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Technical Memorandum #1 Public Involvement Plan

February 12, 2015


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Multiple outreach and data gather activities were used to engage the public as part of the process:

The public involvement process used in developing of the plan provided significant input into the needs to be addressed, concerns with specific projects that would result in community impacts and the strategies used in the LRTP.

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Public perceptions telephone survey Interactive project web site On-line asset allocation game Social media Community forum engagement Overview video Contact list Newsletters Overview brochure Youth outreach Visualization techniques Agency meetings Public workshops Public hearing

A significant effort was made to engage minority and underserved populations in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 12898 and Title VI of the Civil Rights. Strategies and tactics used to engage minorities and underserved included identifying the population locations, target outreach to organizations serving these populations, scheduling public workshops in areas with clusters of these populations. Analysis of the investments related to these populations was performed to ensure the investments resulted in equity and the projects implemented would not result in disproportionate impacts.

The stakeholders involved represented a wide range of community organizations and populations.

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Future decision-makers (middle and high school students) were engaged through the Transportation Tomorrow program which resulted in 120 student participants. Users of public transportation were engaged through the telephone survey and public workshops. Representatives of public transportation employees were engaged as part of our steering committee and the North Florida TPO’s committees and boards.

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Freight shippers and freight transportation providers were solicited for participation as part of the outreach process. A presentation was made to the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce’s Logistics and Advisory Group which involved approximately 40 representatives of beneficial cargo operators, overthe-road truckers, shipping companies and railroads, third party logistics providers, etc. In addition to attending the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce’s Logistics and Advisory Group meetings, Norfolk Southern and CSX participated in one steering committee. JAXPORT, the Nassau County Ocean Highway Port Authority, Jacksonville Aviation Authority and St. Augustine Airport also participated through the North Florida TPO Board and committees. The Jacksonville Transportation Authority participated in the agency meetings and the Sunshine Bus Company participated through their involvement in the Regional Transportation Commission. Military freight transportation providers were represented by the U.S Navy Air Station Jacksonville on the steering committee and the North Florida TPO Board. Representatives of pedestrian and bicyclist organizations participated such as the North Florida Bicycle Club and the Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Jacksonville participated in steering committee and public workshops. Significant discussion and focus on investments in active transportation solutions were adopted as part of the plan. Representatives of the disabled participated through the North Florida TPO Board and committees. Several members of the disabled community attended the Needs Plan and Cost Feasible Plan meetings in the urban core. Neighborhood associations and community groups were solicited through our contact list mailings. Business and professional groups were engaged through presentations to local community organizations such as rotary clubs, the Jacksonville Chamber and public workshops. Elected officials and agency representatives were engaged through the North Florida TPO Board and committees, community planning groups and briefings to commissions on the planning process.


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan A total of 109 community meetings, public workshops and the public hearing were conducted as part of the project.

during the meetings or in correspondence), road investment and investment in bicycles and pedestrians also remain a high priority. Figure E-1 summarizes the priorities resulting from the public involvement.

The size of the contact database increased by 53 percent from 653 to 1,000 contacts compared to the 2035 LRTP. The contact database included geographically and demographically diverse organizations. Meeting advertising increased from seven to eight print publications. Radio spots increased and television advertising was used for the first time.

These priorities were reflected in developing of the Cost Feasible Plan by allocating funding through which the North Florida TPO has the primary decision-making authority. When the allocation funds to the types of improvements were analyzed, bicycles and pedestrians are funded with a significantly higher percent of the needs identified than for road capacity projects. The results of the planning process resulted in fair and equitable distribution by mode. Figure E-2 shows the percent of need met in each of the priority areas.

Facebook advertising was again used to drive traffic resulting in 651 clicks and 136,967 impressions. Facebook and Twitter posts were used in LRTP outreach for the first time with 72 tweets and 100 Facebook updates generating 7,110 impressions. Finally, 60 pins on Pinterest generated over 83,864 impressions in ten months.

An analysis of the investments for major projects in minority or underserved populations was also performed and the major investments in these areas consisted of transit improvements for enhanced bus service, bus rapid transit, commuter rail and streetcars. In addition, the Jacksonville Transportation Authority plans to implement transit mobility and enhancement projects that will serve many of these areas to provide greater mobility and access to transit.

In comparison to the 2035 LRTP, meeting attendance improved with an average of 15 per meeting to 16 per meeting. The number of comments submitted increased over 500 percent from 83 for the 2035 LRTP to 500 for this update.

The result of the public involvement process reflected the needs of the community balanced with the regional needs identified in the planning process.

The major themes of the public involvement process were that transit should be a major priority for future investments within the region. Depending on the type of participation (through the allocation game on-line, the allocation game in workshops or comments received

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

70%

63%

60% 50% 40%

39%

33%

30% 17%

20%

18%

12%

10%

11%

0% Road

Transit

TSM&O Allocation

5%

2%

0%

Bicycles and Pedestrians

Freight

Public Perception

Figure E-1. Summary of Funding Allocation Compared to Public Priority

70%

65% 58%

60% 50%

38%

40% 30%

26%

20% 10%

5%

0% Road

Transit

TSM&O

Bicycle and Pedestrian

Percent Figure E-2. Percent of Need Met by Mode

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Freight


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

STUDY PARTICIPANTS NORTH FLORIDA TPO BOARD CHAIRMAN Nancy Sikes-Kline, City of St. Augustine Commission VICE CHAIRMAN Doyle Carter, Jacksonville City Council TREASURER Diane Hutchings, Clay County Commission Brian Reaves, Nassau County Ocean, Highway and Port Authority Charlie Latham, Mayor, City of Jacksonville Beach Alvin Brown, Mayor, City of Jacksonville Reginald Brown, Jacksonville City Council Danny Leeper, Nassau County Commission Rachael Bennett, St. Johns County Commission Ed Fleming, JAXPORT Donna Harper, Jacksonville Transportation Authority Teresa Davlantes, Jacksonville Aviation Authority William Bishop, Jacksonville City Council Doug Conkey, Clay County Commission Carl Youman, St. Augustine/St. Johns Airport Authority EX OFFICIO MEMBERS James Croft, Baker County Chip Laibl, Putnam County Capt. Roy Undersander, U.S. Navy NON-VOTING ADVISER: Gregory Evans, P.E., FDOT District 2 Secretary

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

NORTH FLORIDA TPO TECHNICAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN Jeff Beck, Clay County Engineering Department VICE CHAIRMAN Calvin Burney, City of Jacksonville Planning Department Neil Shinkre, St. Johns County Public Works Scott Herring, Nassau County Engineering Starling Kramer, Clay County Public Works Alaina Ray, Town of Orange Park Tom Morris, Clay County Utility Authority Phong Nguyen, St. Johns County Planning Steve Lindorff, Jacksonville Beach Planning Rick Carper, Atlantic Beach Public Works David Kaufman, JAXPORT Jim Robinson, City of Jacksonville Public Works Asst. Chief Dale Allen, Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Mike Null, Green Cove Springs Planning Department David Buchanan, Town of Hilliard Martha Graham, St. Augustine Public Works Department Gary Larson, City of St. Augustine Beach Mayor Stan Totman, Town of Baldwin Bryan Spell, JEA Systems Planning Joseph Napoli, City of Jacksonville Environmental Quality Division Kevin Harvey, St. Augustine Airport Authority Karen Taulbee, Florida Department of Transportation Vincent Clark, Florida Department of Environmental Protection Todd Lindner, Jacksonville Aviation Authority Ed Lehman, Northeast Florida Regional Council Donald Jacobovitz, Putnam County Barbara Goodman, National Park Service Neil Nance, Jacksonville Transportation Authority Engineering Division Suraya Teeple, Jacksonville Transportation Authority Transit Division Shelby Jack, Town of Hastings Lisa Parlapiano, WorkSource Ron Braddock, Nassau County Ocean Highway and Port Authority Matt Schellhorn, U.S. Navy Peter King, Nassau County Planning Terry Suggs, City of Keystone Heights

