Page 1

Technical Memorandum #2 Goals and Objectives

February 12, 2015


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation   

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND IMPLEMENTING POLICIES F ACED WITH ESCALATING DEMANDS FOR TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT AND LIMITED RESOURCES , ESTABLISHING THE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES WITHIN THE LRTP IS AN ESSENTIAL FIRST STEP IN DEFINING THE SUCCESS OF OUR PLAN AND GUIDING DECISION MAKING .

LRTP GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 

The goals, objective and performance measures  proposed are based on the transportation user’s point of  view.  The order of the goals and objectives do not  indicate the priority.   

Through the LRTP, it is North Florida TPO’s vision to  promote the regional optimization of mobility consistent  with the values of local communities.  

Specifically, the goals and objectives are to enhance the  following:         

Economic Competitiveness  Livability  Safety  Mobility and Accessibility  Equity in Decision Making  System Preservation 

   

1  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation   

GOAL 1: INVEST IN PROJECTS THAT ENHANCE ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS

Table 2 on the next page summarizes the objectives,  performance measures and benchmarks associated with  this goal.  The targets are to achieve the benchmarks by  the year 2040. 

Investing in projects that enhance economic  competitiveness are primarily those that improve travel  time reliability, which is the most important factor for  freight operators, enhance access to job and maximize  the return on investment.  Table 1 summarizes the  objectives, performance measures and benchmarks  associated with this goal. 

GOAL 2: INVEST IN LIVABLE AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES There no single definition of what constitutes a “livable”  or “sustainable” transportation system. According to the  definition endorsed by the Transportation Research  Board Sustainable Transportation Indicators  Subcommittee, a sustainable transportation system  follows: 

Allows the basic access and development needs of individuals, companies, and society to be met safely and in a manner consistent with human and ecosystem health, and promotes equity within and between successive generations. Is affordable, operates fairly and efficiently, offers a choice of transportation modes, and supports a competitive economy, as well as balanced regional development. Limits air, water, noise emissions, waste and resource use. Limits emissions and waste within the planet’s ability to absorb them, uses renewable resources at or below their rates of generation, and uses non‐renewable resources at or below the rates of development of renewable substitutes, while minimizing the impact on the use of land and the generation of noise. Table 1. Enhance Economic Competitiveness Objectives and Performance Measures Objective  Performance Measure Improve travel reliability on major  Travel time reliability freight routes  Enhance access to jobs  Jobs within ½ mile of a congestion  management system facility  Maximize the return on investment  Benefit: cost ratio Return on investment 

2  

Benchmark Maintain or improve the  reliability  Maintain or improve access to  jobs  Rank benefit‐to‐cost ratio Rank return on investment 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation  Table 2. Livability and Sustainability Objectives and Performance Measures Objective  Performance Measure Enhance transit  ¼ mile walk accessibility to transit stops accessibility  Households within 5 miles of major transit centers or park  and ride lots  Enhance transit  Annual boardings per vehicle revenue mile ridership  Annual boardings per vehicle revenue hour  Enhance bicycle and  Lane mile with bicycle and pedestrian facilities at the quality  pedestrian quality of  of service standard  service  Reduce the cost of  Transportation costs per capita congestion per capita  Costs of congestion  Reduce the impacts of  Environmental screening and mitigation investments on the  natural environment  Reduce emissions from  Hydrocarbon, nitrous oxides and volatile organic compound  automobiles  emissions  Consistency with land  Includes active transportation design principles in context  use planning  sensitive solutions  Supports regional  Reduce clearance times for evacuations evacuation needs  Table notes 

Benchmark 95% of all stops (1)  (2)  (2)  85% of lane miles 

(3) Apply Efficient Decision  Making Process to all projects  in LRTP.  Maintain attainment status. (4)  Include walkability standards  in context sensitive solutions  Improve clearance times by  15 minutes. (5) 

(1) This performance measure will not change significantly from year to year unless major route changes or new transit  operations are deployed.  (2) Coordination with Jacksonville Transportation Authority is needed to develop the baseline and benchmark data needed.  (3) Many exogenous factors influence this performance measure including the price of fuels that are beyond the scope of a  LRTP.  However, this performance measure will be considered within the LRTP based on policy decisions made during  the scenario development.  (4) Emissions will be determined using Florida emission factors from the FHWA Moves model.  (5) Based on modeling provide by the Northeast Florida Regional Council. 

GOAL 3: ENHANCE SAFETY Investing in projects that enhance safety will lead to  reduced crashes and lower crash severity.  Table 3 summarizes the objectives, performance  measures and benchmarks associated with this goal. 

Table 3. Safety Objectives and Performance Measures Objective  Performance Measure Reduce Crashes  Number of crashes  Crash rate per million vehicle miles  Reduce Fatal crashes  Number of fatalities  Crash rate per million vehicle miles 

3

Benchmark Reduce by 0.25% each year  Reduce or maintain  Reduce by 0.25% each year  Reduce or maintain 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation   

GOAL 4: ENHANCE MOBILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY

Understanding the trade‐offs of these goals in the  context of each corridor being considered is an essential  element to identifying the right mobility solution for any  project. 

Enhancing mobility includes addressing the four  dimensions of mobility – quantity of travel, quality of  travel, system accessibility and system utilization.   Several of these measures also support other goals and  objectives (such as livability and sustainability).   

