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An Independent Lifestyle Newsmagazine for a Grown-up Audience July 2009 Volume 2 Issue 7

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The Cariboo Gold Rush is still in full swing and Barkerville is teeming with fortune seekers from all over the world. Exciting events and fun-filled activities abound for the whole family. See the blacksmith and miners at work, ride the stagecoach, enjoy a live theatre show, tour Barkerville’s main street and Chinatown, pan

NORTH of 50 July 09

for gold, attend a class at the schoolhouse, witness courtroom drama at Richfield, visit with local residents–it’s all here! Barkerville welcomes visitors from mid May to late September. Please phone 1-888-994-3332 ext. 29, e-mail barkerville@barkerville.ca or visit www.barkerville.ca for more information.


NORTH of 50 July 09

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Jann Bailey’s passion for life and art story by Sherry Bennett Twenty months ago, while sitting in a doctor's office at Vancouver General Hospital, Jann L.M. Bailey's world stopped turning. Acute myelogenous leukemia - those were the three powerful words the oncologist delivered to Jann's ears on November 7, 2007. Her energetic lifestyle was thrown into a complete tailspin. The disease strikes less than five in 100,000 people - and now, Jann was one of them. She became a reluctant participant in an exclusive club for those afflicted with cancer of the blood and bone marrow. The Kamloops Art Gallery executive director was forced to make a critical decision: accept an invitation to a personal pity party or throw on the boxing gloves and TKO the disease that was so mercilessly ravaging her body. "It came as a very big shock, but in typical form, she said, 'Okay, how do we deal with it and fight it?'" Her trip to Vancouver was intended to be for one doctor's appointment. It would be seven months before Jann returned home to Kamloops. "I've learned much more about blood than I want to, or care to, but that's part of the process-learning how it all works," says Jann while running her fingers through the strands of her newly grown curly, black hair. A tenacious and tireless advocate of the visual arts since her early years in Hamilton, Ontario, Jann spent the better part of a year-and-a-half advocating for her own survival. "I took it one day at a time and was determined to fight it with dignity, pride, and respect for those who were helping me." With three bouts of chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant behind her, the skip's returned to Jann's step. Back at the helm at the KAG on a part-time basis, the executive director's leading her troops forward the only way she knows how-with commitment and passion. "It all comes down to passion. Passion spelled with capitals." Born with the creative gene, Jann's passion for photography and printmaking led her to the Ontario College of Art and Design in 1973. A scholarship provided her with the opportunity to spend her final year of college at the Lacoste, France campus of the New York based Sarah Lawrence College. "My art history professor there, Julien Levy, is literally the reason why I'm in this position here today," she says. While studying in France, Jann spent weekends with Levy and his wife at their Bonnaire home. Levy, one of modernism's pre-eminent art dealers, operated the Julien Levy Gallery in New York from 1931 to 1949. "One weekend we were talking about my future. He asked me what I was thinking of doing and I told him teaching. He said, 'I think you would be better suited for the museum field. That's where you should work-you would be great.' So it was Julien who set me on the path that I'm on today and I've never looked back." Through work at the Hamilton and Peterborough Art Galleries, and through teaching arts administration and conservation at Fleming College, Jann promptly established a solid reputation for her work in the country's Eastern arts arena. But she knew, she had to spread her artistic wings in the country's west in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the nation's visual arts sector and fulfill a longing to work internationally Jann accepted the position as the KAG's executive director in 1987 and spent a decade tucked away in the cramped and crowded museum basement, all the while lobbying ardently for a bright and modern space to house her gallery. For 22 years, Jann and her collective of dedicated gallery supporters plotted along, one step at a time, raising the gallery's stature from a small regional gallery into one of B.C.'s premiere galleries. "I'm passionate about arts and believe in them for our social, economic and cultural well-being. When you are passionate you don't mind telling the story and selling it. I think I've become very good at that." Jann's volunteer affiliations are extensive and run the gamut from board member of the Kamloops Hospice Association to past-president of the Canadian Museum Association.

Jann has been KAG’s executive director since 1987

Her tenures with the Canadian Art Museum Directors and the Canadian Museum Association were positions centred in advocacy and provided her with the opportunity to promote the artistic medium so near and dear to her heart. In June of 2008 her strong leadership at the regional and national levels earned her double accolades, first with an appointment as a Fellow of the CMA, followed by an honorary doctorate from Thompson Rivers University. "I was on cloud nine. That was a pretty tough year. To be recognized not only within my own community, but nationally, made me feel good. I was very proud." "The only problem was that with my bald head, the doctoral cap didn't fit," Jann adds with a laugh. Her grand vision to posture her regional gallery on the international stage came to fruition with her selection by the Canada Council to serve as co-commissionaire to represent Canada in organizing an exhibition of First Nations Artist Rebecca Belmore at the 51st Venice Biennale in 2005. "The Venice Biennale was a huge undertaking for a regional gallery. Viewed by more than 300,000 people, it defined the Kamloops Art Gallery's reputation on the international stage." Still subscribed to a cocktail of anti-rejection drugs and steroids to combat her chronic case of Graft-versus-host disease, a side effect of her bone marrow transplant, Jann's not out of the woods yet, but is well on her way down the pathway to remission. "I'm not Wonder Woman. I still find myself looking over my shoulder. I've not been a woman who has had many fears in life, but every now and then I catch myself worrying a wee bit that it might come back. I have to correct that by looking to the future and enjoying the day for today." An advocate for many causes, Jann's anxious to add one more cause to the list by sharing her experiences with leukemia with others who have suffered the same fate. "There's such a synergy and camaraderie with people who've experienced leukemia. Because it's so rare, it's important that we talk about it." "What I've learned from all of this is that we need to support each other. We need to look after each other." "We get so wrapped up in going from A to B. Stuff like this makes us stop and appreciate. It's made me more humble and more passionate."


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Feisty Trout in Kamloops Lakes by Sherry Bennett From its earliest days, the allure of the feisty trout in Kamloops' lakes beckoned anglers from near and far. Viewed through Roderick Haig-Browns eyes, the Kamloops region as fisherman's country where every man seemed to be an angler of some sort or another, and discussed the fighting trout with vigour at every hotel, barber shop, general store and street corner. Playing host to some of the planet's most beautiful and healthy waters, the region's lakes have long held their own unique charm and distinction. Among the lakes, Paul, Pinantan, Knouff, Adams, Beaver, Tunkwa, Kelly, Pennask and Hyas have all observed infamy for their underwater runners. The popularity of the region's legendary 'Kamloops trout' grew in the latter part of the 19th century, receiving a boost of legitimacy from the scientific community after a biologist from Stanford University gave the trout its own distinct place in the register of recognized fish species-Salmo Kamloops. But subsequent research carried out in Paul Lake in 1931 disputed the species by pointing out that the Photo Courtesy Kamloops Museum & Archives differences that led to the distinct species classification were environmentally induced rather than genetics. So ended the legend of the so-called Kamloops Trout. In stark contrast to modern times where one percent of fish register at five pounds or over, the region's lakes of yesteryear teemed with magnificent, plump rainbows. With a good catch comprising 50 to 100 fish in the 1890s, unwonted was the need to spin a yarn of the big one that got away. On more than one occasion, the angler was said to have hauled in more than his own weight in fish. Originally, lakes in the region were barren of resident trout, including Paul and Knouff, which were two of the first to be stocked and quickly become great producers. Famous for its evening fishing, Paul Lake was stocked with 5,000 fry in 1909 and by 1922, visitors frequenting the charismatic Echo Lodge were enjoying the adrenaline rush induced by 10 pound trout peeling the fishing line off the reel.

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By the 1930s, whoppers were being pulled from virtually every lake in the region. A 33-pound fighter tugged in from Pavilion Lake. A 23.5 pounder lured with an earthworm on the shores of Knouff Lake. And the region's largest recorded trout ever pulled in-a 46-pounder from Jewel Lake (now Long Lake) in 1932. Against the advice of experienced anglers, Knouff Lake was stocked with 175,000 fry in 1932, subsequently depleting the lake's food supply. In this lake that once swarmed with fish, the average weight plummeted from five pounds to one pound. The heydays featuring 20 pound trophy trout are merely memories now, but just as they did a century ago, feisty trout lurking in the depths of the Thompson/Cariboo's lakes and rivers are still gulping up the fly and screaming out the line for thousands of sports fishermen from around the world. Facts contained in this piece extracted from articles by Ken Favrholdt and Robert Koopmans.

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NORTH of 50 July 09 Carbon tax coercion continues Submitted by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation As British Columbians jump into their cars to go to Canada Day celebrations or take their families to the beach, they will be feeling the pinch at the pumps. On July 1st, the carbon tax goes up again, as the government continues with its plan to force people out of their cars, sit around in the dark, and wear sweaters in their homes to stop what some people believe is a looming global warming Armageddon. But as political parties have discovered to their dismay, voters are not willing to sacrifice their wellbeing today to prevent something that may or may not happen 100 years from now. It's time to get rid of the carbon tax and use the tax system for what it was intended -- financing essential government services -- not as a tool to distort the price of energy to engineer a colour-of-the-month social outcome. B.C.'s carbon tax started at $10 per tonne in 2008 and on July 1st, the carbon tax goes up by 50 per cent, to $15 per tonne. Of course, that’s before the GST is charged. That’s right, the federal government charges GST on the carbon tax, bumping the carbon tax increase to 58 per cent - a pure tax grab. Why are citizens forced to pay more for energy? Because governments adapt their policies to consensus opinion to win votes. The green lobby convinced the Premier of a consensus on global warming, and the popularity of creating policies around it. So imagine his surprise when, after gasoline prices popped over $1.50 per litre mark for the first time ever (thanks in part to the carbon tax), the NDP's popularity jumped as well. Coincidence? Doubtful. The federal Liberals learned this the hard way after their carbon tax was overwhelmingly rejected by Canadian voters in the 2008 General Election. The so-called Green Shift was rightly seen as a tax grab designed to shift money out of consumers' pockets for new social engineering schemes. The green lobby says government should add a carbon tax to fossil fuels because they insist carbon dioxide is a pollutant and a carbon tax would force polluters to pay for their misdeeds. Except carbon dioxide is not a pollutant. According to Environment Canada, "air pollution is made of various chemicals and particles that contaminate the atmosphere around the Earth.” Carbon dioxide is a clear, colourless, odourless gas that each one of us breathes out every second of every day. People still have to drive and heat their homes and increasing the cost of energy will do little to force people to behave otherwise. It will create hardship and difficult choices as people decide whether to enroll their children in soccer programs because of the cost of driving. But as more people realize the climate changes, always has and always will, the carbon tax will fall out of favour as a tool of coercion. People pay taxes so government can provide essential services, not to be manipulated in some social engineering experiment. Heating our homes and driving our cars are already expensive enough. It's time for government to eliminate the carbon tax and stop creating more worries for families who are already concerned about jobs, the economy and their future wellbeing.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Re: Bleeker Lake article

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Thompson Rivers University Partners With Dr. Halstrom Sleep Apnea & Snoring Clinics To Launch Mobile Center For Respiratory Health Ground-breaking Not For Profit Mobile Outreach Program Aims to Educate Public on Sleep Apnea Via Health Screenings and On-site Information Sessions

Dr. Halstrom Sleep Apnea & Snoring Clinics, a pioneer of sleep apnea and snoring devices and therapy, has become the major sponsor partner of Thompson Rivers University’s Mobile Center for Respiratory Health (MCRH) program, a Province-wide, multi-city initiative designed to identify and demonstrate the role of all health professionals in supporting and participating in primary screening for sleep apnea, which is a widespread health condition that remains undiagnosed and untreated. According to the Canadian Lung Association sleep apnea is actually quite common, however, most people who have sleep apnea are unaware of the symptoms and subsequently have not been effective diagnosed. We know that: ! ! !