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

NORTH FLORIDA TPO CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN Bernie O’Connor, Duval County (at large) VICE CHAIRMAN Frank Riner, Town of Orange Park Richard Darby, Clay County (at large) James M. Lucas, Duval County (Beaches) Richard Berry, Duval County (North Citizens Planning Advisory Committee) Celia Miller, Duval County (Urban Core Citizens Planning Advisory Committee) Lin White, Duval County (at large) Larry Solomon, Duval County (Northwest Citizens Planning Advisory Committee) Lesley Davidson, Duval County (at large) Warren Butler, St. Johns County (at large) Barney Roberts, Duval County (at large) Terry Tillman, City of Baldwin Anita Warming, Duval County (at large) Heather Neville, City of St. Augustine Gene Brisach, Nassau County (at large) Vickie Breedlove, Duval County (at large) Jim Hill, Duval County (Southeast Citizens Planning Advisory Committee) Roger Sharp, Duval County (Arlington/Beaches Citizens Planning Advisory Committee) Martha Moore, Duval County (at large) Ken Amaro, Duval County (at large) Brian Alley, St. Johns County (at large) Bradley Gordon, St. Johns County Melinda Luedtke, Amelia Island Branch Davis, Duval County (at large) Ron Hick, Nassau County (at large) Mike Kloehn, Clay County (at large)

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

LRTP STEERING COMMITTEE Dale Allen, Jacksonville Sherriff’s Office Jeff Beck, Clay County Public Works Bill Ball, City of Jacksonville Public Works Bill Bishop, Council Member, City of Jacksonville Dan Buckman, Nassau County Public Schools Calvin Burney, City of Jacksonville Planning Vincent Clark, Florida Department of Environmental Protection Enis Davis, MetroJacksonville Dawn Emerick, Health Planning Council of North East Florida Janis Fleet, City of Green Cove Springs Barbara Goodman, National Park Service James Green, Florida Department of Transportation Kimberly Hair, Jacksonville Aviation Authority Scott Herring, Nassau County Planning Don Jacobovitz, Putnam County Public Works Dorren Joyner Howard, Florida Department of Transportation David Kauffman, JAXPORT Peter King, Nassau County Mark Knight, City of St. Augustine Planning Starling Kramer, Clay County Planning Gary Larson , City of Atlantic Beach Ed Lehman, Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council Michelle Leak, Mayo Clinic Todd Linder, Jacksonville Aviation Authority Steve Lindorff, City of Jacksonville Beach Planning Dan Locklear, St. Johns County Public Works Carolyn Morgan, Clay County Planning Joe Napoli, City of Jacksonville Environmental Quality Phong Nguyen, St. Johns County Planning Mike Null, City of Green Cove Springs Bernie O’Conner, Citizen Lisa Parlapiano, Career Source Northeast Florida Ed Preston, Baker County Public Works Alaina Ray, Town of Orange Park Matt Schellhorm, U.S. Navy Brian Spell, JEA Joe Stephenson, Regional Planning Commission David Stubbs, JAXPORT Karen Taulbee, Florida Department of Transportation Suraya Teeple, Jacksonville Transportation Authority Brad Thoburn, Jacksonville Transportation Authority Steve Tocknell, Citizen Kim Weisnburger, U.S. Marine Corps

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................................ i Study Participants ......................................................................................................................................................... iv Public Perceptions Survey .............................................................................................................................................. 1 Electronic Media ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 Community Forum ....................................................................................................................................................... 12 Overview Video............................................................................................................................................................ 12 Calendar ....................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Contact List .................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Newsletter ................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Overview Brochure ...................................................................................................................................................... 12 Transportation Tomorrow Youth Outreach ................................................................................................................. 13 Visualization Techniques ............................................................................................................................................. 13 Agency Meetings ......................................................................................................................................................... 14 Needs Plan Workshops ................................................................................................................................................ 17 Cost Feasible Plan Workshops ..................................................................................................................................... 24 Using of Public Input in the Planning Process .............................................................................................................. 25 Public Hearing .............................................................................................................................................................. 28 Environmental Justice and Title VI ............................................................................................................................... 28 Performance Measures ............................................................................................................................................... 32 Summary ...................................................................................................................................................................... 32

LIST OF APPENDICES (available upon request) Appendix A Public Perception Survey Results Appendix B Website and Social Media Appendix C Asset Allocation Game Appendix D Overview Video Appendix E Contact List Appendix F Overview Brochure Appendix G Transportation Tomorrow Appendix H Agency Meeting Summaries Appendix I Needs Plan Advertising, Materials and Comments Appendix J Cost Feasible Advertising, Materials and Comments Appendix K Public Hearing Appendix L Environmental Justice Census Maps Appendix M Other Key Correspondence

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure E-1. Summary of Funding Allocation Compared to Public Priority .................................................................... iii Figure E-2. Percent of Need Met by Mode ................................................................................................................... iii Figure 1. Interactive Priority Map .................................................................................................................................. 6 Figure 2. Visits and Use of Allocation Game .................................................................................................................. 7 Figure 3. Reported Priorities in Asset Allocation Game ................................................................................................. 8 Figure 4. Summary of Budget Allocation ....................................................................................................................... 9 Figure 5. Summary Brochure ....................................................................................................................................... 12 Figure 6. Example of Future City Competition Physical Model.................................................................................... 13 Figure 7. Safety Hot Spots ............................................................................................................................................ 18 Figure 8. Congestion Hot Spots.................................................................................................................................... 19 Figure 9. Comparison of Priorities from Multiple Sources .......................................................................................... 23 Figure 10. Summary of Funding Allocation Compared to Public Priority .................................................................... 27 Figure 11. Percent of Need Met by Mode ................................................................................................................... 27

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1. On-line Asset Allocation Game......................................................................................................................... 4 Table 2. Interactive Priority Map Legend ...................................................................................................................... 5 Table 3. Summary of Priority Strategies from On-line Allocation Game ....................................................................... 8 Table 4. Budget Allocation from On-line Allocation Game ............................................................................................ 9 Table 5. Summary of Strategies from On-line Allocation Game .................................................................................. 10 Table 6. Summary of Demographic Information from On-line Allocation Game ........................................................ 11 Table 7. Meeting Summary .......................................................................................................................................... 14 Table 8. Summary of Meeting Advertisements ........................................................................................................... 20 Table 9. Needs Plan Workshops Attendance ............................................................................................................... 21 Table 10. Summary of Needs Plan Public Workshop Allocation Game ....................................................................... 21 Table 11. Summary of Needs Plan Public Workshop Comments................................................................................. 22 Table 12. Summary of Input by Percent Respondents ................................................................................................ 23 Table 13. Summary of Attendance at the Cost Feasible Plan Workshops ................................................................... 24 Table 14. Summary of Comments During Cost Feasible Plan Workshops ................................................................... 24 Table 15. Summary of Finding Programs and Allocation by Mode .............................................................................. 26 Table 16. Organizations Serving Minority and Underserved Populations ................................................................... 29 Table 17. Major Improvements in Minority and Underserved Communities.............................................................. 31

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT T HE INFORMATION GATHERED IN THE EARLY PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IS ESSENTIAL TO THE SUCCESS OF THE LRTP. W HEN COMBINED WITH PLANNING AND ENGINEERING DATA , IT SETS THE DIRECTION FOR THE PLAN ' S DEVELOPMENT . I T WILL TELL THE N ORTH F LORIDA TPO WHAT THE RESIDENTS OF N ORTH F LORIDA CONSIDER IMPORTANT AND PLAYS A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN ESTABLISHING THE TRANSPORTATION GOALS . This report summarizes public involvement program facilitated as part of the planning process. The activities carried out were to inform and solicit ideas from the public about transportation needs, alternatives and priorities. The program elements are described further in the following sections. The Path Forward 2040 Public Involvement Plan contained a structured process to inform the public and interested parties and solicit input in identifying transportation needs and prioritizing projects. Multiple methods were used to engage and solicit input from the public as part of the planning process.