Table 4 summarizes the objectives, performance  measures and benchmarks associated with this goal.  The measures associated with the quantity of travel are  oriented to how many people use the network.  These  measures are important, as some operational  improvements may increase the throughput of travel at a  location, but the quality of travel flow (speeds, delays,  etc.) may not change during the peak hour.   

Mobility is about more than increasing the volume of  persons served and managing congestion.  Users want a  less stressful commute, but they also want improved  reliability of their travel, more choices including transit,  walking and bicycling and to ensure we optimize system  operations before we invest in new infrastructure.   

Table 4. Mobility and Accessibility Objectives and Performance Measures Goal  Mobility Performance Measures Benchmark Person‐miles traveled  Truck‐miles traveled  Vehicle‐miles traveled  Person trips  Transit ridership  Average speed  Delay  Average trip time 

(2) (2)  Optimize the  (2)  quantity of  travel  (2)  Increase transit ridership  Maintain or improve the average travel speed  Maintain or reduce the average vehicle delay  Maintain or reduce the average trip time  Optimize the  Maintain or improve the reliability  quality if  Reliability  Achieve 95% reliability (on time arrival) on Strategic  travel (1)  Intermodal System  facilities.  Maintain the level of service standard (FDOT standard for  Level of service on rural facilities  Strategic Intermodal System facilities and local government  standards for other facilities)  Proximity to major transportation hubs  (3)  Improve the  % miles bicycle accommodations  (3)  accessibility  to mode  % miles pedestrian accommodations  (3)  choices  Transit coverage  Increase the % of population served with ¼ mile  % system heavily congested  Maintain or reduce the % of system heavily congested  % travel heavily congested  Maintain or reduce the % of travel heavily congested  Optimize the  Vehicles per lane mile  Optimize the vehicles per lane mile for a desired LOS  utilization of  Duration of congestion  Maintain or reduce the duration of congestion  the system  Optimize the transit load factor for a desired quality of  Transit load factor  service  (1) These measures may not apply on corridors not selected for context‐based solutions that may intentionally lower the  running speed or capacity.  (2) Generally, increases in the quantity traveled (throughout) are preferred.  However, consistent with livability and  sustainability goals, one objective is to reduce the amount of travel needed.  Therefore, no benchmarks are proposed, but  monitoring is recommended.  (3) These performance measures will not change significantly from year to year but will be evaluated in each major update to  the LRTP to establish benchmark and monitor performance.  4   


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation     

Optimizing the quantity of travel is proposed so that  context sensitive solutions and alternatives that result in  fewer trips and less use of the transportation network  can be considered equitably with projects that add  capacity. The quality of travel includes not only speeds  and delays but also travel reliability.  

1. To avoid, minimize, or mitigate disproportionately  high and adverse human health and environmental  effects, including social and economic effects, on  minority populations and low‐income populations.  2. To ensure the full and fair participation by all  potentially affected communities in the  transportation decision‐making process. 

Accessibility refers to the ease of reaching goods,  services and other activities.  Accessibility analysis is one  component of mobility in that it considers the  connections to adjacent land uses and the modalities of  transportation between desired origins and destinations.   By improving accessibility, we can meet the same needs  of users by being smarter and enhancing the efficiencies  of our investments. 

3. To prevent the denial of, reduction in, or  significant delay in the receipt of benefits by minority  and low‐income populations. 2  4F9F10F10F

Together these four dimensions will allow us to evaluate  the tradeoffs of alternative transportation investments. 

To address these goals, these three principles are  adopted as objectives for this LRTP.  The performance  measures associated with each objective are less  quantifiable than the objectives associated with other  goals and are more process oriented.  These three  factors will be considered as part of the Needs Plan and  Cost Feasible Plan and will be implemented using  Geographic Information Systems techniques to identify  the minority and low‐income populations and by  designing outreach programs to involve minority and  low‐income populations. 

GOAL 5: ENHANCE EQUITY IN DECISION MAKING

GOAL 6: PRESERVE AND MAINTAIN OUR EXISTING SYSTEM

The United States Environmental Protection Agency  defines Environmental Justice as follows. 

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and FDOT  established formal goals and objectives for systems  preservation that are proposed for adoption as part of  this LRTP.  They include: 

As transportation providers, understanding the  utilization of the system is important in optimizing the  transportation network.  Measures such as the duration  of congestion are used to ensure the services and  facilities are allocated appropriately. 

Environmental Justice is the fair treatment and  meaningful involvement of all people regardless of  race, color, national origin, or income with respect to  the development, implementation, and enforcement  of environmental laws, regulations, and policies. EPA  has this goal for all communities and persons across  this Nation [sic]. It will be achieved when everyone  enjoys the same degree of protection from  environmental and health hazards and equal access  to the decision‐making process to have a healthy  environment in which to live, learn, and work. 1 

1. 2. 3.

4.

3F8F9F9F

The United States Department of Transportation defines  three fundamental Environmental Justice principles for  the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal  Transit Administration as follows:                                                                    1. "Environmental Justice". US EPA. Retrieved  2012‐03‐29. 

5.

                                                                 2.

5  

Have 95 percent of the Strategic Intermodal System  in good or better condition.  Have 85 percent of other arterials in good or better  condition.  Strengthen bridges that are either (1) structurally  deficient or (2) posted for weight restriction within  six years on FDOT facilities.  Replace bridges that require structural repair and  are more cost effective to replace within nine years  on FDOT facilities.  Satisfy FDOT’s off system bridge replacement goals. 