20% of adults have at least mild sleep apnea (1 in 5 adults) almost 7% of adults have at least moderate sleep apnea (1 in 15 adults) 2 - 3% of children are likely to have sleep apnea

Given the prevalence of this condition within our population, and the devastating consequences Thompson Rivers University, in conjunction with Dr. Halstrom, launched the MCRH program, which aims to significantly raise the awareness, spark meaningful dialogue and present workable solutions for this important health initiative. As part of the MCRH program, Dr. Halstrom, who is the inventor of The Silencer, will provide his guidance and expertise to assist with the screening and treatment efforts of Thompson Rivers University students and doctors from the MCRH program’s advisory group. Further, via a specialized MCRH Trailer, retrofitted specifically to host screening events, students and doctors will travel to various communities across the Province of British Columbia and hold public information forums along with lunch & learn presentations for the staff of local health professionals. The following are a few of the health consequences that underscore the serious nature of sleep apnea: Sleep disordered breathing is an independent risk factor for insulin resistance Untreated Mild – Moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) – is almost double risk of a cardiovascular disease ! Untreated Severe OSA is greater than four times risk of cardiovascular disease ! Moderate-severe sleep apnea is independently associated with a large increased risk of all-cause mortality ! Patients with OSA have increased rates of motor vehicle crashes and personal injury ! !

“The MCRH team at Thompson Rivers University has consistently demonstrated strong leadership and a proactive approach when it comes to the education and study of sleep disorders and apnea, and we are extremely excited to help raise the bar even further,” said Don Halstrom, President and CEO of Dr. Halstrom’s Sleep Apnea and Snoring Clinics. “This milestone program will not only enable Thompson Rivers University to enhance their own internal program, but also represents the first step in a larger scale effort to effectively increase much needed screening efforts for the public over the long term.” The MCRH program has a planned five-year term. During this term the MCRH Trailer will travel to and have a positive impact on all regions of the Province of British Columbia. The MCRH Trailer will be visiting the following regions/cities during its first five-months of operations:

Dear Editor: In your June issue, on page ten, you feature an article describing Terasen's creation of a picnic site at Bleeker Lake. The impression given, in what I assume was a Terasen press release, is that the company did all the work. As you see from Jim Woodward's letter to Kamloops This Week, other groups were involved. I don't wish to denigrate Terasen, but I feel that it is very important that volunteer groups be recognized for their efforts. (I am not affiliated with any of the groups or organizations.) Sincerely Yours, Marie Hicks

In addition to the public health benefits the program expands and enriches the educational experience for the Thompson Rivers University students. Between Q4 2008 and Q1 2009, the MCRH Trailer is planned to be in use in various high-profile locations within the Vancouver and Fraser Valley areas.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Jim Woodward’s letter, which appeared in the Kamloops This Week acknowledged the contributions from various groups, including Kamloops and District Fish and Game Association, Charlie’s Back Hoe Service, Dawson Construction, Scouts, St. John’s Ambulance volunteers, The Miistry of Tourism Culture and the Arts, RONA, and Terasen.

This issue and past issues of North of 50 Lifestyle Newsmagazine are available on-line at www.northof50.com

Kamloops: June 2009 Kelowna: July 2009 Prince George / Williams Lake: August 2009 Nanaimo / Comox / Campbell River: September 2009 Victoria: October 2009

Adult Tutoring Program A new program providing adults with tutoring is looking for learners and volunteer tutors. Partner Assisted Learning (PAL) is a volunteer based literacy organization that offers free tutoring to adults. Learners are individually matched with tutors who will help them reach their goals. Tutors can assist with reading, writing, spelling, and basic math and receive training and ongoing services and support. PAL is a community partnership between the Secwepemc Cultural Education Society, Thompson Rivers University and the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development. “This program will appeal to anyone interested in reading for pleasure or work, or who wants to continue their studies,” says Regional Literacy Coordinator Fred Cunningham. “It is a chance to receive help with your reading, for free. It only takes your time and commitment." For more information, please contact PAL coordinator Janessa Mckenzie at 250-852-3091 or janessamckenzie@yahoo.ca


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NORTH of 50 July 09

Editor’s Notes Old Guys Rule

a division of 0727724 BC Ltd.

Publisher Dean Wallis dean@northof50.com Managing Editor TJ Wallis editor@northof50.com Advertising Sales Dean Wallis dean@northof50.com Kamloops Sales sales@northof50.com Ad Design Emily Duggan emily@northof50.com Deadline for Ads to be submitted is the 22nd of the month for publication on or about the 1st of the month.

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is an independent, free m o n t h l y publication, locally owned, produced and distributed throughout the Thompson / Okanagan and Shuswap areas by 0727724 BC Ltd. Disclaimer: The publisher will not b e responsible for errors or omissions. In the e v e n t o f a typographical error, the portion of the advertisement that is incorrect w i l l not be charged for, but the balance of the advertisement will be paid at the applicable rate. T h e o p i n i o n s a n d v i e w s contained in submitted articles to North Of 50 newsmagazine are not necessarily those of the publisher. T h e p u b l i s h e r r e ta i n s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t a l l s u b m i s s i o n s , including articles and l e t t e r s t o the editor, for brevity and clarity. Copyright is retained on a l l m a t e r i a l , t e x t a n d g r a p h i c s in this publication. No reproduction is allowed of any material in any form, print or electronic, for any purpose, except with the e x p r e s s e d permission of North of 50 P u b l i c a t i o n s (unless for private reference only).

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The television news is generally filled with stories that anger, disappoint, scare, sadden and annoy me, but occasionally one comes across the wire that just makes me smile and cheer. Yesterday was one of those days. While the news (including the Canadian networks) was dominated by an annoying story about a US senator who’d disappeared to Brazil for several days, been unfaithful to his wife, and who may or may not have destroyed his political career, one story gave me an “Aw shucks” moment. It was the story of 84 year old Bob Bennett of Vancouver Island, who’d been trapped in a well shaft for four days before being rescued. By all accounts the senior is just fine, thank you very much. You knowthat he’s the tough guy who’s got the guts and the stamina to chew off his own arm to save his life. He belongs on a billboard that says, Old Guys Rule. Just as this story came out, CNN was reporting on its crawler that 5 senior citizens in Germany had been charged with kidnapping. Now, that’s not an everyday occurrence. Turns out, the group in their 60s and 70s kidnapped a much younger 56 year old who allegedly owed them money on an investment scheme gone bad. Two of the older gents tied up the younger with electrical tape, stuffed him into the trunk of a car, held him for four days, and beat him senseless in an attempt to get their money back. Who the heck did this young whippersnapper think he was dealing with? Didn’t he know that Old Guys Rule? Generally, I try not to advocate violence or taking the law into your own hands, but my delight in this story would make Ghandi cringe. I am hoping these kidnapping seniors don’t turn out to be part of a huge crime family trying to collect on a loan sharking debt. That would be disappointing … because, I may be inspired by stories of old guys fighting back, but I’m annoyed by stories of seniors committing criminal acts. Tsk, tsk. Seniors turning the tables on criminals is an entirely different story. Here’s a recent headline that, I’m sorry to say, made me smile: “Bad assed Senior Citizens taking down criminal dirtbags.” I was tickled pink to read about a senior who beat a would-be robber with a cane, an elderly woman who fought back against an unscrupulous corporation – and won, an old guy in a wheelchair who drop kicked a couple of carjackers, who ran away crying like little girls. It’s a bit like being proud of your child for standing up to the school yard bully. As a parent, you wag your finger, admonish your offspring for their inappropriate behavior and send them to their room for a couple of hours of contemplation and soul searching. But secretly, you’re impressed. And you’re relieved -- because now you know your child is capable of defending himself. A part of you wants to give them a pat on the back for his courage, but on the other hand, you don’t want to send the message that violence is an acceptable way to handle disputes. But when the person standing up to the bully is over the age of 65, chances are he doesn’t need a finger wagging lecture from yours truly to explain to him what’s right and wrong. He’s already learned his life lessons … and one of them is: Don’t mess with old guys, because Old Guys Rule So, next time you notice a baseball cap or a T-shirt that boasts, “Old Guys Rule,” give ‘em the thumbs up, because you know it’s true.


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A Lot Going for Salmon Arm A friend here in Salmon Arm recently created a blog site called Aim High Salmon Arm (www.salmonarm.wordpress.com). This is not one of your run of the mill self-indulgent

blogs that inflicts misinformation on the uninformed. No, AHSA is dedicated to encouraging dialogue and reflection on issues that affect Salmon Arm and, inevitably, the global community we are all part of. Glancing through the submissions on the site, I was reminded that Salmon Arm is a very odd community. Here I'm using "odd" affectionately and in its original meaning as something that is "singular in a positive sense of renowned, rare, choice." Oh, I know. All of our towns and cities are different, unique even, each with its own charm and assets. But Salmon Arm is something else. It's really quite an amazing place. For starters, we are the only town in Canada we can find that has successfully fended off "Smart Centres," Canada's largest shopping mall developer. (In this case, the massive development was proposed for an environmentally sensitive area at the mouth of the Salmon River and would have nearly duplicated in size the entire commercial area of the downtown core.) This was not easy. Led by an all-volunteer group called the Committee for a Strong and Sustainable Salmon Arm (CASSSA), it took the collective effort of hundreds of community members researching environmental and economic issues, appearing at council meetings, organizing rallies, preparing and distributing information pamphlets, discussing the issues door-to-door, making presentations to community groups, and, finally, hundreds of concerned community members coming out night after night (staying, in one case, until 2:00 am!) to voice there concerns at a series of council meetings. But that's not the only remarkable display of Salmon Arm community engagement and resourcefulness. Not by a long shot. The SALMAR Community Association is celebrating its 50th anniversary as the owners and operators of theatres in Salmon Arm - currently five of them. So what? Well, they may be the only non-profit group in all of North America to operate a first-run multiplex, pouring thousands of dollars back into the community each year. (Why send profits to Los Angeles when we can keep them right here in town supporting dozens of worthwhile community projects?). Salmon Arm is home to one of the most successful film societies and festivals in the country (and the only 3-D festival.) The Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival, celebrating its 16th anniversary this summer, has become one of the premier summer music festivals in Canada, drawing around 15,000 people to the magnificent site adjacent to the downtown. We have a vibrant downtown that thrives despite economic downturns and big box blandishments. Salmon Arm has one of the top fairs in the province, with one of the highest per-capital participation rates. We have a municipal trail system that is the envy of BC - and under the leadership of volunteer committees, we will soon have one of the most extensive systems in the country. We are in the midst of a community initiated Smart Growth (not to be confused with Smart Centres!) project that is providing new and more sustainable ways of looking at how our community can grow for everyone's benefit. We have the Larch Hills trail system, one of the largest Nordic tracts in western Canada, maintained by the Larch Hills Ski Club, a volunteer community group that for 20 years has made the Larch Hills synonymous with excellence in communitymanaged sports venues. But why am I telling you all of this? Because there is another word I'd like to analyze: community. Community comes from the Latin word communis, "common, public, general, shared by all or many." Communis became commutatem, "fellowship, community of relations or feelings." I like that. A community of common feelings. Salmon Arm, like all communities - has its deep philosophical and political divisions. But somehow despite these, there is a remarkably high level of shared engagement, caring and commitment - a community of common feelings - I have rarely seen elsewhere. While walking a while ago, I exchanged greetings with a woman sharing the path. "Aren't we luck to have such wonderful trails?" she asked. I nodded, smiled and went on, but as I thought about the woman's comment, I realized she was wrong. It wasn't luck we had the trail. It was vision and lots of hard work. Dozens of people had lobbied at the political level, as well as wielded shovels and mattocks to build the trail itself. And it is these people that make Salmon Arm special. We have a long history of self-reliance, cooperation and stubbornness, traits often seen in agricultural communities. It has resulted in a tradition of volunteerism and community responsibility. Maybe it's this tradition that keeps us from becoming just another cookie-cutter town. Or maybe we're just cantankerous. Either way, keep your eye on Salmon Arm. We've got something good going up here.

