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AUGUST 2016 | LIFE & CULTURE 45223

4 EDUCATION

6 SPIRITS

WORDPLAY GROWS

THE DOG DA(ZE) OF

LEADERSHIP FROM WITHIN

SUMMER ARE UPON US

A FREE COMMUNITY PUBLICATION

8 NON-PROFIT 13 COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

VISIONARY & VOICES

HELP CAIN GROW! RECOGNITION CAMPAIGN


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GREEN DENTAL OFFICE* Keeping Northsiders smiling since 1982!

Thielen Dental Practice

Christopher Thielen, D.D.S. LLC General Dentist Cosmetic, Implant & Family Dentistry 513 541-5655 4254 Hamilton Avenue www.CincyDental.com

* Environmentally conscientious: Proud to be the only OHIO-EPA DEED GOLD AND GREEN compliant dental office in Cincinnati! 

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


COVER ARTIST

CONTRIBUTORS

WHAT’S INSIDE

EDITORS IN CHIEF:

NEWS IN NORTHSIDE: NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY COUNCIL��������������������������� 2 NORTHSIDE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION����������������������� 2

Leo Pierson D’Cruz and Michelle D’Cruz

NORTHSIDER MANAGEMENT TEAM: Ollie Kroner, Mati Senerchia, Karen Andrew, Jarrett Shedd, Kamall Kimball, Jonathan Sears, Barry Schwartz, James Heller-Jackson, Leo Pierson D’Cruz and Michelle D’Cruz

PAPER ROLLERS: Happen Inc. Volunteers led by Tommy Reuff

DELIVERY TEAM: Kamall Kimball, Riccardo Taylor, Karen Andrews, Sue Wilke, Stephen Davis, SaraLynne Thoresen, ThoraLynne McKinney, Mati Senerchia, Noeli Senerchia, Jacob Walker, Daisy Walker, Evan Hunter-Linville, Owen Hunter-Linville, Lauren & Meredith Shockely-Smith

REBECCA NAVA Rebecca Nava is an artist and educator who earned a BFA in Painting from UC’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning in 2000 and an MFA in Painting from Boston University in 2004. Her work ranges from large scale abstract paintings, mixed media multi-sensory installations and public murals. She has been the lead artist for three public murals through the Artworks organization and teaches as an adjunct professor at local art schools and colleges. She lives and works in Northside for the past 10 years.

CALL FOR ARTISTS/COVER ART The Northsider is seeking monthly cover art submissions from local artists. All 2 dimensional pieces will be considered. One stipulation of publication is that the piece or a print be donated to The Northsider Annual Art Auction Fundraiser that will help support the paper. If you are interested in having your artwork considered: Email: northsidermonthly@gmail.com Subject line: Cover Art Submission

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY

The Northsider Monthly is published on the first Friday of the month and is distributed to businesses and residents in the 45223 zip code.

MISSION STATEMENT As an independent monthly communication, The Northsider’s mission is to engage and inform about life and culture in the Northside Neighborhood. As such, The Northsider is committed to providing timely, quality and informative community news and opinions while embracing the diversity of the neighborhood. Northsider, LLC. is a Nonprofit Limited Liability Company overseen by the Northside Community Council. The Northside Community Council is a volunteer, communitybased organization that provides an opportunity for all individuals and groups in the community to participate in Northside’s present and to chart Northside’s future. As such, it is committed to bringing people of diverse backgrounds and opinions together in an atmosphere that fosters cooperation and communication.

DEVELOPMENT: NEWS FROM APPLE STREET�������� 3 AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD: CINCY SUMMER STREETS 2016 RETURNS TO NORTHSIDE���������������� 3 EDUCATION: WORDPLAY GROWS LEADERSHIP FROM WITHIN�������������������������������������� 4 HAPPEN HAPPENINGS: HAPPEN INC. ANNOUNCES LOANS TO TEENS������������� 5 CREATIVE WRITING: AUGUST�������������������������������������� 6 SPIRITS: THE DOG DA(ZE) OF SUMMER��������������� 6 ENVIRONMENT: SOLAR PANELS IN EVERY DIRECTION����������������������� 7 NON-PROFIT SPOTLIGHT: VISIONARY & VOICES����� 8 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: FORMER MAYDAY BECOMES NSYC������������������������������ 9 AT THE MARKET: NATIONAL FARMERS MARKET WEEK����������������������� 10 CITY HALL: CITY PREPARES FOR OPENING OF THE STREET CAR���������������������������11 EVENT SPOTLIGHT: YOUNG ADULT KICKBALL TOURNAMENT RAISES MONEY TO FIGHT POVERTY����12 COMMUNITY: HELP CAIN GROW!��������������������������� 13 OPINION: CREATIVITY, COURTESY, AND TENDER CANCER CARE������������������������������������ 14 SCREEN: HAPPEN’S KID CRITICS���������������������������� 15 EVENTS������������������������������������������������������������������������ 16

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NEWS IN NORTHSIDE

Northside Community Council Updates METRO Unveils Draft Plans for Northside Transit Hub

What Northside Projects Should the City Help Fund Next Year?

Accepting Nominations for Board Vacancy

At the July NCC meeting, Metro officials presented plans for the Transit Hub to be located at the corner of Blue Rock an Spring Grove. It was announced that the land has been acquired, and they hope construction will begin soon and be completed by next Fall. METRO’s presentation is available at www.norhtside.net/ncc.

Each year, through the Community Budget Requests process, the City of Cincinnati asks neighborhoods to submit their top 3 projects deserving of funding in the upcoming City budget. In the past, Northside has requested projects including street repavement, gateway signage, streetscaping, and trail maintenance, etc. We need your ideas now! Please send your project ideas to northside45223@gmail.com.

NCC will be wishing farewell to our Board member Neha Gupta, who is heading to Arizona for PhD program in August. Neha is irreplaceable, and we thank her for her service to the neighborhood. NCC is now accepting nominations to fill her seat. Please contact George.murray@gmail.com with nominations.

Next Community Council Meeting: 7PM August 15th at McKie Rec Center. For frequent updates, find us on Facebook! FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit www.northside.net.