"Overview of Transportation and Environmental  Justice". U.S. Department of Transportation.  Retrieved 2010‐01‐22. 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    In addition, the objective of the systems preservation  and maintenance goal is to provide a transit fleet that  meets Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA’s)  requirements for system preservation, vehicle age and  maintenance. 

Federal and state requirements and policies associated  with the LRTP’s goals for “Equity in Decision Making” and  “System Preservation” were in place before this plan  began and are recommended for direct adoption in the  plan.  The following are new policies to consider. 

Table 5 summarizes the performance measures  established for preservation, operations and  maintenance. 

ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS This policy requires each new project included in the  2040 Cost Feasible Plan provide a benefit‐to‐cost ratio.   This policy will ensure that all projects are evaluated  using consistent criteria in relationship to the economic  goals of the plan and are focused on the greatest  economic return and efficient allocation of resources. 

LRTP IMPLEMENTING POLICIES  INTENT

Not all projects that are included in the Cost Feasible  Plan may demonstrate benefit‐to‐cost ratio of greater  than 1.0.  The intent of the policy is for this to be one of  the factors used to support decision‐making.   

Adopting more formal policies as part of the LRTP is a  first step toward a stronger regional approach to  transportation decision making.  Establishing these policies is within the context of the  role of the North Florida TPO as a policy board in regional  planning.  The intent is not for the Board to be involved  with or direct design decisions.  Engineers are the  licensed professionals charged with safe and efficient  operation of the transportation system. It is  inappropriate, for the Board or elected officials to direct  elements of roadway design.  However, it is appropriate  at the policy level to establish the general framework and  policy guidelines for the objectives of the project to be  constructed. 

LIVABILITY TRANSIT INVESTMENT Incorporating a regional livability policy in the LRTP will  guide investment decisions to promote transit and mode  choices.  The Jacksonville Transportation Authority has  defined a vision for future transit investments with the  2040 horizon that may include bus rapid transit, trolleys,  commuter rail and other modes.  The policy intent is to  support these investments.  In addition to considering transit alternatives, successful  transit investments are dependent on walkable access,  pedestrian‐oriented design and transit‐oriented design.  

As changes to the LRTP or Transportation Improvement  Program are considered for adoption by the North  Florida TPO, a policy review of the projects should be  performed to ensure the proposed investments reflect  the values and intent of the goals and objectives within  the LRTP.  Policies for economic competitiveness,  livability, safety, mobility and accessibility were adopted. 

CONTEXT SENSITIVE SOLUTIONS A policy in the LRTP that identifies corridors where  investments would be made consistent with complete 

Table 5. System Preservation Objectives and Performance Measures Objective  Performance Measure Benchmark Maintain roadways  FDOT condition rating system  95% of SIS roadways in good or better condition  85% of non‐SIS roadways in good or better condition  Maintain bridges  FDOT condition rating system  Strengthen bridges that are either (1) structurally  deficient or (2) posted for weight restriction within six  years on FDOT facilities.   Replace bridges that require structural repair that more  cost effective to replace within nine years on FDOT  facilities.   Satisfy FDOT’s off system bridge replacement goals.  Maintain transit system  FTA system preservation Age of vehicles   6   


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation 

street and context sensitive solutions principles is  recommended.  With the complete streets and context  sensitive solutions concept, we are working to change  the paradigm from “moving cars quickly” to “providing  safe mobility for all modes”.  

SAFETY

Implementing these concepts should reflect the context  and character of the surrounding built and natural  environments.  These transportation investments need  to be linked to land use and zoning requirements to  ensure a consistent urban character and link  transportation investment to achieve the goals of  livability include.  

As part of the Strategic Safety Plan completed in 2012,  several strategic safety corridors and intersections on the  state‐maintained highway system and local roadways  were identified.  Many safety projects are smaller in  scope and costs and can be implemented in a shorter  time than major capacity improvements.  Safety projects  often result in high benefit‐to‐cost ratios.  This policy  leverages the plan to identify safety strategies for  implanting and advancing projects.   

Maximizing the number of lanes to six general use lanes.  Any additional lanes would be bus rapid transit or other managed lanes. Investing in each corridor consistent with an urban character defined through the project or adopted from a prior study such as the Neighborhood Vision projects performed by the City of Jacksonville.  For example, on some corridors an urban village could be used which would require wider sidewalks and on‐street parking or grand boulevards, or “Grand Boulevard” concepts. Grand Boulevards would require bicycle, pedestrians and transit to be considered with equal consideration to automobile mobility. Requiring land use and zoning regulations to be in place by local governments to encourage redevelopment consistent with the urban design characteristics established for the corridor. Establishing prototype corridor concepts for use within designated corridors or areas.

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS The policies associated with transit oriented  development context sensitive solutions are key  elements of the overall mobility and accessibility  approach for this plan.  In addition, to ensure we are  optimizing the efficiency of the network, a  Transportation Systems Management and Operations  (TSM&O) policy is proposed.  TSM&O alternatives should be considered prior to  investing in new capacity.  These strategies are highly  competitive with capacity projects funding in many  settings.  Examples of TSM&O approaches include:       

The following actions were performed as part of the  developing the LRTP.  

candidates for more detailed evaluation during  project development phases were identified.  context sensitive solutions improvements were included in the 2040 Needs Plan and 2040 Cost Feasible Plan.