In addition to the narrative provided herein, the following appendices document the public involvement process:        

Appendix A Public Perception Survey Results Appendix B Website and Social Media Appendix C Asset Allocation Game Appendix D Overview Video Appendix E Contact List Appendix F Overview Brochure Appendix G Transportation Tomorrow Appendix H Agency Meeting Summaries


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan     

Appendix I Needs Plan Advertising, Materials and Comments Appendix J Cost Feasible Advertising, Materials and Comments Appendix K Public Hearing Appendix L Environmental Justice Census Maps Appendix M Other Key Correspondence

PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS SURVEY

A survey was conducted online, by landline telephone and by mobile phone among residents of Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Putnam, and St. Johns counties to identify opinions on transportation issues and needs. A total of 759 respondents participated in the survey. The key findings are listed below: 

Of the respondents who work outside the home, 92 percent traveled to their jobs by private car, while three percent rode the bus, two percent participated in a car pool, and the remainder went by bicycle (one percent), airplane (one percent), walking (0.5 percent), or were always on the road, such professional truckers (one percent). About seven percent of the commuters said that the traffic on their primary road to work was “always backed up far below the speed limit,” and 21 percent said their road was “usually below the speed limit unless there’s bad weather or an accident.” Interstate 10 was most often cited as “always backed up,” by 25 percent of the people who used it. The mean commuting time to work was 24 minutes, and the median commute was 20 minutes. These findings were unchanged from the 2008 transportation survey. About 86 percent of the commuters reported that their current commuting time was acceptable to them, while 14 percent found it “unacceptable.” 97 percent said they would be willing to accept a commute up to 30 minutes to work. About 17 percent of the respondents reported that they had used public transit in North Florida during the past year. Public transit use was highest among respondents age 18 to 24, at 36 percent, and also among those with household incomes under $25,000, at 28 percent. Among those who used public transportation, 61 percent used the bus, 27 percent used a trolley, 26 percent used the Skyway, and 23 percent used a van or shuttle service. Most residents of North Florida have used public transit in another city: 67 percent said they had used

public transit while traveling in another city. In this case, the rate of usage increased with household income, rising from a low of 43 percent among those with household incomes below $25,000 to 81 percent among those with household incomes of $150,000 and over. Those who had used public transit in another city had most often used a bus (68 percent), subway (62 percent), commuter rail (35 percent) or light rail (28 percent). The “need for better mass transit” was identified by 22 percent of the respondents as the most important transportation issue in North Florida. Fifteen percent specifically mentioned the need for an expanded bus system, while 13 percent called for an expanded road system and 12 percent mentioned the need to alleviate traffic congestion in general. Only one of eight ideas for transportation was deemed a “high priority” by a majority of the respondents. “Providing smooth-flowing traffic on local highways” is a high priority for 72 percent of the respondents, 47 percent placed a high priority of “Providing convenient public transit alternatives,” and 37 percent placed a high priority on “Promoting the use of alternative fuels and vehicles.” Of the respondents, 28 percent felt that public transit services in North Florida are adequate, while 52 percent said they are not adequate and 20 percent were “not sure.” Those who said public transit is not adequate were invited to suggest what the region should do to improve it. 36 percent called for “more buses” or “more bus routes.” 18 percent suggested using light rail, and 13 percent proposed expanding all of the public transit options for greater accessibility. Public opinion was divided on the best long-term solution to reducing traffic in their area. “Improving public transit,” was supported by 37 percent. About 26 percent favored “developing communities where people don’t have to drive so much” and 24 percent advocated “building new roads.”

A copy of the survey report is provided in Appendix A.

ELECTRONIC MEDIA

The public information campaign used multiple forms of electronic media to inform and solicit public input.  

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Interactive project web site Asset allocation game


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan  

Social media Community forum engagement

The following summarizes the geographic clusters of comments: 

A summary of these media are provided in Appendix B.

PROJECT WEB SITE The pathforward2040.com website is included:     

Home page with news, events and social media feed, overview video and link to asset allocation game Plan development overview with news and frequently asked questions Project lists, maps and documents Public involvement opportunities including the asset allocation game, online survey and social media Project team contact information

In the urban core, transit was identified as the highest priority in the comments (29 comments). This is the consistent with comments received through other sources (public perception survey, public meetings, etc.). The next highest comment was related to freight and port-related investments (8 comments).

Table 3 summarizes the priority strategies and rankings of the participants. Figure 3 summarize the reported priorities. Similar to other sources of input, transit and bicycle and pedestrian improvements were the highest ranked priorities followed by maintaining our roadways and improving traffic flow.

From September 2013 to December 2014 the site had 4,527 users, 5,586 sessions and 9,652 page-views. The most popular page was “Get Involved” which detailed public involvement opportunities including a survey, asset allocation game, meetings and events. The second most popular page was “Resources” which included project lists, maps and study documents.

In Table 4 and Figure 4, when the budget was allocated, enhancing safety and widening roadways were budgeted higher than transit or bicycles and pedestrians. A total of 1,714 data points were input on the strategies recommended within each priority area More males than females responded. The household income was distributed to higher income brackets than exist within the region with a weighted average of $82,500 versus a median wage for the region of $42,400. Ten responders were in the low income bracket with a household income of less than $10,000 per year.

ASSET ALLOCATION GAME The Path Forward 2040 website included a link to an “asset allocation game” where visitors could provide input. There were five screens that are summarized in Table 1 summarizes the game. The project resulted in 1 1,400 visitors and 257 persons provided data.

Table 5 summarizes the strategies recommended in the on-line allocation game. Table 6 is a summary of the demographics of the participants.

F

Figure 1 is a map of the locations where users identified priority locations. Table 2 is a legend for the map indicating the priority of the map input by color.

A report summarizing the input from the allocation game is provided in Appendix C.

The input received for users peaked around placements in MetroJacksonville.com an online community forum on transportation. Figure 2 summarizes the number of visitors use of the allocation game by period.

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Map Data on Google Drive https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1m6 MDLQVmM8JACZ1J9n4hYH32Irs_v2Ie-TSFvo2O Map on Google Maps https://www.google.com/fusiontables/embedviz?q=select+col2 +from+1m6MDLQVmM8JACZ1J9n4hYH32Irs_v2IeTSFvo2O&viz=MAP&h=false&lat=30.256694798509937&lng=81.79939270020623&t=1&z=9&l=col2&y=2&tmplt=2&hml=TW O_COL_LAT_LNG

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 1. On-line Asset Allocation Game Screen Screen 1 – Welcome

Screen Image

The first screen provides a brief introduction to the project.

Screen 2 – Priority Ranking The second screen asked visitors to prioritize a list of priorities by moving their top three priorities. Ten preset priorities were provided with an option to suggest another priority.          

Invest in ports Enhance safety Expand transit Serve elderly or disabled Serve trucking Alternative fuel infrastructure Maintain roads and bridges Enhance traffic flow Serve bicycles and pedestrians Widen roads

The opportunity to comment about the priorities was also provided and a link to an interactive map provided for users to identify specific locations where projects are needed. Screen 3 – Budget Allocation The third screen asked visitors to allocate budget amounts in ten categories. Each category contained existing budget amounts that reflect federal and state limitations of the flexibility of funding programs within the plan. For example, the Strategic Intermodal Systems road capacity funding category investments are selected by the state and provided to the North Florida TPO for concurrency. The visitors’ task was to allocate the portion of the budget that was not already allocated.

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 1. On-line Asset Allocation Game Screen 4 – Additional Questions The fourth screen asked visitors to provide more detailed input on the type of alternative strategies the respondent would recommend in each of the ten priority areas. This was accomplished by having visitors rank a set of alternatives for each category. Users could also add comments within each priority area describing each alternative.

Screen 5 – Stay Involved The last screen was used to gather demographic data about visitors and provide additional project information for those who wished to provide information.