Don Sawyer is a writer, educator and former director of Okanagan College's International Development Centre. He lives with his wife in Salmon Arm. You can contact Don Sawyer by email at donsawyer@telus.net or by mail at Don Sawyer c/o North of 50, Box 100, Armstrong, BC V0E 1B0. For more information on Don' writing and development work, visit his web site at www.northerned.com.

Calvin White

Don Sawyer

FAIR COMMENT

NORTH of 50 July 09

What Does Tibet Deserve From Us?

For the past five years I've taken school groups to the Czech Republic. While there we spend a day at Terezin, the small town north of Prague which served as a Jewish ghetto town during World War 2. Tens of thousands died there in terrible conditions while awaiting transit to the death camps. But Terezin was more than an internment centre to expedite Hitler's Final Solution. It was also used as a propaganda tool to convince the world, through the International Red Cross, that the Nazis' treatment of the Jews was benign and misunderstood. In preparation for an inspection by the Red Cross, Terezin was rigged up to look like a pleasant, spa town created for Jews. A bogus town council was set up, money printed, phoney shops set up replete with goods previously confiscated by the Jewish prisoners, and play-grounds, sports competitions and other trappings organized to con the Red Cross team of inspectors. Evidently it worked, as they later wrote positive reports about Terezin. The lice, disease, vermin, over-crowded conditions, vicious police measures, and oppressive captivity somehow escaped their purview. Flash forward sixty-seven years and the same deceptive propaganda techniques seem to find favour with the Chinese government in the treatment of Tibetans. This is not to accuse China of the same style or degree of evil embodied by the Nazis. But last March, when a coterie of international journalists was ushered to Lhasa to observe how orderly, progressive, and peaceful life there is in the wake of widespread demonstrations and consequent suppression, the hope was that the manipulation of reality would be convincing. Unfortunately for the Chinese, some brave Tibetan monks were prepared to sacrifice their future by cracking the gloss and exposing the ruse. Because of that courage and risk, the journalists were forced to formally report on a reality contrary to what China hoped would be presented. It's human nature to want to believe in good and to want to avoid emotionally unsettling situations. Since 1959 when the Chinese government decided to militarily exert full control over Tibet, the world has chosen to downplay the oppression. Political arguments about sovereignty have been used to distract us and shift focus from the ground reality in which a people have had their centuries old religion and culture systematically attacked. The desire to do business and make money has weighed more than the moral responsibility to condemn the forceful repression of the Tibetan people and the imprisonments and deaths that have been perpetrated against all opposition for almost fifty years. For many years, China has allowed tourists into Tibet for a controlled holiday. There has been no lack of willing customers. Cultural genocide is too big of a mouthful to be an impediment. Thinking too much can be such a downer. And China has been given full acceptance on the world stage. The last Olympics were merely a reflection of that. The world's media have been careful to always include the official Chinese version of events. Should there be too much credence given to the lived truth of Tibetans, we'd have to ask ourselves where we've been the past fifty years. Thus, the absolutely ridiculous terminology that the Chinese government uses to describe the situation - calling the Dalai Lama a "splittist" and naming the "Dalai clique" as masterminding the chaos is reported as though it makes sense. The archaic language and thinking harkens back to the stilted vision and jargon of the fifties' Chinese Communist Party propaganda mills. During the days of the Cold War, it was normal for media reports to cover repression behind the Iron Curtain. When brave people tried to escape over the Berlin Wall and got shot, images and condemnation would flutter through the "Free World". Defectors would be given respect and acceptance, hockey stars particularly. Even today, Cuban defectors are lauded. Every year, Tibetans take their chances to escape into Nepal by crossing the high Himalayan passes. Less than three years ago, Chinese border guards shot at a group trying such an escape and killed a nun. Their version was that the border guards fired in self-defence. Luckily, independent western mountain climbers witnessed the assault and attested it was simple target practice. Isn't it time to understand the reality in Tibet in a similar way to what was happening in Terezin? None of my students could understand how our world could have been so self-interested and so dense as to allow the Holocaust and to fall for the deception at Terezin. They were emotionally shaken up after their visit. That is as it should be. They could feel the dark energy still tangible in that sorry town. They didn't think of themselves as tourists even now, so long after all the bodies have settled into dust; they saw themselves as learners and witnesses. With bodies still warm and anguish still pulsing, what does Tibet deserve from us? Calvin White is a retired high school counsellor who lives in the North Okanagan. He has had over 70 essays published in the various Canadian daily newspapers, including the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, Toronto Star, Vancouver Sun and Province. If you have any comments on this column, you can write to Calvin White at calvinwhite@northof50.com or to Calvin White, c/o North of 50, Box 100, Armstrong, BC V0E 1B0


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Thompson/Nicola/South Cariboo

Coming Events

person at the door. Concession & Beverage Garden on site. For more info call 250-378-0349.

Clinton Country Jamboree. Set amid the peaceful tranquility of Clintons Reg Conn Centennial Park, the 10th Annual Clinton Country Jamboree is a feast for the senses. Hosted once again by Legendary Cowboy Poet Mike Puhallo Saturday, August 15 from 8am to 9pm. Your free admission provides a full day of celebrating western heritage. Bring your lawn chairs and stay all day to enjoy live music, cowboy poetry, demonstrations, open market, beer garden, meals, prizes and much more! For more information contact Robin Fennell, Chairperson at (250) 4592284.

The Annual Sturgeon Derby is fishing and fun all rolled up in one at Various River Locations Lillooet, BC! Jul 25th. Great Prizes and post derby BBQ and Celebration at the Reynolds Hotel on the Patio! Entrance fee $70.00. For more info contact Steve at 250-256-4848.

Free informative Tours of Thompson Rivers University Gardens are offered very Wednesday evening, 6:00pm to 7:30 through July and August. Guides are Volunteers from TRU's "Friends of the Gardens" and are ready to answer your questions about the plant you see.. Topics vary weekly and each tour is unique. Prepare for an easy walk and dress for the weather. lMeet at TRU Horticulture, House 10, far West end of campus. Free parking nearby in Lot N. Call 1-250-828-5181 for more information. Lillooet Apricot & Tsaqwen Festival Friday July 24 @ 9:00Am - Sunday July 29 @ 9:00PM Celebrating the apricot & the Tsaqwen Saskatoon Berry. Live music, great food & more. Contact Information: 250256-4308 Everyone is invited to come out for 'Hot July Nights' in the South Cariboo, downtown 100 Mile House, Friday July 10. Building on last year's successful relaunch of the 100 Mile House Show n Shine, there will be even more shiny chrome on display over our three-day event. Starting Friday afternoon with another 'Cruzin the Dub' gathering at the local A & W and ending Sunday afternoon with the windup of the traditional Show n Shine competition, there will be lots happening for participants and spectators alike. Highlights include a two-day Swap Meet, cruises, and dancing the night away to Bobby B & the Beaumont's! For more information, or to pre-register for this great event, please visit hotjulynights.ca. Starting July 3, 2009 to Sept 5, 2009 the Spirit of Kamloops runs every Saturday and Sunday at 11:00 am and every Friday, Saturday and Monday at 7:00 pm Full schedule and more information, tickets visit www.kamrail.com or phone 250-374-2141 The 17th Annual Merritt Mountain Music Festival July 9th to July 12th is the largest outdoor Country Music Festival in Canada. The Merritt Mountain Music Festival 2009 proudly presents: Paul Brandt, George Canyon, Kenny Chesney, Steve Miller Band, Emerson Drive, Pam Tillis, Jaydee Bixby, Ridley Bent And many more stars and soon to be stars!! Up and Coming stars will be performing on the Little Big Stage and in the Pump House Saloon. Camping on site - new Beach for Fun. Bus service from the grounds to town available. For more info call 604-525-3330. 30 Bulls - 30 Riders Only 8 Seconds Nicola Valley Memorial Arena Merritt, Jul 10th, 2009 to Jul 11th, 2009 5:30PM to 3:00PM Witness Pro Rodeo Action at this weekends great Bullfest. $15 per

Cambie Farm Theatre’s Third Annual Outdoor Summer Production August 6-10 "Don’t Count Your Chickens Until They Cry Wolf" by Carol Lynn Wright Pearson is a fast-paced, mad cap Musical based on Aesop's fables for children of all ages and adults young at heart. This play includes all of your favourites; the tortoise and the hare, the lion and the mouse, the boy who cried wolf, and many more. Cambie Farm Theatre is situatied 9 km E of Sicamous, surrounded by spectacular mountains, forest and fields. All plays take place outdoors with avenue-style seating for the audience, which is often nose-to-nose with the actors. Thursday through Sunday, August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Tickets are $12.00 for adults, $7.00 for students, and children under 6 are free. For info and reservations call 250-836-2763 or cambiefarmtheatre@jetstream.net . Tickets are available at True Value in Sicamous and Wearabouts in Salmon Arm. The Little Britches Rodeo July 25 at Logan Lake Ranch and Country Club. 9:00Am to 5:00PM. The Little Britches Rodeo consists of youth competitors in Junior and Senior divisions. Junior boys compete in racing, stake, goat tail tying and steer riding. Junior girls compete in pole bending, barrel racing, and goat tail tying. Senior Boys compete in the stake race, calf tying, breakaways roping, undecorating, and cow riding. Senior Girls compete in pole bending, goat tying, breakaway and dobbing. Pancake Breakfast at 7 am for $5/person - concessions are available on the grounds. Admission to this year's rodeo is by Donation! For more info contact Sabrina Caniball at 250-523-6716. Switzmalph Cultural Day & Pow-Wow on July 20. 1 pm - 7 pm - First Nations pow-wow, archery, atlatl, stick games, hand drum contest, village tours, storytelling, native theatre, live entertainment and concessions. Phone for further details. Switzmalph Cultural Centre, 1st Ave SW 250-803-0395 www.shuswapcentre.org JOBS: Western Canada Theatre requires a Technical Director to begin August 24, 2009. This is a full-time salaried position with benefits on a 10 month contract; during July and August, maintenance is scheduled in both venues and work is on an on-call basis. Western Canada Theatre is also looking for a Technician to start August 24, 2009. More info and job descriptions are available on the website www.westerncanadatheatre.bc.ca

NORTH of 50 July 09 Sun Peaks and Region Farmer s Market Sustaining the local economy is even more important this summer and visitors and residents at Sun Peaks Resort will once again be supporting local farmers, ranchers and artisans. The award winning Sun Peaks & Region Farmers Market is returning for a 4th season and will be set up in the heart of the Sun Peaks Village on Sunday, June 28 from 10am to 2pm and will continue every Sunday all summer. The Farmers’ Market at Sun Peaks had a record breaking season in 2008, with an average of 16 vendors each week and close to 20 during the BC150 Feastival Celebration during the August long weekend. The Sun Peaks Market was awarded the Best Small Market from the BC150 Farmers’ Market awards for its continued efforts to promote sustainable agriculture in the region. Local vendors are extremely pleased with how the Sun Peaks Market has grown and say they are hoping people will continue to recognize the value of supporting local producers. “The money you spend at my booth, I spend at the grocery store or the farmers market or the gas station,” says Kelsey Kashaluba of Fisherman’s Catch. “It’s a great big circle.” The Sun Peaks Farmers’ Market will continue be an integral part of the community this summer. The Village will be alive with buskers and entertainment, creating a unique ambiance for customers while they shop for fresh fruits, organic vegetables, meats, seafood and crafts from local artisans. Come up for the market and stay for the day in the natural mountain environment surrounding Sun Peaks. Ride the chairlift and hike in the alpine, go mountain biking, horseback riding or canoe at McGillivray Lake. The Sun Peaks & Region Farmers’ Market will take place every Sunday this summer from 10am to 2pm.

