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UP NORTH

Bride Bride FALL/WINTER 2012-13

NORTHERN MICHIGAN’S LONGEST-RUNNING WEDDING GUIDE PUBLICATION

INSIDE: BRIDE & GROOM CHECKLISTS • BUDGET PLANNERS BRIDE-2012 0930 AXX.indd 1

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UP NORTH

Bride

is published by Northern Michigan Review, Inc., 319 State Street, Petoskey, Michigan 49770 Editorial Sheri McWhirter, Special Publications Coordinator Cheryl Stackus Mark Lindsay Mary Jane Doerr

| Inside ■

Cover story

6 10 16 20 23-27

The real-life love story of the bride on our cover cover.................................................

Flowers

What's trending in arrangements, types and colors for fall & winter .............

Photography

Trash the dress sessions ...............................................................................

Reception

Backup plans for autumn/winter weather .......................................................

Planners & checklists ........................

Floral planner........................................................................................................ 23 Bride's checklist .................................................................................................... 24

Contributing Photographers Paul Retherford Wedding Photography Photography by Yosh Lauren Pethers Photography Pink Trillium Photography ShutterBugs Photography e.c. campbell photography Tatum Photo and Design North Star Photographs Northern Art Photography AREA PHOTOGRAPHERS: Send us a CD of your best wedding shots to use in the next issue of Up North Bride Send or drop off to: Up North Bride, 319 State St., Petoskey, Michigan 49770 Retail Advertising Christy Lyons, advertising director (231) 439-9329 clyons@petoskeynews.com Petoskey News-Review advertising staff WED GD1

B Bride

UP U P NORTH

L AU R E N P E T H E R S PH OTO G R A PH Y

Design Wendy Wolfsen 231.347.2544 wwolfsen@petoskeynews.com

SPRING/SUMMER 2013

Groom's checklist ................................................................................................. 26 Budget planner ..................................................................................................... 27

Preservation

Saving the dress after a 'Trash the Dress' shoot ..........................................

Dessert

Groom's cakes................................................................................................

Invitations

Pros and cons of online invites ......................................................................

Honeymoon

Planning a 'mini-moon' ...................................................................................

30 34 38 40

NORTHERN MICHIGAN’S LONGEST-RUNNING WEDDING GUIDE PUBLICATION

INSIDE: BRIDE & GROOM CHECKLISTS • BUDGET PLANNERS

SPRING/SUMMER 2013 Work begins on our spring issue in February. If you are a wedding-related business, put your message in front of those who are looking for your help — engaged couples in Northern Michigan.

Published: Late March, 2013 Deadline: February 18, 2013

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PH M PH OT O G R A PI N K T R I L LI U

Y

PH OT O G R A PH

Y BY YO S H

PAU L R E T H E R FO R D W E D D I N G PH OTO G R A PH Y

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| Cover

Star-crossed: Friends turned lovers BY S H E R I M C W H I R T E R UP NORTH BRIDE PH OTO S BY E .C. C A M P B E L L PH OTO G R A PH Y

A

nna Joseph met her husband in high school, but they were never really sweethearts. That is, until they went off to college, lived in the same duplex building and finally went on their first date. “He said, ‘Let’s go on a real date,’ but I didn’t even know how to go on a real date. It was a little weird because I was on a date with my best friend and I didn’t know how to act. I kept trying to pay,” Anna said, laughing. Anna’s mother, though, always thought there was more to Anna’s relationship with longtime friend Tim Joseph. It never mattered to her that Anna said the two remained just good friends. “My mom always used to say, ‘You have got to marry that Tim boy.’ And your mom is always right. I did end up marrying that ‘Tim boy,’” Anna said. “He waited for me.” The pair didn’t actually date for long, getting married the very next year. And that wasn’t all that happened fast. “He proposed in August and we got married in October,” Anna said. The proposal has a story of its own, she said. Tim intended to propose when the two went to a local park one

afternoon to fly a kite. Anna wanted to try her hand at the outdoor activity for the first time “in forever” and Tim planned to somehow slip the ring onto the kite, so Anna would find it when she reeled the airborne toy back in. That didn’t happen, though. “We couldn’t get the kite to go up. It was so frustrating. So he didn’t propose,” Anna said. Instead, as the Rochester Hills couple drove away, they passed by the nature center at Stony Creek Metropark in Shelby

Township. It looked familiar to Anna and she wanted to stop and look around. As soon as she started to walk down a pathway, she recognized the place as a special spot from her childhood. “I was nostalgic. I hadn’t been there since I was 10 years old,” Anna said. Park officials installed a new overlook deck that provided a view of Stony Creek since Anna had last been at the nature preserve. That was when Tim made his move, Anna said.