Table 2. Interactive Priority Map Legend Priority Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Enhance Safety Expand Transit Invest in Ports Maintain Roads/Bridges Serve Bikes and Pedestrians Serve Elderly/Disabled Widen Roads

Icon Color Green Purple White Turquoise Grey Blue Red Yellow

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Figure 1. Interactive Priority Map

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Figure 2. Visits and Use of Asset Allocation Game

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 3. Summary of Priority Strategies On-line Allocation Game Ranking Priority Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Enhance Safety Expand Transit Invest in Ports Maintain Roads/Bridges Serve Bikes and Pedestrians Serve Elderly/Disabled Serve Trucking Traffic Flow Widen Roads

Times Ranked

Figure 3. Reported Priorities in Asset Allocation Game

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Average Rank 27 47 108 38 64 99 19 5 55 20

2.15 2.04 1.74 2.13 2.17 1.99 2.37 2.20 1.96 1.60


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 4. Budget Allocation from On-line Allocation Game Budget Item Enhance Safety Widen Roads Expand Transit Serve Bikes & Pedestrians Serve Elderly/Disabled Maintain Roads & Bridges Invest in Ports Serve Trucking Traffic Flow Alternative Fuel Infrastructure

Dollars Allocated

Average Dollars 399 166 1024 847 217 548 287 44 412 187

Figure 4. Summary of Budget Allocation

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2.79 1.15 7.11 5.88 1.52 3.81 1.99 0.31 2.86 1.30


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 5. Summary of Strategies from On-line Allocation Game Strategy Alternative Fuels I would not invest in alternative fuels Incentives for alternative fuel purchases Incentives for compressed natural gas stations Incentives for electronic vehicle stations Enhance Safety Access management (reducing driveways and closing medians) Improving traffic signals (removing "permitted left turn phases, etc.) Intersection improvements (adding turn lanes, etc.) Expand Transit Commuter rail Enhancing bus service Expanding bus services Trolley services Invest in Ports I would not invest in ports Improve rail access to ports Improve water access to ports (dredging) Serve Bicyclists and Pedestrians Construct bicycle lanes Construct paths separate from the roadway Construct sidewalks Traffic Flow Road rangers Roadway message signs Traffic signal coordination Widen Roads Build new roads Construct or improve intersections and interchanges Widen existing roadways Widen roadways with express lanes Total

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Inputs 224 26 72 53 73 233 68 64 101 306 97 68 70 71 214 23 81 44 66 263 78 103 82 209 51 55 103 263 49 96 58 1,712

Relative Rank 1.81 2.19 1.71 1.92 1.68 1.69 1.93 2.13 1.26 2.09 1.62 2.10 2.54 2.28 1.76 2.26 1.63 2.30 1.39 1.77 1.90 1.55 1.91 2.18 1.93 1.84 2.03 2.82 1.52 2.13 2.07 1.84


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Table 6. Summary of Demographic Information from On-line Allocation Game Survey item Gender Female Male Household Income Less than $25,000 $25,000 but less than $50,000 $50,000 but less than $100,000 $100,000 but less than $150,000 $150,000 and over Residents in Household 1 2 3 4 5 More than 5 Number of Drivers in Household 1 2 3 4 5 Number of Vehicles in Household 1 2 3 4 5 Work Trip Travel Modes Bike Bus Drive Mix of modes Commute Durations Less than 10 minutes Between 10 and 30 minutes Between 30 and 60 minutes More than 1 hour

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Number of Responses 117 43 74 105 10 16 44 25 10 106 21 47 15 18 4 1 109 22 70 11 5 1 107 25 60 14 7 1 106 3 2 86 15 101 24 54 20 3


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

SOCIAL MEDIA

who sign up via the website. The contact list is provided in Appendix E.

The North Florida TPO’s Facebook page and Twitter account were used to post study updates, meetings, events and information. The public involvement team posted 72 tweets and 100 Facebook status updates generating 7,110 impressions. Facebook advertising was used to generate traffic to the asset allocation game December 2013 to February 2014 resulting in 136,967 impressions and 651 clicks to the site.

NEWSLETTERS

Newsletters announcing meetings and study updates were distributed to the contact list at the beginning of the study, prior to each round of public meetings.

Two Pinterest boards were developed to encourage input – “What’s Your Vision?” and “Transportation Flashback.” Sixty pins were placed generating over 8,000 impressions per month. The most popular pin, “More bike paths, please!” showed the Cherry Creek bike path in Denver and was re-pinned over 50 times.

OVERVIEW BROCHURE

An overview brochure was created to introduce the LRTP update process and participation opportunities. The complete brochure was distributed at meetings and events throughout the course of the project. The brochure cover is shown in Figure 5. The brochure is provided in Appendix F.

COMMUNITY FORUM

The Metrojacksonville.com is an online news publication and community forum was used to share articles about the update, promote discussion and obtain comments. Each round of public meetings was promoted on the site through editorial articles and banner advertising that linked to the pathforward2040.com site.

OVERVIEW VIDEO

An overview video was created to explain the LRTP process. The video was posted on the website and used for presentations, meetings and workshops. The video can be viewed at www.pathforward2040.com.

CALENDAR

A public involvement calendar was developed to schedule and document presentations, group meetings, public workshops and outreach events throughout the study.

CONTACT LIST

A contact list of stakeholders was developed to include elected officials, agency partners, transportation-related organizations, business and civic groups, neighborhood associations, environmental groups, organizations serving the elderly, disabled, minority and low-income populations, meeting attendees and interested parties

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Figure 5. Summary Brochure


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW YOUTH OUTREACH

As part of the 2014 National Engineer’s Week Future City Competition, 120 students in elementary, middle and high school throughout North Florida imagined their “city of the future”. The competition engages teams of students, educators and mentors to prepare vision statements, write research essays, use the SimCity™ software, build scale models with recycled materials, and present their ideas for cities of the future in the year 2050. A summary of their activities is provided in Appendix G. The participating schools included:     

Video – a project video was prepared explaining the context and planning process used.

AGENCY MEETINGS

A total of 109 community small group, steering committee, North Florida TPO Board or committees, or community organization briefings were conducted during the planning process. Table 7 summarizes these meetings by organization and if the meeting was a technical meeting, citizens meeting, and if the meeting engaged or invited minorities, underserved populations or businesses. Summaries of the key meetings are provided in Appendix H.

Clay County - Argyle Elementary Duval County - Lee High School Duval County - Westview K-8 Nassau County - Yulee Middle School St. Johns County - Florida School for the Deaf and Blind

STEERING COMMITTEE The Steering Committee was formed with representatives from the TPO Technical Coordinating Committee, Citizens Advisory Committee, Board, agencies, environmental, business and community groups. The members of the Steering Committee are shown in the forward to this report and included representatives from:

Individuals from transportation agencies and consulting firms volunteered as mentors. The result of the program was education on the role of transportation in regional development. The participants identified a wide range of future technologies for transit that included trains, hyperloops, gondola and bus rapid transit. Livability was also emphasized as part of several models. Figure 6 is an example of the one of the physical models developed by Yulee Middle School.

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VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES

Career Source Citizens Community forum (Metro Jacksonville) Elected officials Florida Department of Environmental Protection FDOT Health Planning Council of Northeast Florida Jacksonville Aviation Authority

Visualization techniques are required to communicate the planning process to the public. The visualization techniques employed included: 

Allocation games – on-line and interactive meeting games were used to engage the public in the virtual or physical allocation of resources. Interactive map for needs – as part of the on-line allocation game, participants could locate specific project needs and add comments explaining their needs. Temperature charts – as part of the Needs Plan public workshops temperature charts were used to explain intensity and extent of congestion and safety challenges. Maps, charts and graphs – presentations were used as part of the public workshops to explain the purpose, intent and process used in the development of the plan.

