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WINTER 2015 VOLUME 75/NUMBER 1

Opening a New Future

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Exceeding Expectations In A History of North Park College, author Leland Carlson narrates the events of September 18, 1894, when a small group of people gathered with a “goodly number of students” on the steps of Old Main to dedicate that building and to officially begin classes on this new campus. Classes had been initiated three years earlier in Minneapolis and since that time this building, designed to house all the needs of a young school, had been constructed by the dedicated hands of many volunteers. The size of the new class of students and the grandeur of the new building exceeded the expectations of all who nurtured North Park University in its very early days. Reflecting the many good years ahead, Carlson described the school on that first day of classes in Old Main as “a work just beginning.” Now 120 years later, on September 12, 2014, a much larger group gathered on this same campus to celebrate anew. Throughout the day we heard, again and again, a common refrain, “This exceeds every expectation!” Over the past five years we have been profoundly grateful for the depth of generosity of all who supported Campaign North Park at an unprecedented level, surpassing the target goal of the campaign to raise a total of $63 million. And as construction of the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life was completed, as the ribbon was cut, and as we toured the building on this day of dedication, we were impressed again by the character of the building’s architectural design, the extensive integration of technology in the teaching of science in every laboratory, and the creative ways in which each student’s whole life—intellectually, socially, spiritually, personally, and professionally—comes together as each graduate prepares to live with significance and in service. Starting on page 10, you can see selected moments from our celebration as well as gain a closer look into life and learning at the Johnson Center. Both the unprecedented level of giving evidenced in Campaign North Park and the impressive magnitude of the Johnson Center have exceeded our expectations. Today we imagine a renewed future for North Park, a future characterized by constant faith, deeper learning, and wider service. Today we are drawn forward by a compelling aspiration: to prepare succeeding generations of graduates to lead and serve for God’s glory and neighbor’s good. North Park University continues to be “a work just beginning,” exceeding expectations with each tomorrow.

North Parker Editorial Board David L. Parkyn President Mary K. Surridge Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Marcia Mawe Director of Marketing Melissa Vélez-Luce C’04 G’12 Director of Alumni Relations

Editorial Staff Mary Nowesnick Editor John Potter C’05 News and Copy Editor Megan Gilmore C’05 S’13 G’13 Web Editor Tatjana Jovancevic Lead Designer Patty O’Friel Designer Chris Padgett Anthony Barlich Tricia Koning Photographers

David L. Parkyn President, North Park University On the cover: The release of festive balloons followed the ribbon-cutting and formal opening of the new Johnson Center for Science and Community Life. See more, starting on page 10.


2 Campus News

Record fall enrollment, honoring Dr. Klyne Snodgrass, and 2014 inductees to the Viking Hall of Fame

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Homecoming 2014

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The GOLD Program

Opening a New Future

Recent undergraduate alumni enjoy new ways to stay connected.

10 Dedication Celebration

28  2014 Alumni Award Honorees

Nancy and G. Timothy Johnson Center for Science and Community Life

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See how North Park alumni returned to campus to celebrate, October 24–26.

14 The Johnsons

Mark S. Johnson PhD A’69 C’73 Thomas S. Bagley C’74 Katelyn Johnson C’04

16 The Next Era in Learning 20 Day in the Life

Enjoy the North Parker online, too, with back issues for reading or download at www.northpark.edu/northparker

30 Alumni Notes

Check what’s happening with your classmates and other alumni.

The North Parker is published twice a year for alumni and friends of North Park University, 3225 West Foster Avenue, Chicago, IL 60625-4895. For mailing list adjustments, address changes, questions, or suggestions, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at (773) 244-5273.


Campus News North Parker | Winter 2015

North Park Achieves Record Enrollment for Traditional Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

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In September, the University announced record enrollment for traditional undergraduate and graduate programs. The total of 1,955 traditional undergraduate students, an increase of 30 students over last year, and 26 more than the previous record in 2011, is a testament to North Park’s commitment to science education, as well as the University’s emphasis on intercultural learning opportunities. The total enrollment for North Park for the fall semester stands at 3,193. “The ability for North Park to attract a record traditional undergraduate and graduate enrollment, at a time when enrollment in higher education nationally is a challenge, demonstrates the strength of North Park’s mission and vitality of our education program,” said University President Dr. David Parkyn. The University again appeared in the top tier of regional universities in the U.S. News & World Report 2015 edition of its annual “Best Colleges” rankings. North Park has demonstrated its commitment to science education with the launch of new undergraduate majors this year in engineering, health sciences, and medical studies, as well as the opening of the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life. University officials attribute fall’s record traditional undergraduate enrollment to our strong academic programs and to an increased focus on caring for our students. “Having the largest traditional undergraduate population in North Park University’s history is incredibly exciting, and gives us strong momentum for even more growth,” said Dr. Jodi Koslow Martin, vice president of student engagement. “What North Park does well is what students and families are looking for—a quality education with accomplished faculty and staff who care for students. An engaging learning environment both inside and outside the classroom enables students to thrive as they work toward their degree, as well as draws new students to the community of North Park University.”

Graduate enrollment reaches new heights North Park’s graduate programs achieved record enrollment of 758 students, eclipsing 2011’s record of 728. This includes a record 395 students in the School of Business and Nonprofit Management, in addition to a record 196 students in the master of science in nursing program in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences. In addition, the School of Adult Learning successfully launched its first graduate program, welcoming 22 students into the master of arts in counseling psychology. “The School of Business and Nonprofit Management is delighted to welcome a record number of students to our graduate programs this fall,” said Dean Wesley Lindahl. “We have built a strong reputation in the nonprofit management field, where we are a leader in the Chicagoland area. In addition, our relationships with national organizations, including the Association of Fundraising Professionals, continue to draw future leaders from across the country to North Park.” North Park University has offered business programs since the late 1800s, and currently awards five master’s degrees and 17 graduate certificates, many of them online and at multiple locations. The School of Nursing and Health Sciences has been preparing leaders in health care since 1965. In undergraduate and graduate programs, nursing courses and faculty uphold a caring philosophy that reflects a commitment to a culture of nursing excellence grounded in the compassion of Christ. “In North Park’s 123-year history, we stand at a critical juncture,” Parkyn added. “This enrollment news confirms that the momentum we’ve built over the past few years is the right direction for our institution. We now have the responsibility to continue to move forward in new ways to build upon our foundation of preparing students for lives of significance and service.”


Campus News

Dr. Klyne Snodgrass: Attaining Four Decades of Bridge-Building for Students, Scholars, and Pastors One of Snodgrass’s students, who credits him for “the confidence to go on for a doctorate,” is Dr. Rebekah Eklund C’97 S’03, assistant professor of theology at Loyola University Maryland. Eklund, along with Dr. John E. Phelan Jr., senior professor of theological studies at North Park, are the co-editors of a Festschrift—a collection of scholarly essays in honor of a long and distinguished career— written in honor of Snodgrass. Snodgrass’s career includes his widely regarded Stories with Intent, a pillar in the study of the parables of Jesus. The Festschrift, titled Doing Theology for the Church, is divided into five sections organized around Snodgrass’s major research interests: Gospels and parables; Paul; inner-biblical interpretation; women and ministry; and John E. Phelan, Jr. (at right) presents identity. “The contributors are Dr. Snodgrass with a framed cover of colleagues and former students,” the Festschrift. Eklund added. “Klyne is one of those rare scholars who is equally admired among serious New Testament scholars and pastors. He has been able to build a bridge between those two worlds. “ The collection was given to Snodgrass at this year’s Symposium on the Theological Interpretation of Scripture, September 25–27 at North Park Theological Seminary. Snodgrass has coordinated the Symposium for years, and plans to continue to do so after his retirement. In addition to coordinating the Symposium, Snodgrass will teach as an adjunct professor at the Seminary beginning in Fall 2015. He and his wife, Phyllis, also may spend more time in the South near family. “I will keep doing the kinds of things I do: writing and teaching,” Snodgrass says. “I’m a teacher. It’s who I am. But nobody tells you how to do this retirement thing. So you’ve got to figure out how God is leading you at this point in your life. You’ve got to ask again, ‘Who am I going to be?’”