AUTHOR’S SHOWCASE AND TRADE FAIR The Kamloops Arts Council and Partners in Publishing are looking for authors to participate in their Author's Showcase and Trade Fair. This is an opportunity for authors to network and liaise with other authors, publishers, editors, illustrators, and others from "the biz". Authors may also promote and sell their work (15% commission to the KAC on all sales). If you are interested or have questions, please contact the Kamloops Arts Council at 250-372-7323 or info@kamloopsarts.ca


NORTH of 50 July 09

Community Events 100 MILE HOUSE 100 MILE - Diabetes drop-in is held every Tuesday from 1-2 p.m. at the South Cariboo Community Health Centre. Speak with the nurse or dietitian. Everyone welcome. For information phone 395-7676. Farmers Market and Craft Fair. Loon Bay Resort, Sheridan Lake. Runs Saturdays, 10 am to 3 pm May Long Weekend through Labour day. Call 250-593-2353 for more information. 100 Mile Legion AllVeterans get-togethers are held Saturdays at 2 p.m. at the legion. Meat draws at 3 p.m. For more information call 395-2511. Creekside Seniors Centre offers activities for seniors such as pool, darts, bridge, whist, cribbage and carpet bowling. For more information call (250)3953919. 108 Newcomers Group. First and third Thursday of every month at 10:30 am in the Community Centre upstairs room. Meet other newcomers

over a cup of coffee in an informal setting. Drop-in fee: $2. Caroline 791-9250.

ASHCROFT Visit the Aschroft Farmers Market, Saturdays 8 am - 2 pm. 4th Ave, Between Railway & Brink. For info call (250) 453-9235.

BARRIERE The Barriere & District Heritage Society will be having their 5th Annual Quilt Show from July 25 to August 8, 2009 At the North Thompson Museum – 343 Lilley Road, Barriere, BC. Open – Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 5pm. One day only – 25th Anniversary Tea – Saturday, July 25, 2009 Please contact Shirley Wittner at 250-672-5916 for more information. Barriere Survivors meet 2nd Monday of the Month 10:30 am to 12:30 @ Volunteer Centre. Anyone who has suffered a Brain Injury Ph. Kamloops Brain Injury Assoc (250) 3721799 ask for John for info. Alzheimers/Dementia Support Group 1st Thursday of each month

from 10:00a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Volunteer Centre on Barriere Town Rd. Phone 250-377-8200 or 1800-886-6946.

KAMLOOPS The newly formed Kamloops Garden Railway Club is looking for donations of large-scale track, buildings & rolling stock for a permanent "G" scale layout at The Kamloops Wildlife Park. Tax reciepts will be issued. To donate or for more information on our organization ~ call Hans @ 250-828-1418. Breast cancer support group meet the second Saturday of the month at Lansdown Village, lower level, 111-450 Lansdowne St., from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Call 250-374-9188. WonderCafe Soup Kitchen at Mt. Paul

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Thompson/Nicola/South Cariboo

Kamloops Ostomy Support Group meets at 7 pm on first Thursday of month at Medichair, boardroom. 210-450 Landsdowne Street, contact for info: Ken at 250-819-0315 or Evelyn at 250-828-6647. Pottery classes for the Fab 55+. Discover or rediscover the great feeling of creating in clay- Hand building, sculpture, coils or slabs. Held every Tuesday from 1-3:30PM at Heritage House pottery studio in Riverside Park. $5 for non members $3 for members. Free clay is available for small projects and fee covers firing, glazing and use of tools. For more information contact Diane Britt at 5732604 or 377-8793. Kamloops Garden Club Meets every 4 th Wed. of the month in Heritage House at 7:00 pm. Jeanette Moslin (250) 3729669. The Wells Gray Country Seniors Society meet the first Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at the Resource Centre; Third Sunday Seniors Social at 1p.m. in the Munroe Room at Wells Gray Inn; Seniors Book Club meet on the fourth Thursday of each month in the Clearwater library. Contact Lois G e i g e r , lgeiger@mercuryspeed.co m. The Kamloops Raging Grannies is a non-partisan group of women who use humor to actively raise the consciousness of citizens through peaceful means to promote positive change within our communities. More info 372-3105. Tuesday afternoon cribage at the McArthur park lawn Bowling Clubhouse (beside NorBroc Stadium) at 1:30 p.m. Everyone welcome. No partners needed. Crib, coffee and good company. Call 250-579-0028. Are you a breast cancer survivor looking for fun, fitness and friendship? The Spirit Warrior dragon boat team is a great group

of women who meet Tuesdays & Thursdays at 6pm at Pioneer Park in Kamloops. We are looking for more members, no experience required! Call Liama at 377-8514 or Dell at 320-1765 or e-mail spiritwarriors@shaw.ca. Bridge at Desert Gardens Community Centre, every Tuesday, at 12:30 p.m. 540 Seymour Street. For info call (250) 3725110. The Kamloops Family History Society meets every fourth Thursday throughout the year Sept May. We meet at the Heritage House from 7:00 - 9:00 pm. To all bridge players: We welcome new players to our 12:30p.m. Tuesday gatherings at Desert Gardens Community Centre on Seymour Street. If you know the fundaments of the game, you can learn as you go. Call Dave, 250-374-4963, or Peg, 250-376-0250 The Alzheimer Society of BC, Central Interior, 543 Battle St. Kamloops, offers programs and services for people whose lives are affected by Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia. Programs and services include education workshops and information and support groups for family caregivers and for people diagnosed with early dementia. Call 250377-8200 or 1-800-8666946. Interior Authors Group, a group that brings people together who are interested in the art of writing, meets the second Wednesday of the month at the Kamloops Art Gallery, 465 Victoria St., at 7p.m. Call Ted Joslin, 250-374-8910. Dance to the music of the Kamloops Old Time Fiddlers the first and third Saturday of the month from 8 to 11 p.m. at Heritage House. Everyone welcome. Members $6, non-members $7. Call 250-376-2330. Join a fun men’s and women’s a cappella chorus, The Hub City Singers, in rehersals every Tuesday, 7 to 9p.m., at the Old Yacht Club, 1140 River St. Members don’t have to be able to read music. Call 250-578-7503. Seniors Dance with the

Golden Serenadors every second Friday of the month at the North Shore Community Centre, 730 Cottonwood Ave. Admission $4 Call 250376-4777 PATCHS, a grassroots community-based group working to achieve positive changes in the health care system, meets the first Monday of each month at Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St., at 6:30p.m. Call Rick, 250579-8541 or email riturner@shaw.ca. Kamloops Ostomy Support Group meets at 7 pm on first Thursday of month. Contact: Ketina at 250-571-1456. (Jan mtg moved to Jan 8 due to holiday)

LILLOOET Visit the weekly Lillooet Farmers Market - Every Friday. Centrally located on Main Street, across from the Post Office. Featuring the best in local produce, meat, crafts and artisan products. Royal Canadian Legion Branch 66 737 Main Street Lillooet BC 250-256-7332 Meat draws every Friday 5 : 3 0 - 8 : 3 0 P M Members and Guests always welcome Carpet Bowling for Seniors, Mondays & Thursdays from ;30 - 11:30 am at the Gymnasium or Mezzanine at the Lillooet & District REC Centre, 930 Main Street. Drop In Fee.

LOGAN LAKE Logan Lake Seniors holds Bingo Fridays 1-3, 80 150 Opal, Village Centre Mall. Call (250) 5232759.

MERRITT Bingo Tuesdays at 1 p.m. at the Merritt Senior Centre. Rummoli and Pool Fridays at 7 p.m. 2202 Jackson Avenue. Join the Toastmasters to gain confidence! They meet every Tuesday at 5:00 pm at the Merritt Library.

SAVONA Join us for exercise Wednesday and Friday mornings at 8:45 a.m. OAPO Bfranch 129, 6605 Buie Road/Savona Access Road. Call Jennier Coburn for more info at (250) 3730081.


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Thompson/Nicola/South Cariboo

NORTH of 50 July 09

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Lifeguard Service at Riverside Park Begins Beginning Saturday, June 27 to Sunday, September 6, lifeguard service will be available at the Riverside Park beach from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm daily, weather permitting. To promote a safe river swim experience, when the "Lifeguard on Duty" sign is displayed, the City recommends swimming within the designated swim area and to keep within arm's reach of young children. Lifeguard training will be held on June 26 at Riverside Park from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm. For more information about the training please call 250-828-3754. For your information, an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) unit is located in the Riverside Lifeguard office and will be available during lifeguard on-duty hours. In the event of a medical emergency, call 911 and immediately alert the lifeguards.