Figure 6. Example Future City Physical Model

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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 7. Meeting Summary Date 22-Feb-13 26-Jun-13 9-Jul-13 10-Jul-13 11-Jul-13 13-Jul-13 15-Jul-13 16-Jul-13 16-Jul-13 18-Jul-13 22-Jul-13 22-Jul-13 23-Jul-13 30-Jul-13 31-Jul-13 31-Jul-13 2-Aug-13 5-Aug-13 6-Aug-13 9-Aug-13 9-Aug-13 9-Aug-13 12-Aug-13 12-Aug-13 13-Aug-13 16-Aug-13 16-Aug-13 16-Aug-13 25-Aug-13 28-Aug-13 5-Sep-13 5-Sep-13 9-Sep-13 24-Sep-13 1-Oct-13 6-Dec-13 17-Dec-13 10-Jan-14 14-Jan-14 14-Jan-14

Event

County

Agency Kickoff Meeting Steering Committee Meeting #1 Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Baker County Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – Town of Orange Park Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Clay County Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Nassau County Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – City of St. Augustine Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Fernandina Beach Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - St. Johns County Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Putnam County Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – City of Hastings Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Marineland Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Green Cove Springs Jax2035 Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee of the Florida Bicycle Association Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Callahan City Hall Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – City of Jacksonville Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Macclenney Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Penney Farms Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - St. Augustine Beach Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Atlantic Beach Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Jacksonville Beach Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Neptune Beach Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Pomona Park Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Welaka Jax2035 Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee of the Florida Bicycle Association Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Crescent City Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Interlachen Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – City of Palatka Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Penney Farms Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion – City of Yulee Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Baldwin Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Keystone Heights Travel Demand Model Government Staff Discussion - Town of Glen St. Mary Jax2035 Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee of the Florida Bicycle Association Jax2035 Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee of the Florida Bicycle Association Regional Transportation Commission Jax2035 Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee of the Florida Bicycle Association Data Forecasts and Needs Teleconference - Putnam County Data Forecasts and Needs Teleconference - Clay County Data Forecasts and Needs Teleconference - Nassau County

14

Region Region Baker Clay Clay Nassau St. Johns Nassau St. Johns Putnam St. Johns St. Johns Clay Regional Nassau Duval Baker Clay St. Johns Duval Duval Duval Putnam Putnam Regional Putnam Putnam Putnam Clay Nassau Duval Clay Baker Regional Regional Region Regional Putnam Clay Nassau

Technical                                        

Citizen

Minority or Underserved

Business

   


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 7. Meeting Summary Date 14-Jan-14 16-Jan-14 26-Feb-14 26-Feb-14 1-Mar-14 12-Mar-14 13-Mar-14 24-Mar-14 27-Mar-14 2-Apr-14 2-Apr-14 3-Apr-14 10-Apr-14 14-Apr-14 14-Apr-14 14-Apr-14 15-Apr-14 17-Apr-14 22-Apr-14 22-Apr-14 22-Apr-14 23-Apr-14 23-Apr-14 24-Apr-14 28-Apr-14 4-May-14 6-May-14 7-May-14 7-May-14 7-May-14 10-May-14 12-May-14 15-May-14 28-May-14 4-Jun-14 4-Jun-14 5-Jun-14 12-Jun-14 12-Jun-14

Event

County

Data Forecasts and Needs Teleconference - St. Johns County Regional Transportation Commission Amelia Island-Fernandina Beach-Yulee Chamber Government Affairs Committee Regional Transportation Commission Northewest Jacksonville Sherriff ShAdCo Safety Fair City of Jacksonville North Citizens Planning Advisory Committee North Florida TPO Board Briefing Emmanuel United Methodist Church -Palatka Steering Committee Meeting #2 North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing Regional Transportation Commission North Florida TPO Board Briefing City of Jacksonville TEU Committee Briefing St. Augustine City Commission West Augustine Community Redevelopment Association Needs Plan Public Workshop – St. Augustine City Commission Chambers Needs Plan Public Workshop – Clay County Thrasher-Horne Center Baker County Commission Briefing Clay County Commission Briefing Needs Plan Public Workshop – Baker County Commission Chambers Nassau County Commission Briefing Needs Plan Public Workshop – Nassau County Commission Chambers Needs Plan Public Workshop – Duval County Florida State College Deerwood Needs Plan Public Workshop – Putnam County Commission Chambers Trinity United Methodist Church - Fernandina Shrimp Festival St. Johns County Commission Briefing Steering Committee Meeting #3 North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing National Train Day Healthy Baker - Baker County Health Department Springfield Community Meeting with Congresswoman Brown Regional Transportation Commission North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing Rotary Club of Arlington Lincolnville Neighborhood Association City of Jacksonville Northwest Citizens Planning Advisory Committee

15

St. Johns Region Nassau Region Duval Duval Region Putnam Region Region Region Region Region Duval St. Johns St. Johns St. Johns Clay Baker Clay Baker Nassau Nassau Duval Putnam Nassau St. Johns Region Region Region Duval Baker Duval Region Region Region Duval St. Johns Duval

Technical

Citizen

 

      

    

                 

Minority or Underserved

Business

        

 

 

  

 

  

  

 

 

   

 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 7. Meeting Summary Date 18-Jun-14 18-Jun-14 26-Jun-14 6-Aug-14 6-Aug-14 6-Aug-14 14-Aug-14 27-Aug-14 11-Sep-14 16-Sep-14 16-Sep-14 17-Sep-14 18-Sep-14 22-Sep-14 23-Sep-14 24-Sep-14 1-Oct-14 1-Oct-14 1-Oct-14 4-Oct-14 9-Oct-14 14-Oct-14 22-Oct-14 28-Oct-14 5-Nov-14 5-Nov-14 13-Nov-14 13-Nov-14 17-Nov-14 3-Dec-14

Event

County

River Region Human Services Community Review Panel SouthPoint Rotary Steering Committee Meeting #4 Steering Committee Meeting #5 North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Board Briefing Southside Businessmen's Club North Florida TPO Board Briefing Associated Builders and Contractors Women's Council Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop - Jacksonville Main Library Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop - Fleming Island High School Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop - American Beach Community Center Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop - Bartram Trail Library Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop - Jacksonville Beach City Hall Regional Transportation Commission Steering Committee Meeting #6 North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing Clay Soul Food Festival North Florida TPO Board Briefing Logistics Advisory Group Regional Transportation Commission Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshop – North Florida TPO Board Room North Florida TPO Citizens Advisory Committee Briefing North Florida TPO Technical Coordinating Committee Briefing Public Hearing – North Florida TPO Board Room North Florida TPO Board Briefing Lakeshore Area Preservation Society Regional Transportation Commission

Duval Duval Region Region Region Region Region Duval Region Duval Duval Clay Nassau St. Johns Duval Region Region Region Region Clay Region Region Region Duval Region Region Region Region Duval Region

16

Technical

Citizen

 

Minority or Underserved 

  

  

 

       

 

Business

   

   

 

 

  

  

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  

    

 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan           

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION

Jacksonville Sherriff Office Jacksonville Transportation Authority JAXPORT Local governments Mayo Clinic (healthcare) National Park Service Regional Planning Commission Regional Transportation Commission U.S. Marine Corps U.S. Navy WorkSource

In 2013, the Florida Legislature established a Regional Transportation Commission for the six county area of Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns Counties. The commission is charged with developing a regional multimodal corridors plan and identifying funding to support deployments of regional nature. As part of the planning process, briefings were provided throughout the planning process in December of 2013, January, February, March, April, May, September and October of 2014. At the December 3, 2014 meeting, the commission endorsed of the plan.

The steering committee met six times - in June of 2013, and March, May, June, August and October of 2014.

NEEDS PLAN PUBLIC WORKSHOPS

TECHNICAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE The members of the Technical Coordinating Committee are summarized in the Forward of this report and include representatives from:             

MEETING FORMAT Six Needs Plan public workshops were conducted in April 2014. One workshop was conducted in each of the six counties participating in the Needs Plan. A presentation was provided during the workshops that provided:

FDOT Jacksonville Aviation Authority Jacksonville Sherriff Office JAXPORT Local governments National Park Service Ocean Highway and Port Authority Regional Planning Commission Regional Transportation Commission St. Augustine Airport Authority U.S. Navy Utilities (JEA and Clay County) WorkSource

       

Briefings and workshops were provided to the Technical Coordinating Committee in April, May, June, August, October and November of 2014. These meetings are publically noticed in accordance with the North Florida TPO policies.

Overview of the planning process Goals and objectives Summary of trends and conditions related to population growth Increases in congestion Growth in transit ridership Crashes Maps were used to provide visualizations of the hot spots for congestion and safety Opportunities for public input through the web page and allocation game, comment cards during the workshop and contact information for the North Florida TPO.