North Parker | Winter 2015

For more than four decades, most students’ first class at North Park Theological Seminary has been New Testament I with Dr. Klyne Snodgrass. “I view my task as helping people bridge from a college degree into the theological world,” Snodgrass said, a few weeks into his 41st and final Dr. Snodgrass converses with a colleague year full-time at North Park. in his Nyvall Hall office in 1983. “I want them to be able to be at home in any theological discussion, to take them to a level most of them haven’t even thought about, and to introduce them to the quite technical world of New Testament studies. That’s my job; I’m a bridge person.” In fact, Snodgrass has been building bridges throughout the academic world, the global church, and within the North Park community since his arrival in 1974. “I was very young and green,” said Snodgrass, who came to North Park after teaching for only a year at Georgetown College in Kentucky. “I knew I was moving to a different level and I had to work very hard. I was the age of most of the students. It was hard work, but a lot of fun.” Dr. David Kersten C’77 S’82 S’97, dean of North Park Theological Seminary, is among the long list of church leaders to have studied with Snodgrass over the years. “When he came here, it was North Park College and Theological Seminary, and there weren’t a lot of PhDs across campus. He’s seen the huge trajectory of academic growth within the Seminary. He is, in some ways, the anchor to that.” “There is one thing I learned a long time ago,” Snodgrass said. “When people ask the question, ‘What makes a good teacher?’ The answer is good students. If you have good students, you cannot fail.”

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Campus News North Parker | Winter 2015

Sustainability a Priority at Johnson Center

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When the new Nancy and G. Timothy Johnson Center for Science and Community Life was being conceived as an integral part of the University’s campus, sustainability was a critically important component to the overall design and use of the building. North Park worked closely with longtime architectural partner VOA Associates Inc. to design a space that is anticipated to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, which establishes criteria for the construction of sustainable buildings. “Environmental stewardship and sustainability within our urban campus setting was one of our main objectives,” said Carl Balsam, executive vice president and chief financial officer of North Park University. LEED-certified buildings are designed to lower operating costs, reduce waste sent to landfills during construction and operation, conserve energy and water, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and increase asset value. Using a LEED checklist of targeted sustainable solutions, the University was able to provide the best environment for students, faculty, staff, and visitors, while also minimizing waste, reducing toxins, lowering potential energy bills and operating costs, and achieving healthier indoor air quality. Throughout the design process, participants in design charrettes— which included scientists, faculty, staff and administrators, and students—gave input to the architectural team for the design of a building that would create a space for all students, optimize outdoor space and daylight, as well as meet sustainability goals. That design is evident in the two-story atrium and the lobby, which encourages gathering and social interaction.

A number of sustainable solutions were implemented throughout design and construction phases. The Johnson Center is on track to achieve LEED Gold status. The sustainable points achieved as regulated by LEED include sustainable site, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, and innovation and design process. Uniquely, many aspects of the Johnson Center LEED certification will be studied and taught as part of the curriculum for the environmental science and chemistry majors at North Park. Specifically, the Introduction to Environmental Science class taught by Dr. Al Bjorkman, and Environmental Chemistry, taught by Dr. Jon Rienstra-Kiracofe, will study the various components that comprise the Johnson Center’s LEED Gold status, such as its green roof, and energy efficiency and sustainable technologies. Storm water runoff was abated through the use of a green roof, storm water collection, retention and re-use, and vegetated detention areas. Native and adaptive landscaping will help reduce irrigation needs. In addition to the green roof, high albedo, white thermoplastic roof membrane was used to reduce heat absorption and minimize the urban heat island effect. Because the University’s location provides easy access to multiple public transportation options, exemplary transit-related LEED credits also were obtained. Learn more about the opening of the Johnson Center, starting on page 10.


www.northpark.edu/news-highlights Recently Published Faculty and Staff Books

Reflecting the breadth of expertise and interests at North Park, several University faculty and staff recently authored publications on a wide range of topics, including: •W  hy Do the Best Schools Focus on Character? by Dr. Yoojin Choi and Jae Hyeok Jang • I ncorporating Children in Worship by Dr. Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom and David Bjorlin •F  ire in My Soul by Dr. Max Lee, Soong Bong Choir, and Jin Ki Hwang • Converts to Civil Society by Dr. Lida Nedilsky • Essential Eschatology by Dr. John Phelan •F  orgive Us by Dr. Soong-Chan Rah, Dr. Mae Elise Cannon, Lisa Sharon Harper, and Troy Jackson •D  r. Alice Gorguis published two books on mathematics, and Tim Lowly authored three books on art  r. Anne Marie Andreasson-Hogg translated into •D English If You Are the Son of God by Jacque Ellul For a complete list of publications, see www.northpark.edu/faculty-books.

Campus News

News Highlights

New Faculty and Staff Welcomed

North Park welcomed new full-time faculty and staff to the University as the 2014–2015 academic year began. They were introduced to the University community August 19 at the annual faculty and staff Gathering Day. New faculty members include Elizabeth Pierre, pastoral care and counseling teaching fellow at the Seminary; Alyssa Anderson, visiting assistant professor of exercise science; Dr. Yoojin Choi, associate professor of biology and coordinator summer science initiatives; Mark Gavoor, associate professor of operations management; Dr. Christopher Hubbard, assistant professor of management; Terry McCreedy, visiting assistant professor of nursing; Dr. Suzen Moeller, associate professor of nursing for health sciences; and Helene Pochopien, associate professor of nursing. New staff members were added in the offices of Athletics, Development, Enrollment, Information Technology, the Provost, the School of Business and Nonprofit Management, Security and Safety, Student Administrative Services, Student Engagement, and University Marketing and Communications.

New Security Initiatives Enhance Student Safety

North Parker | Winter 2015

This academic year, the Office of Campus Safety and Security and the Division of Student Engagement launched two security initiatives to provide new technology and more comprehensive security coverage. The LifeLine Response EDU mobile app provides students with cutting-edge technology that allows them to respond to an emergency situation with the touch of a button. With features like emergency responder notifications, real-time GPS service, and alerts that can be sent to family and friends, students can travel more securely around campus and the city. The app is also available to University faculty and staff. Another new addition is the Viking Shuttle, a free transportation system that operates on a continual route to important locations in and around campus. Security professionals will operate the shuttle, providing additional coverage around the campus perimeter. When the shuttle is not in service, students can take advantage of the Security Escort Service.

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Campus News

More News Highlights New Career Advantage Program Prepares Students to Succeed

The Office of Career Development and Internships launched its new Career Advantage program this fall to help students discover and pursue a career path that fits their skills, interests, and abilities. In the strategic, four-year Career Advantage program, students work with faculty and staff to create a personalized career development plan. “We use a student’s resume, starting at the very beginning of their time at North Park, and work with them to build it year over year, so they are better prepared for whatever direction they want to go in,” said Pamela BozemanEvans, senior director of career development and internships. Upon completion of each year’s professional development experiences—including skill assessment, resume development, job-shadowing opportunities, internship placement, networking events, and interview preparation—students will earn Career Advantage certification, with the assurance that they will enter the workforce able to meet or exceed the expectations of their employers.

Conflict Transformation Program Expanded to Full Major

Beginning this fall, North Park undergraduate students can complete a bachelor of arts in conflict transformation studies, a program that was previously offered as a certificate. Professors Dr. Mary Trujillo and Dr. Robert Hostetter serve as co-directors for the program, and have developed a curriculum to study peacemaking, reconciliation processes, sustainable justice solutions, and the interplay between faith and conflict. Hostetter’s background in the discipline of performance and social change adds a unique dimension to North Park’s new major, encouraging creativity and community interaction. “Conflict is a universal experience—even though we don’t want it to be,” Hostetter said. As a Christian institution that welcomes students of all faith backgrounds, the University is also uniquely situated to help students engage with religious questions and develop an understanding of the global conversation surrounding faith and conflict.