A touch of Hollywood came to the South Okanagan on a hot mid-June weekend recently, at the first annual Osoyoos Celebrity Wine Festival. Leading the glitzy celebrity lineup was well-known B.C. born actor Jason Priestley, who played host for the event along with Emmy award winning producer Chad Oakes. Priestley is a co-owner in Black Hills Estate Winery, located between Oliver and Osoyoos. The winery along with Destination Osoyoos were co-sponsors of the unique opportunity for guests to mingle with television and movie stars, and enjoy area fine wines and cuisine. “There are so many exceptional wineries in the area, and this event and the media coverage we’re creating will help bring some richly deserved exposure to the great wines of the region,” explains Priestley. Priestley is best known for his 10 year stint as an actor/director on the hit show Beverley Hills 90210, and coming along to Osoyoos with him was another cast member from that show Tiffani- Amber Thiessen. Also mingling with the mainly out of town guests were seasoned movie actor Bruce Greenwood, Canadian radio personality Terry David Mulligan, Canadian Olympic Gold medal winning athlete Michelle Cameron, representing Miracle Hydrate cosmetic line, The Medium t.v. star David Cubbitt and Cameron Daddo of CSI. President of Black Hills Estate Winery and festival organizer Glenn Fawcett says proceeds from the festival totaled $45,730, and went to support several good causes, Providence Children’s Center in Calgary and the Osoyoos Child Care Centre. A banner evening was held at Osoyoos’s new Walnut Beach Resort, with wine tasting, some high stakes wine auctioning, and a stellar performance by the silky smooth voices of the internationally recognized Canadian Tenors. With a record that just went Gold in Canada and upcoming tours to Ireland, Holland and Asia, the four member group has taken the world by storm. This, however, was their first time in Osoyoos, and as member Remigio Pereira observes the town was “very hot, fantastic, it’s so beautiful though.” On the following evening, Black Hills Winery celebrated the release of its popular Nota Bene blend wine, with festival guests once again enjoying wine and food, live music, vineyard tours and barrel room tastings. Priestley and gourmet celebrity chef Ned Bell of the Food Network did their part by serving up BBQ halibut on a grill. Priestley patiently paused in his cooking duties intermittently to sign autographs, chat warmly with guests and pose for photos with fans. Priestley has that born in Canada, down to earth personality, grew up on hockey and fishing persona that has never left him despite his Hollywood fame. He also has an obvious sense of humour. North of 50 chimed in with a few questions for Priestley, and inquired about whether or not he cooked at home in Beverly Hills. “Yes, I do, all the time. Every day,” he answers smoothly. “Every day?” we persist. “Every day,” he assures us. “What is your specialty?” we wonder. “Everything is my specialty. I love to cook,” he replies. We take him at his word about the cooking, and pursue another line of enquiry, his interest in the sport he grew up with in Canada, that of hockey. Priestley said he does indeed still play hockey, in L.A., and points out that he is, after all, Canadian. Didn’t he become an American citizen? “ I have duel citizenship,” he says. “I would never give up my Canadian citizenship. I’m a Canadian. I just happen to have more than one passport now.” Priestley adds jokingly, “It’s all the rage these days. All the kids are doing it.” Meanwhile, Priestley says that he and his wife Naomi are awaiting a special addition in their family life, the arrival of a second child. And with his customary humour, “I do have another baby on the way, yeah. Coming soon to a theatre near you.” Priestley’s counterpart on 90210, Tiffani Amber Thiessen, also travelled from L.A. to Osoyoos to appear at the wine fest, and she added a gracious presence that comes from a lifetime in the public eye. “I was invited by my dear friend Jason Priestley,” says Thiessen. Born and raised in southern California, Thiessen has been a working t.v. and film actress ever since the age of 15 when she joined the t.v. show Saved by the Bell. She has a new show entitled White Collar coming out in August on the USA Network. She says she has spent a lot of time in Vancouver and loves it there, but has never been to the South Okanagan until now. She is well acquainted with two elements in this weekend festival, fine wines and charity causes. “Especially being from California, we have wonderful wines,” she says, noting that Osoyoos is not that far really from her home state, “so I can imagine that it’s got wonderful wine.” Like many successful celebrities, she believes in giving back to others. “I run a cancer clinic for kids out in Idaho which I do,” she says, with a trip planned there as soon as she returns from this event. The cause of the fight against cancer became personal for her in her own family. “My grandmother con’td on page 11 passed away on my dad’s side, but I think cancer touches everybody,” she says. “I think


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everybody has a story, and anything that involves kids, and if I can put a smile on a kid’s face I feel like I’m in heaven.” Familiar actor Bruce Greenwood also mixed with the guests, “and I’m just here for the charity really,” he comments. Greenwood has appeared in numerous movies over the years, most recently as Captain Pike in the new Star Trek movie. A busy actor, he has a movie coming out in October entitled Mao’s Last Dancer, which he says is “about a ballet dancer based on the book by the same name.” And for a complete change of pace, he adds he will probably be doing a western in the “deserts” of Oregon in the fall. Global t.v. show Entertainment Tonight was at the festival to capture all of the excitement, and planned to tour other areas of the South Okanagan to broadcast a special week of coverage. Radio host and wine connoisseur Terry David Mulligan also planned to feature it on his radio show and on his website www.tastingroomradio.com. “It’s a great way to dialogue with the audience and industry,” he says about this inaugural festival. He gives kudos to the celebrities who gave up their time and attended it, noting “it was Jason and Chad that got the ball rolling. “It was great to see all the wineries supporting the event,” he comments. Mulligan sees the festival becoming an annual attraction, adding, “It can only get better and better,” and proclaims it “a solid charity event.”


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NORTH of 50 July 09


NORTH of 50 July 09

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The 500-mile strip that defines the lower corner of Alaska has many names including the Panhandle, the Inside Passage and Southeast Alaska. It consists of a long net of remote islands, fjords and waterways lacing together Ketchikan and Prince of Wales Island to the south, with Haines and Skagway to the north. The region is an endlessly fascinating network of marine mammal habitat, bird rookeries, rich oldgrowth forests, glaciers , tiny ancient fishing villages and modern towns. This splendor prompted 19th century naturalist John Muir to declare his trip through Southeast waters "pure wildness." The network of waterways, called the Inside Passage, is integral to life in the region. Every Southeast community is connected by this marine highway, and many residents know the region from top to bottom. Alan Chaffen grew up in Haines, the northern terminus of the Alaska Marine Highway system, riding the ferries that ply those waters. Now the manager at the ferry terminal in Petersburg, located at the southern half of the passage, he recommends the

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Some 70,000 people live along the Inside Passage. Among the residents is a large Alaskan Native population of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian Indians. Southeast's seaside communities offer a glimpse into

NORTH of 50 July 09

Home life in both urban and rural Alaska. You can explore the shops, restaurants and museums in Juneau, the state capital, or wander among charming older homes weathered by saltwater and sea winds in smaller communities like Petersburg and Sitka. The question is, which sort of watercraft is best for exploring Alaska's Panhandle? If you want to recall the days of the 19th century Klondike Gold Rush, when steamships carried passengers to the land of adventure and wealth, take a cruiseship. This option allows travelers to combine the luxuries of a hotel with the adventure of a trip through America's most spectacular wilderness. Cruiseships range in size and luxury, from megaliners to small ships and formal to casual atmospheres. Or maybe you're more of an independent traveler. You can jump a ferry at Bellingham, Washington and ride the Alaska Marine Highway, sleeping in recliners on the deck or in berths onboard and others nights in bed-and-breakfasts in the towns and villages along the way. Ferry stops along the Inside Passage route begin in the south, with Ketchikan, Wrangell and Petersburg. Sitka, Juneau, Skagway and Haines comprise the northern section of the trip. A car or camper can be easily loaded onto the ferry, expanding independent travel options even further. For the truly adventurous, consider loading a sea kayak onto the ferry and designing a trip that allows time to explore the silent coves and tiny islands that pepper thousands of miles of the pristine coastal water. Sea kayaks are easily checked onto ferry vessels, or can be rented in most Southeast towns and villages along the route. Many tour operators offer fully-guided sea kayaking trips for all ages and skill levels that range from one day to one week and include gear and support services such as camp set-


and A way

NORTH of 50 July 09

ALASKA

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CONT’D from pg 14

up and meal preparation.There is no greater scenic advantage than the perspective offered from sitting behind the paddle of a sea kayak. These narrow, sleek boats can access secluded harbors and hidden estuaries too small for larger vessels. If you prefer a trip that combines ambiance without the crowds of a cruise, hop aboard a yacht. Often owned by local Alaskans, small yachts offer the luxury of a commercial cruiseship and the intimacy and flexibility of exploring from a private boat. Larger yachts can accommodate 12 guests in six private staterooms and offer fishing, kayaking, hiking and wildlife viewing from the boat and onshore. Many larger yacht charters have on-board naturalists and itineraries can be customized to fit any schedule or interest. For an Alaska Inside Passage Travel Planner, call 800-4230568. For information on the Alaska Marine Highway System, call 800-642-0066. For Alaska Visitor Information write to: Dept. 712, P. O. Box 196710, Anchorage, AK 99519-6710, call 800 862-5275 or visit the web site http://apr.travelalaska.com

2009 GOLD RUSH EVENT Gold Country Communities Society is pleased to announce the inaugural event of their pilot GeoTourism Program. Marking the public launch of the ongoing Gold Country GeoTourism Program, these events offer participants a preview of this ground-breaking Program. The first of its kind in British Columbia, the GeoTourism Program will also be available online and in Gold Country Information Centers following the local events. Visit a community of your choice, enjoy a morning of fun, family activities and then race for fabulous First-To-Find prizes! "It is very exciting to see international interest for an event in our region," says GeoTourism Director Tanya Wong. "We have participants registered from as far away as the Netherlands and emails come in every day." Come relive the Gold Rush with a modern day treasure hunt on July 4th! All the fun of a geocaching event, with an added tourism twist; discover tales of our pioneers, unearth geological wonders or reveal magnificent sites of beauty. Visit sites throughout the region, collect stickers and win great prizes! Newly returned board chair Ida Makaro shares, "We will be working hard to ensure that all of our member municipalities and regional areas benefit from this program and in turn, encourage their excitement and participation with us. The Gold Country GeoTourism Program offers a great economic opportunity." Simultaneous launch events will be occurring in Cache Creek, Clinton, Lillooet, Logan Lake, Lytton and Merritt. Choose a location, dust off your hiking shoes and grab a few friends for a day of adventure and fun. This event features G.P.S. use tips, geocaching basics, chances to win unique collector coins, promotional items and FREE cake! Those who pre-register by July 2nd for the event will receive a complimentary 'goodie' bag. 9:30 am - Registration - Meet & Greet 10:15 am - Cake Cutting Ceremony 11:00 am - Shot Gun Start 1:00 pm - Wrap up For more information on the Geotourism program visit www.goldtrail.com, for other Gold Country initiatives please visit www.exploregoldcountry.com, or contact the office during business hours

Be a Tourist in Your Own Province this summer Northern BC offers up the Great Bear Rainforest Eco-Challenge Sustainability is more than a buzz word in British Columbia, where everyone from the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games to the most remote ecolodge is striving to keep things green. One to watch is the King Pacific Lodge in the Great Bear Rainforest, in Gitga'at territory on BC’s central coast. Set in one of the most ecologically and culturally sensitive parts of the province, the lodge is a leader in sustainable initiatives, from its close cooperation with the local First Nations community to its carbon neutral vacation packages. And now the latest: The Great Bear Rainforest Eco-Challenge. As part of a “giveback getaway" available throughout the 2009 season, guests are set a series of challenges, all designed to help them gain a deeper understanding of the culture and ecosystem of the area; success earns donations in the guest’s name to local community and conservation groups. And the ecochallengers really have to earn their donations. Tackling a five-mile open water kayak trip or mastering vocabulary in the Sm'algyax language will, for example, earn a $100 donation to the local Hartley Bay School. Participants may also try capturing four marine or land mammals on film, releasing three salmon caught on self-tied flies, photographing two of the three bear species living in the area, or climbing a nearby mountain and snapping shots of edible plant species to prove they’ve been there. Any one challenge will earn a donation to the school, to the North Coast Cetacean Society, or to the Gitga'at Cultural Centre; completing all seven tasks will earn a $1,000 donation to the Hartley Bay School. It’s not entirely altruistic: three challenges will win a luxurious spa treatment. A well-deserved eco-challenge win. www.kingpacificlodge.com Get Artsy this August Get artsy at the 8th Annual BC Cultural Crawl. This celebration of art and culture kicks off on BC Day. From August 1 to 31 a diverse mix of artists and business owners in throughout each region BC will host a “Crawl” which includes many communityinitiated events: musical, theatrical and dance performances, visual arts displays, festivals, museum and heritage exhibitions, culinary and winery experiences, art-walks, and more. Every community has its own unique cultural footprint. View seaside creations of the Sunshine Coast or chat with awardwinning artists and enjoy a good belly laugh at Abbotsford’s hilarious dinner theatre. The BC Cultural Crawl will lead you to a unique cultural experience in a distant town, or right in your backyard. For more information visit www.art-bc.com. Tobiano Wins Big Unquestionably, one of the most coveted awards a Canadian golf course can receive is Golf Digest’s “Best New Canadian Course” honour. After all, the list of recipients of this prestigious award is packed with heavy-hitters: The Links at Crowbush Cove on Prince Edward Island, Ontario favourite Devil’s Pulpit, and British Columbia’s own Greywolf Golf Course have all received the nod and continue to draw rave reviews. Now you can chalk up another win for a great new BC

course: in 2008, the awe-inspiring Tobiano took the crown. Soaring high above the shores of Kamloops Lake, Tobiano simply wows. But, just to prove the award wasn’t a fluke, later in the year, SCOREGolf Magazine, Canada’s leading voice in the golf world, also gave Tobiano the “Best New Course in Canada” title. Our recommendation is this: if you’ve never played it, get thee there. www.tobianogolf.com Speak with Loons, Sample the Plants on Vancouver Island If immersing yourself in nature proves to be, well, natural, then discover a wilderness treasure or two with the Qualicum Beach-based adventure crew from Coastal Revelations. Indeed, with this team at the helm, guided eco-hikes and walking tours through Vancouver Island are sure to unearth more than a few finds. Summon the salty fragrance of the sea and learn more about the bizarre and fascinating aquatic life just below the water’s surface; look waaaay up for a full view of the giants of the forest in Cathedral Grove - 800-year-old Douglas Fir, and Western Red Cedar that rival skycrapers from cosmopolitan hubs; check out the birthplace of legendary BC salmon or learn to identify a bird’s song while photographing the Island’s 200-plus species. Should this prove too sedate, take to the trails for an Edible Plant Walk where berries, tangy needles, candy roots and fragrant mushrooms tantalize. Or kick it up a notch with Die Another Day – Wilderness Survival Play, a half-day bit of exploration that blends treasure hunt games, edible wild food, fire building skills and coaching on how to construct a shelter from scratch. With two-hour to full-day outings – not to mention a diverse setting that boasts ancient rainforests, seaside scapes and mountainous heights – adventures are sure to prove a welcome revelation. www.coastalrevelations.com

