taking time for movement, reflection and ritual. Facilitated by Cynthia Allen. $160 ($145 if registered before 1/10). Call 513.541.5720 to register.

Move better, feel better, look better. Monday, January 5 or Monday, January 12, 6:00 pm

Quality Walking Is Quality Medicine

restoring you to your potential

Visit futurelifenow.com for information on class series and individual services.

4138 Hamilton Avenue. Enter on Knowlton Street. Customer parking behind building.

Poor quality walking has some nasty side effects like chronic back or neck pain, arthritis, plantar fasciitis and osteoporosis. Learn how to get more from this selfgenerated medicine. Sunday, February 15, 1:30 pm

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events calendar – january

FIND OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING AROUND NORTHSIDE THIS MONTH. ONGOING EVENTS: First Monday – Northside Business Association Monthly Meeting @ Happen, Inc. 4201 Hamilton Ave. (6PM) The Northside Business Association is a resource for all Northside Businesses and works to continually improve the neighborhood. More info: call 513-5414745 or email: bdemske@ella.net

Third Monday (Fourth Monday January and

February) – Northside Community Council Monthly Meeting @ McKie Rec Center 1655 Chase Ave. (7PM) Get involved with issues that directly affect our community! The NCC is a volunteer, community-based organization that provides an opportunity for all individuals in the community to participate in Northside’s present and to chart Northside’s future.

Every other Monday – The Qtet @ Northside

Tavern 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9PM) Influences range from Miles Davis to Van Halen. Jazz. Front room. Cost: Free www.northsidetav.com

Every other Monday – Northside Jazz

Ensemble @ Northside Tavern 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9PM) From Funk, Reggae and Soul to Rock, Free Jazz, Blues and straight-ahead Jazz and back again, this tight four-piece puts familiar tunes in a brand new bag. Jazz. Front room. Cost: Free. www.northsidetav.com

Every Monday – Afternoon Games @

Northside Branch of the Cincinnati Public Library 4219 Hamilton Ave. (3PM) For information, call 513-369-4449

Every Monday – Mom-to-Mom support group @ Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (10:30am to 1pm) FREE. Children are offered an array of fun motor activities in an encouraging, safe, soft environment. www.theplaceforfamilies.com

Every Monday – Crawlers & Climbers @

Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (10:30-11:15am) $10 per class. Children are offered an array of fun motor activities in an encouraging, safe, soft environment. www.theplaceforfamilies.com

Every Monday – Whale of a Tale / Storytime

@ Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (12:00 - 12.30pm) FREE. Interactive bilingual story time. Instill the love of reading within your child from infancy upward by participating in our multi-sensory story time. Weekly themes incorporate story telling, singing, and a simple take-home craft, if desired. www.theplaceforfamilies.com

Every Monday – The Marburg Collective @

The Comet 4579 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Indie/Jazz. www.cometbar.com 16 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

Every Monday – Trivia @ Northside Tavern

4163 Hamilton Ave. (8PM) Cost: Free. www. northsidetav.com.

Every Monday – Bomb’s Away Comedy Open

Mic @ Mayday (8PM) Cost: Free. 4227 Spring Grove Ave. www.maydaynorthside.com

Every tuesday– JitterBugs @ Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center (10:30-11:15) Ages 18 months to 3 years. $10 per class. This unique movement class for beginners introduces basic terminology and the fundamental movements of ballet, modern, African and creative dance! www. theplaceforfamilies.com Every Tuesday – Teen Movie Madness @ Northside Branch of the Cincinnati Public Library 4219 Hamilton Ave. (3PM) For information, call 513-369-4449 Every Tuesday – Zumba @ McKie

Center (6PM) 1655 Chase Avenue. ”If you are perfect don’t come”- you’ll ruin our demographic.