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“I can’t remember exactly what he said because I was so shocked. I remember it was something really beautiful. He got down on one knee. Of course I said ‘yes.’” The wedding date came fast on the heels of the proposal and Anna admits there was a good reason for the hurry. She and Timothy found out two days after their engagement began that they were about to become new parents. “Well, I already knew him, so

we thought ‘why wait?’” Anna’s mother took on the Herculean task of collecting and flattening with an iron about 1,000 colored autumn leaves, decorations for the wedding and reception held at Addison Oaks County Park near Romeo. They initially planned to have an outdoor ceremony, but the weather forecast was “up in the air,” so they decided to use the indoor option at the park. The building had many windows so guests could see the beautiful colored

leaves all around, especially since it didn’t actually rain that day, after all. “It was a beautiful day in the upper-60s, which was pretty great,” Anna said. “It pretty much went off without a hitch.” She said the only trouble arose after the wedding day, when the photograph proofs came back. They were a disaster, she said. “They were the worst photos in the world. We left that day with no tangible memories, no  Continued on page 8 Up North Bride

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Friends turned lovers Continued from page 6

really nice pictures from the day,” Anna said. Her advice to brides is to make sure they know and trust their professional photographers, along with their ability to produce great images. In the end, Anna and Tim paid the photographer for her services on the wedding day, but failed to purchase a single print. “She was really mad, actually,” Anna said. The only shining image that came out of the wedding day — Oct. 26, 2003 — is a snapshot a guest took just before Anna walked down the aisle. Both her father, Brian O’Malley, and her step-father, Eric Pett, stood nearby to comfort her, an attempt to ease her nerves as she grew quite anxious just before her two dads walked her down the aisle. “I was just so nervous,” Anna said. “I got stage fright with all those people looking at me.” The snapshot’s importance was underscored when Anna’s father died two years after she wed. “So that was definitely a really important memory,” Anna said. Then eight years later a friend, E’Lisa Campbell of e.c. campbell photography, offered to take a new round of photographs, a way to re-create some wedding images for Anna. But Anna wasn’t sure she’d even fit into her wedding gown again. After all, it had been more than eight years and she had given birth to two children by then. Despite her worries, the gown fit, just as it had the first time. “I got back in it and I cried I was so happy. When you’re a little girl, your wedding dress is it. It’s the only thing,” Anna said. “It made me feel like a bride again, swooning over my husband. I still felt like a princess.” Anna remained somewhat skeptical about having her replacement photographs taken during the “freezing” winter in her mother’s snowy backyard. But in the end, the photographs turned out perfectly, including some taken with her two children, she said. “I felt like my whole wedding had been redeemed,” Anna said. 

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| Flowers

R . J. S C OT T PH OTO G R A PH Y

mbrace the wild: EWedding flowers take cues from nature C H ERY L STAC K U S — U P N O R T H B R I D E

M

any believe June nuptials are the most popular, but September actually is the busiest wedding month of all. The challenge for florists with autumn weddings is a more limited selection from local nurseries and gardens, as the abundance of summer blooms wanes. Yet, the various flowers still in season along with non-floral botanicals such as cattails, pussy willows, curly willow, coleus, ornamental cabbages, lichens, ginger, even bare branches, provide an ample assortment with which to create distinctly original accessories and displays. Ironing and waxing leaves such as maple, oak, chestnut, ash, aspen or fruit trees is an-

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other way to capture a riot of fall foliage colors through October and even well into November. Preserving a collection of the smallest leaves of any deciduous species is an alternative to the typical petals strewn by the flower girl. Also using mint, eucalyptus or bay leaves incorporates the dimension of aroma to enhance the occasion’s memorability. Scattering leaves atop the dining, gift and dessert tables also helps to carry the autumnal theme into the reception. Asters, which symbolize love, faith and wisdom, is September’s official flower, but numerous other options abide: ranunculus, which is often mistaken for roses, along with black-eyed Susan, coreopsis, dahlias, late-blooming

lilies, hydrangeas and cultivars like orchids, anthuriums and roses. Other ideal autumn wedding colors can draw from the rich palette of the changing leaves, including scarlet, russet, sunny orange, marigold, aubergine and chartreuse — perfect for casual or semi-formal events. Shades of brown like cocoa, espresso and dark chocolate can be balanced with a lighter hue, such as sage green or a bright beige to render a more sophisticated look. A slate grey or steel blue wardrobe with wine-colored flowers can be paired with a pale neutral. Nancy Rondel, owner of A.R. Pontius Flower Shop in Harbor Springs, said late summer and fall weddings are on the rise.

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“What I’m seeing is that brides are doing smaller weddings and using a variety of different types of material, asking for more texture and unusual designs. It’s neat. Up here this summer we saw lots of natural materials — pods, ferns even birch bark — paired with white flowers and a few bright pops of color, like hot pink and orange. It was really fun.” Rondel predicts this penchant for quirky combinations “will carry over into fall and winter.” Of course, roses are still a favorite in any season and suppliers are cultivating “larger roses, with great staying power. Once they are open they’re very dependable. They’re also breeding roses with fragrance once again. It’s really wonderful,” she said. Currently, textural interest is very much in vogue. Sydney Wormell, floral designer and owner of Upsy Daisy Floral shop in Boyne City said she’s noticed an interesting trend. “I’m seeing plenty of colorful, traditional fall flowers: mums, gerbera daisies, hydrangeas or snow ball bushes, but the trend is toward a light, more neutral, understated style, like sepia toned-photographs, capturing more of an of English antiquey look,” Wormell said. Monotone color-on-color arrays using contrasting textures is a very popular device right now. For example, Wormell incorporates sprays of berries, pods, ornamental grasses and eucalyptus into her designs. The harder, sturdy surface of bamboo juxtaposed with the delicate fragility of ferns can make  Continued on page 12