OLLIE KRONER President, Northside Community Council olliekroner@gmail.com

Northside Business Association Even though we are in the middle of summer, The Northside Business Association urges Northside businesses to start planning for the holiday and winter months from October running through February 2017. “We would like all to see the Northside Business District thrive even more this coming winter holiday season by attracting more and more visitors from the Greater Cincinnati area” said Northside Business Association President Jim Swafford. “We have a very eclectic business district that also includes great restaurants and

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entertainment establishments which reach across a wide demographic of people and interests,” he added. What people need to know are how many small businesses and retail shops are here which offer so much to the public. Combined with great restaurants and entertainment they can make for a perfect holiday shopping experience. Northside is a holiday shopping destination where you can find a lot in just a few easy, walk able blocks. There are shops here where you will find unique gifts that you can’t find anywhere else in Cincinnati.

The NBA wants to expand that interest and reach a wider audience by offering the kind of experiences Northside is known for. “So, if you are business owner we want to remind you to start planning your holiday offerings and sales now. Please share those plans with the NBA at our regular meetings on the first Monday of every month at 7:00pm at Happen, Inc. located at the corner of Hamilton and Chase Ave.” said Swafford. “If you are a resident of Northside we ask you to help support your

local Northside businesses this coming winter season by taking the Northside Winter Holiday Challenge and purchasing the majority or all of your holiday gifts from the Northside Business District. Think about it, Northside offers everything from clothes to honey to skateboards plus you can purchase gift certificates from some of Cincinnati’s best and most well known restaurants right here in Northside” said Swafford.

JIM SWAFFORD President, Northside Business Association

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


DEVELOPMENT

AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD

Apple Street Market Clears a Hurdle Exciting news from Apple Street Market Cooperative! The 10-year pro-forma completed by ICA Group and consultant Michael Valiant has determined that the grocery store can be very successful at the original site- 4145 Apple Street. This means that we are ready to embark full speed ahead on the next steps to opening Apple Street Market. First, the time has come to tap into the funds in our escrow account. We will access these funds to finish inspections and preconstruction requirements on the Apple Street building. This is a tremendously important and thrilling step in the progress of the Apple Street Market project. Next, we must complete our financing goals for 2016, while continuing to select equipment for the store, as well as completing design revisions. We will then send our design revisions for Apple Street Market to Cincinnati’s Building Department for approval. Once the Cincinnati Building Department has approved these designs, we will select the contractor/subcontractors and begin construction. As the construction process progresses we will get a clearer completion date and from there we can begin planning on recruiting further suppliers in addition to Associated Wholesale Grocers and Our Harvest Cooperative. Throughout the construction process, we will be working to formalize plans for partnerships with other community

organizations on food access and education programs and create plans for hiring from within the community. While we work with contractors on construction details, we will be conducting a new community owner drive to attempt to exceed our goal of 2,000 community owners, while also conducting a community owner loaner campaign. In attempt to continue our funding goals, we will be holding a bingo night fundraiser at Urban Artifact on August 20th at 5:30pm. We have awesome prizes planned, including prize baskets valued at $100+, and a $1,000 cash grand prize! We only have 200 tickets available for the event, so be sure to reserve your spot, and you can reserve a table of eight so you can make it a party with your friends! https://www.eventbrite. com/e/bingo-night-fundraisertickets-26327293644 This is an exciting time for Apple Street Market, and in order to continue the progress on the project, we rely heavily on our volunteers. Our volunteers are a large part of what keeps the project alive and moving, if you or anyone you know is interested in joining our volunteer team- please reach out to us. For volunteer information or additional bingo information contact info@applestreetmarket.coop!

Come play in the streets of Northside at one of Cincinnati’s best summer events! The always fun and free “Cincy Summer Streets” event returns to Northside for the third time on Sunday, August 28. Cincy Summer Streets opens up the city’s largest public places – our streets – and creates a car-free space for everyone to walk, bike, mingle and play. Special activities will take place at “play-stops” along the open street route. Cincinnati has joined more than 100 Open Streets events taking place across the country in cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Louisville, New York, Portland and Seattle.

golf, jousting, hula hooping, yoga, dancing, belly dancing, art-making, music and more!

In Northside, Hamilton Avenue becomes a “park for a day” and will be closed to cars and opened to the public to bike, run, walk, skateboard, play, and create art. Cyclists can rent bikes at the event or bring their own. Many free, fun activities will take place along the route, such as jump roping, lawn bowling, mini

For more information, visit www. cincysummerstreets.org,

The Cincy Summer Streets Northside event will take place Sunday, August 28, 12:00 to 4:00 pm – on Hamilton Avenue between Pullan Avenue and Spring Grove Avenue. Cincy Summer Streets 2016 is sponsored by The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./US Bank Foundation. Summer Streets is supported by the Northside Community Council, Northside Business Association, Art on the Streets and the Cincinnati Development Fund.

Follow Summer Streets at facebook. com/CincySummerStreets, Twitter@ cincystreets and Instagram/ cincystreets with #cincystreets.

JAMES HELLER JACKSON

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ABBEY KLEVER

In attempt to continue our funding goals, Apple Street will be holding a bingo night fundraiser at Urban Artifact on August 20th at 5:30pm. We have awesome prizes planned, including prize baskets valued at $100+, and a $1,000 cash grand prize! We only have 200 tickets available for the event, so be sure to reserve your spot, and you can reserve a table of eight so you can make it a party with your friends!

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY

“Cincy Summer Streets 2016” Returns to Northside

Telephone: (513) 607-5358 | Email: owen.kelm@opklaw.com opklaw.com Northside Resident

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EDUCATION

WordPlay Grows Leadership From Within Aiken High School, but she wrote much more than she spoke. Slowly, surely, she took her place as a leader in the group, first sharing the words she’d written, then sharing more. “Being with WordPlay, I’ve been able to let my creative side out,” says Anderson, now 18. “I have peace of mind.”