Every Tuesday – Bike Night @ The Comet

4579 Hamilton Ave. (7pm) Motorcycle enthusiasts gathering. Free. Bikes, Burritos and Brews. www.cometbar.com

Every Tuesday – Artist In Residency: @ The Comet 4579 Hamilton Ave. (10pm) Free. Indie/Folk. www.cometbar.com Every Tuesday – Cinthesizer @ Chameleon, 4114 Hamilton Ave. (8pm) Free. Electronic. www.thechameleonclub.com Every Tuesday – Trivia Tuesday @ Mayday

(8PM) Trivia every Tuesday, with prizes and specials. Cost: Free. 4227 Spring Grove Ave. www.maydaynorthside.com

Third Tuesday– Square Dance @ Northside

Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. (8-10:30 pm) All dances taught. Live music by the Northside Volunteers. Beer on tap. Suggested donation $5-10 to caller. It’s hip, it’s what’s happening. Each month features a different caller and live old-time music and dance. Historic tavern, resonate wooden floor for dancers, small stage for all-volunteer band. Jan. 16 T Claw (Boulder CO)

First wednesday– The Chris Comer Trio @ The Listing Loon 4124 Hamilton Ave. (8PM) A piano based jazz trio. Cost: Free. More info: www.ChrisComerTrio.com Every Wednesday – Northside Farmers Market

@ Northside Presbyterian Church 4222 Hamilton Ave.(4-7PM) This twelve-month market brings tri-state farmers to the city of Cincinnati to sell their produce, meat, eggs, crafts and fruit. NFM prides itself on bringing fresh and locally produced food to the vibrant

community of Northside. More info: www. northsidefm.org

Every Wednesday – Live Acoustic Wednesdays @ Bistro Grace 4034 Hamilton Ave (6:309pm) we support local events, breweries and musicians. We are centrally located in Northside. We have quality food at reasonable prices and a full bar. We offer happy hour prices, drink specials and half off wines. Free. BistroGrace.com Every Wednesday – Karaoke @ Chameleon, 4114 Hamilton Ave. (8pm) Free. Karaoke. www.thechameleonclub.com Every Wednesday – Sexy Time Live Band Karaoke @ Northside Tavern 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9PM) Live band karaoke. Back room. Cost: Free. www.sexytimekaraoke.com

Line and circle dances from Eastern Europe/ Middle East. No partners necessary, no experience necessary. Teaching available 8-9 PM. For information, call 541-6306 or e-mail kspencer1@zoomtown.com. Cost: $5.

Every Second Saturday – Northside Second Saturdays (6-10PM) Come see art, shop, imbibe and eat in one of Cincinnati’s most creative and diverse neighborhoods. Featuring new art openings, later hours, bar drink specials, interactive events and promotions that vary monthly with participating businesses. Every Second Saturday – Hook & Ladder (Vinyl Night) w/ Margaret Darling (The Seedy Seeds, Devout Wax) @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Vinyl / Variety. www.thechameleonclub.com

Every Thursday – Zumba Class @ Northside

Every Second Saturday – Galaxie Art Show & Skate Park Fundraiser @ Galaxie Skate Shop, 4202 Hamilton Ave. (6pm) Free. Art. galaxieskateshop.blogspot.com

Every Thursday – International Folk Dancing

Every Second Saturday – Basement Reggae w/ Abiyah & Grover @ The Comet, 4579 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Reggae. www. cometbar.com

Presbyterian Church Thursday (7PM) 4222 Hamilton Ave. ”If you are perfect don’t come”you’ll ruin our demographic. @ Clifton Community Arts Center, 7-9 PM. Line/circle dances from Eastern Europe/ Middle East. No partners necessary, no experience necessary. Teaching available. For information, call 541-6306 or e-mail kspencer1@zoomtown.com. Cost $3.

first sundays– Bulletville @ Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Live music. Front room. Free. www.northsidetav.com

Every Thursday – Slow and Steady Bike Ride @ Leaves from Hoffner Park 4104 Hamilton Avenue (7PM) Cost: Free. Join this welcoming and easy bike ride.

