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City Editor: Joe Palmer H 815-753-9646

Tuesday, November 6, 2012 H NorthernStar.info

Police officers give out safety tips for students Brooke Shinberg Staff Writer

DeKalb | On average, the city of DeKalb faces a violent crime every 36 hours, and there is a sexual assault every eight days, according to the 2011 annual report from the DeKalb Police Department. There are a few simple things people can do to help ensure their own safety. “I think as far as the assaults, whether it be sexual or robbery type thing, people should avoid walking late night hours or early morning hours alone,” said DeKalb County Sheriff Roger Scott. “At any time it’s always better to have a partner with you or have a cellphone charged and ready to be used.” NIU Police Sgt. Alan Smith said

Police Beat | Blotter The following was taken directly from area police and fire department records, or from DeKalb County court records. Anyone mentioned is presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law.

Sunday • At 10:35 p.m., officers went The following was taken directly from the University Police. Anyone mentioned is presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law. The University Police Department provides police reports on the Web at finfacil.niu.edu/PublicSafety.

to notify law enforcement is anything seems out of the ordinary. “We encourage students to let us know if lights are out or anything looks suspicious,” Smith said. DeKalb Police Lt. Jason Leverton said the most important way to stay safe is to pay attention. “Well, I think the biggest thing is that people are aware of their surroundings,” Leverton said. “Just when you leave wherever you are, take a look around, look at your surroundings. We don’t want people to become easy targets because they aren’t paying attention.” Area police departments have programs in place to help make the area safer for all. “What we’ve been doing is assigning additional officers to ar-

eas that are busy,” Leverton said. “We are devoting as many resources as we can to those areas. We have officers on foot or on bicycles keeping an eye on things.”

to Hope Haven, 1145 Rushmoore Drive, to serve a warrant. Chiedu O. Ikedionwu, 36, was charged with failure to appear—unlicensed. Ikedionwu was booked and transported to the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office.

tion, Jonnetthe R. Boyd, 31, was charged with battery and transported to the DeKalb Police Department.

Well, I think the biggest thing is that people are aware of their surroundings.”

Lt. Jason Leverton

DeKalb Police Department

Weekends can be a particularly effective time for police intervention, Leverton said. “Very active weekend nights especially, we put as many people as we can in busy areas,” Leverton said. “Because of the police presence we probably have prevented other crimes from happening.”

• At 10:56 p.m., officers observed a vehicle at 1300 Sycamore Road traveling at a high rate of • At 10:51 p.m., officers re- speed. Following a traffic stop, sponded to University Plaza, 900 Aaron Hardt, 33, was charged Crane Drive, for a report of two with speeding, and two counts of subjects arguing. After investiga- DUI. Hardt was released on bond. tiated an investigation. This case Standards and Student Conduct for is open pending further investiga- unlawful possession of alcohol by tion. a minor.

• At 10:16 p.m., an officer was sent to the NIU Police Department in regard to a report of harassment by electronic communications. The officer met with the complainant Friday and took a report. This case is open • At 1:15 p.m. on Oct. 5 an offi- pending further investigation. cer was sent to the Campus Recreation Center in regard to a report Saturday of theft. The officer met with the complainant and took a report. The • At 5:42 p.m. on Oct. 31, an ofcase was administratively closed due to a lack of leads. ficer was sent to the Founders Memorial Library in regard to a report • At 9:30 a.m. on Oct. 30, an of- of theft. The officer met with the ficer was sent to Douglas Hall in re- complainant and took a report. On gard to a report of theft from a mo- Saturday, the complainant recovtor vehicle. The officer met with ered their property. the complainant and took a re• At 7:20 p.m. on Nov. 2, an offiport. On Friday, the case was administratively closed due to a lack cer was sent to Douglas Hall in regard to a report of criminal damof leads. age. The officer met with the com• At 11:56 a.m. on Oct. 30, an plainant and took a report. On officer was sent to the NIU Police Saturday, the case was administraDepartment in regard to a report tively closed due to a lack of leads. of theft. The officer met with the complainant and took a report. On • At 1:09 p.m., an officer on paFriday, the complainant recovered trol at Huskie Stadium met with a their property. person who was under 21 and in possession of alcohol. The meeting • At 1:17 a.m., an officer conduct- resulted in the individual being reed a traffic stop at the 800 block of ferred to the Office of Community West Lincoln Highway. One passen- Standards and Student Conduct for ger, Jere M. Buford, 23, of Chicago, unlawful possession of alcohol by attempted to flee from the scene. a minor. Buford was located and arrested for obstructing a peace officer. Bu• At 1:17 p.m., an officer on paford was processed at the NIU Po- trol at Huskie Stadium met with a lice Department and released on a person who was under 21 and in possession of alcohol. The meeting $150 bond. resulted in the individual being re• At 7:20 p.m., an officer was ferred to the Office of Community sent to Douglas Hall in regard to Standards and Student Conduct for a report of criminal damage. The unlawful possession of alcohol by officer met with the complainant a minor. and took a report. This case is open pending further investigation. • At 1:33 p.m., an officer on patrol at Huskie Stadium met with a • At 8:57 p.m., officers were sent person who was under 21 and in to Northern View Building No. 2 in possession of alcohol. The meeting regard to a report of battery. Offi- resulted in the individual being recers arrived on the scene and ini- ferred to the Office of Community

News

• At 4 p.m., an officer on patrol at the Huskie Stadium met with Nathaniel J. Calder, 18, of Crestwood, who was under 21 and in possession of alcohol. Calder provided the officer with false information. He was processed at the NIU Police Department and released on a $150 bond.