WordPlay graduate Jhayne Anderson now on staff as a program assistant

Program assistant Jhayne Anderson credits nonprofit’s role in her life Jhayne Anderson’s smile travels through the storefront space of WordPlay Cincy in Northside like a ray of light, welcoming each new student to the neighborhood nonprofit. Today, Anderson, a WordPlay program assistant and a student at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, has a lot to smile about. But it wasn’t always that way. She was just 14 years old when she first stepped through WordPlay’s doors as part of WordUp, a specialized program developed to encourage at-risk high-school students to get the support they needed to graduate high school and to find — and share — their voices with their communities. Her first visits to WordUp were quiet ones. She listened to her peers from 4

Anderson’s road out of high school wasn’t an easy one. She moved often and trouble at home led to trouble in school. Though she was a talented writer with strong academic skills, she sometimes had trouble controlling her frustration with a disjointed life. At WordPlay, though, she could escape her worries and stresses, meet and work alongside people from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, and share her creativity freely. WordPlay “helped me pull out my creativity and my love for writing,” she says. Anderson’s involvement with WordPlay solidified when she helped create and performed as a key member of a production called “Enter Stage Write.” “One day, I felt like I lost all my creative juices,” she remembers. “A volunteer named Emma (Rosen) pulled me to the side, and she wrote for me while I said I how I felt. It became a great masterpiece; I even performed it.” After Anderson took the stage in front of a standing room only crowd for “Enter Stage Write,” she knew her life would never be the same. She took the energy of that experience and held on tight to it. She forged an early graduation for herself from the

Job Corps program when she was just 16, and she has been working mostly full-time ever since. She enrolled at Cincinnati State this summer and is studying to be a registered nurse. She hopes to take that degree and build upon it as she creates a life based on helping others. It’s a lesson she teaches naturally as part of WordPlay. “WordPlay is something I always want to be a part of,” she says. “WordPlay is a place where you can be creative, you can be yourself without being judged. It’s a place where you can grow. WordPlay is full of people who won’t give up on you and are willing to help with all educational needs, and people who want to see you succeed in all parts of life.”

Legend By Jhayne Anderson I can succeed even with boundaries Legends arise from your words Erase — fear or doubt WordPlay can help you make a way You have a reason – You have a voice WordPlay is here in each and every season It’s time to embrace what you can become It’s never too late for greatness It’s never too late to be a legend

As she continues to pass along lessons she’s learned at WordPlay, she’s enjoying college classes and saving up for her own apartment. For WordPlay Executive Director Libby Hunter, Anderson is a shining example of what WordPlay is all about.

Who you are can set waves to inspire others

“I’m so proud of Jhayne and all that she has been able to accomplish,” Hunter says. “Having her here at WordPlay, giving back and still being an active participant in our programs for teens, illustrates the power of our community.”

Legends, arise for from your words and let your words become one.

We all have views and shoes to fill WordPlay can help open your mind and gain a strong will Create art with your heart and skill

You can help support the WordPlay community by liking the nonprofit on Facebook, by signing up to volunteer, or by making a donation to support our operations.

ELISSA YANCEY WordPlay Co-Founder and Past President

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


HAPPEN HAPPENINGS

Happen Inc. Announces Loans To Teens Happen, Inc. has been working with Northside teens for a full year to get them prepared for summer employment. Last year Happen offered sessions starting in September to teens about employment subjects from how to create and complete a resume to filling out job applications. The teens participated in role-play interviews and also learned the dos and don’ts of the entire interview process. Happen even offered a class on how to iron cloths and how to dress for an interview. All the sessions were well attended and were provided by volunteers in human resources roles and local business owners. “It was a great experience and Happen did see success in directly helping to find teens employment this summer, but it also made me aware that teens have even more challenges that we did not predict when given an opportunity to work”, said Happen Inc., director Tommy Rueff. There are Northside teens that completed all of the Happen programs with great success that actually got job offers this summer from varies businesses, but just didn’t have the financial resources to start working. Rueff explained that one teen didn’t have the money to purchase the required footwear for landscaping and another teen didn’t have the savings to purchase a $70 monthly bus pass to get to his job before he received his first two-week paycheck. One teen just needed $2.25 for bus fair to make it to his first interview. “I gave him the money and he made it to the interview on time, got the job and now he going to work every morning. It is amazing how just access to $2.25 bus fair can change a teens life.” Rueff added. This summer Rueff called up two THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY

Happen sponsors and explained the dilemma and received $200.00 to start to help teens get ready for their first day on the job. “We have a resource gap in our neighborhood between teens gaining employment and helping to get what they need for their first day of work. The solution is Happen’s Teen Loans that will supply kids with the funding resources to make sure they can start their first day at their new job. “It’s designed just like a normal loan. A decision is made if the request can be accepted and payment terms are discussed and agreed upon. There is also interest included in the loan but not through monetary means. Interest is paid on the loan by completing community service in Northside. Teens can pay back the interest on their loans by agreeing to complete community service from picking up trash to volunteering during community events.

Teens participating in Happen’s Employment Sessions

Happen’s theme is “Community is not just where you live, it’s how you live with other people.” “Happen’s Teen Loans is another example of how anyone can make real a difference in a child’s life, given the opportunity, and this has allowed Happen to become so much more than providing art sessions in our neighborhood”, said Rueff. If you would like to support Happen’s Teens loans or any of Happen’s community programs by donating through Happen’s “3M Program - Support Happen Through Mind, Money or Muscle” You can contact Happen at info@happeninc.org or by calling 513-751-2345.

HAPPEN, INC. Art activities for parents & children 4201 Hamilton Ave (& Chase) 5


SPIRITS

CREATIVE WRITING

The Dog Da(ze) of Summer Are Upon Us

AUGUST

The dog da(ze) of summer are upon us here in Northside. That generally means two things for all you friendly Northside neighborinos, either what appears to your friend’s to be clandestine operations in the comfort of one’s own air conditioned home or, like any good moisture farmer, braving the heat of what feels like two suns to find solace in your local cantina.

lose sometimes help rooms full of people laugh and cry watch a man eat a whole fish in dim light slowly and surely take a test you cannot fail use your laptop to reflect sun under your neck

Wretched hives of scum and villainy aside, there is really only one sure fired way to beat the heat: frozen drinks. Frozen drinks fall into one of three categories, Margaritas, Daiquiris, and Slushes. By following the basic recipe for each of these, it is easy to mix and match different spirits or fruits for a unique house twist all your own.