The policy built on work being prepared by local agencies within the region that are developing context sensitive solutions, livable communities and low impact development guidelines. A network of context sensitive solutions corridors was identified where context sensitive solutions are considered a priority. A list of context sensitive solutions guidelines was prepared where specific types of investments are encouraged.  The guidelines are provided in Technical Memorandum #9 – Context Sensitive Solutions Guidelines. A conceptual evaluation context sensitive solutions were screened and identified projects that are

Integrated corridor management Arterial traffic management systems Bus rapid transit Ramp metering Hard shoulder running Commercial vehicle information systems

The following actions were performed within the LRTP  process.  

7

A TSM&O network that includes the constrained corridors identified in the plan and the congested corridors identified in the Congestion Management Plan are designated. A list of candidate TSM&O strategies and tactics screened and identified for more detailed evaluation during project development phases. TSM&O improvements were included in the 2040 Needs Plan and the Cost Feasible Plan.


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation 

This page is intentionally blank. 

8


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation 

CONSISTENCY WITH FEDERAL AND STATE PLANS T HE LRTP CONSIDERS THE REQUIREMENTS OF KEY LEGISLATIVE , STATEWIDE AND POLICIES , GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AND IS CONSISTENT WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF F EDERAL AND S TATE LEGISLATION . MOVING AHEAD FOR PROGRESS IN THE 21ST CENTURY 3

1F1F

Congress passed the act entitled Moving Ahead for  Progress in the 21st Century (MAP‐21) in 2012 which  establishes national performance goals for Federal  highway programs and include:  

 

Support the economic vitality of the metropolitan areas, especially by enabling global competitiveness, productivity and efficiency. Increase the safety and security of the transportation system for motorized and non‐ motorized users to achieve a significant reduction in

3

Adapted from  http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/tpr_and_nepa/tpran dnepa.cfm    9 

traffic fatalities and serious injuries on all public  roads.  Increase the accessibility and mobility of people and freight to achieve a significant reduction in  congestion on the National Highway System.  Improve the efficiency of the surface transportation system.  Improve the national freight network, strengthen the ability of rural communities to access national  and international trade markets, and support  regional economic development.  Enhance the performance of the transportation system while protecting and enhancing the natural  environment. 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation 

As part of MAP‐21, the following new policies related to  metropolitan planning were identified:  

LRTPs and Transportation Improvement Programs (TIPs) are required to be developed through a  performance‐based approach.  As part of the  performance‐based planning approach: o Performance measures that support national goals are required. o Targets are required with monitoring toward attaining the performance measures. o The targets should be established in coordination with other state or public transportation agencies. o Targets are required to be integrated into the continuing planning process. o The performance measures should be included in the LRTP and show the progress that is anticipated to be achieved by planned investments and decision making.  System Performance Reports are required that describe the progress made toward achieving the performance targets. o The U.S. Department of Transportation will establish the minimum condition levels for all highways on the Interstate System and bridges on the National Highway System.

Within two years of enacting MAP‐21, each MPO shall include representation by transportation providers, including public transit systems.

Table 6 demonstrates how these goals and objectives are  consistent with the federal requirements in MAP‐21.  Table 7 outlines the Federal planning requirements as  enumerated in CFR 450.322 and provides references to  how each of the planning requirements is addressed.  The public involvement requirements from Federal and  state legislation and policies are discussed in greater  detail in the Public Involvement section.    

10


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 6. Traceability Matrix 

Goal

Objective

Invest in projects that  Improve travel time reliability on major freight routes.  enhance economic  Enhance access to jobs.  competitiveness  Maximize the return on investment. 





Reduce the cost of congestion per capita. 







Reduce the impacts of improvements on the natural  environment  Reduce crashes.  Reduce facilities. 

Optimize the utilization of the system.  Avoid disproportionately adverse impacts on minority  or low‐income populations. 

       

  

       

   

 

   

       

   

Satisfy FDOT’s off system bridge replacement goals. 

  

  

  

  

  

Meet FTA transit system maintenance requirements. 











Meet the FDOT pavement condition goals  Meet the FDOT bridge condition goals 

Protect and  enhance the  environment 

 

 

Ensure fair participation by all affected populations.  Prevent the denial of benefits to minority and low‐ income populations. 

11  





Enhance mobility and  Optimize the quality of travel.  accessibility  Improve the accessibility to mode choices. 

Preserve and  maintain our existing  system 



Improve efficiency 

Improve the  national  freight  network  

Enhance bicycle and pedestrian quality of service. 

Optimize the quantity of travel. 

Enhance equity in  decision making 



Increase accessibility  and  mobility 

Enhance transit ridership. 

Reduce emissions from automobiles. 

Enhance safety 



Increase safety and  security 

   

Enhance transit accessibility. 