Final sundays– The Tillers @ Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Live music. Front room. Free. www.northsidetav.com

Every Thursday – Karaoke with Bree @

Why?) @ The Comet 4579 Hamilton Ave., (10:30 PM) Free. Indie/Improvisational. www.cometbar.com

Boswell’s, 1686 Blue Rock. (8pm) Free. Great food, great drinks, great karaoke! www.facebook.com/hotwheelsentertainment

Every first & third Thursday – Comedy

Night w/ Andrew Rudick @ Chameleon, 4114 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. www. thechameleonclub.com (3rd & 5th Sunday this month due to New Year’s)

LAST Thursday – Folk & Fiction @ The Listing

Loon 4124 Hamilton Ave. (6-11PM) Reading and musical performances. Cost: Free. More info: facebook.com/folkandfiction

Every Saturday – Signing Safari @ Cincinnati

Family Enrichment Center (11:30-12:15) Ages 6 to 35 months. $10 per class. Join your child in singing, signing, playing, & rhyming! www.theplaceforfamilies.com

Every SATURDAY – Zumba @ McKie

Center (12PM) 1655 Chase Avenue. ”If you are perfect don’t come”- you’ll ruin our demographic.

Every Saturday – International Folk Dancing

@ Twin Towers’ Hader Room (8-10:30 PM).

life & culture 45223

every sunday–SUNIGHT w/ Josiah Wolf (of

Every Sunday– Comet Bluegrass Allstars @

The Comet. (7:30PM & 9PM) The Comet house band plays two sets every Sunday. Cost: Free. 4579 Hamilton Ave.

EVERY OTHER SUNDY – MULAMBA (Cinthesizer) @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Indie/Electronic. thechameleonclub.com

UPCOMING EVENTS: Saturday, January 3 – Trunkweed w/ SMUT @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Indie/Electronic thechameleonclub.com Monday, January 5 – Experience Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement @ Future Life Now (6:30-8:30PM) With Cynthia Allen. Discover what the Feldenkrais Method can do for YOU. Attend either or both. Free event. In Northside at: Future Life Now 4138 Hamilton Ave., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45223 Phone (513)541-5720. Registration required. Call or email support@futurelifenow.com.


beginning Mon Jan. 5 – Toddler Times @

Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (10:30 & 2:30) CFEC’s new 2-day a week Montessori-inspired program for 2 & 3 year olds! Mornings & afternoons available. Only 10 spots available! $20 for 1 2-hour day; $36 for 2. In this Montessori inspired program toddlers are given the opportunity and materials to explore and discover in keeping with a toddler’s natural drive to act independently. Class activities foster cognitive, speech, and language development, strengthen fine and gross motor skills, teach early grace and courtesy practices, and instill self-help ability in daily life tasks www.theplaceforfamilies.com

donation to CCAC. Registration required. Call 513-541-5720 or email support@ futurelifenow.com

Saturday, January 10 – Art Opening - Mary Mischenko @ Future Life Now (6:30-8:30PM) Come see the beauty of Mary Mischenko’s works. Have some tea and meet new friends. You can just show up or let us know you are coming. Hope to see you there! In Northside at: Future Life Now 4138 Hamilton Ave., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45223 Phone (513)541-5720.

Monday, January 12 – Experience Feldenkrais

w/ Counterfeit Money Machine and Super Origami @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Hip-Hop. www.thechameleonclub. com

Awareness Through Movement @ Future Life Now (6:30-8:30PM) With Cynthia Allen. Discover what the Feldenkrais Method can do for YOU. Attend either or both. Free event. In Northside at: Future Life Now 4138 Hamilton Ave., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45223 Phone (513)541-5720. Registration required. Call or email support@futurelifenow.com.

Saturday, January 10 – PRIM w/ Umin @

Saturday, January 17 – Escape of the 28 and

Friday, January 9 – Suave’s CD Release Party

Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Indie. www.northsidetav.com.

Saturday, January 10 – Reverse a Hunch Back with Trekking Poles @ Clifton Cultural Arts Center (9:30 to 10:30 am) With Cynthia Allen. Your back can become strong instead of rounded when it is engaged naturally in walking. At Clifton Cultural Arts Center, 3711 Clifton Avenue, 45220. $10 suggested

Hamilton Avenue Road to Freedom @ Taft Museum of Art 316 Pike Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. (1PM) On April 2, 1853, 28 men, women, and children fled slavery in Boone County, Kentucky, for the freedom of the North. Believed to be one of the largest groups to have escaped from this area, they were aided locally by the united efforts of the Underground Railroad in Cincinnati, Northside, and College Hill. Join local historians

Serving Northside lunch & dinner Monday–Saturday

Kathy Dahl and Betty Ann Smiddy, from the Hamilton Avenue Road to Freedom Committee, who will share their important research into this and other Underground Railroad stories that follow the Hamilton Avenue route and the communities of Northside, College Hill, North College Hill and Mt Healthy. Several of these sites were recently included into the National Parks Service Network to Freedom listings. FREE Reservations Required 513-684-4515.