get a sunburn eat frozen grapes cook a chicken find fourteen four leaf clovers inspect all ideas take a walk without your glasses and look at the gas lights the way they’re meant to be seen put your glasses on admire the way some things gain definition some things stay the same

Scott Holzman Director of Programming scott@chasepublic.com 1569 Chase Ave

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CHASE PUBLIC

Margaritas are the classic Mexicancum-American frozen cocktail. It doesn’t get any easier to make from scratch either. Never use that garbage mix you can find at liquor stores, once you go homemade you won’t ever go back. It is a simple 3-2-1 recipe. 3 parts tequila, 2 parts fresh lime juice, and 1 part triple sec (don’t use the cheap stuff either Patron Citronge is surprisingly affordable and extremely delicious. Spring for the Cointreau if you’re a high class individual [you aren’t]). If you’re like me, I prefer my margaritas a bit stronger and go with the ol’ 4-32 formula. Try adding in some frozen raspberries or strawberries in the blender for a fruity kick. Daiquiris are not much different but instead of a tequila base, they

support the backbone of colonial America, Rum. A bit more of a toned down recipe than the loco margarita, the base recipe for a daiquiri calls for 2 parts light rum, 1 part fresh lime juice, ½ part simple syrup (equal portions sugar:water). From there it is a matter of flavoring to your preference. Want a pina-colada? Of course you do! Add some pineapple chunks and coconut crème liqueur to the blender with ice and throw this daiquiri recipe on top for a delicious frozen treat. Finally, the oft forgotten slushie. Where my family comes from *cough* The Westside *cough* there is only one type of slushie, and it is made with Bourbon. Take 1 can frozen lemonade, 1 can pineapple juice, 1 ½ cups sugar, 2 cups black tea and 2 cups bourbon. Mix these ingredients together, move into a freezer safe pitcher, and freeze overnight. The next day this bourbon delight will be the consistency of your favorite slushie stand with an adult kick. This recipe makes a lot, so be prepared to party or sip it slowly from the freezer throughout the summer. One final piece of advice. All of these recipes can be made straight up, over ice, or as I prefer, mixed with ice in a blender. Either way, stay safe in that summer sun sipping these frozen cocktails, and remember to drink plenty of water!

BRET KOLLMANN BAKER Bret is a, liquid enthusiast, and Co-owner/ Chief of Brewing Operations at Urban Artifact.

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


ENVIRONMENT

Solar Panels in Every Direction South. West. And Southwest! But not North. Last month the Northsider Monthly highlighted a Northside couple who have built a carport ready-made for solar panels. By ready-made we mean that it is a large flat angled surface that faces due south. Of course most people put panels on their roof, and you can’t choose the direction of that. Obviously a roof facing due south will make the most electricity. The good news is that a west or southwest facing roof is a great option as well. Why is that? First let’s talk about how much less electricity panels will make depending on how far you move away from due south. North is out. East could work but is bad for reasons we’ll get to below. That leaves west. Based on simulations run by a local installer (credit to Dovetail Solar), if you have a roof that faces due west your solar panels will make approximately 11% less electricity than if they were due south. Not too bad! Panels facing southwest are only 3% less! And if you have half of your panels facing due south and half facing due west, that results in 5% less. All in all, not too bad. Above I mentioned that east facing solar panels isn’t the way to go, but west is actually pretty good. Why is that? It has to do with the time of day that peak demand for electricity typically occurs. In the summer electric demand typically peaks around 3pm, while during the fall / winter / spring it peaks around 7pm. A solar panel facing east will make more power early in the day which is further away from peak demand. But west

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY

facing solar panel will make power closer to the time of peak demand, especially during summer. As it turns out, the highest peaks of the whole year are on hot summer days because of air conditioning. There are special power plants designed only to be used during these highest summer peak times, sensibly called “peaking” power plants. These “peaking” power plants are quite inefficient and create a lot of CO2 for the amount of power they make. So anytime you can lower electrical use during peak hours, you are reducing the amount of “peaking” power plant use, which is a great way to lower your carbon footprint. This is also why you might have heard it’s good to run your laundry or dishwasher at off peak times, such as in the middle of the night. If you are interested in reading more about this kind of stuff, I’ve started a website that goes into way more depth about the grid, electrical demand, solar panels, and home batteries called whyhomebatteries.org

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So even if you can’t go south, go west my friends!

CASEY MOOTHART Casey Moothart lives in Northside with his family, and is hopefully moving forward with some solar panels next month. Or maybe the maybe the month after that.

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NON-PROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Visionaries + Voices

Located at the corner of Spring Grove Ave. and Powers Street, Northside non-profit Visionaries + Voices isn’t your typical art studio. The mission of Visionaries + Voices, referred to as V+V for short, is to provide artistic, cultural, and professional opportunities for artists with disabilities. Artists primarily come to V+V through referrals from the Department of Disabilities Services in Hamilton and surrounding counties. The types of disabilities that artists present with can run the gamut from intellectual to physical. “Everyone is coming from different life situations,” said V+V Studio Director Jen Franks. V+V assesses each artist individually to gauge their fit for the program. The 8

biggest factor is simply the artist’s passion for the arts. “In general, artists do well if they’re really interested in art and wanting to explore that,” Franks explained. “V+V is a great place for people to come together and try new things by being in a creative environment together.” Each weekday, about 20 artists come to the Northside studio to create. Artists also create daily at V+V’s TriCounty studio located on Northland Ave. in Springdale. Artists are selfdriven, and most work individually on the projects that interest them. V+V provides the supplies, and a team of four studio coordinators are on hand to offer help as needed. The artists work in a variety of mediums, “from drawing to painting to ceramics, soft sculpture, we even have a sewing machine,” said Franks.