Invest in livable  communities and  sustainable  communities 

Support economic  vitality 

 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 7. Federal Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  (a) The metropolitan transportation planning process shall  include the development of a transportation plan addressing  no less than a 20‐year planning horizon as of the effective  date.     In nonattainment and maintenance areas, the effective date  of the transportation plan shall be the date of a conformity  determination issued by the FHWA and the FTA. In  attainment areas, the effective date of the transportation  plan shall be its date of adoption by the MPO.  (b) The transportation plan shall include both long‐range  and short‐range strategies/actions that lead to the  development of an integrated multimodal transportation  system to facilitate the safe and efficient movement of  people and goods in addressing current and future  transportation demand.  (c) The MPO shall review and update the transportation plan  at least every four years in air quality nonattainment and  maintenance areas and at least every five years in  attainment areas to confirm the transportation plan's  validity and consistency with current and forecasted  transportation and land use conditions and trends and to  extend the forecast period to at least a 20‐year planning  horizon.     In addition, the MPO may revise the transportation plan at  any time using the procedures in this section without a  requirement to extend the horizon year. The transportation  plan (and any revisions) shall be approved by the MPO and  submitted for information purposes to the Governor. Copies  of any updated or revised transportation plans must be  provided to the FHWA and the FTA.  (d) In metropolitan areas that are in nonattainment for  ozone or carbon monoxide, the MPO shall coordinate the  development of the metropolitan transportation plan with  the process for developing transportation control measures  in a State Implementation Plan.  (e) The MPO, the State(s), and the public transportation  operator(s) shall validate data utilized in preparing other  existing modal plans for providing input to the  transportation plan.     In updating the transportation plan, the MPO shall base the  update on the latest available estimates and assumptions  for population, land use, travel, employment, congestion,  and economic activity.   The MPO shall approve  transportation plan contents and supporting analyses  produced by a transportation plan update. 

Action Taken The plan addresses a horizon of 2040.          A maintenance plan is not required in this airshed based on  Section 185A of the Clean Air Act Amendments and the  adopted State Implementation Plan. 

Short‐ and long‐range strategies were evaluated that  included safety and TSM&O strategies.  

This is an update to the 2035 Long‐Range Transportation  Plan.                 Not applicable.     

Not applicable.

Extensive coordination with all state and local  transportation agencies including the Jacksonville  Transportation Authority was performed in the  development of the plan as outlined in the public  involvement section.     A travel demand model was prepared as part of the  planning process that included information on the  population, land use, travel, employment, congestion and  economic activity.  These data were reviewed and approved  by the local agencies and the North Florida TPO.      

12  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 7. Federal Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  Action Taken (f) The metropolitan transportation plan shall, at a minimum, include: (1) The projected transportation demand of persons and  A regional travel demand model was developed that  goods in the metropolitan planning area over the period of  included a freight analysis and forecasts through the year  the transportation plan.  2040.   (2) Existing and proposed transportation facilities (including  A comprehensive evaluation of all regional multimodal  major roadways, transit, multimodal and intermodal  needs was conducted as part of the planning process.  As  facilities, pedestrian walkways and bicycle facilities, and  documented in this report, an inventory of major roadways,  intermodal connectors) that should function as an  transit, multimodal and intermodal facilities, pedestrian  integrated metropolitan transportation system, giving  walkways and bicycle facilities, and intermodal connectors  emphasis to those facilities that serve important national  was completed and the needs were identified.  and regional transportation functions over the period of the    transportation plan.         In addition, the locally preferred alternative selected from an  Transit projects are identified in the plan.  Projects where  project development has begun and projects with plans to  Alternatives Analysis under the FTA's Capital Investment  conduct alternatives analysis phases are also identified.   Grant program (49 U.S.C. 5309 and 49 CFR part 611) needs  to be adopted as part of the metropolitan transportation  plan as a condition for funding under 49 U.S.C. 5309.  (3) Operational and management strategies to improve the  A regional ITS and TSM&O Master Plan was adopted as part  performance of existing transportation facilities to relieve  of the Needs Plan and funding will be allocated on an  vehicular congestion and maximize the safety and mobility  annual basis to address needs within the plan.   of people and goods.  (4) Consideration of the results of the congestion  The congestion management process was used to identify  management process in Transportation Management Areas  needs and alternative strategies to address congestion.   that meet the requirements of this subpart, including the  identification of single‐occupancy vehicle projects that result  from a congestion management process in Transportation  Management Areas that are nonattainment for ozone or  carbon monoxide.  (5) Assessment of capital investment and other strategies to  Operations and maintenance of the region’s infrastructure  preserve the existing and projected future metropolitan  was addressed and funding was allocated within this plan.    transportation infrastructure and provide for multimodal    capacity increases based on regional priorities and needs.         The metropolitan transportation plan may consider projects  An analysis of the regional congestion management plan  and strategies that address areas or corridors where current  and process was used to identify system bottlenecks and  or projected congestion threatens the efficient functioning of  needs.    key elements of the metropolitan area's transportation  system.  (6) Design concept and design scope descriptions of all  The purpose and need for each project is summarized for  existing and proposed transportation facilities in sufficient  projects.  Cost estimates were included based on prior  detail, regardless of funding source, in nonattainment and  studies for most of the projects included in the plan.    maintenance areas for conformity determinations under the  Where project costs estimates were not available, generic  EPA's transportation conformity rule (40 CFR part 93). In all  cost estimates were used based on FDOT historical data.   These are provided in Appendix K.  areas (regardless of air quality designation), all proposed  improvements shall be described in sufficient detail to  develop cost estimates. 