Advertise your Business on the Travel Page Call Dean or Emily at

1-877-667-8450 for details


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Paul Crawford - Outside the Frame Penticton Art Gallery's Director/Curator, Paul Crawford, thinks outside the box - or in this instance, outside the frame. With a mind like quicksilver and speech to match, he fires others with his enthusiasm to explore avenues not previously dreamt possible. For instance, the gallery's latest exhibit which opens on Saturday, July 18, will explore the art and culture that surrounds skateboarding. Outside the gallery, Crawford will install 8ft square panels and invite Penticton's youth, including some graffiti artists, to cover them with a multitude of different art forms. He aims to recognize and validate the contributions of marginalized young people, to show respect for their talents and give them an opportunity to express themselves legitimately. In Crawford's opinion, taking such risks is necessary in order to make connections between art objects and the culture from which they derive. "It's all about engaging the public and breaking down the preconceived notion of what art is," he explains, "Not to deify it or wrap it in mystery." Crawford partners within the community, using music, theatre, literature ... and graffiti, to make art accessible to the widest possible audience. He never knows the outcome, but so far it has always been positive. Three years ago, when he installed an exhibition of several leading Tibetan painters' work at the Penticton Gallery, he linked the exhibit with the lifestyle in Tibet by inviting eleven Tibetan monks to create a sand mandala. (He accommodated them at his home which he vacated for the duration of their stay.) People still speak of their experiences interacting with the monks as life-changing. So what influenced Crawford's philosophy, particularly in regard to his outreach to the younger generation, which he deems essential if galleries are to keep their doors open? He gives several examples of the way art impacted his early life, although he came from a household with no interest in the subject. As a boy, his parents would drop him off at their local library in West Vancouver to amuse himself for the afternoon. It was a glorious building and he loved to explore the multiple levels and sunken rooms within its expansive open floor plan. One day he came across a small landscape painting in a back hallway. Next to it, on a piece of paper of equal size, was the story behind the painting. He was impressed that this story was given the same value, from a visual standpoint, as the painting itself. (It transpired that the painting and story were Emily Carr's.)

NORTH of 50 July 09 story & photos by Christine Pilgrim

And he encourages others to follow his example. In his experience, most are accessible, gracious, generous and willing to share anecdotes, knowledge and ideas. His personal art collection, which has been exhibited throughout British Columbia and stems from that $5 Karsh photograph, is as extensive and breath-taking as his knowledge of the background to each piece. Barely forty, he humbly ascribes his curating success to his uncanny knack of being able to draw upon the countless pieces of trivia he has stored in his brain in order to interpret exhibits. He loves to see how the threads intercept his own existence and cultural history. For example, when Murray Adaskin gave a first hand account of what it was like to sit down to tea with Emily Carr, he felt an instant connection with the Group of Seven. While others more qualified might have been appointed to direct and curate the Grand Forks Art Gallery, which he put firmly on the map several years ago, and the Penticton Art Gallery which currently thrives under his direction, it's Paul Crawford's eclectic knowledge and dauntless courage, coupled with his ability to work collaboratively, that Boards and Trustees appreciate. Whether writing, publishing or curating, he enjoys running with the flame of an idea and once it flares, passing it on to others. He is adamant that he should be dispensable. Not that he abandons projects - far from it! He frequently returns to Wells, near Barkerville, where he and actor Charles Ross started the One Minute Play Festival, now in its tenth year, and he was present at the June opening of the new gallery building in Grand Forks, an enterprise he instigated back in 2002. He remembers when, three years ago, he relocated Penticton's then 29th Annual Art Auction from its traditional home and, in a collective effort, almost doubled its income. This year's 32nd Annual Art Auction and Dinner - Starry, Starry Night on Saturday, July 4th, will extend from the gallery into the exquisite Japanese Gardens and Okanagan Lake Park adjacent. The auction will be presided over by Doug Levis from Levis Fine Arts in Calgary. Dinner in the Japanese Gardens will be catered by the Black Iron Grill, with music by the Rob Dewar Trio. "Music is an ideal catalyst. It's so universal," says Crawford. The monthly concert series he introduced in the gallery tea rooms is "sound proof" of that! For complete details of the Penticton Art Gallery schedule call 250-493-2928. As for Paul Crawford's schedule ... look somewhere outside the frame!

Then, in Grade 6, impressionist Daniel Izzard amazed the twelve-year-old when he skillfully completed a painting of mountains overlooking a lake in a 45-minute class demonstration. In Grade 11, when he took a Western Civilization course, the teacher brought in an object from whatever time period the class studied, thus making tangible connections and more palpable, interesting lessons. As a self-confessed "failed" university student (although he nonetheless boasts a degree in Art History), Crawford was browsing through a thrift store when he came across an old photograph for $5. It was signed by Yousuf Karsh. Thinking that his find might be valuable, he wrote to Karsh to get the story behind the photograph. Karsh, wrote back, enclosing a signed photo of himself. If a renowned Canadian photographer like Yousuf Karsh would respond to a young man's questions, then how approachable might other artists be? Crawford soon found out. As a result, he now enjoys a close friendship with poet P. K. Page and has been on regular speaking terms with artists like Jack Shadbolt, TV journalists like Pierre Burton and composers like Murray Adaskin. The permanent collection exhibition space at the Penticton Gallery was re-named after another friend, famed watercolourist Toni Onley. Crawford hastily points out that he speaks to famous artists because he is curious, not star-struck.

Paul Crawford, curator at the Penticton Art Gallery believes it’s important to engage the public and breakdown preconceived ideas of what is art. Photo: Christine Pilgrim


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Personal Experience PRINCETON'S TRADITIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL Life in Princeton is mostly slow and sleepy. There are no traffic lights and rush hour consists of two cars in front of you waiting to cross the one-lane bridge over the Tulameen. By six o'clock the streets are quiet. But if you had been in Princeton on August 16th and 17th last year you would have experienced streets crowded with smiling people and heard bagpipes, fiddle music, cowboy songs or loggers' poetry wafting through the air. The town square would have been filled with people in strange costumes and blackened faces dancing to button accordion music. This was the First Annual Princeton Traditional Music Festival. Two years ago my husband, Jon Bartlett, and I moved to Princeton. I had just retired from almost 25 years of teaching elementary school in Surrey and Jon was a retired teacher and researcher. We were tired of the urban rat race and the rain and chose Princeton because of its climate, its history and its easy access to the coast. On June 30, 2007, the day after I retired and the day after we moved to Princeton, the town was in the throes of its "Sounds of Our Heritage" Festival, a three-day event that included a Canada Day parade, horse races, and dance. Jon and I organized the music for one of the stages and had so much fun that we wanted to do it again. We formed the Princeton Traditional Music Society and the Society, with tremendous support from the local community, began to organize for the following year the First Annual Princeton Traditional Music Festival. We beat the bushes for local talent and invited musician friends from the coast. The final result was a two-day free festival held Quicksbottom Morris from Victoria dancing at last year's festival. Photo supplied on two stages in downtown Princeton. Nearly one hundred performers donated their talents in the form of Celtic music, bagpipes, logging, mining and cowboy songs, cowboy poetry, accordion music and traditional ballads. Performers came from the local area, the coast, Vancouver Island, and we even had a band from San Francisco. The weekend was non-stop music from Friday afternoon until Sunday evening. It exceeded our wildest expectations. The musical party on Saturday evening had bluegrass in our front yard, accordion tunes on the porch, Celtic music in the back yard, singing in the living room, singing on the museum steps across the street, more singing in the local park and still more in the town square down the block. We were in musical heaven! Plans are already afoot for this year's Princeton Traditional Music Festival to be held on August 21st to 23rd. We begin with a participatory street dance on Friday evening followed by music from 10 am until 6 pm on two stages Saturday and Sunday. Once again the Festival happens right in town and admission is free. Our experience with the Festival has shown us that the kinds of things we like to do and believe in are much easier to pursue in a small community. Another project that has come to fruition, thanks to Princeton, is the production of a CD of local songs and poems. Jon and I have been collectors and singers of Canadian songs for decades. Our passion is the songs of BC and the history that goes with them. Jon worked for years with the late Phil Thomas on his collection of BC songs, and was editor of Phil's book, Songs of the Pacific Northwest, a seminal work combining songs and history in an unprecedented way. During visits to Princeton over the past five years we spent much time in the Princeton Archives, and in newspapers dating back to 1900 we found a wealth of song and poetry. With the help of the archivist as well as financial support from the Princeton Arts Council, BC 150 and the Princeton and District Community Forest Corporation we produced a CD called "Now It's Called Princeton: Songs and Poems from BC's Upper Similkameen". The CD contains 27 songs and poems found in the newspapers and is accompanied by a 24-page booklet with historical background and photos. All proceeds from CD sales go to support the Princeton Museum and the Princeton Traditional Music Festival. Princeton is one of the oldest communities in BC and next year it will celebrate its 150th birthday. In honour of the occasion the Princeton Traditional Music Society will be producing a book, tentatively called The Wit and Wisdom of Princeton. The book will contain the many songs and poems that didn't make it onto the CD. Moving to Princeton has given us a new lease on life. Being retired has given us the time and energy to pursue our passions and the opportunity to give back to our new community.

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Do you have a personal story you would like to North of 50 readers?

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We would like to invite you to submit your story for publication. A personal experience story can be about anything. It might be inspiring, funny, scary or wierd. It might be about a wonderful holiday or a travel nightmare. It might be about pursuing a lifelong passion, how you coped with a health crisis or a personal loss. It could be a love story, a ghost story, a travel story. It’s YOUR story, whatever that is. Guidelines: Stories should be between 600 and 800 words and can be on any topic, but must be your personal experience. You must include your telephone number and address. These will not be published and are for verification purposes only. Submit your story by Mail to: Personal Experience, Editor, North of 50. Box 100 Armstrong, BC V0E 1B0 or email to: editor@northof50.com or fax to: (250) 546-8914.