Examples of the visualization techniques used are shown in Figure 7 for safety hot spots and Figure 8 for congestion hot spots. The meeting materials are provided in Appendix I.

CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE The members of the Citizens Advisory Committee are summarized in the Forward of this report. Briefings and workshops were provided to the Citizens Advisory Committee in April, May, June, August, October and November of 2014. These meetings are publically noticed in accordance with the North Florida TPO policies.

Table 8 summarizes the public notifications for the Needs Plan and Cost Feasible Plan public workshops and the Cost Feasible Plan Public Hearing.

PARTICIPATION A summary of the attendees at each of the Needs Plan public workshops are summarized in Table 9.

17


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Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 8. Summary of Public Meeting Advertisements Needs Plan Workshops

Dates

Targeted Minority or Underserved

Needs Plan Workshops: 22-Apr-14, 23-Apr-14, 23-Apr-14, 24-Apr-14, 28-Apr-14 Florida Times-Union

8-Apr-14

St. Augustine Record

8-Apr-14

Baker County Press

10-Apr-14

Clay Today

10-Apr-14

Florida Star

12-Apr-14

Eco Latino

14-Apr-14

Fernandina News Leader

16-Apr-14

Palatka Daily News

22-Apr-14

Radio  WJBT 93.3 The Beat (Urban Contemporary)  WQIK FM 99.9 (Country)  WSOL V1015 FM (Urban Adult Contemporary)  WJGH Jack FM (Classic Hits)  WNWW Kiss FM (Pop Contemporary)  WFXJ Sports Radio AM 930 (Sports) Metrojacksonville.com banner

7-Apr-14 through 23-Apr-14

13-Apr-14 through 28-Apr-14

Cost Feasible Plan Workshops 18-Sep-14, 2-Sep-14, 17-Sep-14, 23-Sep-14, 16-Sep-14 Florida Times-Union

9-Sep-14 and 16-Sep-14

St. Augustine Record

9-Sep-14

Creekline (Northwest St. Johns County) Southside Newsline (zip code 32256) Beaches Leader

Delivered 8-Sep-14 through 11-Sep-14 Delivered 1-Sep-14 through 4-Sep-14 11-Sep-14

Ponte Vedra Beach Leader

11-Sep-14

Fernandina News-Leader

12-Sep-14

Clay Today

11-Sep-14

Florida Star

13-Sep-14

Eco Latino web banner

1-Sep-14 through 30-Sep-14

Metrojacksonville.com banner

4-Sep-14 through 23-Sep-14

Radio - WJCT First Coast Connect

10-Sep-14

Television – First Cost Connect

8-Sep-14 through 22-Sep-14

Cost Feasible Plan Workshop 28-Oct-14 Florida Times-Union

23-Oct-14

Public Hearing 13-Nov-14 Florida Times-Union

24-Cot-14 and 25-Oct-14

20


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 9. Needs Plan Workshops Attendance Location Baker County – Commission Chambers Clay County - Thrasher-Horne Center Duval County - FSCJ Deerwood Nassau County – Commission Chambers Putnam County – Commission Chambers St. Johns County - St. Augustine City Commission Chambers Total Average Per Meeting

Attendance 15 20 8 9 9 43 104 17.3

During the workshops an allocation game was conducted using tokens for participants to determine how they would invest their resources similar to the interactive project web site. Stations focusing on five categories – bicycle and pedestrian, road capacity, safety and TSM&O, transit and freight were provided. Each station included a map and list of potential projects needed, reference brochures pertaining to previous studies and a tube for that category. As attendees arrived, they were given a handout explaining the workshop and a pouch of ten tokens to place in tubes at each of the five stations based on their preferences.

Table 10 provides a summary of the results of the allocation game that was conducted during the meetings. This table is colored so that the areas that received the greatest interest are coded green and the least are coded brown. During the public meetings and based on follow-up correspondence (such as emails and phone calls), 155 comments were provided. Table 11 summarizes the comments by topic.

Table 10. Summary of Needs Plan Public Workshop Allocation Game Transit

Bicycles and Pedestrians

Road Capacity

Freight

Safety and TSM&O

Participants

2

26F31F

Baker Clay Duval Nassau Putnam

21% 25% 27% 26% 16%

10% 24% 36% 23% 14%

41% 26% 17% 9% 38%

20% 11% 8% 15% 30%

7% 14% 13% 26% 3%

15 19 8 6 8

St. Johns Overall

40% 30%

31% 25%

15% 23%

6% 12%

8% 10%

43 99

2

The exact number of participants is not known since not all participants fully allocated ten tokens. The values are estimated by rounding to the next highest factor of ten. For example, if 183 tokens were used, 19 participants were assumed. 21


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 11. Summary of Needs Plan Public Workshop Comments Topic Transit Bicycle and Pedestrian Road Freight Safety Miscellaneous TSM&O Context sensitive solutions Need for additional funding Land use and transportation coordination Grand Total Attendees from Baker, Clay and Putnam counties favored road capacity projects as their top priority.

Number

Percent 69 29

45% 19%

22 12 12 3 3 2

14% 8% 8% 2% 2% 1%

2 1 155

1% 1% 100%

Overall, there was a significant increase in support for transit and bicycle and pedestrian projects from previous LRTP updates with the meeting participants.

Clay County participants were closely divided among road, transit and bicycle and pedestrian projects.

Following the Needs Plan workshops, the North Florida TPO received correspondence objecting to the construction of the SR 313 in the vicinity of Twelve Mile Swamp. Because of the environmental fatal flaws and potential for public controversy associated with this project it was removed from the Needs Plan. CR 2209 from SR 16 to SR 9B was also removed from the Needs Plan based over environmental concerns.

Duval County attendees selected bicycle and pedestrian projects as their top priority, followed by transit. St. Johns and Nassau participants prioritized transit first, followed by bicycle and pedestrian projects. Nassau participants also felt equally strong about safety and TSM&O projects.

22


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

COMPARISON OF PRIORITIES When these results of the telephone survey, on-line allocation game and the public meeting allocation game were considered, the results are shown in Figure 9 and Table 12.

Similar to the public meeting participants, the telephone survey respondents had transit as the highest priority. Road capacity was the second priority with a much higher priority than the public meeting attendees. The telephone survey responders rated bicycle and pedestrian improvements as much lower priorities.

450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Transit

Bicycles and Pedestrians

Road Capacity

Freight

Safety and TSM&O

Telephone Survey

290

7

195

0

67

On-line Allocation Game

108

99

139

43

47

Public Workshops

30

25

22

12

10

Figure 9. Comparison of Priorities from Multiple Sources

Table 12. Summary of Input by Percent of Respondents Transit

Bicycles and Pedestrians

Road Capacity

Freight

Public Workshop On-line Allocation Game

30% 25%

25% 23%

23% 32%

12% 10%

Safety and TSM&O 10% 11%

Telephone Survey All Participants

67% 39%

2% 12%

45% 33%

0% 5%

15% 11%

Note: The telephone survey does not total 100 percent because respondents could comment on multiple categories.

23


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

The on-line allocation game had a much high allocation to road capacity than the workshop participants. Transit was the second highest priority.

The meeting locations within each county were shifted to reach new geographic and demographic areas. Television advertising was used instead of radio for the second round of meetings, but public relations effort included participation with agency partners on public radio public affairs programming.

As shown in the summary in input provided in Table 13, 39 percent of respondents prioritized transit improvements and 33 percent of respondents prioritized road improvements. Bicycle and pedestrian improvements compared similarly with safety and TSM&O improvements at 12 percent and 11 percent respectively. Freight investments received the lowest priority.

The meeting materials are provided in Appendix J

PARTICIPATION A summary of the attendees at each of the Cost Feasible Plan workshops is summarized in Table 13 and the comments by priority area are summarized in Table 14.

COST FEASIBLE PLAN WORKSHOPS

Duval County attendees commented that a majority of funding was committed to Strategic Intermodal System projects versus other desired projects focusing on transit, bicycle and pedestrian improvements.