Saturday, January 17 – Vinyl Frontier w/ Meiosis, Juan Cosby, and MULAMBA @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. Vinyl/ Dance/Various. www.thechameleonclub.com

Friday, January 23 – DJ Jocelyn @ Chameleon @ Chameleon 4114 Hamilton Ave. Hip-Hop. www.thechameleonclub.com

Saturday January 24 – Calling All Tooth Fairies! @ Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (12:45pm) FREE. A local pediatric team will be covering a variety of topics concerning children’s teeth and dental health during this fun workshop. Topics will include teething and suggested comfort remedies, the eruption of baby and permanent teeth, keeping gums and teeth healthy and clean, the diet’s impact, the fluoride controversy, benefits of sealants, and dental emergencies. www.theplaceforfamilies. com. Saturday January 24 – Ninth annual Up for Grabs Day in Northside! @ Northside Presbyterian Church 4222 Hamilton Ave. (12-4PM) We hope you’ll join us for this super fun way to build community and save reusable goods from the landfill. Up for Grabs Day is a completely free reuse event! The price of admission is at least two reusable items to donate (but feel free to bring a truck load - the event is more fun if there’s lots of good stuff!). You sort your own stuff onto tables by category and then you’re free to take as much stuff home as you want. You can come back as many times as you like over the course of the event as long as you bring

more stuff to donate. Please remember that items at up for grabs day are for personal use only and are not to be sold or used for profit. Our goal is to bring like-minded people (the Northside state of mind) together for a fun day while at the same time help people streamline and clean out their lives, and redistribute items to those who will use them in hopes of keeping useful items out of landfills. All unclaimed items are donated to charities including CAIN, the public library, and St. Vincent DePaul at the end of the day. Check us out on facebook to volunteer or for updates about this awesome event!

Saturday, January 24 – Cincy Brass w/ Comprador, Eclipse, and Animal Mother @ Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. (9pm) Free. Rock/Jazz. www.northsidetav.com.

Sunday, January 25 – PILATES OPEN HOUSE Open house from 3pm-5pm. Join us at Pilates with Myra and sample Pilates and massage therapy. Call 513-312-2997 for more info.

Saturday January 31– Chiropractic for Kids @ Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center 4244 Hamilton Ave. (12:45pm) FREE. Have a toddler or young child? Ask yourself how many times they’ve fallen down today. Often, it’s at least 5 to 10! How many times in a week, in a month, in a year? Our children’s bodies take a beating at this age!. Parents report three unexpected benefits when their child receives regular chiropractic care: improved sleeping, improved behavior and attitude, and improved immune system function! Join Dr. Heather Iannelli to learn more! www.theplaceforfamilies.com. Every Saturday till 2/14/14 – LIBERTY TAX ROAD SIDE PARTY @ 4152 Hamilton Ave across from KFC. (12pm to 2pm) You get FREE Hotdogs,Hamburgers and gifts. (Hiring) We have open interviews from 2-4pm. We are looking for Markerters and Dancers. Also if you need help with your taxes or need health coverage we can help. Also You can earn some CASH just refer a NEW Customer to Liberty and get $50 CASH. Hope to see you there!! More info: libertytaxcfn@gmail.com

Schaeper Pharmacy, Inc. 4187 Hamilton Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45223 513-541-0354

Your Family’s Good Neighbor® Pharmacy… *Ranked #1 by JD Power for Customer Satisfaction over ALL Chain Drug Stores in 2013! Flu Shots Now Available!!!

Richard A. Schaeper, R.Ph.

Linette Corwin, R.Ph.