North Parker | Winter 2015

School of Music Launches Master of Music in Collaborative Piano

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The School of Music will launch a new master of music in collaborative piano (MMCP) degree with a focus on vocal coaching in Fall 2015. The program combines academics, practical experience, and performance opportunities for highly skilled pianists to work as accompanists. The School of Music developed the degree amidst increasing demand for classically trained collaborative pianists and chamber music artists. Considered a companion program to the master of music in vocal performance (MMVP) degree track, the MMCP will blend strong academic inquiry with coached presentations centered on performance as a means of learning. “Students in the new MMCP program will continue to hone their skills at the piano while at the same time working side-by-side with our graduate voice students, including classes for language diction, repertoire development, and vocal performance studies,” said Dr. Karen Bauer, voice department chair and MMVP director.


Campus Theme Series Asks, “What is Food?”

Campus News

More News Highlights The University is hosting several prominent speakers throughout 2014–2015 to address this year’s Campus Theme, “What is Food?” Each academic year, the University offers a series of public discussions reflecting on a common theme. As part of the Campus Theme Lecture Series, Chicago Public Media’s Monica Eng (at left) visited campus October 31 to deliver “Trick or Treat: The Question of Food in Chicago.” On November 6, author Bich Minh Nguyen (at right) addressed the University with her talk, “Are We What We Eat? Stories of Cultural Identity and Cuisine in America.” All first-year students read and discussed Nguyen’s novel Short Girls, about secondgeneration Vietnamese immigrant sisters and their cultural and family history. Other scheduled speakers for the year include Dr. Kimberly Stein of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute and Dr. Norman Wirzba of Duke Divinity School.

Interdisciplinary Symposium Explores Faith and Health

On November 8, North Park welcomed ministers and healthcare professionals to campus for “Being Present: A Faithful Response to Mental Illness,” the University’s first church and mental health symposium. The sold-out event—a collaboration between the Seminary, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, and the School of Adult Learning—featured keynote speaker Dr. John Swinton of the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Participants explored the question of how healthcare professionals and congregations can respond faithfully to the challenge of mental illness, considering what can be done together that neither can do alone. The symposium also featured a presentation from Christianity Today editor Amy Simpson, author of Troubled Minds: Mental Illness and the Church’s Mission, who discussed supporting families living with mental illness. Additional workshops examined the role of mental health in culture, with a goal of identifying partners for responding to mental illness in our churches and communities.

Fall Choir Tour Unites Audiences with “Songs of Love and Loss”

North Parker | Winter 2015

The University Choir and Chamber Singers toured Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan over Fall Break, October 17–19, performing at three churches, Covenant Village of the Great Lakes, and LaPorte High School. More than 40 North Park students participated in the tour, representing the University’s undergraduate and graduate music programs. “There is so much music that fits under the umbrella of ‘Love and Loss,’” said Dr. Julia Davids, director of choral activities and Stephen J. Hendrickson Associate Professor of Music. “For this tour program, we endeavored to bring together some of the finest standard choral works as well as some newer additions to the canon. There’s a wide variety of music and emotions that the choirs get to display.” The choirs performed at Harbert Community Church in Sawyer, Mich.; Forest Park Covenant Church in Muskegon, Mich.; and Trinity Evangelical Covenant Church in Oak Lawn, Ill.

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Campus News

Celebrating Hall of Fame honors (from left to right): John Hjelm C’75, Adam Sinvoic C’06, Annika Safstrom C’07, Shari Hayden C’00, Brady Josephson C’07 G’08, and Bill Anderson C’69.

2014 Hall of Fame Inductees Six North Park University athletes were inducted into the Viking Hall of Fame at an October 24 ceremony during the University’s annual Homecoming festivities. This year’s inductees were William “Bill” Anderson C’69, football and coaching; Shari Hayden C’00, track and field; Dr. John Hjelm C’75, swimming and coaching; Brady Josephson C’07 G’08, baseball; Annika Safstrom C’07, women’s rowing; and Adam Sinovic C’06, soccer.

Bill Anderson C’69

Anderson served as the Vikings’ head football coach and chair of the physical education department from 1978 to 1985. During his tenure, the University recorded the second-most College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin victories in a season (four, 1979) as well as the most total wins under any head coach in program history (15). Anderson’s 42-year coaching career spanned over three colleges and two high schools. “The people at North Park are the greatest people in the world,” Anderson said at the ceremony. “I’ve learned that the journey—and don’t take this the wrong way— is a heck of a lot more important than the Hall of Fame itself.” While a student, he was a four-year letter-winner as a member of the football team, including during North Park’s record-breaking season of 1968.

North Parker | Winter 2015

Shari Hayden C’00

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One of the most outstanding track and field athletes North Park has produced, Hayden was named Female Athlete of the Year in 2000. She is the school record-holder in multiple events, including the outdoor 100-meter hurdles (14.73 seconds) and the 400- and 1600-meter relays, and is second all-time in the indoor 400-meter hurdles (63.54) and the 55-meter hurdles (8.43). A four-year letter-winner for North Park, Hayden was also a two-time CCIW conference champion in the 100-meter hurdles in 1999 and 2000, and earned NCAA national qualifying spots in the indoor 55-meter hurdles three different times, the outdoor 100-meter hurdles three times, and the 400-meter hurdles. She currently teaches physical education and health and serves as assistant track and field coach for girls at Morton East High School in Cicero, Ill. Hayden’s sister, Michelle Hayden Smith C’98, was inducted into the Viking Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dr. John Hjelm C’75

Hjelm has served North Park for 34 years as a teacher, mentor, and coach, including as head swimming coach, tennis coach, and interim athletic director. He has been the cross-country skiing sponsor of the school for the past 17 years. As an undergraduate, Hjelm was an All-CCIW swimmer. “Sports change lives,” Hjelm said as he accepted his award. Through his experiences in swimming, Hjelm

said, he learned how to excel, and that hard work pays dividends. “Sports have been good to me. North Park has been good to me and for me, and I will be eternally grateful.” Hjelm is professor of exercise and sport for the University, where he leads popular class trips off-campus for canoeing and cross-country skiing.

Brady Josephson C’07 G’08

Recognized as Sportsperson of the Year his senior year, Josephson served as a three-year captain for the baseball team, in addition to being a four-year Academic All-CCIW selection. A native of Alberta, Canada, he is the school record-holder in 10 different categories and was active as a student ambassador, a member of the Chapel Team, and the founder of the urban outreach initiative Viking Kids Day. As a four-year letter-winner and starter for the baseball program, Josephson earned team MVP honors. An All-CCIW Conference Second Team selection and an All-Central Region pick his senior year, he was also the 2007 Par Excellence Award Recipient. Josephson went on to earn a master of nonprofit administration from the University, and is an adjunct faculty member for the School of Business and Nonprofit Management. He currently works in client strategy with the charitable organization Chimp in Vancouver, Canada.

Annika Safstrom C’07

Safstrom is regarded as one of the pioneers of the North Park women’s rowing program, laying the groundwork for future rowing student-athletes to follow. “I want to thank the athletic department for conveniently making women’s rowing a varsity sport just in time for my freshman year,” said Safstrom, smiling as she took the podium at the ceremony. A three-time Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association Scholar Athlete and three-time All-Mid-Atlantic Athlete, she was also a Female Athlete of the Year finalist and a three-time Dad Vail Regatta medalist. Safstrom earned gold, silver, and bronze medals as a member of the novice 4+ and varsity 4+ teams. She is currently a certified athletic trainer specializing in postsurgical rehabilitation at the Illinois Bone and Joint Institute.

Adam Sinovic C’06

A three-time All-CCIW selection for soccer, including two AllCCIW First Team selections in 2005 and 2006, Sinovic is heralded as one of North Park’s best all-around student-athletes. A two-time team captain and later an assistant coach for the program, he was a three-time CCIW champion, and earned National Soccer Coaches Association of America All-Central Region honors in 2006. “My four years as a student at North Park were the best four years of my life, and an experience I’ll never forget,” Sinovic said at the ceremony. He is currently vice president of River City Products Packaging, Inc., in Lenexa, Kan.