MEETING FORMAT Five Cost Feasible Plan Public Workshops were held September 16-22 in Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns counties and October 28, 2014 in Duval County. The meetings were advertised via newsletters, website posting, social media and radio public affairs programming. Notifications also included general circulation, local and minority publications, web and television advertising. The notifications are summarized in Table 8. Attendees viewed maps and lists of proposed projects. The consultant gave a PowerPoint presentation explaining the funding and project selection process.

Clay County attendees wanted more investment in roadway infrastructure as part of the Strategic Intermodal System. Additional outreach targeting Clay County minority communities showed a desire for more transit. St. Johns County attendees had concerns about the SR 23 First Coast Expressway and Shands Bridge. Nassau County residents focused on the need for bicycle, pedestrian and safety improvements.

Table 13. Summary of Attendance at the Cost Feasible Plan Workshops Location St. Johns County - Bartram Trail Library Duval County - Jacksonville Main Library Duval County - Jacksonville Beach Clay County - Fleming Island H.S. Teach Center Nassau County American Beach Community Center Duval County - North Florida TPO Board Room Total Average Per Meeting

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Attendance 16 28 6 11 32 1 94 15.6


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 14. Summary of Comments During Cost Feasible Plan Workshops Topic

Comments

Bicycle and Pedestrian Transit Road Funding Environment Grand Total

Percent 39 23 18 12 1 90

USE OF PUBLIC INPUT IN THE PLANNING PROCESS

During the planning process extensive agency and community outreach was conducted. During both the Needs Plan and Cost Feasible Plan meetings, significant interest in improving transit and enhanced services for bicycles and pedestrian improvements were provided. During the prioritization funds, significant consideration to advance funding for transit and bicycle and pedestrian improvements were made. Table 15 on the next page shows the allocation of the total funding in the plan to various components based on the primary decision-making authority. With the various funding categories, limitations exist as to how the funding can be used. The FDOT has the primary decision-making authority for other programs with concurrency of the North Florida TPO for 70 percent of the revenue estimated in the plan. The North Florida TPO has primary decision-making authority with the concurrency of FHWA for 11 percent of the revenue and local government funded projects represent 18 percent of the plan.

25

43% 26% 20% 13% 1% 100%


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 15. Summary of Finding Programs and Allocation by Mode Primary DecisionMaking Authority FDOT FDOT FDOT North Florida TPO North Florida TPO North Florida TPO North Florida TPO North Florida TPO North Florida TPO

Program Strategic Intermodal System Turnpike/Tolls SIS Multimodal FDOT Subtotal Other State Highways Transportation Management Area Transportation Alternatives (TALU) Transportation Alternatives (TALT) Transportation Regional Incentive Program (TRIP) State and Federal Transit North Florida TPO Subtotal

Local Local Local Local Local Local

Clay County Duval County Road Capacity JAXPORT Transit Local Match Duval County Subtotal Nassau County

Local

St. Johns County Subtotal Local FTA Passenger Ferry Grant Federal Seaport Grant Federal Grants Grand Total

Federal Grants Federal Grants

3

Roads

Transit

Bicycle and 3 Pedestrian

TSM&O

Freight

$4,057.74 $1,951.22 $6,008.96 $1,297.42

$1,377.21 $1,377.21

$0.00 $91.66

$0.00

$13.44 $31.20 $41.30 $1.06

$34.21

$760.00 $760.00

$178.66

$34.21

$0.00

$11.84 $43.03

$268.75

$21.23 $1,587.40 $236.88 $860.64

$860.64 $39.64 $159.41 $1,296.58

$0.00 $8,892.93

$253.33 $253.33

$253.33 $6.62 $6.62 $2,397.16

$2,006.10 $2,006.10

$0.00

$59.44

$0.00 $186.50

$0.00

$186.50

$7.97 $124.27

$0.00

$186.50

$302.93

$0.00 $34.21

$311.00 $311.00 $2,503.60

$102.47 $1.98

These expenditures are based on 5% of road capacity projects on arterials and dedicated revenues for bicycle and pedestrian projects. 26

Total $4,057.74 $1,951.22 $3,383.31 $9,392.27 $1,389.08 $316.40 $31.20 $41.30 $22.29 $760.00 $2.560.27 $248.73 $963.11 $186.50 $253.33 $1,402.95 $41.63 $167.38 $1,860.68 $6.62 $311.00 $317.62 $14,130.82


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Within the context of these funding program limitations, Figure 9 summarizes the proportion of funding allocated by mode in relation to the priorities provided through public input.

After coordination with local agencies and deliberations of the plan alternatives, the North Florida TPO believes the plan makes an appropriate allocation of resources considering the public input and the proportion of the needs identified through the planning process.

This chart shows that a greater proportion of the total funding is dedicated to road projects than other modes of investment. However, a much smaller percentage of the total needs for roadways (26 percent) are met than with any other mode as shown in Figure 10. 70%

Additional detail on the needs and prioritization of projects is identified in Part Three of this report.

63%

60% 50% 40%

39%

33%

30% 17%

20%

18%

12%

10%

11%

0% Road

Transit

TSM&O Allocation

5%

2%

0%

Bicycles and Pedestrians

Freight

Public Perception

Figure 9. Summary of Funding Allocation Compared to Public Priority

70%

65% 58%

60% 50%

38%

40% 30%

26%

20% 10%

5%

0% Road

Transit

TSM&O

Bicycle and Pedestrian

Percent Figure 10. Percent of Need Met by Mode 27

Freight


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Strategies and Efforts

PUBLIC HEARING

The plan was adopted by the North Florida TPO Board as part of the November 13, 2014 regularly scheduled board meeting. A unanimous vote was recorded to approve the plan. The meeting materials are provided in Appendix K.

As part of the planning process, extensive efforts were made to engage minority and underserved populations through a demographic analysis, targeted outreach, using web sites with interactive opportunities to provide information on needs and priorities, social media, telephone surveys and outreach to organizations and elected officials. The process and performance measures deployed are summarized in the following sections.

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND TITLE VI

Identification of Minority and Underserved Populations The location of minority and underserved population communities were identified using 2010 Census data by census tract. Areas with minority or underserved populations of 50 percent or more map and identified as communities for special consideration. The following communities were identified.

Executive Order 12898, signed by President Clinton in February 1994, directed all Federal agencies to make environmental justice a key part of its mission by identifying and addressing the impacts of programs, policies, and activities on both minority and low-income populations.

1.

In 1999, the U.S. Department of Transportation issued a memorandum to all federally-funded transportation agencies, including state DOTs and MPO, and required such agencies to comply with Title VI and environmental justice. Noting that issues of Title VI and environmental justice were raised by concerned citizens primarily during project development phases of projects, the U.S. Department of Transportation urged that compliance be evaluated as early as possible, specifically, in the planning stages of the transportation process.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Throughout the LRTP study process, the provisions of environmental justice, as defined by the Federal Highway Administration, were followed to ensure consistency with environmental justice and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. North Florida TPO staff and consultants made every effort to include all affected parties from varying socioeconomic groups to ensure that their input was considered in the planning process. The planning process was also conducted in compliance with the following related legislation 



7.

Low income households making less than $25,000 per year. Populations greater than 65 years old. Black: a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Hispanic or Latino: a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. Asian American: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia or the Indian subcontinent. American Indian and Alaskan Native: a person having origins in any of the original people of North America, South America (including Central America), and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa or other Pacific Islands.

Regional maps showing the results of this analysis are provided in Appendix L. No significant populations of American Indian or Native Hawaiian were identified through the mapping.

23 CFR 450.316, providing interested parties with reasonable opportunities to be involved in the metropolitan transportation planning process. Chapter 286, Florida Statutes (Florida Sunshine Law) requiring public access to governmental meetings at the state and local level and requires meetings of boards and commissions to be open to the public, adequately noticed, and recorded via minutes.

Outreach Efforts and Analysis of Needs Multiple strategies were implemented as part of the public involvement process to engage the underserved and minority populations as summarized in the prior section. The organizations solicited for participation in the planning process related to minority and underserved populations are summarized in Table 16.