13  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 7. Federal Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  (7) A discussion of types of potential environmental  mitigation activities and potential areas to carry out these  activities, including activities that may have the greatest  potential to restore and maintain the environmental  functions affected by the metropolitan transportation plan.  The discussion may focus on policies, programs, or  strategies, rather than at the project level. The discussion  shall be developed in consultation with Federal, State, and  Tribal land management, wildlife, and regulatory agencies.  The MPO may establish reasonable timeframes for  performing this consultation.  (8) Pedestrian walkway and bicycle transportation facilities  in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 217(g); 

(9) Transportation and transit enhancement activities, as  appropriate; and  (10) A financial plan that demonstrates how the adopted  transportation plan can be implemented.  (i) For purposes of transportation system operations and  maintenance, the financial plan shall contain system‐level  estimates of costs and revenue sources that are reasonably  expected to be available to adequately operate and  maintain Federal‐aid highways (as defined by 23 U.S.C.  101(a)(5)) and public transportation (as defined by title 49  U.S.C. Chapter 53).  (ii) For the purpose of developing the metropolitan  transportation plan, the MPO, public transportation  operator(s), and State shall cooperatively develop estimates  of funds that will be available to support metropolitan  transportation plan implementation, as required under  §450.314(a). All necessary financial resources from public  and private sources that are reasonably expected to be  made available to carry out the transportation plan shall be  identified.  (iii) The financial plan shall include recommendations on any  additional financing strategies to fund projects and  programs included in the metropolitan transportation plan.  In the case of new funding sources, strategies for ensuring  their availability shall be identified. 

Action Taken A systemwide approach to environmental mitigation  activities are identified in the plan.  Estimates for mitigation  costs were provided for projects as part of the plan.  The  Efficient Transportation Decision Making Process  established by FDOT was used to identify an inventory of  issues that may be associated with each corridor.  The FDOT  has established procedures for addressing all mitigation  issues in consultation with agencies as part of the Project  Development and Environment (PD&E) process. 

Pedestrian and bicycle improvements are addressed in the  plan as part of the Active Transportation discussion.   Dedicated funding was set aside for bicycle and pedestrian  projects.  Projects that are candidates for context sensitive  solutions and transit accessibility and mobility  enhancements are also identified.  Transit and transit mobility enhancement improvements are  addressed in the plan.   A financial plan was prepared and is documented in this  plan.  System‐level estimates of operations and maintenance  costs were identified for state roads, local roads and transit  and are documented in this report. 

Federal and state funding program estimates were provided  in consultation with FDOT.  These revenues are summarized  in this report.  Through consultation with the Jacksonville  Transportation Authority, estimates of local match and  operations and maintenance costs for each project were  developed for transit. 

A financial plan was prepared that included alternative  revenue sources. While developing the plan, alternatives for  additional financing beyond those that are currently in place  were not advanced to the Cost Feasible Plan stage. Toll  revenues anticipated to fund the future First Coast  Expressway were also estimated.  Locally‐funded and  privately‐funded projects of regional significance were also  identified. 

14  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 7. Federal Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  (iv) In developing the financial plan, the MPO shall take into  account all projects and strategies proposed for funding  under title 23 U.S.C., title 49 U.S.C. Chapter 53 or with other  Federal funds; State assistance; local sources; and private  participation. Starting December 11, 2007, revenue and cost  estimates that support the metropolitan transportation plan  must use an inflation rate(s) to reflect “year of expenditure  dollars,” based on reasonable financial principles and  information, developed cooperatively by the MPO, State(s),  and public transportation operator(s).  (v) For the outer years of the metropolitan transportation  plan (i.e., beyond the first 10 years), the financial plan may  reflect aggregate cost ranges/cost bands, as long as the  future funding source(s) is reasonably expected to be  available to support the projected cost ranges/cost bands.  (vi) For nonattainment and maintenance areas, the financial  plan shall address the specific financial strategies required to  ensure the implementation of traffic control measures in the  applicable State Implementation Plan.  (vii) For illustrative purposes, the financial plan may (but is  not required to) include additional projects that would be  included in the adopted transportation plan if additional  resources beyond those identified in the financial plan were  to become available.  (viii) In cases that the FHWA and the FTA find a metropolitan  transportation plan to be fiscally constrained and a revenue  source is subsequently removed or substantially reduced  (i.e., by legislative or administrative actions), the FHWA and  the FTA will not withdraw the original determination of fiscal  constraint; however, in such cases, the FHWA and the FTA  will not act on an updated or amended metropolitan  transportation plan that does not reflect the changed  revenue situation.  (g) The MPO shall consult, as appropriate, with State and  local agencies responsible for land use management, natural  resources, environmental protection, conservation, and  historic preservation concerning the development of the  transportation plan. The consultation shall involve  (1) Comparison of transportation plans with State  conservation plans or maps, if available; or  (2) Comparison of transportation plans to inventories of  natural or historic resources, if available. 

Action Taken The Cost Feasible Plan was developed using year of  expenditure dollars and inflation rates provided by FDOT.   All values in this report are expressed in the year‐of‐ expenditure, unless otherwise noted.   

Funding bands of 2019‐2020, 2021‐2025, 2026‐2030 and  2031‐2040 were used. 

A maintenance plan is not required in this airshed based on  Section 185A of the Clean Air Act Amendments and the  adopted State Implementation Plan.  A needs plan was developed that identifies the illustrative  projects that would be included if additional resources were  available.  Illustrative projects that were not funded for  construction but funded for preliminary engineering phases  only are also summarized in the plan.  Not applicable.  This process is address in the plan  maintenance phase. 

Extensive coordination with agencies was performed as part  of the planning process and is summarized in this report.   

Conservation areas were identified as part of the planning  process and are shown on the plan maps.  A comparison was performed through the Efficient  Transportation Decision Making Process. 