University Mourns Loss of Beloved Professor

Campus News

More News Highlights Nancy Berggren, a longtime faculty member of North Park University’s School of Education, died May 21 in Skokie, Ill., after an extended illness. Berggren, 63, began teaching at the University in 1985 as a lecturer in education and became assistant professor of education in 1990. A memorial service was held Saturday, June 21, in Anderson Chapel, with a reception following the service in Hamming Hall. An alumna of the University, Berggren also served as coordinator of clinical experiences, and enjoyed helping students find a school clinical placement that was right for them. The University celebrated Berggren, who had been scheduled to retire in August, at a gathering of faculty and staff May 13. “Nancy, we often hear you say, ‘I love North Park,’” President Parkyn said at the event. “We want you to hear today us say to you, ‘North Park loves Nancy.’” Read more about Nancy Berggren in Alumni Notes on page 36.

National Fundraising Awards Recognize North Park

North Park University was recognized by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) in June with two 2014 Educational Fundraising Awards. Using data gathered over a three-year span, CASE awarded the University with national honors in Overall Fundraising Performance and Overall Fundraising Improvement for private comprehensive institutions. A panel of judges select CASE award recipients based on a number of factors, including a pattern of growth in total support, the overall breadth in program areas, the impact of the 12 largest gifts on total support, and the pattern of growth among alumni and other individual donors. “Our success is defined by the deep generosity of the alumni and friends of North Park,” said Mary Surridge, vice president for development and alumni relations. “We remain ever grateful for their inspiring support. We are honored to have the generosity of our constituency noted by this respected national organization.”

University Ministries Programming Examines Theme of “Therefore”

North Parker | Winter 2015

This fall, University Ministries launched its 2014–2015 Chapel series, “Therefore.” According to Director of University Ministries Anthony Zamble, the theme “underscores the necessity of transformation and growth in the Christian life, flowing from the biblical truth that any genuine encounter with the living God leads to transformation.” Chapel services on this theme throughout the fall have featured the following topics and speakers: a discussion of this year’s events in Ferguson, Mo.; Skye Jethani, executive editor of Christianity Today’s Leadership Journal; NFL Superbowl champion Ben Utecht (at left); and Rev. Wilfredo de Jesús S’06. Chapel guest speakers in the spring will include Rev. Gail Song Bantum and Rev. Efrem Smith, among others. “Our hope and prayer is that as we seek after God this year, the story of our life together would include more ‘but now’ and ‘therefore,’” said Campus Pastor Judy Peterson C’92 S’01. “That now we live our lives asking in each situation, ‘What am I there for?’”

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The Johnson Center for Science and Community Life was officially opened on September 12, 2014, with hundreds of alumni, donors, and friends along with North Park students, faculty, staff, and Board of Trustees. The new building’s namesakes Nancy and G. Timothy Johnson led the outdoor ribbon-cutting ceremony. The event, said President David L. Parkyn, celebrated an “important milestone in the history of learning on this campus.” Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations Mary K. Surridge thanked all who “marched forward with us to ensure the success of Campaign North Park.”

DEDICA

Dedication day began with a special Medicine & Media Symposium and an outdoor Festival on the Green. Following the ribbon-cutting, guests toured the Johnson Center. President’s Club members enjoyed dinner and a program in Hamming Hall, and a dessert reception in the festive atrium of the Johnson Center. The following pages offer selected images from the Dedication celebration. See more photos and videos at www.northpark.edu/dedication.

North Parker | Winter 2015

During a break from the day’s rain, the campus celebrated the outdoor ribbon-cutting ceremony.

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Vice President Mary K. Surridge

Symposium experts (from left): Dr. Tim Johnson, Charles Gibson, and Dr. Joseph Martin


ATION Armour Swanson joins President Parkyn

North Parker | Winter 2015

The Johnsons make it official.

President David L. Parkyn

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Campaign North Park Co-Chair David Helwig

President’s Club members gather for dinner in Hamming Hall.

North Parker | Winter 2015

Festival on the Campus Green

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The dessert reception in the atrium

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Kaleb Nyquist C‘12 speaks with family members at the reception.


Dr. G. Timothy Johnson and Dr. Timothy E. Johnson confer about the new Center for Student Engagement.

Dr. Jon Rienstra-Kiracofe describes new research opportunities.

North Parker | Winter 2015

A festive Johnson Center at the end of Dedication day

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THE JOHN “We are beyond thrilled with the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life.

It is the result of what started in 2008 as a true leap of faith. Since Nancy and I both passed through the North Park science programs as students in the middle of the last century, we know how important it is to truly update lab and learning facilities to bring North Park into the modern arena of the biological and physical sciences. But as in the past, the heart of science learning at North Park is the core of highly qualified faculty who make these subjects come alive in the minds of budding scientists. We are especially gratified that this faculty finally has a facility worthy of their talents. “We also think it is highly appropriate that these cutting-edge science facilities are anchored in the same building that houses those who guide North Park students in their spiritual and emotional growth. In our minds, faith and learning are the essential ingredients of lives of service and significance. So we salute all those—faculty, administration, alumni, students, donors, and friends—who actually made this dream a reality. We are truly pleased to have been a part of this great adventure and thank God for the results.”

—Nancy and Dr. G. Timothy Johnson C’56 S’63

North Parker | Winter 2015

Seventeen members of the Johnson Family joined building namesakes Dr. Tim and Nancy Johnson (at right) to celebrate the formal opening of the Johnson Center.

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NSONS

North Parker | Winter 2015

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At the heart of campus, the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life now welcomes students to vital and more dynamic ways of learning and discovery in cutting-edge labs and classrooms. Our newest addition to campus is well-equipped to fully realize the academic, spiritual, social, and cultural dimensions of the University’s educational environment. The day-to-day impact of this important facility on the work of faculty, staff, and administrators is dramatic and far-reaching. To better understand the influence of the Johnson Center, four North Parkers who teach and serve students every day describe how the building affects their work, their mission, and their students.

THE NEXT ERA IN Dr. Drew Rholl | Assistant Professor of Biology

LEAR

North Parker | Winter 2015

Teaches general microbiology and immunology, and a new Ethics in Biology course, starting in Spring 2015. Research area: prevalence and genotypes of Illinois tick-borne pathogens.

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Lighter, safer, and more interactive My favorite thing about the Johnson Center is the natural light and team-based lab spaces. The microbiology lab has two massive banks of windows, and our office pod has floor-to-ceiling windows looking onto the beautiful Campus Green. In our former classrooms in the basement of Carlson Tower, there would be days we’d never see the sun. Our new labs are also designed as pods, with students facing each other as they tackle experiments, so it’s easier to foster group interactions. Classroom technology provides resources such as interactive podiums, and our anatomy students can dissect the human body on our new iPads with programs used in medical schools, then view the real thing in our new cadaver lab. Few schools can offer this.

High-quality equipment creates more in-depth research The higher-end equipment and lab spaces in the Johnson Center allow us to work more in-depth with our research subjects, and in much safer ways. Modern biosafety cabinets in our labs are the same kind used in diagnostic and research facilities around the country. More lab space means we can create new projects for students to work on without the fear of tight quarters. With better safety equipment, we can start projects that could have been dangerous in the past, which will also mean more interesting and diverse undergraduate research symposia. Our current students keep using the word “beautiful” to describe the building. Typically, we want our labs and teaching spaces to simply be “efficient,” but when they can be both, it’s a win-win.

Career-ready for science and health care For juniors and seniors in our lab, we provide a year’s worth of insight into the research world, which serves as an interesting talking point on their resumes that can set them apart during job and graduate school interviews. Our students also present their research both at national and local biology and public health conferences. This all prepares our students to go on to graduate programs in medicine, molecular biology, cellular biology, dentistry, and clinical lab sciences. Former students who are currently working in healthcare tell me, “I use what I learned in your course every day.” That is a good feeling.


RNING

Pamela Bozeman-Evans | Senior Director of Career Development and Internships

Leads programs to ensure students are prepared for a competitive job market, and develops business and nonprofit relationships to provide full-time and internship opportunities for current students and alumni.

Student services: More creative, better synergy Creating a wonderfully designed space like the Johnson Center sends a very important message to our students: At the intersection of creative design and cutting-edge technology is optimal learning.

internship experience, career counseling, help with professional branding, job referrals, placement support, and introductions to career professionals throughout the city.

We are dedicated to providing internships and career opportunities for our students with such top employers as the March of Dimes, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Swedish Covenant Hospital, WGN-TV, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and many more. This new facility will help us to engage even more employers and partners to support our work in developing the next generation of leaders.