In addition to the open studio hours, V+V addresses the vocational needs of artists through the Teaching Artist Program (TAP). V+V pairs artists with community mentors for the duration of the program. Artists complete an education course and undergo professional development. Artists then shadow an art teacher, develop lesson plans, and student teach throughout the school year. Around five artists complete the program each year. 27 artists have gone through the program since it began in 2012. After completing the program, artists connect with paid opportunities to work as arts instructors in local schools. The larger community can get involved with V+V in a variety of ways. Art openings are free, open to the public, and take place five times annually. Visit the V+V website for upcoming openings and current exhibits. V+V holds Collective Vision open studio nights at the Northside studio on the last Thursday of each month from

6-8 pm. Collective Vision is a chance for community members to create alongside V+V artists and staff. In addition to Collective Vision, V+V artists host a free instructional series on the third Sunday of each month from 5-6:30 pm at the 21C hotel downtown. Those interested in volunteering are encouraged to reach out to Volunteer Coordinator Hannah Leow at hleow@visionariesandvoices.com. Visionaries + Voices 3841 Spring Grove Ave. (513) 861-4333 For more info, check out their website at www.visionariesandvoices.com

KAMAL E. KIMBALL Kamal has called Northside home since 2015 and loves everything that the neighborhood has to offer! When she’s not stuffing her face at Melt or Tickle Pickle, she can be found getting schooled at NSYC trivia on Tuesdays nights. Come say hi!

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Former Mayday Becomes Nautical-Themed NSYC

The side yard of 4231 Spring Grove Ave. is covered in sand and is adorned with a lifeguard chair, marking the location of Northside Yacht Club. Stuart MacKenzie and Jon Weiner, both from the school of Molly Wellmann, opened the nauticalthemed restaurant last August in the former Mayday space. The restaurant owes its name to the nearby Mill Creek, which flooded in 1937 and put the entire area underwater. Murals from that flood are all around the bar, depicting residents in their boats paddling up and down the streets. NSYC is known for its cocktails, housemade syrups and local craft beer. The Volcano Bowl, which serves four, consists of gin, Cruzan black rum, Cruzan 151 rum, Cruzan white rum, Cruzan gold rum, pineapple, NSYC grenadine, lemon juice, pineapple juice and orange juice. It’s all blended together and then lit on fire. The craft beer list is ever changing, and brings in brews from Rhinegeist and Fifty West, as well as nationally-known craft favorites. Chef Ryan Whitcomb, formerly of Local 127, does escalated bar food right. THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY

The menu is small, but is packed with flavor. The smoked wings are a customer favorite, and are served with your choice of sauce - try the chipotle lime honey, it’s always a crowd pleaser. The hand-cut Kennabec fries are great on their own or as a vessel for NYSC’s poutine or house-made Cincinnati-style chili, which can be made vegan. And if you’re craving something cheesy, the macaroni and cheese with short ribs is a must. NYSC also serves up Sunday brunch, buffet-style. It’s an ever-changing menu, and at just $10, it’s one of the better deals in the neighborhood. There’s also the Yacht Club Bloody, which is homemade mix, Stoli vodka and citrus, garnished with celery, a chicken wing, bacon, and a pork slider made with smoked Boston butt. Live music, trivia, yoga and Bengals watch parties round out NSYC’s offerings. Plus, Mondays are Burger Radness, where Chef Ryan concocts a delicious one-off burger, and you get to pick the draft to accompany it. CAITLIN KOENIG 9


AT THE MARKET

National Farmers Market Week 5 Ways to celebrate the holiday at your local farmers market As declared by the Secretary of Agriculture on June 14th, 2016, August 7-13th is National Farmers Market Week this year. But really, why celebrate local food for only one week a year? Here are 5 ways to celebrate National Farmers Market Week at the Northside Farmers Market the entire month of August. 1. Try Something New Farmers market these days offer a diverse range of items. This month, try artisan goat milk soap, ground cherries, miniature gerkins, local mushrooms, lasagna, or kambucha. Not sure what some of these items are or where to find them? Stop by the info booth and staff will guide you to unique products. 2. Bring a Friend How many people have you told about the farmers market recently? Invite a friend to join

Rock The Ladle serves up samples of soup

you this month, and show him/ her your favorite vendors, how to use a credit/debit/EBT card at the info booth, or take our free Zumba classes (5-6pm) together. 3. Talk To a Vendor Talking to vendors is what makes

LIVE MUSIC ALMOST EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK. SHOWS ARE FREE! CHECK INDIVIDUAL LISTINGS FOR SHOWTIMES. 4163 HAMILTON AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45223 (513) 542-3603 NORTHSIDE-TAVERN.COM HOURS: MON – SAT: 5:00PM – 2:30AM SUNDAY: 7:00PM – 2:30AM HAPPY HOUR: MON-SAT 5-8PM

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Kambucha, a refreshing tea drink, is just one unique item at the farmers market

the farmers market shopping experience different than any other. Ask your farmers how they grow things, for recipe ideas, or just learn their names. 4. Tag NFM in your market haul The Northside Farmers Market is on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The market posts its own glamour shots of produce and vendors almost every day, but why not join in and show the world your favorite products? Snap a photo of your market haul then tag the market on one of those platforms. 5. Share The Harvest This month, help a neighbor in need by purchasing a local food item and donating it to Churches Active In Northside’s

(CAIN) Another For a Neighbor program. Donated food items are distributed in pantry on Thursday mornings after the market. The Northside Farmers Market is open every Wednesday, rain or shine, from 4-7pm, and located during the summer months in Hoffner Park, 4101 Hamilton Ave. For more information about products, our free shuttle service, and upcoming events, visit the market’s website, www.northsidefm.org.

ANA BIRD Ana Bird is the Manager of the Northside Farmers Market. She loves to garden, to eat, and learn about regional foods. She also teaches ballet to children in the Greater Cincinnati Area.

THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


CITY HALL

City Prepares for Opening of the Streetcar

You have likely seen streetcars running throughout the city over the last few months as they have worked through their “burn in” phase of testing the five vehicles, training staff and operators, and ensuring that the system is ready for riders in September. The history of Cincinnati’s streetcar project cannot be covered in the limited column inches available here, but put shortly, City Hall is buzzing over the final details of a project that was originally proposed in 2007, put to voters at two different occasions, and put on hold for a brief period of time.

One perfect example of this is Oktoberfest Zinzinnati’s move from Fifth Street to Second and Third

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But on days where we do not have special festivals or sporting events, the streetcar will still serve as a critical link between the Banks and Findlay Market, and this will mark a return to rail transportation that has been nearly ten years in the making. Tickets for the streetcar will cost $1 for two hours of use or $2 for a single day pass. Transit passes, such as monthly Zone 1 Metro passes, will also allow you unlimited rides on the streetcar. For the opening, additional promotions are still in the works, but riders should expect a festive atmosphere, long lines and packed vehicles. When Kansas City unveiled their streetcar in May more than 27,000 people took a ride.