15  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 7. Federal Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  (h) The metropolitan transportation plan should include a  safety element that incorporates or summarizes the  priorities, goals, countermeasures, or projects for the MPA  contained in the Strategic Highway Safety Plan required  under 23 U.S.C. 148, as well as (as appropriate) emergency  relief and disaster preparedness plans and strategies and  policies that support homeland security (as appropriate) and  safeguard the personal security of all motorized and non‐ motorized users.  (i) The MPO shall provide citizens, affected public agencies,  representatives of public transportation employees, freight  shippers, providers of freight transportation services, private  providers of transportation, representatives of users of  public transportation, representatives of users of pedestrian  walkways and bicycle transportation facilities,  representatives of the disabled, and other interested parties  with a reasonable opportunity to comment on the  transportation plan using the participation plan developed  under §450.316(a).  (j) The metropolitan transportation plan shall be published  or otherwise made readily available by the MPO for public  review, including (to the maximum extent practicable) in  electronically accessible formats and means, such as the  World Wide Web.  (k) A State or MPO shall not be required to select any project  from the illustrative list of additional projects included in the  financial plan under paragraph (f)(10) of this section. 

(l) In nonattainment and maintenance areas for  transportation‐related pollutants, the MPO, as well as the  FHWA and the FTA, must make a conformity determination  on any updated or amended transportation plan in  accordance with the Clean Air Act and the EPA  transportation conformity regulations (40 CFR part 93).  During a conformity lapse, MPOs can prepare an interim  metropolitan transportation plan as a basis for advancing  projects that are eligible to proceed under a conformity  lapse. An interim metropolitan transportation plan  consisting of eligible projects from, or consistent with, the  most recent conforming transportation plan and  Transportation Improvement Program may proceed  immediately without revisiting the requirements of this  section, subject to interagency consultation defined in 40  CFR part 93. An interim metropolitan transportation plan  containing eligible projects that are not from, or consistent  with, the most recent conforming transportation plan and  Transportation Improvement Program must meet all the  requirements of this section.     

Action Taken The region recently adopted a Strategic Safety Plan and the  needs identified in the plan are summarized in this plan.   Funding will be allocated on an annual basis for selected  projects in consultation with FDOT.    Emergency relief and disaster preparedness plans were  prepared by the Regional Planning Council and considered  as part of the plan.  Evaluation routes received a priority  designation as part of the prioritization process.  The North Florida TPO Board, Technical Advisory Board and  Citizens Advisory Board were consulted through the plan  development.  These boards include representatives of all  users.  A project steering committee was also established  which included additional members.  The participation of  these interest groups is documented in greater detail in  Technical Memorandum #1 – Public Involvement and  summarized in this report.  

A project web site was established for the project and all  materials were made available to the public for review.  The  project web site is http://pathforward2040.com/.  

All projects were adopted by the North Florida TPO.  Two  projects were excluded from consideration in the Cost  Feasible Plan based on the potential environmental impacts.   These projects are documented in the Environmental  Considerations section.  A maintenance plan is not required in this airshed based on  Section 185A of the Clean Air Act Amendments and the  State Implementation Plan. 

16  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation   

FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION PLAN The 2060 Florida Transportation Plan was adopted in  2010 and creates a shared vision for the future of  transportation in Florida and the goals, objectives and  strategies to achieve this vision over the next 50 years. 

Goal: Make transportation decisions to promote  responsible environmental stewardship  

Goal: Invest in transportation systems to support a  prosperous, globally competitive economy  

 

Maximize Florida’s position as a strategic hub for  international and domestic trade, visitors and  investment by developing, enhancing, and funding  Florida’s Strategic Intermodal System.  Improve transportation connectivity for people and  freight to establish emerging regional employment  centers in rural and urban areas.  Plan and develop transportation systems to provide  adequate connectivity to economically productive  rural lands.  Invest in transportation capacity improvements to  meet future demand for moving people and freight.  Be a worldwide leader in developing and  implementing innovative transportation  technologies and systems. 

Goal: Provide a safe and secure transportation system  for all users    

Goal: Improve mobility and connectivity for people and  freight 

Goal: Make transportation decisions to support and  enhance livable communities 

Develop transportation plans and make investments  to support the goals of the Florida Transportation  Plan and other statewide plans, as well as regional  and community visions and plans.  Coordinate transportation investments with other  public and private decisions to foster livable  communities.  Coordinate transportation and land use decisions to  support livable rural and urban communities. 

  

17  

Eliminate fatalities and minimize injuries on the  transportation system.  Improve the security of Florida’s transportation  system.  Improve Florida’s ability to use the transportation  system to respond to emergencies and security risks. 

Plan and develop transportation systems and  facilities in a manner which protects and, where  feasible, restores the function and character of the  natural environment and avoids or minimizes  adverse environmental impacts.  Plan and develop transportation systems to reduce  energy consumption, improve air quality, and reduce  greenhouse gas emissions. 

Expand transportation options for residents, visitors  and businesses.  Reinforce and transform Florida’s Strategic  Intermodal System to provide multimodal options  for moving people and freight.  Develop and operate a statewide high speed and  intercity passenger rail system connecting all regions  of the state and linking to public transportation  systems in rural and urban areas.  Expand and integrate regional public transit systems  in Florida’s urban areas.  Increase the efficiency and reliability of travel for  people and freight.  Integrate modal infrastructure, technologies, and  payment systems to provide seamless connectivity  for passenger and freight trips from origin to  destination. 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation   

STATE PLANNING REQUIREMENTS The state planning principles to be considered in the  LRTP: preserving the existing transportation  infrastructure; enhancing Florida’s economic  competitiveness; and improving travel choices to ensure  mobility.   Table 8 summarizes the state planning requirements and  how they addressed in this plan. 