S H U T T E R B U G S PH OTO G R A PH Y

E .C. C A M P B E L L PH OTO G R A PH Y

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Embracing the wild

Continued from page 11 goal by interspersing traditional flowers with “big clumps of baby’s breath — no longer just a filler — hens and chicks and other succulents, wheat, rosemary, mint and other herbs,” Burrell said. It’s all about making eclectic creations, she said. Burrell often uses slightly offbeat containers such as canning jars, milk glass or whatever appeals to her idiosyncratic tastes. Recently she assembled several large arrangements, all in assorted copper pots of varying sizes, shapes and proportions. Rustic settings like country churches, open fields or township halls can be accentuated with floral arrangements in buckets, milk canisters, baskets or even hollowedout pumpkins that contain dried wild flowers, wheat, rye or ornamental grasses to create inexpensive designs, she said. Also with a harvest-time wedding theme, cornucopias stuffed with fruits, vegetables, grapevines, gourds and flowers can perfectly symbolize prosperity, good fortune and bountiful lives.

Once the snow flies, brides and wedding planners can choose from a vast array of flowers imported from Hawaii, Central and South America, an almost unlimited number of blooms. Winter is an excellent time for rich, darker jewel tones in clothing and flowers, experts said. Some brides embrace traditional holiday colors with red flowers and berries, Christmas trees, garland, holly, ivy and evergreens festooned with fairy lights, silver and gold cords or ribbon. Others prefer more seasonal color schemes, such as navy or midnight blue, jade, black, burgundy or dark green sometimes accented in striking contrast with pale pink, silver, touches of taupe or pure white. Pine cones as place card holders or scattered across the tables with bare branches — whether or not sprayed gold, white or black and further decorated — help bring nature indoors. “We see more crystals, metallic accents, and faux jewels in the wintertime,” Wormell said.  TAT U M PH OTO A N D D ES I G N

a dramatic impression, along Queen Anne’s lace against the shiny, waxy finish of succulents. Jackie Burrell, proprietor of Flowers From Sky’s the Limit in Petoskey, said brides exercise greater freedom of choice today, with much less conformity to proscribed expectations. “Girls are doing less ‘matchymatchy’ stuff. Really there is no right or wrong, but a definite trend toward a more eclectic mix of bouquets,” she said. For example, instead of the ceremony flowers, sprays, corsages and table decorations all being essentially identical, each attendant in the wedding party may carry or wear individualized nosegays or boutonnieres in different proportions, shapes and styles loosely based on the bride’s bouquet. Centerpieces may be different on every table using just one type of flower or a single color from the bride’s bouquet tied together with the same greenery. Burrell agreed with Wormell that texture is a key consideration right now. She achieves this

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| Photography

N O R T H E R N A R T PH OTO G R A PH Y

rash the dress, rock the frock T BY S H E R I M C W H I R T E R U P N O R T H B R I D E

W

hether called trash the dress or rock the frock photography shoots, local photographers say these unconventional bridal sessions can generate some beautiful images and spectacular memories. Michigan brides have long taken advantage of the beautiful vistas, rolling sand dunes and sparkling waters as a backdrop for lovely landscape-style portraits. But some are getting a bit more into it, literally. More and more brides are being photographed wading into Lake Michigan or lying on the beach in their wedding gown, typically the day after the wed-

ding or even weeks later. But a dip in the big lake isn’t the only option with the state’s abundant hiking trails, streams, inland lakes and other wild places. “I like them because they really give the couple a chance to relax. They don’t have to worry about dirt or grass stains for trash the dress,” said Andrea Bogard, photographer and owner of Northern Art Photography, of Traverse City. Bogard said the beach is perhaps the most popular place for couples to have trash the dress photo shoots. But whether that’s at a Great Lake beach or an inland lake, it’s important to at least be in clean, clear water free

from muck and gunk. You should be able to see the sand on the bottom, she said. “We prefer to use cleaner water, like Lake Michigan,” Bogard said. “But there are lots of options. We’ve done lots of rocks or boulders left behind by the glaciers. It gives you a very different look, not a soft bridal portrait by any means.” Photographer Tatum Criner, of Tatum Photo and Design in East Jordan, said she recently photographed a downstate Michigan couple in a trash the dress session during their Mackinac Island honeymoon. She met and photographed the newlyweds on the island so they could im-

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TAT U M PH OTO A N D D ES I G N

L AU R E N P E T H E R S PH OTO G R A PH Y

mortalize the dress and create lasting memories during their honeymoon. “Not only are they my favorite thing to do, they add so much to a couple’s album. Sessions like this are when you can capture the couple being truly relaxed and together. Their personalities shine, the romance is there and it’s always so much fun,” she said. “I’ve done some where we’re just walking through the woods in the fall and I’ve done others that went four-wheeling through a mud bog. I really encourage brides and grooms to consider these sessions because I guarantee their favorite shots will come from this experience

together.” Criner said she also believes trash the dress photos often turn out the best because wedding day pressure is off. “There’s no worrying about being back in time for the reception, or the pressure from all the guests. It’s just the two of them, in love, enjoying each other and getting some awesome photos,” she said. Bogard agreed wedding day pressure can impact day-of photographs, but knowing a rock the frock session is upcoming can help relieve wedding day tension. Some of the most fascinating images come out of these special photo shoots because it’s

all about the couple, she said. “What they want and where they want it,” Bogard said. “I always offer it as an option. Some brides come to you knowing they want to do it. Some have never heard of it. I think it enriches a wedding album in a very unique way.” But not every bride is keen to, well, trash their dress. That doesn’t mean they can’t have these atypical bridal portraits, though. A less expensive off-the-rack gown can be used in the rock the frock session, especially if the bride wants to keep the one she wore down the aisle.  Continued on page 18 Up North Bride