Open and inviting spaces— and fresh bagels Students love the Johnson Center. The brightly lit foyer, comfortable seating, high-tech science labs, and fresh Einstein Bros bagels draw hundreds of students daily.

Students and alumni can find everything they need right here to begin or strengthen their careers: support in choosing a major or career,

Personally, I love the sunny, open spaces that invite students in to sit with friends, meet with faculty, or study quietly.

North Parker | Winter 2015

This building now houses in one beautiful space the Center for Student Engagement, creating a great synergy among my colleagues. We are able to provide better coordinated services, share information, and be more creative.

World-class preparation for future leaders The Johnson Center reflects our commitment and investment in the world-class education of our students.

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Richard Kohng | Outreach Ministries Coordinator, University Ministries

North Parker | Winter 2015

Supports North Park’s urban identity by facilitating students’ co-curricular civic engagement and service-learning initiatives with our faculty, and interfacing with our community partners.

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Opportunities grow for students to stop, visit, and get involved Being located in a space more central to our campus, where there is a great deal of foot traffic, makes it easier for students to stop by and visit throughout the day. Our students are excited about the new building and see the great potential it has to expand our efforts in connecting the campus with our community and city. One of the critical components of our work with students is to encourage them to see that learning and listening doesn’t just happen in the classroom but also outside these walls, particularly with respect to our community. It’s incredibly rewarding when our students get involved in the community with humility, service, and respect.

A central hub that welcomes all students The Johnson Center gives us incredible access for recruiting students into our programs. Because it serves as a central hub for many student services and academic programs, we find that students are always present in public spaces where casual conversations can take place. I believe that our student leaders sense the great opportunity we have being located in the middle of a building where commuter and residential students spend much of their time. Connections deepen to our city and community The Johnson Center can serve as a place where the walls between the campus and the community around us become more transparent. Our community partners see the building as a resource to deepen the good

work they do in our city in partnership with our campus community. They can connect with our students in an easily accessible space on campus. The building has different capacities and aesthetics that can greatly enhance the dynamics of a meeting or an event. Part of the Chicago skyline is in the view from the Helwig Boardroom on the third floor, and we know this is not merely an architectural coincidence. The Johnson Center serves as a constant reminder of our values and mission as a University: Our urban location is not incidental but essential to who we are and what we strive to be.


Dr. Isabel Larraza | Associate Professor of Chemistry

Teaches organic chemistry and biochemistry. Research areas: green chemistry, organic synthesis with application to medicinal chemistry, and chemistry education. Vast resources broaden hands-on experience The Johnson Center is perfect. The vast technological resources and modern settings offer the opportunity to implement the most current, pedagogically effective techniques in teaching science—flipping the classroom, guided inquiry, lecture capture, and so on.

Elegant labs inspire our teaching and enrich student learning Students are awed by the facilities. They have already expressed how the wonderful labs and classrooms have enriched greatly their learning experience. I see them being more engaged and motivated, thus making my teaching easier and very enjoyable. It has also motivated me to develop new labs and projects that will enhance altogether our students’ learning. The whole building is warm and inviting. The labs are roomy and elegant, and I have the most wonderful view of the campus and Chicago’s skyline from my research lab. How much more inspiring can it get?

North Parker | Winter 2015

The labs are spacious and extremely functional. The newly added state-of-the-art instrumentation is already permitting the students to gain hands-on experience that very few colleges in the area can boast of. The research lab will support and elevate our research activities to a much higher level.

More advanced learning accelerates student success To offer our students a first-rate education, we must engage them in a more collaborative, investigative experience to promote higher levels of effective student learning. With the Johnson Center, this is now a reality. My research group will benefit enormously, especially with the acquisition of the latest equipment like the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. Now, my students can engage in rewarding investigation of green methodologies of important application in the synthesis of drug intermediates. With the resources at the Johnson Center, they will explore and discover by doing chemistry at the graduate level. We will prepare them to become proficient and experienced in science, so they can succeed in any rigorous graduate or medical program.

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DAYIN THE LIFE: 8 1 9 1

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From 8:00 am to 8:00 pm, students are attending classes, meeting friends, discussing internship opportunities, conducting experiments, grabbing coffee and a bagel, pausing in prayer, or finding a nook to study and reflect. At the heart of campus, the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life is open—and active—from morning until night to help North Park students prepare for lives of significance and service. 20


JOHNSON CENTER

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North Parker | Winter 2015

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Spanning 101,000 square feet, the Johnson Center features 30 stateof-the-art laboratories and collaborative research spaces, classrooms, seminar rooms, and faculty offices for the departments of biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and engineering, and psychology. The Center for Student Engagement houses Career Development and Internships, Residence Life and Housing, the International Office,

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Student Success, University Ministries, and the prayer room. Also enhancing the building: Helwig Boardroom, Hendrickson Lecture Hall, Bickner Bistro, and numerous gathering spaces for study and interaction. Learn more at www.northpark.edu/johnsoncenter. 23


Hundreds of alumni returned to campus to celebrate Homecoming 2014. Be sure to save the date for next year’s Homecoming Celebration, October 16–18, 2015. For more photos from the weekend’s celebrations, visit www.northpark.edu/homecoming

Hamming Hall was filled with alumni celebrating their reunions at the Annual Reunion and Awards Breakfast.

North Parker | Winter 2015

The stands were packed with faithful Viking supporters at the football game and other athletic events.

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Friendly volunteers greeted runners at Saturday’s River Run.

The Classes of 2004–2014 came together for the GOLD Reunion at Golden Crust Pizzeria (also see page 27).


The Alumni Art Exhibit featured the work of our talented North Parker artists.

The Vikings celebrated Homecoming with a victory: winning 26-7 over visiting Millikin University.

At halftime, Head Men’s Soccer Coach John Born was recognized for earning the 200th victory of his career.

A future North Parker enjoyed the Block Party.

North Parker | Winter 2015

Members of the Academy, College, and Seminary classes of 1964 enjoyed the Golden Circle 50th Reunion.

Alumni, students, faculty, and staff participated in the River Run 5k. 25


The 2014 HONOR ROLL

North Parker | Winter 2015

OF DONORS AND ANNUAL REPORT: AVAILABLE ONLINE

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Each year we are blessed with the generous support of many individuals, families, and organizations. We recognize these gifts through the Honor Roll of Donors and Annual Report. We publish these online as a way to make the Honor Roll available to a broader audience and to prudently steward the University’s resources. Please visit www.northpark.edu/honorroll.

The gifts from our donors support the breadth of student scholarships and campus activities, and ensure the vital mission of our University. We express our deep gratitude for your generosity and faithfulness. Every effort is made to properly recognize your gifts. For questions, comments, or further information, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations at (866) 366-8096 or via email at development@northpark.edu.


Alumni Program

New GOLD Program Engages Recent Undergraduate Alums

alumni@northpark.edu

Current GOLD committee members include the following alumni: Jamie Bacon C’11 Sean Burke C’09 Lukas Dahlstrom C’10 Kristin Englund C’10 Tiffany Hines C’10 Hannah Prevost-Schultz C’09 Justin Prevost-Schultz C’11 Kari Sager C’10 Kelsey VanDeursen C’14 Melissa Vélez-Luce C’04 G’12 Kelly (Sladkey) Vetter C’11 All undergraduate alumni from the last decade are welcome to participate in planning and attending upcoming GOLD events. To learn more, make sure your alumni profile is up-to-date on North Park Connect at https://connect.northpark.edu; visit www.northpark.edu/alumni; and follow North Park alumni on Facebook (facebook.com/northparkalumni) and Twitter (@ npualumni). For more information about joining the GOLD committee, contact Vélez-Luce at mvelezluce@northpark.edu or call (773) 244-5273.