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H e a l t h M at t e rs

NORTH of 50 July 09

Interior Health Advises to Take Precautions Against Mosquito Bites West Nile virus has not yet arrived in BC, however, it has been found in areas adjacent to us (Alberta and Washington State.) So, Interior Health is reminding residents to take extra precautions against mosquito bites when travelling this summer. In 2008, the only human case in BC was found to be travel related. Western Canada had 19 reported human cases; 17 in Saskatchewan, 1 in Alberta and 1 in BC. The Western United States reported a combined human case count of 63 human cases in Montana, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Interior Health is continuing to collect mosquitoes for testing to detect the virus through the 2009 season, if, and when, it arrives. While West Nile virus has not yet been detected in mosquitoes or birds in BC, Washington State has reported positive mosquitoes early in the season. IH reminds residents that establishing a routine at home to reduce mosquito bites will help protect them while travelling outside of BC this summer. West Nile virus infection is a disease that primarily resides in birds, and can be spread from birds to humans by infected mosquitoes. About 20% of infected people may experience mild to severe flu-

like symptoms, and a small number of people (less than 1% of those infected) may develop a serious neurological disease. The best protection against West Nile Virus is to avoid mosquito bites, and reduce mosquito breeding areas. Here are some things you can do to protect yourself from West Nile virus: $ Use mosquito repellent - Apply mosquito repellent to areas of exposed skin. Check the product label for instructions on proper use. Repellents containing DEET are safe if the label precautions are followed. DEET-free products are available, but may not provide as long-lasting protection. $ Wear protective clothing - Avoid dark clothing, as it tends to attract mosquitoes. If you are in an area with lots of mosquitoes, wear loose fitting, full-length pants and a long-sleeved shirt to keep mosquitoes from biting. Mosquitoes that can carry WNV are most active at dusk and at dawn. Avoid using floral fragrances such as perfumes, soaps, hair care products, and lotions. $ Install mosquito screens on windows - Consider staying indoors between dusk and dawn and in the early evening.

Important Labelling Information for Iron-Containing Products Health Canada is advising Canadians to carefully read the labelling of iron supplement products as there is potential for confusion about dosage. Products currently on the Canadian market display the dose in different ways on the product label and consumers may misinterpret the amount of iron in the product and potentially take an incorrect dose. The potential for harm from consuming too much iron includes adverse effects such as constipation, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. At very high doses, iron may cause serious harm. Children may be particularly at risk for overdose. This update comes in light of Health Canada's action to update how information is presented on labels so that consumers can easily compare the iron content of different products and make informed choices with confidence. As of January 1, 2010, all products containing iron on the Canadian market will be required to have consistent labelling information with respect to daily dosage. Until January 1, 2010, it is possible that consumers may find similar products on the market that have different labelling and as such, Health Canada will continue to work with industry to ensure there is consistent labelling of iron products. In 2004, the Natural Health Products Regulations came into force requiring all natural health products, including those containing iron, to have consistent

labelling with respect to dosage information. Prior to the Regulations coming into effect, single ingredient iron products were authorized as drugs and identified the quantity of the source of the iron (iron salt) on the front label e.g., ferrous gluconate 300 mg; this may also apply to other iron salts such as ferrous sulphate or ferrous fumarate. Details about how much elemental iron this quantity of the iron salt provides (for the example above, 37.5 mg of iron) are generally found on the side or back panels of the label. A review of currently marketed products shows that the placement and arrangement of the information on the labels varies. With all authorized iron supplements currently on the market, the information necessary for the safe and appropriate use of the product is present on one or more panels of the label.Consumers should carefully read the labelling of these products and consult with their health care practitioner if they still have any questions or concerns. Health Canada would also like to remind Canadians that the maximum daily dosage for elemental iron is 45 mg per day for adults and youths between the ages 14-18 years and 40 mg per day for children between the ages of 0-13, unless a health care practitioner advises otherwise.

Survey shows Canadians well aware of melanoma skin cancer but half don’t check their skin often enough. Canadians are well aware of melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, but 1 in 2 people don't check their skin often enough, according to a recent survey conducted by Angus Reid Strategies for the Canadian Dermatology Association. Melanoma, unlike many cancers, is clearly visible on the skin. Early detection is directly linked to a very high survival rate - 90% for Canadians. However, 940 Canadians - 3 people a week - will die from melanoma this year, and 5,000 will be diagnosed with it. Melanoma is now the 8th most common cancer found in Canadians. It is one of a small number of cancers that continues to increase in incidence. The first ever "Melanoma Awareness and Attitudes Survey of Canadians" revealed that most Canadians know what melanoma is and what it looks like - a new or existing mole, freckle or spot that is changing in colour, shape or size. However, when it comes to actually checking the skin, fully 55% do not check their skin often enough. That comprises 24% who never check their skin and 31% who say they check "less often" than every couple of months. As a guide, people should check their skin for signs of skin cancer once a month or every couple of months.

SKIN CANCER cont’d on page 19

l Prevent mosquito breeding around your home Anything that can hold water is a likely mosquito breeding area. Try to identify and remove these areas on your property. A few things to do include: empty saucers under flowerpots; change water in bird baths twice a week; unclog rain gutters; drain tarps, tires, and other debris where rain water may collect; and install a pump in ornamental ponds or stock them with fish. Stagnant backyard pools can be a big source of mosquitoes and should be maintained regularly to prevent mosquito growth. The Province of BC conducts a surveillance program for West Nile virus which includes testing of dead birds in the corvid family: crows, ravens, magpies and jays. These birds are more likely than others to die from West Nile virus. It also includes trapping and testing of mosquitoes from numerous sites in the province. Interior Health traps mosquitoes at 20 sites across the Southern Interior and sends them to the provincial lab for testing. Interior Health also works with local governments in efforts to control mosquito populations and coordinate planning. The public will be notified when, and if, the first positive mosquitoes and/or birds are found in the province.

Phenobarbital Recall Health Canada is warning consumers that all lots of the prescription drug pms - Phenobarbital tablets in the 60 milligram (mg) format (DIN 00178810) are being recalled because some oversized tablets were recently found on the Canadian market. The oversized tablets were found to contain more Phenobarbital than the label indicates, exposing patients to the potential risk of accidental overdose. The Canadian distributor, Pharmascience Inc. of Montreal Quebec, has initiated a recall of all lots presently on the market. Phenobarbital is widely used as an anticonvulsant for the treatment of seizure disorders, and it is also used to treat anxiety and sleep related disorders as it has sedative and hypnotic properties. Health Canada advises consumers currently using pms -Phenobarbital 60mg to return this product to their pharmacist for a replacement. Consumers should not stop taking their medication without consulting a health care professional, as abrupt discontinuation of this medication can cause symptoms of withdrawal (such as irritability, headache, dizziness, sweating, tremors, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, weight loss or anorexia, nightmares, insomnia) and, if used to treat seizures, can result in an increase in seizures. To date, no adverse reactions from the use of pms Phenobarbital 60mg tablets have been reported to Health Canada. The oversized tablets may contain significantly more phenobarbital than the 60mg indicated on the label. Symptoms of an overdose may include uncontrolled eye movements, lack of muscle coordination, impaired speech, extreme drowsiness, decreased breathing and heart rate and may begin within 1-2 hours after taking a Phenobarbital overdose. An overdose may be life threatening and can result in a coma and/or cardiac arrest. Consumers who have used this product and are concerned about their health should contact their health care practitioner for advice. Consumers requiring more information about this advisory can contact Health Canada’s public enquiries line at (613) 957-2991, or toll free at 1-866-225-0709.


NORTH of 50 July 09 Ask the Expert: Dr. Sophie Jamal (NC)—Dr. Sophie Jamal, Director of the Osteoporosis Research and Clinical Programs at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, answers questions about osteoporosis. Question: I'm 52 years old and although I've always been a healthy person, I've heard that women over 50 are at higher risk of osteoporosis. I want to do everything I can to help make sure I don't get it – what do I need to know? Answer: Osteoporosis is often called the “silent thief” because it can cause bone loss, increasing your risk of fracture without any symptoms. Because it is silent, the key to prevention is being aware of your risk factors. If you are at risk for bone loss and fractures, there are several measures that you and your doctor can institute in order to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis, or to help prevent further bone loss and fractures if you have already been diagnosed. Although anyone can develop osteoporosis, postmenopausal women are especially at risk because of the drop in estrogen levels that happens at menopause. Estrogen plays an important role in keeping women's bones healthy. There are five main factors that can increase a person's risk of fracture. These are: low bone mineral density (BMD); a prior history of a fragility fracture (one that occurs as a result of minimal trauma or no trauma, like falling from a standing height); being 65 years of age or older, use of oral steroid pills for at least 3 months; and a family history of osteoporosis. If you believe you are at risk, I encourage you to speak with your doctor. He or she can perform a bone mineral density test to assess your bone mass and evaluate your fracture risk. Your doctor can also discuss lifestyle measures you can take to keep your bones healthy. Healthy lifestyle habits, including regular weightbearing exercise such as walking and eating a healthy diet rich in calcium and vitamin D can help protect some people from developing osteoporosis. For others, these measures may not be enough, and they may require a prescription medication, which can prevent further bone loss and reduce your risk of fracture by up to 50 per cent. There are several osteoporosis medications that can be taken in different ways (e.g. oral tablets, injections, an intranasal spray or an intravenous infusion). There is also a range of dosing options (e.g. daily, weekly, once-amonth, or yearly), so you and your doctor can tailor the treatment to your individual needs and preferences.

17th ANNUAL SALMON ARM ROOTS AND BLUES ANNOUNCES NIGHT SCHEDULE Lights up, music on!! Nighttime is gonna rock at the Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival! The line-up is complete! Fifty of the best, most exciting, diversely programmed, and talented artists you'll ever find gathered in one place, and they're all coming to perform for YOU! Presenting only the very best that blues, roots, soul, R&B, gospel and world music has to offer, this year's Roots and Blues line-up is one you surely won't want to miss. Unless you've just awoke from a six month nap, you know by now just what we're talking about - the spectacular 2009 line-up includes Serena Ryder, the Sam Roberts Band, Johnny Winter, Dr. John and the Lower 911 and so much more. Look for the schedule and ticket info on-line at www..rootsandblues.ca August 14-16 at the Salmon Arm Fairgrounds.

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New Eco-B Bucks help you Recycle Now…and Save TNRD introduces new $1 Eco-buck stickers for your waste. For people that are keen on recycling and have little waste to dispose of, the Thompson-Nicola Regional District (TNRD) has introduced a new $1 "Eco-buck" sticker to make paying for waste even easier. "The new blue bag recycling program is becoming more popular since it was first introduced in January," says Peter Hughes, Director of Environmental Services. "People are taking control of their waste disposal costs by recycling more and disposing of less waste. That's why we've taken the next step to introduce the new "Eco-buck" to give people more options when it comes to paying for the garbage they have leftover." With the Recycle Now…and Save program launched this January, residents and businesses can recycle as much as they need - using the convenient blue bag recycling program available at most TNRD transfer stations and landfills - and pay for the waste that's left using a prepaid "Eco-card". Now, in addition to the Eco-cards which come in $10, $20 and $50 amounts, residents can purchase a handy $1 Eco-buck sticker that can simply be placed on the bag of garbage for disposal in the appropriate bins at your local transfer station or landfill. "In response to requests from our residents, we've added the Eco-buck sticker that offers even more control over garbage disposal costs," adds Hughes. "This is especially helpful for weekend and summer residents, as well as those who are avid recyclers and who may not need a $10 or $20 Eco-card." Residents and businesses will need to pick up their Eco-cards and Eco-bucks to pay for the waste they take to their local transfer stations and landfills. The Eco-cards can be purchased from most municipal offices and more than 40 local retailers or online at www.tnrd.bc.ca. The Ecobuck stickers are also available at most municipal offices and many retailers. The handy punch cards and stickers can be used to pay for garbage disposal at $1 per bag or a set rate for larger loads starting at $5 for a short-box pickup truck or $10 for a full-sized pickup truck. For convenience, local businesses and larger waste generators can also set up an account with the TNRD. Since the program started, TNRD residents and businesses have recycled more than 800 metric tonnes of materials and by doing so have helped to save precious space in our landfills as well as to conserve natural resources. For more information on where to buy your Ecocards or Eco-bucks, including what you can recycle and the recycling depot nearest you, visit our website at www.tnrd.bc.ca or call the TNRD toll free at 1-877377-8673.