Tricia Rice, PharmD


verse & prose STAND UP AND MAKE A STAND DEEP DOWN, IN THE WHISPERS, OF THE DARK. THERE IS SILENCE. NOT THE KIND OF SILENCE, AS IF YOU WERE SLEEPING IN YOUR BED. BUT THE SILENCE, OF WOMAN CRYING. WOMEN THAT HAD BEEN, MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY ABUSED. THE SILENCE OF A GUN BEING PUT TO HER HEAD. SAYING IF YOU MOVE, OR TELL ANYONE, I WILL SHOOT YOU DEAD. THE KIND OF SILENCE WHILE LYING IN A PUDDLE OF BLOOD AS LIFE SLIPS AWAY. THERE IS A SILENCE CRY. BUT CRYING FROM DEEP DOWN INSIDE. SAYING I WILL SURVIVE, I WILL SURVIVE. FOR MY HEART IS CRYING OUT. TO GOD, SAVE THEM LORD. MAY GOD BLESS THEIR SOULS WHO HAVE PERISHED SITUATION LIKE THESES. ASHES, TO ASHES. DUSTS TO DUSTS. STRETCH OUT YOUR ARMS, AND REACH TOWARDS HEAVEN. FOR ONLY GOD KNOWS THE WAY. THE WAY OUT OF YOUR SITUATION. THE WAY TO STAND UP. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE OF YOURSELF. DEEP DOWN, IN THE DEPTHS OF YOUR SOUL. DEEP DOWN IN THE REALM OF YOUR SPIRIT, THAT LETS YOU KNOW, WHO YOU ARE. TAKE A STAND AND STAND UP. LIFE IS A BLESSING, GIVEN FROM HEAVEN ABOVE. NOONE HAS THE RIGHT TO TAKE WHAT HAS GIVEN TO YOU. NOONE CAN DECIDE YOUR DESTINY. ONLY GOD, AND YOURSELF. FOR GOD HAS MADE YOU FROM HIS PRECIOUS LOVE. BELIEVE ALL THINGS, ARE POSSIBLE. BELIEVE THEY WILL COME TRUE. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, FOR GOD WILL SEE YOU THROUGH. JUST STAND UP.

livia stinson A Northside resident for most of her life, Livia has been writing poetry since aged 10. As a slam poet she performs in many venues around Cincinnati. You can view her on Youtube -Livia Stenson Poetic Poet. 18 vol. 2 | Issue 1 JAN 15’

CANCER POEMS Watching the inner eyes searching for signs. Nothing is seen, everything is suspicious. A car goes up the wrong street. Blind to the way of direction, A swerve puts it on the curb. It is too late. Police arrive and the driver gets out. It’s too late. Everything returns to normal. The street is quiet, except For memories of the car that turned Around and parked the opposite way. It’s too late for the street, the car And the driver. The normal embraces the cancer Believing that the signals of direction Can be corrected with more police: Radiation, chemicals, surgery, pills And the blinding lights of a street Swept by tow trucks. Too late? Too late. Time travel on the streets of fear. Never too late for caring. Never too late for compassion. Never too late for the facing of suffering. Never too late to say, “I love you.” Right on time to say and be Healed, helped, harbored, Unhurried, and at home.

Steve Sunderland Steve Sunderland is director, Peace Village Cancer Project

life & culture 45223

DEMONS WALK THE WOLVES Shake the crustaceans from your head while hearing the chants of those forest dwellers looked down upon by local upstanding fire voices smoke drums shakers naked bodies writhe and wither to come alive again infected by the energies abounding around faces of love faces of hate faces of power digesting the sky and wanting more tasting the stars with soft tongues serpent ones wrap themselves around the sun moving like living knots of flesh orbs of tissue float out there in the infinite space surrounding us all push off this rock into forever never to return but to grow old in the ship always moving in one direction with no way to turn or move the center of gravity mid line generated and fostered like concrete weightless touching nothing ever again

brandon E. Niehaus Brandon E. Niehaus has a shoebox full of ideas and occasionally picks one out to focus on. He also enjoys dogs, pocket knives, and reading.


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The northsider, jan. 2015

volume 2 | issue 1

northsider.northside.net

a free community publication

Northsider Vol. 2 | Issue 1 | January 2015  

[4] COMMUNITY NEWS - JOIN THE CAIN SCENE IN 2015! - COMMUNITY DISCUSSION AND FILM ABOUT PRESCHOOL PROMISE - NORTHSIDE TEENS ARE MAKING...

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