North Parker | Winter 2015

Alumni are staying connected in new ways during their first 10 years after graduation as part of North Park’s GOLD (Graduates of Last Decade) program. Formerly referred to as Young Alumni, the program is taking a fresh approach to scheduling events and developing resources to support North Park undergraduate alumni in their first decade after college. A GOLD volunteer committee is working with the Office of Alumni Relations to share ideas and interests, and plan events for their peers. A sold-out event at Hopleaf Bar in Chicago’s Andersonville neighborhood helped kick off the newly restructured program in February. In July, a crowd of 75 gathered for a jazz concert in Millennium Park. At Homecoming, following the afternoon Viking football game, the GOLD reunion welcomed alumni from 2004–2014 to nearby Golden Crust Pizza & Tap. Additionally, GOLD members are encouraged to participate in events that are open to all alumni, such as AlumniNetwork, a networking event held each spring, and AlumniConnection events that are hosted in various cities throughout the year. “By developing a GOLD program, we are putting new energy into our long-standing commitment to provide alumni with meaningful opportunities to remain connected with each other, continuing the good relationships they enjoyed during their North Park years,” says Melissa Vélez-Luce C’04 G’12, director of alumni relations. The goal of GOLD is to enable young alumni to stay connected, as well as to find new North Park friends through social and networking events, she says. To create awareness of the GOLD program among this year’s senior class, the GOLD program hosted a kickoff pizza party for seniors in September, and will host another celebration at the start of their final semester in January. “These events enable us to celebrate our seniors as they transition from student life as well as teach them about the resources provided by the Alumni Association.”

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Alumni Honors

2014 Alumni Award Honorees

alumni@northpark.edu

Mark S. Johnson PhD A’69 C’73

North Parker | Winter 2015

Thomas S. Bagley C’74

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Katelyn Johnson C’04

Mark S. Johnson PhD A’69 C’73 North Park Academy 2014 Distinguished Alumni Award “The Friday pep rallies, athletic events, and talent shows brought a sense of unity to the Academy. Being a member of the athletic teams, Key Club, and Varsity Singers also forged a comradeship with other students that I have not since matched.” For Dr. Mark Johnson, a scientist and researcher, being recognized by North Park this year is “an honor and a thrill, particularly as it coincides with the opening of the new Johnson Center for Science and Community Life.” After graduating from North Park Academy and earning a BA in mathematics from North Park University, Johnson’s interest in nutrition ultimately led him away from mathematics and into biochemistry at the University of Utah’s graduate program. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship to work on bacterial chemotaxis, which he describes as one of biology’s “simplest behaviors.” Today he is associate research professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Loma Linda University. “My education at North Park Academy was superb, with excellent faculty and high-quality resources for such a small student body of 300 students. But the influence of the Academy went far beyond its excellent classroom teaching: It targeted our social and spiritual needs, as well.” He was involved in social clubs, sporting events, and other activities, and he recalls Chaplain Ronald Magnuson (“the Rev”) offering insights into life’s bigger questions. “He showed us that sometimes there are no easy answers,” Johnson says, adding that coaches and teachers were role models who led by example. “North Park Academy was as much a family as it was a school. It fostered an excellent education, good citizenship, a strong moral compass, and a purpose in life,” says Johnson. In addition to continuing his research work, Johnson serves on several administrative committees at Loma Linda, including the Radiation Safety Committee, which oversees all radioactive use at the University and Medical Center. He teaches graduate and medical school classes, and is the medical school course director for medical microbiology. Johnson’s parents are the namesakes of the Dr. Theodore D. and Shirlee G. Johnson Scholarship Fund at North Park.


Alumni Honors

Thomas S. Bagley C’74 North Park University 2014 Distinguished Alumni Award

Katelyn Johnson C’04 North Park University 2014 Distinguished Young Alumni Award

alumni@northpark.edu North Parker | Winter 2015

“Through my academic experience at North Park, I learned how to “North Park was nothing I expected but everything I needed. The study and, most important, how to think. Through athletics, I learned to lessons I learned during my four years at North Park helped set win graciously—but I still hate to lose!” me on my life’s path, and helped propel me towards fulfilling Thomas S. Bagley is passionate about the value of the college my purpose.” experience. “The college years should be a coming of age experience After growing up in a small town in Pennsylvania, Katelyn when a student prepares to become an independent adult.” His own Johnson says that coming to Chicago and to North Park favorite North Park memories: “my feelings of independence and the was “very, very different. It was my first time being around so incredible social experiences with the unique characters I met over many people who had such different life experiences.” Johnson four years, including students, faculty, teammates, and coaches.” recalls being welcomed by Dr. Liza Ann Acosta, professor of Equally important to his personal and professional development, he English, and Dr. Rupe Simms, professor of Africana studies. says, is that he paid his way. “Because I paid 100 percent for my Johnson says her North Park years inspired her “to realize that college education through a series of part-time and summer jobs, I I wanted to fight against racism and for justice and for people learned time management and the true value of an education.” Bagley who are marginalized by society.” Today she is the executive earned his MBA from DePaul University in 1977. director of Action Now Institute in Chicago, which focuses In 1975 he started his business career at Continental Illinois National on “strengthening the voices of people in less-advantaged Bank and in 1984 moved over to Citicorp. In 1989 he founded communities through leadership development, civic Pfingsten Partners, LLC, a private equity firm, which invests in engagement, and direct outreach.” ANI tackles such issues middle market manufacturing, distribution, and business service as providing quality education for low-income minority companies. Bagley is senior managing director. Today the 25-year- students, preventing foreclosures in Cook County, and raising old firm, which is headquartered in Chicago, has approximately $1.3 the minimum wage in Illinois. Before joining ANI, Johnson billion in assets under management and representative offices in served as a program coordinator for “Grow Your Own Teachers” Illinois, North Lawndale chapter, which is dedicated ChangAn, China, and New Delhi, India. to improving teaching in public schools in low-income He credits his participation in North Park football and basketball communities throughout Illinois. for teaching him how to “compete and to persevere through difficult conditions.” He valued experiencing “the incredible bonding and Among her best North Park memories is taking the Sankofa comradeship that develops on a team.” Active in student government, racial reconciliation trip, which Johnson says “changed my he excelled academically, staying on the Dean’s List from sophomore world.” Throughout her North Park years, Johnson says she through senior years. He graduated cum laude with a BA, majoring was always surrounded by people who supported her. Many former classmates are still part of her “core group” and former in economics. faculty members remain good role models. “As a professional, Newly named to North Park’s Board of Trustees, Bagley is eager to I recognize and appreciate people who have a passion for what support the University to ensure that “we continue to provide an they do.” environment that allows students to reach their full potential and live a life that matters.” He is the namesake of the Thomas S. Bagley She advises today’s students to take full advantage of their Family Foundation, which currently supports North Park University, college years: “Be creative, be curious, and embrace everything that North Park and Chicago have to offer. Learning to live a Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and the Navy Seal Foundation. life of significance and service—it was so meaningful to me.” Bagley and his wife, Mary, reside in Chicago.

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Alumni Notes

ALUMNI NOTES WINTER 2015

North Parker | Winter 2015

alumni@northpark.edu

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1950s

Celebrating the 60th wedding anniversary of Jim Persson C’53 S’59 and Arlys Persson with a family reunion in Estes Park, Colo., were many North Parkers, including (from left to right): Shelly (Persson) Tarin C’03, Jan (Stacy) Persson C’79, Russ Persson C’77, Kimmy (Persson) Petty C’12, Megan (Persson) Hopkins C’03, Jessica Persson C’13, Rollie Persson C’83, Valerie (Johnson) Persson C’85, Emily Persson C’10, Tim Hakanson C’02, Krissy (Persson) Hakanson C’06, and Joy Persson C’09. [1] Joe David C’57 announces the publication of his book The Infidels, available through booksellers. For nearly nine years, Joe was a frequent radio and television talk show guest in major U.S. cities, where he candidly discussed issues in education. He has written for professional journals, newspapers, magazines, newsletters, and books, including the Annenberg/CPB Math and Science Project, NPR (To the Best of Our Knowledge), the Forum (University of West Florida), U.S. Airways, Basic Education (Council for Basic Education), The Christian Science Monitor, and many more. Joe is the author of six books.