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Trash the dress

Continued from page 17 Some brides already buy a second dress to wear during the reception celebration, typically a shorter style or at least a less cumbersome one. That second dress intended for the after-wedding party is another possible choice for a trash the dress session. The secret to magical trash the dress photos is in the planning, Bogard said. The bride or both the bride and groom can be photographed in multiple spots, but should be planned in an order

to allow for the messiest poses to come last, she said. Finally, something brides should remember during these abnormal photo shoots is safety. A 30-year-old Montreal bride drowned this summer during a trash the dress photo session, a tragedy that happened after she swam into a deep river and the saturated dress weighed her down. Photo sessions at waterfalls, rivers or any body of water, for

that matter, should be carefully considered. If entering the water, remember the dress will become much heavier and make it more difficult to move around. Swimming into water deeper than your height is potentially dangerous, regardless of swimming ability. But if not wading in and instead simply posing nearby water, be mindful of wet surfaces and maintain sure footing. Awesome photos aren’t worth losing an awesome, newly married life. ď °

N O R T H E R N A R T PH OTO G R A PH Y

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E .C. C A M P B E L L PH OTO G R A PH Y

| Reception

easonal Ssplendor:

Outdoor weddings require indoor back-up plan BY M A R K LI N D S AY UP NORTH BRIDE

W

hen planning an outdoor event, especially in the fall, weather is often a variable that calls for a good back-up plan. Weather is a key detail that comes into play when planning an outdoor event, especially in Northern Michigan. We all hope for beautiful, sunny-but-not-toohot weather for an outdoor event, but the forecast is always changing. It’s a good idea to find a venue that has an indoor or sheltered space available in case of inclement weather. Whether it be the reception hall, a pavilion or open conference space, it’s wise to

have somewhere to go at the last minute, if needed. “At Castle Farms, we guarantee for outdoor wedding ceremonies that the indoor reception space can be accessed earlier in the case of rain,” said Sarah Hagen, lead venue event coordinator. Hagen also shared another good idea. “If no indoor space is available, contact an event rental company and place a hold on a tent. Many companies will require set-up either a day or two prior to the event date and will need a confirmed rental at that time, but by then you’ll be able to have a good idea of the weather forecast to know if you will need the shelter or not,” she said.

For locals, Charlevoix Tent Company offers a wide variety of shapes and sizes to suit any event needs. The company is able to offer not only tents, but seating, lighting, heating, linens and more. Covering all of Northern Michigan, the tent rental business may be the perfect back-up plan for your event or a complement to your plans. For more information contact them directly at (231) 547-9733. When all else fails, you can even incorporate the outdoor weather into your guest favors. Whether you offer umbrellas to shade from the sun or protect from light rain drops, or give away small fans for guests to use to help cool off on a hot day, these

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ideas can be both fun and functional. After planning for the weather comes arranging decorations, food and guests. Use your decor as table weights to keep linens, programs, cards and other items from being taken by the wind. “You can almost always find some weighted item that will go with your theme and help keep everything in place, such as flower vases, large stones, candles, jars or even wine bottles,” Hagen said. When it comes to food, you’ll want to keep in mind other outdoor elements such as: sun, bugs, pollen and the like. “Plan your food and the location of the food accordingly,” Hagen said. “For example, a soft cheese tray probably isn’t the best idea for a midday July event where it will be exposed to heat, and dips can attract bugs easily.” It’s often best to have a covered or small indoor space for the meal display, that may also double as a sheltered space for guests. Another important step is to inform your guests that the event will be outdoors, so they can dress appropriately. Do your best to make sure that guests coming from other parts of the country or world understand the weather conditions and how to dress properly. It’s most likely a good idea to suggest a change of clothes, not only for the wedding party but for other guests who may attend both the wedding and reception. Special consideration should be given to parking at outdoor events. “Ask yourself if there will  Continued on page 22

PAU L R E T H ER FO R D W E D D I N G PH OTO G R A PH Y

N O R T H E R N A R T PH OTO G R A PH Y

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Seasonal splendor

Continued from page 21 be room at the site for all guests to park, or will a shuttle be needed to transport guests from the parking area to the event,â€? Hagen said. If there is limited space for parking, let your guests know so they can make arrangements. Also, inform guests of any parking that might require a longer than normal walk to reach the event, along with special considerations for elderly or handicapped guests. Castle Farms hosts a considerable number of weddings and receptions each year, of all types. For more information on their offerings, visit their website at www.castlefarms.com, or contact the business directly at (231) 237-0884. Castle Farms is located in Charlevoix at 5052 M-66, a few miles south of town. ď °

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| Floral planner Total floral budget:________________

SHOP________________ SHOP__________________ _____________________ _______________________

QUANTITY

BRIDE BRIDESMAIDS TOSS BOUQUET OTHER________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

GROOM GROOMSMEN USHERS FATHERS GRANDFATHERS RING BEARER OTHER________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

MOTHERS GRANDMOTHERS EMCEE OTHER________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

ALTAR ARRANGEMENTS PEW BOWS WEDDING ARCH OTHER________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

CAKE TOPPER/FLOWERS HEAD TABLE CENTERPIECES WELCOME TABLE GIFT TABLE RESTROOMS OTHER________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

Bouquets

Boutonnieres

Corsages

Ceremony

Reception

Other

PRICE EA.