PETE METZ Pete Metz is Chief of Staff to Vice Mayor David Mann. He and his wife, Becca, moved to Northside last year.

S & H AKE S R E V

RS

So what are those final details? The City and the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) are working hard on public awareness campaigns to ensure pedestrians, cyclists and motorists understand how to interact with the streetcar (in short: stay alert, don’t cross in front of the streetcar, ride across the tracks at a 90 degree angle, and make sure not to park your car on the tracks), selling advertising and naming rights for the project, and working with downtown and OTR businesses, festivals, and residents to take full advantage of the new system.

Streets at the Banks. This new location will expand the iconic event, but it will also allow attendees to take advantage of the streetcar to get to and from the event.

MO

For the first time since 1951, Cincinnatians will be able to hop on and off of a streetcar in downtown Cincinnati and Over the Rhine. On the morning of September 9th, city officials will cut the ribbon and invite people along for their first ride on Cincinnati’s new, 3.6-mile streetcar. It will certainly be a party.

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EVENT SPOTLIGHT

Young Adult Kickball Tournament Raises Money to Fight Childhood Poverty CRAFTED COFFEES

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“Kickin’ For A Cause” to be held Aug. 21 From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 21, young adults will come together at the new P&G Cincinnati MLB Urban Youth Academy in Roselawn Park for an afternoon of kickball. The Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s Young Adult Division is organizing the tournament, and the stakes have never been higher— all dollars raised will go towards efforts to lower Cincinnati’s high childhood poverty rate. “Cincinnati has an abysmal ranking—it is ranked in the top five major cities in childhood poverty year after year.” said Brooke Guigui, Chair of the Federation’s Young Adult Division. “It is a horrible statistic, brought home even more when we stop and sit with the fact that these kids and these families are our neighbors.” In 2014, the most recent year for which there are statistics, 44.3 percent of Cincinnati’s children

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lived in poverty. Cincinnati’s rate is more than double the national rate of 21.7 percent and nearly double the state rate of 22.9 percent. Funds brought in through registrations and sponsorships will go to three local organizations that are providing opportunities for children living in poverty: the Reds Community Fund (which benefits the Youth Academy), need-based financial aid for Mayerson JCC children’s and youth programs, and Jewish Family Service’s Bigs and Littles program. “Our young adults realize Cincinnati’s childhood poverty problem is everyone’s problem,” said Jeff Blumental, Director of the Federation’s Young Adult Division. “They’re personally committed to finding innovative ways to create a brighter future for Cincinnati’s kids, and this is a prime example of that.” Learn more at jewishcincinnati.org

JACKIE CONGEDO

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COMMUNITY

Help CAIN Grow! Annette’s Place Wall of Recognition Campaign launched Supporting Northside through Faith, Hope, and Love CAIN – Churches Active In Northside – is joyful to announce the public launch and celebration of the Annette Liebing Hospitality House, “Annette’s Place.” Annette’s Place is a campus expansion of CAIN that will significantly enhance CAIN’s efforts to meet the needs of Northside residents. Just one year ago in June 2015, CAIN realized a long-term goal and purchased the residential property next door to the current CAIN building - thanks to a generous bequest from long-time donor, Annette Liebing. On July 3rd, 2016, Northside neighbors, CAIN volunteers, memberchurch pastors, Board members, and community representatives from the Northside Community Council and the Northside Community Fund gathered to bless, dedicate and announce the public phase of the Capital Campaign to fund Annette’s Place. It was the kick-off for the Wall of Recognition to invite supporters to leave their mark in Northside by dedicating a tile.

Annette Liebing, a native of Northside, was a life-long member of the First United Church of Christ. She left a percentage of her estate to charity. You too can make a bequest or other planned gift to make a difference through CAIN.

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The Wall, a hallway in Annette’s Place, will be filled with memorial tiles with dedications from beloved community supporters. It will serve as a tangible, colorful expression of all that makes Northside unique: collaboration, creativity, diversity, and a passionate investment in the health and wellbeing of our community. Tile gifts will ensure Northside residents have a place to turn in their time of need now and in years to come and offer a way to honor friends and loved ones. There are three levels of giving: Faith Tile….. $125; Hope Tile…..$525; Love Tile…..$1,025. Your legacy will be forever etched as one of faith, hope, and love for your neighbors in need. CAIN has successfully secured over 60% of the necessary funds for the complete renovation of Annette’s Place. Thanks to CAIN member churches, Board, staff, and community support, as well as grant awards from the Spaulding Foundation, the Franciscan Friars of St. John the Baptist Province, and the Northside Community Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation. Renovation designs are based on CAIN’s core values: hospitality and healthy food. Northside Edward Wright of Wright Design, LLC was selected architect to design plans for the conversion of the property. The first phase is the pantry extension which will expand storage capacity to strengthen CAIN’s ability to receive and distribute produce and other necessities. Inside the house, first floor renovations will provide space for programs and services; volunteer

training; and community gatherings. The second floor will function as community living space for live-in service volunteers. Outside, there will be parking and gathering space for community members to connect during Phil’s Place meals, Northside festivities, and other events. Annette’s Place is a permanent extension of CAIN, supporting CAIN’s current core programs and offering year-round services to the Northside community. It is part of CAIN’s ongoing service to our neighbors and neighborhood: to have FAITH, plant HOPE and grow LOVE. We hope you will partner with us by purchasing a tile to support this exciting time of growth and opportunity for Northside. To tour the space, learn more about renovation plans or how you can give, contact me or our Executive Director, MiMi Chamberlin at 513.591.2246 – ext. 3. We will also be a hospitality stop on the Northside House Tour this fall and we hope to see you then! Find us on Facebook, Instagram, Linked In, Twitter. Visit http://www.cainministry.org/ to learn more, contact us or make a contribution.

MATTIE GRIFFIN Mattie Griffin is the Development Coordinator for CAIN – Churches Active In Northside. She has lived in Cincinnati for three years, in an Intentional Community in Mt. Auburn, The McGregor House.