1960s

Loren Stayboldt C’64 was honored to co-host a group representing Alpine Covenant Conference Center at the 2014 Rafer Johnson Breakfast with Champions in Los Angeles this June. The event

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brings leaders of the business and sports communities together to honor the accomplishments of Special Olympics athletes. The group included Calvin “Cal” Johnson C’56 S’62, who for more than 50 years has been close friends with Rafer Johnson, Olympic medalist and founder of the California Special Olympics. Loren (far right) and Cal (third from left) are pictured with Rafer (center) and fellow guests during their visit to the time trials at the USC swimming complex. [2]

1970s

Jim Williams C’75 discovered a love for the arts and a joy for

teaching science in the years following graduation. He traveled the country, adventuring in the outdoors with camera in hand. He also returned to school, completing a master’s degree in science curriculum with a project on the fusion of science and art. He built his photography business while also teaching science in Downers Grove, Ill., from where he recently retired after 33 years. Jim and his wife of 35 years, Pam, now focus on raising funds for the Meredith Williams Foundation, named in honor of their late daughter, as well as for Mercy Home Chicago. Jim has just published his first book, High Altitude Paradise, which can be purchased on his website, www.inwildlight.com. [3]


Alumni Notes

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1980s

Nora Moreno Cargie G’83 has been appointed executive

director of Tufts Health Plan Foundation. As executive director of the foundation, Cargie will lead all activities to further the foundation’s position as a leader in education, coalition-building, and policy work to advance healthy aging in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. [4]

1990s

Kyle Peterson C’98 was quoted in the June 2014 issue of Physics Today magazine, discussing some of his thermonuclear fusion research on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Derek White C’99 was promoted to captain in the United States Air Force in April 2014. He also serves as an ANG chaplain and senior pastor of Bethany Congregational Church in Foxboro, Mass.

North Parker | Winter 2015

In October 2012, Jo Ann Deasy S’97 brought home Declan Joseph Deasy. The one-year anniversary of his adoption was celebrated in April 2014. In July 2014, Jo Ann left her position as pastor at Sojourner Covenant Church in Evanston, Ill., to start a new position as the director of institutional initiatives and student research at the Association of Theological Schools in Pittsburgh, Penn., where she will work with Stephen Graham, former academic dean of North Park Theological Seminary. [5]

2000s

A group of G’02 alumni gathered for a reunion, including (from left to right): Chaitut Roungchai, who recently earned his PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is the owner of Thai Bowl restaurants, located in the Lincoln Park and Taylor Street neighborhoods of Chicago; Sandy Maldonado-Martinez, mother of four and marketing manager at Medieval Times in Schaumburg, Ill.; Christina Lanzona, Office of Development and Alumni Relations at North Park; and Junko Iwamoto, who currently resides in the Shibuya neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan, and is pictured with Momoko, one of her two children. [6] Christina Lanzona and Ruth Ramos Rivera G’02 recently connected in Puerto Rico. Ruth is a supervisor at the Department of Tourism for the government of Puerto Rico, and lives in the Isla Verde neighborhood of San Juan. [7] Laura Wiebe C’03 joined the faculty of the Swinney Conservatory of Music at Central Methodist University as assistant professor of music in August 2014. At Central Methodist, she conducts the 65-voice Conservatory Singers and teaches applied voice, music history, and other academic music courses. Located in Fayette, Mo., Central Methodist University was founded in 1854 and is the only United Methodist Church-affiliated university in Missouri. [8]

alumni@northpark.edu

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Alumni Notes alumni@northpark.edu North Parker | Winter 2015

Connect with North Park

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We’re eager to keep all of our alumni informed and involved in the University and the Seminary. Here are all the ways you can stay in touch with us—and with classmates and other alumni:

You can also connect with us on Facebook at facebook.com/northparkalumni and on Twitter at twitter.com/npualumni.

North Park Connect is an online community just for alumni. Update your contact information when you move, earn a graduate degree, or accept a new job; view and register for alumni events; and join the online alumni directory, where you can reconnect with classmates or build your professional network by connecting with fellow alumni in your area or industry. Go to https://connect.northpark.edu.

To stay up-to-date anytime on upcoming alumni events and reunions, benefits and resources available to alumni, issues of the North Parker, ways to give to North Park, and more, visit www.northpark.edu/alumni. For more information, alumni can contact Melissa Vélez-Luce, director of alumni relations, by phone, email, mail, or by making an appointment to visit in person. For details, go to For more information on how to stay in touch with alumni, visit www.northpark.edu/alumni/contact. www.northpark.edu/alumni


Alumni Notes

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Rachel Bergstrom C’04 began a tenure-track faculty position in

biology at Beloit College in Beloit, Wis., in Fall 2014. After a year at Minnesota State University, Mankato, Rachel is excited to return to her small, liberal arts college roots. She also welcomes moving closer to family; her parents, Kandace and Richard Bergstrom S’81, live in Northbrook, Ill. Dan Dierenfeld C’04 and his wife, Anna, announce the birth of their daughter, Cora Louise. Cora was born on March 3, 2014, joining her big brother Levi (age 2). [9] Gavin James Edquist was born to Chris Edquist C’04 G’11 and Leah Edquist C’04 C’08 on December 20, 2013, weighing 6 lb. The Edquists live in Rochester, Minn. [10] Marci (LaRouech) McCalmon C’04 has been honored with a prestigious Women Who Mean Business “Woman to Watch” Award. Marci was recognized as one of the top up-and-coming female leaders in the state of Hawaii, and also received a promotion to director of sales operations at ProService Hawaii in January 2014. Britta (Heintzelman) Johnson C’05 and Dane Johnson C’06 welcomed baby girl Elin Linnea on May 30, 2013. The Johnson family resides in Chicago. [12] John Potter C’05 and Jenny (Booth) Potter C’05 of Palatine, Ill., welcomed son Elliot Booth Potter on August 18, 2014. Jenny is a creative producer at Willow Creek Community Church, and John works as North Park’s copywriter. [13]

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Forgive Us: Confessions of a Compromised Faith (Zondervan) is a recent publication co-authored by North Park University Adjunct Professor Rev. Dr. Mae Elise Cannon S’06 G’06. Mae’s co-authors are Lisa Sharon Harper, Troy Jackson, and North Park Seminary Professor Soong-Chan Rah. Forgive Us looks at areas where the church has been a source of pain rather than a place of hope. The authors examine both the historical facts about sins in our culture such as racism, sexism, and the care of our environment, and the theological truths that proclaim the church should speak life and hope into these broken systems of the world. The book powerfully calls us to lament our complicity in these sins and then to repent and ask for forgiveness so that we can move forward with reconciliation and peace. [14] Rita Ponce C’07 G’13 announces the birth of her son, Mateo Alejandro Ponce, on August 8, 2014. [15] Andy Nordstrom C’08 has accepted a new position as the director of development for the American Osteopathic Association. [16] In October 2014, Lilian Samaan G’08 transitioned into a new role as vice president of strategic partnerships for World Relief. She previously served as executive director of World Relief Chicago. [17]

Stacey Ernvall C’09 earned a master’s degree from National-Louis University in June 2014 and has accepted a job with the AUSL/ CPS partnership as a 7th–8th grade math and science teacher at a first-year turnaround school on Chicago’s South Side. Stacey will be part of a team starting the Gresham School of Excellence in the Auburn Gresham/Englewood neighborhood. [18]

North Parker | Winter 2015

[11]

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Alumni Notes alumni@northpark.edu

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Kelly (Marshall) Johnson C’09 achieved a dream when her Ultimate Frisbee team, Seattle Riot, won the World Ultimate Club Championship in Lecco, Italy, on August 9, 2014. Seattle Riot won a gold medal and also was voted best in sportsmanship, earning the Spirit of the Game award. While at North Park, Kelly captained Allihopa, the women’s Ultimate Frisbee team. Her husband Luke Johnson C’03 S’11 started North Park’s Ultimate Frisbee program.