28


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan Table 16. Organizations Serving Minority and Underserved Populations Organization Low Income 100 Black Men Ability Housing Adult Services Division Asian American Chamber of Commerce  Baker County Health Department  Better Living Community Association  Career Source of Northeast Florida  City of Jacksonville Citizen’s Planning Advisory Committees  Clara White Mission   Clay County Council on Aging Clay Soul Food Festival  Destined for a Change Duval County Council on Aging Edwards Waters College (Historically Black University) Emmanuel United Methodist Church  Habitat for Humanity  Health Planning Council of North Florida Jacksonville Housing Authority  Knots for Kids  Mayo Clinic Nassau Council on Aging National Council for Negro Women   Northeast Florida Community Action Agency Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition  Northeast Florida Veterans Council  Palatka Housing Authority  Springfield Community Meeting  St. Augustine Council on Aging Summer Haven  United Way of Northeast Florida   West St. Augustine Community Redevelopment Authority  Work Source

29

Elderly

Black 

Hispanic

Asian

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

   

   

 

 

 

  

   

      

   

 


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Analysis of Investments Related to Minority and Underserved Populations The public input received from minority and underserved populations related primarily to the need for more mass transit and active transportation improvements. Significant investments are identified in the Cost Feasible Plan to address these needs and a predominant amount of that investment is occurring in areas where minority and the underserved populations exist. Nearly $2.4 billion of transit investments and $303 million in active transportation investments were adopted. The investments in the Cost Feasible Plan are discussed in greater detail in Part Three.

Equity Considerations Analysis of the investments in transit and highway investments was performed relative to the predominant locations of minority and underserved populations. Table 17 on the next page summarizes these areas, the targeted group and the major projects within that area that are funded.

Language Translation According to the U. S. Census 2013 American Community Survey one-year estimate, only two percent of the households in Clay, Duval and St. Johns counties are deemed “Limited English Speaking Households� with the largest concentration being Spanish speaking households at .8 percent. The public involvement materials were produced in English but translation capability into Spanish or Braille for the visually impaired was available as requested. There were no requests. The public involvement team will continue to monitor demographic trends and anecdotal experience within the TPO service area for language translation as needed.

30


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

Table 17. Major Improvements in Minority and Underserved Communities Low Organization Elderly Black Income

Urban Core (downtown and areas along US 90 Beaver Street east of I-295)

Westside Jacksonville and Argyle (area along the I-295 corridor between US 17 Roosevelt Boulevard and I-10)

Arlington and San Souci (north of SR 10 Atlantic Boulevard and east of I295)

East Arlington (east of I-295 and north of SR 10 Atlantic Boulevard)

Hispanic

West St. Augustine (west of US 1 Ponce de Leon Boulevard)

Middleburg and Penny Farms

31

Major Projects       

Enhanced bus service Bus rapid transit Commuter rail Streetcar Skyway enhancements Transit mobility and accessibility improvements US 90 Beaver Street widening

          

Enhanced bus service Bus rapid transit Transit mobility and accessibility improvements I-295 express lanes Ricker Road widening SR 21 Blanding Boulevard widening Enhanced bus service Bus rapid transit Transit mobility and accessibility improvements I-295 express lanes SR 115 Southside intersection improvements and context sensitive solutions Enhanced bus service Bus rapid transit Transit mobility and accessibility improvements I-295 express lanes Kernan Boulevard widening SR 10 Atlantic Boulevard intersection improvements Commuter rail SR 207 widening from I-95 to South Holmes Boulevard Bus rapid transit SR 21 Blanding Boulevard from SR 16 to CR 215

         


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan 

SUMMARY

The public involvement process used in developing of the plan provided significant input into the needs to be addressed, concerns with specific projects that would result in community impacts and the strategies used in the LRTP. 

Multiple outreach and data gather activities were used to engage the public as part of the process:              

Public perceptions telephone survey Interactive project web site On-line asset allocation game Social media Community forum engagement Overview video Contact list Newsletters Overview brochure Youth outreach Visualization techniques Agency meetings Public workshops Public hearing

A significant effort was made to engage minority and underserved populations in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 12898 and Title VI of the Civil Rights. Strategies and tactics used to engage minorities and underserved included identifying the population locations, target outreach to organizations serving these populations, scheduling public workshops in areas with clusters of these populations. Analysis of the investments related to these populations was performed to ensure the investments resulted in equity and the projects implemented would not result in disproportionate impacts.

 

The stakeholders involved represented a wide range of community organizations and populations. 

 

Future decision-makers (middle and high school students) were engaged through the Transportation Tomorrow program which resulted in 120 student participants. Users of public transportation were engaged through the telephone survey and public workshops. Representatives of public transportation employees were engaged as part of our steering committee and the North Florida TPO’s committees and boards.

Freight shippers and freight transportation providers were solicited for participation as part of the outreach process. A presentation was made to the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce’s Logistics and Advisory Group which involved approximately 40 representatives of beneficial cargo operators, overthe-road truckers, shipping companies and railroads, third party logistics providers, etc. In addition to attending the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce’s Logistics and Advisory Group meetings, Norfolk Southern and CSX participated in one steering committee. JAXPORT, the Nassau County Ocean Highway Port Authority, Jacksonville Aviation Authority and St. Augustine Airport also participated through the North Florida TPO Board and committees. The Jacksonville Transportation Authority participated in the agency meetings and the Sunshine Bus Company participated through their involvement in the Regional Transportation Commission. Military freight transportation providers were represented by the U.S Navy Air Station Jacksonville on the steering committee and the North Florida TPO Board. Representatives of pedestrian and bicyclist organizations participated such as the North Florida Bicycle Club and the Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Jacksonville participated in steering committee and public workshops. Significant discussion and focus on investments in active transportation solutions were adopted as part of the plan. Representatives of the disabled participated through the North Florida TPO Board and committees. Several members of the disabled community attended the Needs Plan and Cost Feasible Plan meetings in the urban core. Neighborhood associations and community groups were solicited through our contact list mailings. Business and professional groups were engaged through presentations to local community organizations such as rotary clubs, the Jacksonville Chamber and public workshops. Elected officials and agency representatives were engaged through the North Florida TPO Board and committees, community planning groups and briefings to commissions on the planning process.

A total of 109 community meetings, public workshops and the public hearing were conducted as part of the project. 32


Path Forward 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan The size of the contact database increased by 53 percent from 653 to 1,000 contacts compared to the 2035 LRTP. The contact database included geographically and demographically diverse organizations. Meeting advertising increased from seven to eight print publications. Radio spots increased and television advertising was used for the first time.

during the meetings or in correspondence), road investment and investment in bicycles and pedestrians also remain a high priority. These priorities were reflected in developing of the Cost Feasible Plan by allocating funding through which the North Florida TPO has the primary decision-making authority. When the allocation funds to the types of improvements were analyzed, bicycles and pedestrians are funded with a significantly higher percent of the needs identified than for road capacity projects. The results of the planning process resulted in fair and equitable distribution by mode. An analysis of the investments for major projects in minority or underserved populations was also performed and the major investments in these areas consisted of transit improvements for enhanced bus service, bus rapid transit, commuter rail and streetcars. In addition, the Jacksonville Transportation Authority plans to implement transit mobility and enhancement projects that will serve many of these areas to provide greater mobility and access to transit.

Facebook advertising was again used to drive traffic resulting in 651 clicks and 136,967 impressions. Facebook and Twitter posts were used in LRTP outreach for the first time with 72 tweets and 100 Facebook updates generating 7,110 impressions. Finally, 60 pins on Pinterest generated over 83,864 impressions in ten months. In comparison to the 2035 LRTP, meeting attendance improved with an average of 15 per meeting to 16 per meeting. The number of comments submitted increased over 500 percent from 83 for the 2035 LRTP to 500 for this update. The major themes of the public involvement process were that transit should be a major priority for future investments within the region. Depending on the type of participation (through the allocation game on-line, the allocation game in workshops or comments received

The result of the public involvement process reflected the needs of the community balanced with the regional needs identified in the planning process.

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2040 LRTP Tech Memo #1: Public Involvement  
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