SKIN CANCER, CONT D FROM PAGE 19 "The good news is that people are actually very good at detecting melanoma on their own skin or that of a family member," says Dr. Cheryl Rosen, national director of the Canadian Dermatology Association's Sun Awareness Program. "Research shows up to 70% of melanomas are first found by the patient themselves or close family members," she adds. Melanoma is most common on the backs of men and the legs of women but can appear anywhere on the body including the arm, scalp or face. While less common in darker skinned people, melanoma may appear on the soles of the feet, palms of the hands or under the nails among other sites. Many Canadians were aware that having a lot of sunburns is a major risk factor for melanoma (80%), the survey showed. However, less than half of those surveyed (42%) knew that having many moles or large moles is a strong risk factor too. Even fewer (34%) recognized that having skin that freckles or is unable to tan, or red or blond hair (30%) are also risk factors. Of course, it is much better to prevent melanoma. When it comes to ways to protect the skin from ultraviolet radiation, many would use a sunscreen (75%), hats and clothing (69%). However, only 56% would seek shade. "There is a need to have more shade available in parks, playing fields and schools so that this natural protection, as well as built shade, is more available for people. When shade is available, it is another option for sun protection," says Dr. Rosen.


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ks o o B & Mo vies

NORTH of 50 July 09

BOOKS: from the publishers FORT ST. JAMES and NEW CALEDONIA Where British Columbia Began AUTHOR: Marie Elliott

New in Theatres: from the producers Outlander Well, I confess, when I picked this one off the shelf I didn’t realize it was a “creature” movie. Somehow, I missed the tag line on the DVD cover that said, “Beowulf Meets Predator.” Sounds like a ridiculous fusing of Vikings and spaceships but this seemingly crazy premise for a movie works at all levels. Sci-fi isn’t really my thing, but I have to tell you, this one I liked. Non-stop action, fantastic visual effects, good acting and a story line that works. It stars Jim Caviezel (The Passion of the Christ) as Kainan, a futuristic soldier who crash lands on Earth in 750 AD. Unfortunately, a hellish, fire-breathing monster, intent on destroying the village lands along with him. It’s a time of warring Viking tribes here on earth. Fusing advanced technology with Iron Age weaponry, Kainan must unite the fierce Vikings and hunt the bloodthirsty beast before it kills them all. Featuring Ron Perlman (Hellboy films), Sophia Myles (Underworld films), and John Hurt (Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull), Outlander is “visually spectacular” (Michael Wilmington, Chicago Daily Herald), combining stunning special effects, fast-paced action, and a fantastic story to explosive effect. The DVD includes 40 plus minutes of deleted Scenes; visual effects tests; animatics, production design galleries. Released by Alliance Films.

He s Just Not That Into You Recently released on DVD, this comedy is based on the wildly popular bestseller from “Sex and the City” scribes Greg Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo, “He’s Just Not That Into You” tells the stories of a group of interconnected, Baltimore-based twenty- and thirtysomethings as they navigate their various relationships from the shallow end of the dating pool through the deep, murky waters of married life, trying to read the signs of the opposite sex… and hoping to be the exceptions to the “no-exceptions” rule. I’d like to insert my own theory of relationships / dating here: If you have to play this many games or analyze a relationship that much, it probably isn’t worth the trouble. But then, it’s the games and over-analysis that provide fodder for relationship movies, so just ignore me and watch the movie. But watch it with someone so you can moan and roll your eyes together at the crazy world of movie love. The film boasts an all-star cast, including Academy Award® winner Ben Affleck as Neil; Jennifer Aniston as Beth; Drew Barrymore as Mary; Academy Award® winner Jennifer Connelly as Janine; Kevin Connolly as Conor; Bradley Cooper as Ben; Ginnifer Goodwin as Gigi; Scarlett Johansson as Anna; Kris Kristofferson as Ken; and Justin Long as Alex. The DVD contains both the widescreen and full frame versions of the film. There are also five additional scenes. Two of these are expansions of Scarlett Johansson’s character, with Theresa Russell playing her mother. Director Ken Kwapis provides an optional commentary for these scenes. Available now in retail outlets, the movie is distributed by Alliance Films.

Crossing Over Many critics didn’t like this movie, but I thought the film was very successful in portraying the underlying reasons, the dilemmas and the lengths to which people will go to stay in the United States, illegally if necessary It’s a very heavy movie and I didn’t crack a smile through the whole 1 hours and 43 minutes. Crossing Over explores the allure of the American dream, and the reality that immigrants find—and create—in 21st century Los Angeles. The movie is thought provoking, if not a bit slow to get off its feet. Max Brogan (Harrison Ford) is an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent (ICE) who is, unfortunately, not a heartless bastard. His job is to track down illegals, but he tends to get personally involved inh their cases, which translates into considerable inner turmoil. His partner, Iranian-American Hamid (Cliff Curtis) awaits his father's naturalization ceremony and suffers from his own inner conflicts, balancing family and American values. As the duo runs routine busts on illegal immigrants, several other stories are revealed. A defense lawyer (Ashley Judd) negotiates for a new family for an orphaned child and must also orchestrate the deportation method of a family whose 15-year old daughter is accused of having ties to terrorism; a young Jewish man (Jim Sturgess) tries to use his unpracticed religion to secure a job; and Cole Frankel (Ray Liotta) uses his position as a green card approval supervisor to force a beautiful Australian model (Alice Eve) into some compromising positions. Released by Alliance Films.

The shape of modern British Columbia was first woven in uncharted rivers, sketched along secret trails and conceived in the long, perilous winters of the central interior. These raw beginnings are linked famously to Simon Fraser and his founding of the fur trade empire known as New Caledonia. Today, only the outlines of these ancient trials and a restored trading post of Fort St. James remain. In Fort St. James and New Caledonia, Marie Elliot weaves a tapestry of colorful characters including the great Carrier chief Kwah, Nor'westers John Stuart and James McDougall, as well as a surprisingly strong cast of women including Miyo Nipiy, Governor Simpson's country wife, Margaret Taylor and the tragic Elizabeth Pruden. These characters lived the stories that built British Columbia, from tales of a long and lonesome winter in the mysterious interior to the murderous relationship between the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company. Fort St. James and New Caledonia is the first book to relive this history in over one hundred years. Marie Elliott brings to the surface previously unpublished readable historical accounts, offer an intimate and fascinating look at the day-to-day lives of the people and companies that built British Columbia. The book offers rare glimpses into the astonishing lives of the first fur traders and visions of the harsh realities they faced, including the unremitting threat of starvation, merciless terrain, extreme isolation and the looming unknown. Marie Elliott has written about BC history for twentyfive years. She is the author of Gold and Grand Dreams (Horsdal & Schubart), has published numerous articles, edited BC Historical News magazine and recently contributed to The Trail of 1858 (Harbour Publishing). Retail price $26.95.

The Deadline For Advertising In the August issue is July 21th.

Call Toll-Free: 1-877-667-8450


NORTH of 50 July 09

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THE BEACH! Ball Birds Boat Bugs Castles Current Dock Dry Ducks Family Fish Fishing Floaters Food Fun Games Hats Hot Icecream Kids Laughter Mud Music Pebbles

Picnic Pirates Races Rain Rocks Sand Seashore Seaweed Sharks Shovel Snacks Sun Sunscreen Swimming Swimsuit Towel Toys Tube Water Waves Wet

Find the words in the grid. When you are done, the unused letters spell out a hidden message. Words can go left or right, top line to bottom line. Words can go horizontally, vertically and diagonally in all eight directions. Answer to puzzle is on page 22.

ACROSS 1. Gross national product (abbr.) 4. Mix 9. Supersonic transport 12. Seafood 13. Eagle’s nest 14. Southwestwen Indian 15. Viper 16. Pretend 17. Caustic substance 18. Sell a fief

DOWN 1. Tennis player Steffi 2. Smeller 3. Watermelon 4. Bewilder 5. Downwind 6. Little Mermaid’s love 7. Day’s opposite 8. Refuses to grant 9. Stew 10. Eye infection 11. Adolescent 19. Silly 21. Tight 23. Lose moisture 25. Buddy 26. Terminal abbr. 27. Daddy 28. Attack 30. Hair stuff 31. Avenue 32. Free of 35. Old-fashioned Dads 38. Dummy 40. _____ sauce FOOD 42. British county 44. De ___(from the beginning) 45. Opera solo 20. Domesticated fowl 43. That girl 22. Hoary 44. Flammable liquid 46. Similar to an apple 47. After awhile 24. A beverage the Queen 48. Author Poe 49. Movie drinks 52. Miner’s goal 50. Skillfully 25. Fruits in different 53. Cringe 51. Abundant colors, including red, 55. Kimono sash 54. Nervous system yellow, green and orange 56. By way of 29. Sweet stuff 57. Wrinkle 33. On top removers 34. Jacob’s son 58. Pixie 37. Rabbit 59. Rowing device 39. Squawked 60. Become tighter 41. Bro.’s sibling 61. Grain

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SUDOKU Each Sudoku puzzle is a 9 by 9 grid of horizontal and vertical rows evenly separated into 9 squares with 9 spaces each. Each puzzles solution is determined by the pattern of the numbers already filled in. You solve the puzzle by filling in the missing digits so that, when completed, each row and each square will have all numbers from1 to 9: each number will appear in exactly nine spaces within each puzzle. Sudoku solution on page 22


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NORTH of 50 July 09

Thompson/Nicola/South Cariboo

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Fax:(250) 546-8914 I steel and wooden slat bench - still in box- needs assembly - 50.00 Call 250-766-0262 Oak glider rocker like new condition $50.00 please call 250-554-1399 in North Shore Kamloops. SeaDoo like new. Used 6 times. was $300, now $150. Aqua Master motorized, inflatable, good for kids, 250-5454187 2 low mileage used all season Goodyear tires 21565RIG 2 for $50.00 OBO. Phone: 250-8324019 Collectors Regency Rose 1950’s service for eight lots, extra peices total pieces 40 to 60 $30.00. Call: 250-766-0514. Craftsman 3/4" drive socket set in metal box, c/w rachet & bars. excellent cond. $150. Hammer drill. 1/2" Mastercraft. 102 pcs.

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readers in the Thompson / South Cariboo / Nicola and the Okanagan/S h u s w a p regions w i t h a f re e classified - for items valued up to $1000. Yo u r a d w i l l ru n i n b o t h e d i t i o n s. * Offer not open to businesses / commercial

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Word Search Solution The beach is the best place to be when it is hot out but look out for sharks!

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NORTH of 50 July 09


July 2009 Thompson Edition - North of 50