TOTAL

PRICE EA.

TOTAL

FLOWER GIRL _____________________________________________________ HAIR _____________________________________________________ PETALS _____________________________________________________ OTHER________________________ _____________________________________________________ TOTAL TOTAL ________ ________ Up North Bride

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BRIDE’S PL ANNER A wedding should be planned in stages with every decision made as early as possible. Begin by setting deadlines, then check off each task as you complete it. 6-12 MONTHS BEFORE

2 MONTHS BEFORE

Choose the kind of wedding you will have, date and time.

Choose wedding bands and engraving.

Discuss the budget, and who will pay for what.

Check marriage license requirements.

Make arrangements with the officiator.

Plan ceremony, reception, menus, master of ceremonies and music.

Reserve the wedding and reception locations. Select your wedding dress, veil and accessories. Choose the bridesmaids, groomsmen, ushers and honored roles. Have formal black/white photo sitting for announcements. Send announcements of your engagement to bride’s and groom’s local and hometown newspapers. Meet with the florist, photographer, caterer, videographer and DJ or entertainment to discuss budgets and options.

Plan rehearsal dinner and bridesmaids’ luncheon. Complete guest list and address invitations. Make arrangements for lodging for out-of-town guests. Purchase gifts for attendants and groom. Plan reception seating if necessary.

Draw up the guest list with fiancé and families. Plan reception music and reserve band or orchestra. Contact rental coordinator for equipment reservations. Discuss honeymoon and reservations. (Traditionally the groom makes all the honeymoon arrangements.) Arrange for time off work if necessary. Buy a good, sturdy notebook to store brochures and notes. Develop record-keeping system for invitations, RSVPs, gifts and thank-you notes.

4-6 MONTHS BEFORE

1 MONTH BEFORE Confirm all arrangements and contracts. Mail invitations so they will arrive three weeks before the wedding. Pick up wedding rings. Arrange for transportation to ceremony and from ceremony to reception. Attend final fittings. Have your hair and makeup done as your would like to have it on your wedding.

Plan new living arrangements and home furnishings.

Schedule any tanning, manicures, etc.

Select and register wedding gifts and patterns.

Purchase guest book and keepsake album.

Select color scheme.

Contact your insurance agent about naming your fiancé as beneficiary on your life insurance, will and auto policies, and about buying homeowners’ and floater insurances to protect wedding gifts.

Order dress and accessories. Order bridesmaids’ dresses, shoes and accessories. Contact men’s formalwear specialist for men’s attire. Have parents select attire. Order wedding cake. Order invitations, announcements, programs, napkins, matchbooks and thank-you notes.

Open joint checking and savings accounts. Decide on a budget and savings program. Discuss them with your financial representatives. Write thank-you notes as gifts are received.

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2 WEEKS BEFORE Get marriage license. Give caterer final guest count. Don’t forget the wedding party, photographer and DJ. Arrange to have your own gown pressed and delivered. Arrange to change your name on driver’s license, Social Security card, credit cards, bank accounts, insurance, etc. Make arrangements for moving into your new home.

1 WEEK BEFORE Pack for honeymoon. Give bridesmaids’ luncheon/party, give attendant gifts. Confirm directions, housing, timetables with attendants. Brief head usher of any special seating arrangements. Arrange for rental returns.

1 DAY BEFORE Pack the “going-to-church” bag and “emergency” bag. Attend rehearsal and rehearsal dinner. Find a quiet moment to give your fiancé his wedding gift.

THE WEDDING DAY Have a nice, relaxed breakfast. Have hair and makeup done. Relax, and let the planning take care of itself.

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GROOM’S PL ANNER PAU L R E T H ER FO R D W E D D I N G PH OTO G R A PH Y

12 MONTHS BEFORE Select engagement ring.

Discuss wedding plans and budget with fiancée and all parents. Select attendants and at least one usher for every 50 guests. Decide on ceremony and reception with fiancée.

9 MONTHS BEFORE Arrange a visit with clergymember or justice of the peace to discuss ceremony. Start compiling your guest list. Discuss honeymoon destinations with fiancée; consult travel agent.

6 MONTHS BEFORE Arrange to pay for bride’s bouquet; order boutonnieres and corsages. Visit gift registry with fiancée. Complete honeymoon plans. For travel abroad, update passports, visas and inoculations. Arrange transportation to ceremony and reception for wedding party.

3 MONTHS BEFORE

2 WEEKS BEFORE Go with fiancée to get marriage license. Arrange for transportation from the reception to the airport, if applicable.

Complete guest list; give to fiancée.

Attend bachelor party.

After consulting fiancée, order wedding attire for yourself and ushers.

Double-check honeymoon reservations.