Northside’s Holistic Health Center • Acupuncture • Massage • The Feldenkrais Method® • Neuro-Linguistic Programming • Reiki • Integrated Nondual Healing Book a session or learn about our classes and workshops online, or call 513.541.5720. Visit our wellness boutique and art gallery Tuesday through Friday, 9:00 am - 5:30 pm.

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OPINION

Creativity, Courtesy, and Tender Cancer Care 1. Introduction: Cancer care for low income, poor, and minorities has traditionally been sorrowful. If treatment happened at all, it was often substandard. Too often it was too late. The history of medicine related to minorities, the poor, and women tells tales of shockingly poor care that bordered on a kind of simplistic and dangerous thinking: “There were good patients and there were bad patients.” Being unable to fit into the category of “good,” meant that minorities and the poor’s lack of survival skyrocketed into hundreds of thousands of what former Surgeon General David Satcher called, “unnecessary deaths.” Overcoming a culture of medicine that either consciously or unconsciously screens large numbers of people into an early death will take a wholly different approach. 2. The Need for Creativity: Cancer care needs a new approach that changes the outcomes for success for minorities, the poor, and women. It is sadly clear that cancer education is non-existent for most people. The warning signs, the willingness to get screening, the openness of hospitals and health

centers to encourage screening, and the commitment to following through with the patient will need to be creatively thought out if there are to be changes in the life chances of poor people and minorities. People will not go to doctors who send signals that they are “bad” patients or where doctors indicate a disrespect for religious, cultural, and language differences. Hospitals that force people to wait for what seems like unnecessary time in emergency rooms, or where procedures for connecting to a doctor are insufficiently explained, and/or where treatments are part of a great and unsolvable puzzle for the patients, will not be visited by many people. A creative and important change needs to occur: the patient in the hands of the medical/health community needs a tender relationship where the patient’s concern assumes priority. Creativity means trust, eye contact, time for questions and real answers, and a sense that the doctor really cares for the soul of the patient. 3. The Need for Courtesy: Sadly, the experience of courtesy in health related relationships is almost non-existent. The culture

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of medicine appears to discourage touching people’s bodies with a personal touch, a sense of respect for different cultural approaches, or talking to people seeking help with the understanding of how incomprehensible most of what doctors say are if there is no relationship, or understanding that poor people may need more time for discussion, more time to explain why they have been reluctant to come for treatment, and, more of a feeling that the doctor is an ally, a friend. Perhaps unintentionally, doctors are known for rejecting the implicit or explicit request for more sharing, too often in ways that convince the patient that there situation is hopeless. Courtesy, the act of respect, the extension of the hand of compassion must be added to what is expected in the doctor’s office, in The hospital, and in any relationship with patients. 4. The Cancer Justice Network As a New Approach: Bringing cancer education, screening, and treatment in a new way that promotes successful outcomes is the mission of the Cancer Justice Network. The key to this new approach is a “navigator.” The role of the navigator is to be an ally, an advocate, a companion, and even a friend to the person seeking to understand the role of cancer in their lives. Invented by Harold Freeman, MD, a New York based surgeon, and an African American, this approach of having navigators go with cancer patients to screenings and treatments totally changed the life chances of his patients. Coming to screenings earlier meant quicker detection and treatment of cancer.

And, more life as a result. In a five year study of the effectiveness of this method, Dr. Freeman totally changed the mortality of cancer patients from expectations of death to drastically improved chances for life. Dr. Freeman emphasizes trust, strong relationships with navigators and patients, respect for the patient’s fears and concerns about their real lives, and successful education about the promise of early screening. Thanks to Dr. Freeman’s creative thought, his sharing his idea in Cincinnati, we have a new approach to cancer care. We will have navigators. Patients who wish to have a person accompany them on their journey through cancer will now have a skilled and compassionate person. Thanks to the following organizations in Cincinnati, we, too, will have this pioneering approach to offer: Christ Church Cathedral, Churches Active in Northside, Southern Baptist Church, St. Vincent de Paul, St. Francis Saraph, FreeStore Food Bank, Caracole, Center for Independent Living Options, Santa Maria, Peaslee Center, Madisonville Education and Assistance Center.Crossroad Health Center, Cincinnati Health Department, Cris Collingsworth Proscan, Jewish Hospital, Xavier University school of nursing, and University of Cincinnati’s school of social work. Now is the time to change the reality of cancer care in Cincinnati for low income, minorities, and women. For more information, please go to cancerjusticenetwork.org

STEVE SUNDERLAND

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SCREEN

Happen’s Kid Critics Age 8-12 THE MUSIC OF STRANGERS

HENRY

Art may be the purest representation of culture. In its many forms, art captures community, history, social interaction and engagement, and civic spirit through the senses. In The Music of Strangers, Morgan Neville, the Academy Award-wining documentarian behind Twenty Feet From Stardom, introduces us to Yo-Yo Ma, the world-renowned cellist, and a global ambassador of music of the first order. Constant touring led Yo-Yo Ma to question what music meant, beyond the merely perfect rendering of notes (notes of culture that had been passed across generations). He wanted to find points of intersection and communion, which pushed him to gather a group of international musicians, back in 2000, to form The Silk Road Project. Imagine, if you will, a picture of a stage filled with musical seekers, expert and diverse speaking a

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MAXWELL

common language through stringed and fluted and percussive tongues that audiences might never have been able to conceive of before. Happen’s Kid Critics screened The Music of Strangers, a far less typical summer selection, but a new release in theaters that just might provide families with something more substantial and engaging than the blockbuster fare. Check out their reasoned responses to the movie and see if it might be the perfect alternative to the noisy pop hits at the box office. -TT Stern-Enzi Each month, Happen’s Kid Film Critics received their own official Happen film critic packet and a press badge. TT Stern-Enzi, Cincinnati film critic, provided insight about the film and guided the children as they wrote this month’s film reviews. Read the reviews below, and be sure to watch

GWEN

ELIZA

The Music Of Strangers is fascinating documentary about music from all different cultures. The Music Of Strangers is an educational and entertaining documentary about the power of music. - Henry

In the documentary I feel the music was wonderful and for the most part they told what they were supposed to. On the other hand this started to go off the beaten path. Also some of the talks, I felt, were a little long. Overall it was okay. - Maxwell

This is a colorful, beautiful and magical movie about the music and cultures of the world. It shows the wonders, the joy and sorrows of the world. It’s a piece of art. - Gwen

This poignant documentary explores themes of unity and cultural identity. However, it focuses more on each individual musician’s life than that of the musicians as a group, which takes something crucial out of the story. The movie gets better as it goes along, but overall it just falls short. - Eliza

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EVENTS Weekly / Tuesdays / Tiny Tunes. Ages 0-11 mos. 10:30-11am. Call for fee. Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center.