18  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 8. State Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  Each MPO must develop a long‐range transportation  plan that addresses at least a 20‐year planning horizon.  The plan must include both long‐range and short‐range  strategies and must comply with all other state and  federal requirements.     The prevailing principles to be considered in the long‐ range transportation plan are: preserving the existing  transportation infrastructure; enhancing Florida’s  economic competitiveness; and improving travel choices  to ensure mobility.     The long‐range transportation plan must be consistent,  to the maximum extent feasible, with future land use  elements and the goals, objectives, and policies of the  approved local government comprehensive plans of the  units of local government located within the jurisdiction  of the MPO     Each MPO is encouraged to consider strategies that  integrate transportation and land use planning to  provide for sustainable development and reduce  greenhouse gas emissions.     The approved long‐range transportation plan must be  considered by local governments while developing the  transportation elements in local government  comprehensive plans and any amendments thereto. 

Action Taken The plan addresses a 22‐year horizon.    Long‐range and short‐range strategies such as TSM&O  were considered.    The prevailing principles were adopted as part of our  goals and objectives.            Future land use forecasts were made in consultation  with local governments and adopted by the North  Florida TPO.  Two land use scenarios were developed  during the planning process.        The North Florida TPO adopted a livability policy as part  of the plan and Active Transportation strategies  including Context Sensitive Solutions were identified.      The approved long‐range transportation plan was  developed through coordination with local  governments and is consistent with the local  government land use plans and capital improvement  programs.  (a)  Identify transportation facilities, including, but not  A comprehensive evaluation of all regional multimodal  limited to major roadways, airports, seaports,  needs was conducted as part of the planning process.   spaceports, commuter rail systems, transit systems, and  As documented in this report, an inventory of major  intermodal or multimodal terminals that will function as  roadways, transit, multimodal and intermodal facilities,  an integrated metropolitan transportation system. The  pedestrian walkways and bicycle facilities, and  long‐range transportation plan must give emphasis to  intermodal connectors.  those transportation facilities that serve national,    statewide or regional functions.  The plan must consider  No projects identified in the plan are located in another  the goals and objectives identified in the Florida  metropolitan area.  Transportation Plan as provided in s. 339.155. If a  project is located within the boundaries of more than  one MPO, the MPOs must coordinate plans regarding  the project in the long‐range transportation plan. 

19  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 8. State Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  Action Taken (b)  Include a financial plan that demonstrates how the  A financial plan was prepared that included alternative  plan can be implemented, indicating resources from  revenue sources. While developing the plan,  alternatives for additional financing beyond those that  public and private sources which are reasonably  are currently in place were not advanced to the Cost  expected to be available to carry out the plan, and  Feasible Plan. Toll revenues anticipated to be available  recommends any additional financing strategies for  to fund the future First Coast Expressway were also  needed projects and programs. The financial plan may  estimated.  include, for illustrative purposes, additional projects  that would be included in the adopted long‐range  transportation plan if reasonable additional resources  beyond those identified in the financial plan were  available. For the purpose of developing the long‐range  transportation plan, the MPO and the department shall  cooperatively develop estimates of funds that will be  available to support the plan implementation.  Innovative financing techniques may be used to fund  needed projects and programs. Such techniques may  include the assessment of tolls, the use of value capture  financing, or the use of value pricing.  (c)  Assess capital investment and other measures necessary to: 1.  Ensure the preservation of the existing metropolitan  Goals and objectives associated with the preservation  transportation system including requirements for the  of the existing transportation system were included.   operation, resurfacing, restoration, and rehabilitation of  The anticipated costs for operations and maintenance  of the state and local transportation systems are  major roadways and requirements for the operation,  maintenance, modernization and rehabilitation of public  documented in the plan.  transportation facilities; and  2.  Make the most efficient use of existing  TSM&O strategies and a dedicated funding source for  transportation facilities to relieve vehicular congestion  these projects were identified.  and maximize the mobility of people and goods.  (d)  Indicate, as appropriate, proposed transportation  Pedestrian and bicycle improvements are addressed in  enhancement activities, including, but not limited to,  the plan as part of the Active Transportation discussion.   Dedicated funding was set aside for bicycle and  pedestrian and bicycle facilities, scenic easements,  pedestrian projects.  Projects that are candidates for  landscaping, historic preservation, mitigation of water  pollution due to highway runoff, and control of outdoor  context sensitive solutions and transit accessibility and  mobility enhancements are also identified.  advertising.  Not applicable. (e)  In addition to the requirements of paragraphs (a)‐ (d), in metropolitan areas that are classified as  nonattainment areas for ozone or carbon monoxide, the  MPO must coordinate the development of the long‐ range transportation plan with the State  Implementation Plan developed pursuant to the  requirements of the federal Clean Air Act. 

20  


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation    Table 8. State Planning Requirements  Planning Requirement  In the development of its long‐range transportation  plan, each MPO must provide the public, affected public  agencies, representatives of transportation agency  employees, freight shippers, providers of freight  transportation services, private providers of  transportation, representatives of users of public transit,  and other interested parties with a reasonable  opportunity to comment on the long‐range  transportation plan. The long‐range transportation plan  must be approved by the MPO  This page is intentionally blank. 

Action Taken The North Florida TPO, Technical Coordinating  Committee and Citizens Advisory Committee were  consulted through the plan development.  These boards  include representations of all users.  A project steering  committee was also established which included  additional members.  The participation of these interest  groups is documented in greater in the section on  public involvement. 

21  


2040 LRTP Tech Memo #2: Goals and Objectives  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you