Shop for honeymoon clothes. Order wedding rings. After consulting fiancée, reserve a block of hotel rooms for out-of-town guests. Plan rehearsal dinner with parents.

6-8 WEEKS BEFORE Help fiancée with thank-you notes for gifts.

Arrange to move belongings to new home.

1 WEEK BEFORE Remind ushers of rehearsal dinner details (give them the gifts that night). Put officiant’s fee in a sealed envelope and give it to best man to deliver after the ceremony.

Get legal and religious papers in order.

Explain any special seating arrangements for family members, etc., to ushers.

Pick up wedding rings; check engraving.

Purchase traveler’s checks.

Buy gifts for fiancée and ushers.

Pack for honeymoon.

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| Budget planner N O R T H STA R PH OTO G R A PH S

Total budget:________________ WEDDING EXPENSES

Attire

Includes the bride, bridesmaids, groom and groomsmen; jewelry; makeup and hair styling; shoes; accessories

AVG. % OF BUDGET

BUDGETED AMOUNT

COST ESTIMATE

ACTUAL COST

10%

Ceremony

Includes the site, officiant, marriage license, prenuptial agreement, ring pillow, rehearsal site and rehearsal dinner; this could be combined with the reception if both are in the same location.

Entertainment

Includes band and/or DJ for ceremony and reception, sound system rental and cocktail hour music

Flowers and decorations

Includes flowers for the ceremony, reception, bride, boutonnieres, corsages, flower girl basket and others; includes decorations for the reception and lighting

Stationery

Includes formal portrait, wedding photographer and wedding videographer; albums and prints; disposable cameras

Photography/video

Includes formal portrait, wedding photographer and wedding videographer; albums and prints; disposable cameras

Reception

Includes the site, food, liquor/beverages, staffing, taxes, tips, equipment rentals, wedding cake, decorations, favors

Rings

Includes his and her rings, and engraving

Transportation

Includes limousines, buses and shuttles for wedding party and guests; parking attendants

Gifts

3% 7% 9% 3% 10% 47% 3% 2%

Includes gifts for the bride, groom, bridesmaids, groomsmen and others; welcome baskets for out-of-town guests

3%

Miscellaneous

3%

* This sheet does not includes honeymoon expenses, and don’t forget to include taxes and tips in the total amounts. Also, please note that these percentages are general, and can be varied if one section is a higher priority to you than another. For example, if you plan to have a block of hotel rooms reserved for your guests, that could go into miscellaneous or be borrowed from another percentage — just make sure it always equals 100 percent.

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ETHE PA U L R

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L AU R E N PE T H ERS PH OTO G R A PH Y

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| Preservation

S H U T T E R B U G S PH OTO G R A PH Y

aving the gown S

after the party or trash the dress session BY S H E R I M C W H I R T E R UP NORTH BRIDE

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here are ways to save a tortured wedding gown, whether intentionally trashed for a photo shoot or simply one on which the bride dropped a forkful of beef bourguignon or a glassful of red wine. Local dry cleaning professionals have seen a lot of really dirty wedding dresses and said it has to be pretty bad if they can’t fix

it. Clever brides will even before the big day have a professional cleaner at the ready, especially if planning a trash-the-dress photo session after the wedding celebration. Jeff Bradford, of Bradford’s Master Dry Cleaners in Petoskey, said he is able to restore wedding gowns to brilliant splendor, even after the worst. He’s unsure whether his bridal clients participate in trash-the-dress photo ses-

sions, or if some are just really, really messy. “They aren’t always admitting to me what they may have done to it,” he said, laughing. “They have fallen overboard on a pontoon boat, gone for a ride on a Harley or even broken up fights at the reception. They all try to out-do each other.” Bradford said his business professionally cleans more than 150 wedding gowns each year, now 35

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years in the industry. “The worst dress was from the overboard bride. It was still kind of wet when it came in, covered in water plants and mud,” Bradford said. Jackie Yoo, manager at A-1 Professional Cleaners in Petoskey, said he long ago grew accustomed to wedding gowns coming in to the shop in poor condition, especially around the bottom. Whether brides walk on mud, clay, dirt roads or asphalt driveways, it can create an absolute mess, Yoo said. “Sometimes the asphalt is

worked in. With red wine versus the asphalt, I’d say the asphalt is harder to clean,” he said. “If it’s after the wedding, it’s really dirty at the bottom.” Professional cleaners often are able to return wedding gowns to brand-new condition, but not always. That’s why some brides who participate in trash-thedress photo sessions — especially those that involve wading into water — opt to instead wear a second gown, often a less expensive off-the-shelf dress. Bradford recommends brides go ahead and invest the ex-

PH OTO G R A PH Y BY YO S H

tra $50 to buy a wedding gown preservation box if they have the dress professionally cleaned. Just hanging it in the back of the closet won’t properly save the often expensive gown, he said. “In four or five years, it will be yellowed from the atmospheric gases,” Bradford said. Both Bradford’s Master Dry Cleaners and A-1 Professional Cleaners work with local brides and those who book destination weddings in Northern Michigan. Bradford’s can be reached at (231) 347-4600, while A-1 is at (231) 347-8151. 