8.13.16 / Whirling Stars: An art show by Robin Madden. Refreshments. Guitar by Todd Juengling. Free. 6:30-8:30pm. Future Life Now.

8.2 – 9.7.16 / Innercise - Learning Tai Chi Chuan and Qigong. Wednesdays. One-$15 or 6-$75. 7-9pm. The Hive.

8.13.16 / Camp Sugar / Life Brother / Elektrek (pop rock). Urban Artifact.

8.6.16 / Subculture (electronic DJ). Urban Artifact. 8.7.16 / Midnight Jazz Orchestra (big band jazz). Urban Artifact.

8.14.16 / Soulful Sunday. 4pm. Urban Artifact. 8.15.16 / Open Mic. Urban Artifact. 8.16.16 / Paint the World (Chick Corea tribute). Urban Artifact.

8.21.16 / Jazz Day. Adanya Stevens Trio, 3pm. Animal Mother with The Billy Wolfe Group, 6pm. Pat Kelly’s PsychoAcoustic Orchestra CD release, 8pm. Urban Artifact. 8.22.16 / Monday-Friday. Register and begin WordPlay Scholars. Help with homework, reading, writing, and more. Between 2:30-6pm. Grades K-8. WordPlay. 8.22.16 / France vs France / Notrth by North / Communications (rock). Urban Artifact.

8.8.16 / Coincidence Improc (longform improv comedy). Urban Artifact.

8.17.16 / Preschool Storytime. Enjoy books, songs, activities and more. Ages 3-6. 10am. Northside Library.

8.9.16 / Lego Lunacy! Make Lego creations. All ages. 6pm. Northside Library.

8.17.16 / Blue Wisp Big Band (big band jazz). Urban Artifact.

8.23.16 / Life-size Bananagrams Game & Treats! Help build giant crossword grid on the floor. All ages. 6pm. Northside Library.

8.18.16 / Elvis (a tribute to The King). Urban Artifact.

8.23.16 / The Paisley Fields (Americana). Urban Artifact.

8.19.16 / Back To School Charity Concert (pop, blues, rock). Benefits Whiz Kids Music. All ages. 8pm-12am. Free. Donations requested. Urban Artifact.

8.24.16 / Preschool Storytime. Enjoy books, songs, activities and more. Ages 3-6. 10am. Northside Library.

8.2.16 / Spookfloaters (Grateful Dead tribute and Apple Street Casino Night fundraiser). Urban Artifact.

8.25.16 / Afternoon Art. Create a masterpiece. Ages 6-16. 4pm. Northside Library.

8.20.16 / Cincinnati Scripted Souls Release Party. Celebrate art by Cincinnati artists. All ages. 6-9pm. Pendleton Art Center.

8.25.16 / Eikthyrnir / Siegelord / Milkman / Automation (metal). Urban Artifact.

8.9.16 / The Devyll Nellys/Time Kings (funk pop dance party). Urban Artifact. 8.10.16 / Preschool Storytime. Enjoy books, songs, activities and more. Ages 3-6. 10am. Northside Library. 8.10.16 / Blue Wisp Big Band (big band jazz). Urban Artifact. 8.11.16 / Lockjaw / Rhythm & Booze/ The ZGs (punk). Urban Artifact. 8.12.16 / Unorthodox 2.0 (electronic DJ). Urban Artifact. 8.13.16 / Volunteer Training. 10:30am. WordPlay.

8.24.16 / Blue Wisp Big Band (big band jazz). Urban Artifact.

8.26 – 8.28.16 / Bewilderfest. Urban Artifact’s first official festival, featuring over 30 bands, 12 breweries. Ages 18-20, $5. Ages 21 and up, free. 8.29.16 / Cool Science! A different experiment every month. Ages 6-16. 4pm. Northside Library. 8.29 – 12.16.16 / Mondays and/or Fridays. Playful Learning. Ages 3-5. 9:30am – 12pm. $25/$47. Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center. 8.29.16 / Tropicoso (salsa dance). Urban Artifact. 8.30.16 / Thomas the Tank Time! Play with wooden train sets. Ages 2-8. 4pm. Northside Library. 8.30.16 / And How / Severed Fingers (one man band, rock). Urban Artifact. 8.31.16 / Preschool Storytime. Enjoy books, songs, activities and more. Ages 3-6. 10am. Northside Library. 8.31.16 / Afternoon Movie and snacks. Ages 6-16. 4pm. Northside Library. 8.31 - 12.14.16 / Wednesdays. Toddler Time. Ages 2. 10am – 12pm. $20/week. Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center. 8.31.16 / Blue Wisp Big Band (big band jazz). Urban Artifact.

Serving Northside lunch + dinner Monday–Friday & dinner Saturday ENJOY OUR NEW OUTDOOR PATIO!

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THE NORTHSIDER MONTHLY


FREE Shuttle to the Farmers Market! Brokering Fine Homes Since 1946

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All are welcome here. We are a progressive faith community - social justice is a focus, and LGBTQ people are fully included. We invite you to join us for our Back to School activities. Sunday Aug. 14

Backpack Blessing (10:30 AM Service)

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Sunday Aug. 21

UC Welcome Week (10:30 AM Service)

Sunday Sept. 11

Fall Kickoff Picnic Launch of Two Services (9:15 AM and 11:00 AM)

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August 2016 Vol. 3 | Issue 8  

NEWS IN NORTHSIDE: NORTH SIDE COMMUNITY COUNCIL - 2 NORTHSIDE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION - 2 DEVELOPMENT: NEWS FROM APPLE STREET - 3 AROUND THE NE...