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C’09, Rorie McDowell, and Chelsea (Redding) McDowell C’10. [22, 23]

Annie Schmidt C’12, Jill Adams G’06, and Laura Rodriguez C’06 (from left to right) are all currently serving as missionaries at Foundation for His Ministry children’s home in Oaxaca, Mexico. [24]

[19]

North Parker | Winter 2015

Hannah Prevost-Schultz C’09 and Justin Prevost-Schultz C’11

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are both excited to be back on campus in a professional capacity. In January, Justin joined the Office of Development and Alumni Relations as annual giving manager. Shortly thereafter, in June 2014, Hannah began working as an undergraduate recruiter in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. In September, Hannah and Justin celebrated their three-year wedding anniversary. [20] Chelsea (Redding) McDowell C’10 and Aaron McDowell C’11 announce the birth of their son, Jacob Kian McDowell, on June 4, 2014. Jacob joins big sister Rorie. [21] Christine (Wahlskog) Wallace C’10 and her husband, Max, announce the birth of Ruby Christine Wallace on February 8, 2014. Ruby was 8 lb. 12 oz. and 21 inches long. Ruby is now a member of the “Burgh Babies,” the next generation of “Burgh Babes” (Christine’s group of close friends from North Park). They are pictured together (back row, left to right): Michael Nelson C’11, Nina Pederson C’10, Aaron McDowell C’11, Kristin Englund C’10, Carolyn Wahlskog, Emily Persson C’10, Charlie Wallace; (front row, left to right): Christine Wallace C’10, Ruby Wallace, Kari Sager C’10, Jennifer Lindsey Smit C’10, Mary (Hakanson) Wells

Who Are North Park’s Future Alumni? As a North Park alum, you already know how special our University community is. If you know any students who might be a good fit for North Park, please tell us about them at and we’ll get in touch. Go to www.northpark.edu/futurealumni.


Alumni Notes

OBITUARIES

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James “Jim” Gordon Hosfield C’51 of Skokie, Ill., passed away on

Joseph “Joe” Preston Hogan A’51 of Winnsboro, Texas, passed

away on November 17, 2013, at the age of 80. He was born and raised in Mt. Vernon, Texas, and moved to Chicago at the age of 14, where he attended North Park Academy. Joe moved back to Texas in 1959, where he worked for 35 years at Texas Instruments as a computer engineer. Some of his interests included off-road motorcycling with his son, developing software, tracing family genealogy with his daughter, and keeping up with friends and family via the Internet and ham radio. Joe was preceded in death by his son, David Hogan, and is survived by his wife of 18 years, Judy Valentine Hogan of Winnsboro; daughters Judy (Rick), Carol (Mark), and Sherrie; stepson Nathan (Michelle); stepdaughter Amy (Lance); and 10 grandchildren. [26]

alumni@northpark.edu

Eivor J. (Blomberg) Heinz A’43 of Benton Harbor, Mich., died on December 31, 2013, at Hanson Hospice Center, Stevensville, Mich. She is survived by five children, eight grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.

North Parker | Winter 2015

February 22, 2014. Jim grew up in the Edgebrook neighborhood of Chicago and was offered a professional baseball contract by the St. Louis Browns at age 17; however, at his parents’ insistence, he attended North Park College and graduated with an associate of arts in business. During his years at North Park, he pitched on the baseball team. Jim married his wife, Diane, on March 1, 1952. He joined the Illinois National Guard in 1950 and served for eight years in the 33rd Infantry Division Automatic Weapons Battalion A Battery. Jim was a section leader and held the rank of sergeant first class. For 73 years, he was a member of Edgebrook Lutheran Church, Chicago, where he ushered Saturday night and Sunday services and taught Sunday school. Jim worked for Household Finance and then as a lighting fixture showroom manager at City Electric Supply Company. He then worked for Mason and Basedow Company for 16 years, selling and redesigning lighting for several buildings in the Chicago area, including Buckingham Fountain, O’Hare Airport, and the Civic Center fountain. Jim went on to work for Kretschmar Hams and Mickleberry’s Ham Company before retiring in 1994. He enjoyed walking and running every day and swimming several times a week, and was passionate about tennis, world travel, and his winters in Hawaii. Diane and Jim have four children: Lisa Cochrane (Cary), Mark (Julie), Julie Anderson, and James, and nine grandchildren: Christopher, Kate, Laura, Drew, Gary, Nancy, Peter, Thomas, and Dakota. [25]

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Alumni Notes

27

North Parker | Winter 2015

alumni@northpark.edu

Janel (Davis) Landon C’70 of Chicago passed away on July 28,

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2014. She was born on November 25, 1948, in Chicago, where she attended Schurz High School. Janel graduated from North Park College with a BA in communications in 1970 and married Wayne Landon in 1975. She modeled and acted for many years, appearing in print advertisements, commercials, and in the Diana Ross film Mahogany in 1975. Janel turned her pursuits to broadcasting and communications and was Chicago’s first female sports announcer alongside Harry Caray. She created and produced Women Today, a live WLUP-AM talk show. Janel received the first Mercedes Benz Mentor Award for her role in hosting the program. She was a founding member and past president of the National Association of Women Business Owners. Janel’s efforts supporting Illinois women in business and her involvement promoting women entrepreneurs gained her recognition as the SBA’s Illinois Women in Business Advocate and Illinois Exporter of the Year. She was also appointed to the U.S. Commerce Department’s Advisory Committee on Small and Minority Businesses for Trade Policy Matters. Janel went on to earn a master of arts from New York’s Marist College School of Communications in 2006, and devoted herself to teaching communications at Columbia College, DePaul University, and Northwestern University. She was mother to Hillary (Roger) and Holly (Zach), stepmother to Skip (Rona) and Craig (Melinda), and a very proud and loving grandmother to Brynleigh, Wyatt, Emily, Charlie, Maggie, and Molly. [27] Clarence Postmus passed away on August 29 at the age of 86. He was a professor of chemistry at North Park from 1970 until his retirement in 1988. He loved nature photography, and could be found taking photographs until the week before his death. Most recently, he and his wife, Beverly, lived in Denver, Colo. In addition to his wife, Clarence is survived by three daughters and seven grandchildren.

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Nancy (Tinzmann) Berggren C’72, a longtime member of the

faculty of the School of Education, passed away on May 21, 2014. She joined North Park in 1985 as lecturer in education, and in 1990 became a full-time instructor with responsibilities for teaching and clinical placements. She completed her service to North Park as director of clinical experiences, and in that role, she touched the life of every student in the School of Education. “Nancy leaves a legacy of caring, competence, and commitment. She loved North Park University and the students we serve. She will be remembered in classrooms across the country by the highly effective teachers she trained, and remembering her will remind all of us to do our very best in all we do,” said Dr. Rebecca L. Nelson, dean, School of Education. Nancy was proud to be a legacy professor, following her mother, Ruth Tinzmann Armstrong, who had been a faculty member in North Park College’s psychology department for many years. Her children, Kris Berggren C’01 and Jenny Berggren C’01, are both North Park alumni and part of a legacy family. Nancy is also survived by her husband, Dick, who served as a teacher in Chicago Public Schools for more than 30 years. She was a fond aunt of Melissa (Tim) and Erica (John), and among other family members is also survived by her brother, Reverend James O. Tinzmann C’74 (Sue). Nancy’s office featured a board filled with photos several layers deep, showing her with students, faculty and staff, and friends. Said her husband Richard: “Nancy touched so many. She changed the lives of her students by inspiring them into the incredible joy of teaching. Her own life was overflowing with love and joy and boundless energy that was felt by all.” North Park University mourns the loss of our dear friend and colleague Nancy Berggren. [28]


Your Gift. Our Students.

Scholarship support is our highest priority! Today, more than ever, scholarships remove the barriers to quality education and open the way for students to enroll, pursue their goals, complete their studies, and graduate with pride from North Park University or from North Park Theological Seminary.

Your Gift to the North Park Fund:

• Strengthens undergraduate scholarships: Award more than $12 million annually in scholarships and financial aid to 89 percent of undergraduate students. • Advances Seminary scholarships: Provide nearly $1 million annually in financial aid and scholarships to assist 74 percent of Seminary students.

Make a difference. Make your gift today. Visit www.northpark.edu/give

can’t do this alone. Your gift helps me to “ Ireach my goals to make a difference in this world. ”

Quincy Rycraw Cochran C’16 Bachelor of Music Music in Worship


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==glory++! A F E S T I VA L O F L E S S O N S A N D C A R O L S

Advent 2014

Sunday, December 7, 2014, at 4:00 pm

North Parker Winter 2015  

The magazine for alumni and friends of North Park University. Volume 75, Issue 1

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