PAU L R E T H E R FO R D W E D D I N G PH OTO G R A PH Y

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| Dessert

omething for him S

PAU L R E T H ER FO R D WEDDING PH OTO G R A PH Y

Old World, New World cake comeback

M A RY JA N E D O E R R UP NORTH BRIDE

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room’s cakes are common in the American South and anyone from there likely is familiar with the tradition. But now these personality-oriented cakes are appearing at Michigan weddings, especially among young couples who wish to honor the grooms and their wedding guests. Groom’s cakes are an Old World custom with origins in England. While bakers often make the traditional, tiered wedding cake with white flour and white sugar — indicating wealth in Victorian times — fruit cake or chocolate

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flat cake tends to be the groom’s cake served. The long-running custom involves cutting it into small pieces to be sent home with guests, even urging single ladies to sleep with the cake under their pillows and dream about their future husband.

Modern groom’s cake

Today, these special cakes are growing in popularity, particularly with young couples with plenty of imagination, humor and a taste for bright colors. Groom’s cakes are made in various designs and shapes, often imaginatively decorated to the bride and groom’s specifications.

“These cakes are definitely something young couples like. The bride often picks out the groom’s favorite sports team. I have made a Boston Red Socks stadium, an MSU ‘S,’ and cakes with the emblems of U of M, the Tigers, Lions, Pistons and Red Wings,” said Maria Sargent, who owns Sweet Maria’s Confections in downtown Petoskey. She said it’s been fast-paced and steady since she opened her new store on Mitchell Street. She provided sweet treats for 25 summer weddings by Labor Day, including a handful that ordered groom’s cakes. Groom’s cakes are less expensive than wedding

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American history, too

Television foodies repeatedly tout the popularity of cupcakes as the baked good of choice at weddings. They must be on to something, as some brides and grooms opt for cupcakes in place of more common tiered wedding cakes. Cupcakes first appeared in a late-18th century American cookbook and are less expensive than wedding cake. They can be custom-made for guests who have special dietary requirements, such as nut- or gluten-free needs. The personal-sized cakes tend to cost a minimum $1.50 each, though can be ordered in miniature, regular and jumbo sizes. Cupcakes come in a variety of flavors and decorations to suit the tastes of guests, allowing them to make their own choice at the reception. Emmy Glass, who owns Sugar Bean Cupcakes in Alanson, started her business last year and stayed busy with weddings ever since. “With cupcakes, the brides  Continued on page 36

R . J. S C OT T PH OTO G R A PH Y

cakes, but can cost several hundred dollars, depending on the size and requested decorations. Angie Foldenawer has baked groom’s cakes since 2005 for Johan’s Pastry Shop in Petoskey. She tends to make between eight and 10 each year, usually for young couples. “I find that these cakes are often served at the rehearsal dinner. They are decorated with the groom’s favorite hobbies or sports team,” she said. “The most unusual request I have ever had was for one of an armadillo cake. Right now I have a request for one of Captain America’s shield.”

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Something for him

Continued from page 35 and grooms can customize their cupcakes with a variety of styles,” she said. Glass prepares her homebaked cupcakes in her kitchen, but hopes to grow into a commercial kitchen one day. This means she specializes in small batches baked to order. She also makes cake truffles from fondant that can be molded into shapes, such as calla lilies. “I do lots of decorations of flowers and pearls in colors that match the wedding colors,” Glass said. These special, small cakes are an old tradition reinvented for contemporary weddings in very colorful, exciting and creative ways. Single women may not sleep with a cupcake under their pillows, but the old American novelty is a fun addition to any wedding reception.

E .C. C A M P B E L L PH OTO G R A PH Y

Rules for special cakes

There are no rules for groom’s cakes or cupcakes regarding when or how they are served, certainly none that might restrain possible designs. Both can reflect the personalities of brides and grooms and add a sentimental or even humorous element to the whole wedding celebration, whether at the rehearsal dinner or reception. 

S H U T T E R B U G S PH OTO G R A PH Y

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| Invites/RSVPs

ros and cons P Printed invites and RSVP vs. online trouble

BY S H E R I M C W H I R T E R — U P N O R T H B R I D E

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obody doubts this is a digital age, but some things are easier — if not better — when done in more traditional ways. Beautiful, stylish and printed invitations remain quite chic, but some engaged couples are moving toward online RSVP options. Trouble is, that doesn’t always work out very well. “I’ve had two brides who were issuing invitations like a ticket and on the ticket were directions to respond on the Internet,” said Beti Emery, graphic designer at The Print Shop in downtown Petoskey. One entire side of one couple’s family encountered problem after problem trying to RSVP online, while the other side breezed through the process. “The older family members were experiencing trouble responding on the Internet,” Emery said. And just because your 80-yearold aunt spends hours each day on Facebook, that doesn’t mean she won’t put your wedding website URL address in the Google search bar or fail to understand how a passwordlocked site works. In the end, the bride and groom may end up a month before the big day calling to confirm with the vast majority of their invited guests, anyway. That’s why Emery recommends wedding invitations and

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printed RSVP cards continue to be used, especially for large, fancy affairs. “If you’re having a large wedding, it’s more on the formal side. Even though we are in a technical age, I believe formal requires a written invitation and a written response,” Emery said. “And you need to be considerate of what your guests are used to.” Kim Jones, owner of Copy Plus/Ink Spot in Harbor Springs, agreed with Emery that

paper invites and RSVP cards are much better, especially for older guests. “You have more of a paper trail to follow, too. Emails can get lost or deleted and once they are gone, they’re gone. I think printed is a much better way,” she said. Jones said she can understand small, quiet weddings with just a couple dozen guests may be more suitable for online invitations and responses, particularly if all guests are young-