Sunday • At 2:21 p.m. on Oct. 16, an officer was sent to the NIU Police Department in regard to a report of theft. The officer met with the complainant and took a report. On Sunday, the case was administratively closed due to a lack of leads. • At 12:09 a.m., an officer on patrol in Douglas Hall met with a person in regard to cannabis. The meeting resulted in the person being referred to the Office of Community Standards and Student Conduct for possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. • At 1:34 a.m., an officer was sent to the New Residence Hall Complex East in regard to a report of theft. The officer met with the complainant and took a report. This case is open pending further investigation. • At 4:51 a.m., an officer was sent to Neptune Hall West in regard to a report of a residential burglary. The officer met with the complainant and took a report. This case is open pending further investigation. • At 5:57 p.m., an officer was dispatched to the NIU Police Department in regard a report of theft. The officer took report. The case was administratively closed due to a lack of leads.

The Associated Press

In this Aug. 17 photo, Gov. Pat Quinn speaks with reporters in Springfield, Ill. Ballots in at least nine counties in the Nov. 6 election include nonbinding questions asking voters whether they would support the legalization of concealed weapons.

State counties to vote on gun rights The Associated Press

Champaign, Ill. | With most voters focused on the economy or health care when they vote on Tuesday, some in Illinois will get a chance to send a message about gun control. Gun-rights advocates in at least nine mostly rural counties have placed measures on ballots asking voters if they want Illinois to allow its residents to carry concealed weapons. Currently, it is the last U.S. state where it’s entirely illegal. The measures are non-binding, since no local law can override state law. But advocates hope the votes help build pressure on lawmakers to support socalled “concealed carry,” an issue that resonates in much of Illinois, and highlights the divide between Chicago’s powerful anti-gun forces and the rest of the state. While Gov. Pat Quinn and Mayor Rahm Emanuel have both pushed for even tighter controls on guns, both the Republican and Democratic candidates in one downstate congressional race said they’d like to see concealed weapons legalized. And a prosecutor in McLean County in central Illinois said recently that he wouldn’t enforce the current state ban. “Part of it, I’m sure, is that growing up in more rural areas, people have grown up hunting, shooting guns,” said Terry Patton, the Henry County State’s Attorney, who supports the legalization of concealed weapons. “They don’t have the fear of guns, maybe, that someone who has never held a gun or shot a gun in their life might have against guns.” Patton said there are nights he leaves the courthouse when he wishes he could carry a gun. “There’s a fair number of times when I’m walking out of the office at night and just finished making a lot of family and loved ones extremely unhappy, sending someone away to prison.” Quinn has promised to veto any bill that would legalize concealed weapons, and earlier this year pushed for a ban on assault weapons. And Emanuel has pushed for statewide handgun registration, as part of a tough gun-control stance he inherited from previous Chicago mayors. “We don’t want situations when people can pull out weapons at their local grocery store, sports stadium or shopping mall,” said Quinn spokeswoman Brooke Anderson. The Illinois House last year

voted down a bill that would have legalized concealed weapons, but the vote was close. The idea of allowing people to legally walk around with a “deadly weapon” in a pocket or holster horrifies Colleen Daley, the executive director of the Chicagobased Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence. She’s grown used to constant pressure from gun rights advocates to make it legal, but sees no reason to worry it will happen soon. “Every year we do hear, ‘This is the year concealed carry is going to pass,’” said Daley, who isn’t related to the Chicago political family of the same name. In addition to Henry County, the concealed weapons measures are on ballots in nearby McDonough, Mercer, Rock Island and Warren counties, Adams and Schuyler counties in western Illinois, Bond County in the south-central part of the state, and Stephenson County along the Wisconsin state line.

Every year we do hear, ‘This is the year concealed carry is going to pass.’”

Colleen Daley

Executive director of Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence

In Warren County, the man behind the ballot measure is 42year-old Sean McKee, a computer-network administrator, husband and father who lives just outside Monmouth. He started gathering the signatures needed to get the question onto the ballot after a series of break-ins in the rural area where he lives. He installed a security system but decided he’d be in trouble if he actually caught someone breaking in. “What am I going to do if I pull up in our driveway and there’s somebody carrying out our guns from our home?” McKee asked. “I don’t have a gun with me.” Gun-rights advocates believe the ballot measures are a good way to pressure lawmakers to try again, and a reason for optimism. Town hall meetings on the subject around the state have drawn big crowds in both counties with ballot measures and without. “We had a standing room only crowd of 500 people” at a meeting in McHenry County in northern Illinois, said Valinda Rowe, spokeswoman for a group called Illinois Carry that tracks gunrights advocacy around the state. She lives in rural White County in southeastern Illinois.


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