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PH OTO G R A PH Y BY YO S H

231.445.1793 www.PaulRetherford.com www.Facebook.com/paulphoto

er and Internet-savvy. But even then, Jones said she leans toward more traditional ways. “There’s something about getting that piece of paper in the mail that’s more special than somebody pushing a button online. But I still write letters to people and send birthday cards through the mail,” Jones said, laughing. Contemporary wedding invitations and RSVP cards tend to mix paper styles, colors and textures, a departure from hearts and flowers on white paper that were more popular in past years. Jones also said some use postcards for the RSVP, a way to minimize paper resources and cut down on postage expenses.  Up North Bride

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| Honeymoon

ini-moons: M BY M A R K LI N D S AY UP NORTH BRIDE

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Some couples choose less expensive, local get-aways

any couples plan lengthy honeymoons in far-away tropical destinations, but more and more newlyweds instead choose to wait to take that expensive vacation for a five or 10-year anniversary. They can opt for a mini-moon, a more local and affordable get-away to follow what may have been a costly wedding ceremony and reception. Whether it’s a destination you can reach by car, plane or a short bicycle ride, the important part of the trip should be the person you’re traveling with. It is nice, however, to have a good plan and to be prepared while traveling so you can enjoy the

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company. Northern Michigan offers a wide variety of close-to-home destinations and opportunities for weekend getaways. Whether you choose an island, cabin in the woods or a casino, the possibilities go on and on. Kay Long, of Passageways Travel in Onaway, suggests brainstorming with a professional to achieve the best possible experience. “Even for a shorter, more local trip, it’s a great idea to consult with a travel planner. The knowledge of locations and experience they can offer will likely prevent common mistakes and mishaps along the way,” she said. Although most vacation planners and travel agencies in

general specialize in far-flung destinations, many have a wide selection of local trips which they have extensive knowledge about. “We also often have connections that can provide savings well beyond what a person could get on their own,” Long said. “Sometimes having good connections can mean getting the nicer rooms and knowing what day trips are going to suit your plans.” Mackinac Island, among the most popular Michigan destinations, can be a perfect trip which doesn’t require much travel. The island has great local flavor, and both historic structures and some more modern buildings.

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E .C. C A M P B E L L PH OTO G R A PH Y

PA WEDDI UL RETHERF ORD NG PH OTO G R APHY

SHUT

Vacationers often find the slower place and the amenities, such as romantic carriage rides, create the ambiance for a great romantic vacation. “People often enjoy the island’s ban on automobiles,” Long said. “Traveling by foot or bicycle connects them more to the outdoors.” One of the most popular attractions on the island is Mission Point Resort, the island’s sole full-service resort with its rich history. In the early 1820s, Reverend William Ferry, a Protestant Missionary, built many of the original structures on the southeast end of Mackinac Island, which became known as

OTO GS PH TERBU

Mission Point. During the 1940s, The Moral Re-Armament — a moral and spiritual movement — became involved on the island. Led by Dr. Frank Buchman, ground-breaking ceremonies began in 1954 for a new MRA World Conference Center. Today, the original main lobby is one of the most distinctive architectural structures on the island, featuring nine-ton majestic trusses that converge at 36 feet up to resemble a 16-sided teepee. The movie production sound stage was constructed in 1958, making it the second-largest of its type in the world at that time. Universal Studios leased the

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sound stage in the summer of 1979 to produce the film “Somewhere in Time.” The entire cast and crew — including stars Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour — were hosted at the resort, then The Inn on Mackinac. The property sold in late 1987 and was renamed Mission Point Resort. The new name reflects back into history when this part of the island housed one of the first churches and the Mission House, an historical landmark which still stands there today. Whether it’s a single destination or a casual tour of the state, autumn is a perfect time  Continued on page 42 Up North Bride

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PI N K T R I L LI U M PH OTO G R A PH Y

Mini-moons

Continued from page 41 to enjoy the region’s color and beauty. Autumn vacationers often plan a fall foliage tour and choose to stay at one or several of the many cozy bed and breakfasts the region boasts. “These types of trips can really be planned out well in advance,” Long said. “Allow us to do all the research and planning so you can just enjoy the time.” Of course there are many other ways to enjoy Michigan and its seasons. The winter wonderland of ski resorts offer everything from cabins to chalets and hotels with deluxe accommodations. Summertime golf getaways and water-based trips abound, whether it be floating down the AuSable River or fishing on the Great Lakes. If you love to be active, Michigan has every season covered. For those who truly want to make the most of our local flavor, try walking the beaches of our local towns, such as Petoskey. Rich in culture and beauty, many of the local places may have unexplored features that could provide just the right get-away. For more information about Mission Point Resort, visit its website at www.missionpoint.com, or call (906) 847-3312. For Passageways Travel, call (231) 348-1005. 

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Up North Bride - Fall & Winter 2012-2013  

Up North Bride is full of helpful hints and ideas for planning your special day. You will find many wedding-related businesses and experts i...

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