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Summer 2004

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 3

BEACON A JOINT PUBLICATION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF OHIO AND THE OHIO MASONIC HOME

Historic ritual presentation symbolizes brotherhood For the first time ever, the Grand Lodge of Ohio and the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Ohio jointly exemplified the Master Mason Degree. With more than 500 brethren in the audience in the Cleveland Masonic Center on June 5, selected ritualists from the Grand Lodge portrayed the degree’s first section and lecture, and a team of Prince Hall members performed the second section and charge. Grand Master Steven J. Krekus and Prince Hall Grand Master Gregory S. Snead together planned the event and cooperatively presided for the day’s festivities. Those in attendance commented on the powerful feeling a brotherhood and common purpose that existed among the brethren. Grand Masters Gregory S. Snead, left, and Steven J. Krekus successfully completed historic ritual representation.

MESC scheduled to close in October The Masonic Eastern Star Community (MESC), a not-for-profit Medicare and Medicaid certified assisted living and nursing home at 1630 W. North Bend Rd, Cincinnati, recently announced it would close operations by October 15, 2004. Formerly the Hamilton County Order of Eastern Star Home, it originally opened in October 21, 1923, as a rest home and nursing facility. On March 31, 2000, it was acquired by The Ohio Masonic Home in Springfield and renamed The Masonic Eastern Star Community. It offers assisted living, respite care, skilled nursing care, and rehabilitation care for its residents. The current 60 skilled nursing and 11 assisted living residents will have 91 days to relocate. Simultaneously, The Home also announced it would soon open a Masonic Senior Services office in the continued on page 15 Beacon / Summer 2004

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The Ohio Masonic Home 2655 W. National Road Springfield, Ohio 45504-3698 Web site: www.ohiomasonichome.org Web site: www.freemason.com

Permit No. 2609 Columbus, OH

PA I D Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage


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FROM THE

G RAND M ASTER

by Steven J. Krekus, Grand Master

It hardly seems possible that the Grand Lodge Communication is only about a month away. The last 11 months have been jam packed with great events. I thank you for allowing me to be a part of them. From the start in Dayton on October 18th to Cleveland on October 16th, Carol and I have been on a great ride as we toured the State and I spoke on my theme of “Freemasonry: A Blueprint for Life”. The 25 District Receptions were a fine opportunity for the Grand Lodge Officers to meet and greet numerous Brethren and their wives around the state. The honor of presenting the Community Service Award to outstanding leaders in the various areas showed that there are truly a large number of people that care for others. I was especially pleased to present the Excellence

in Youth Award to numerous young men and women that have not only excelled in school and their community, but have been exposed to Masonic principles from their membership in Jobs Daughters, Rainbow or DeMolay. I was particularly pleased to present one to our grand daughter Stacy, in the 21st District. We traveled to Florida and Arizona to meet with Brethren wintering or living in those areas and presented 50 and 60 year awards. At several Awards Nights around the state, I got to meet the Brethren that have thought so highly of our fraternity that they chose to be members for most of their lifetimes. In May, I was honored to present Most Worshipful Brother Charles S. Ward with his 50 year emblem. Attending various Grand Lodge sessions throughout the country has been enjoyable and educational. We tend to think that what we do in Ohio is the way everyone else does it. That is certainly not true. Whether it is the degree work, the titles of officers, or the fact that wine is still used in toasts at Table Lodges and alcohol is still allowed to be served at

functions in the Temple, Freemasonry varies from state to state. The Brethren are just as sincere and proud of their membership as we are. I traveled around the Ohio, most of the time with the Grand Chaplain, Right Worshipful Brother Curtis A. Miller, to visit Lodge and District meetings. Some of these meetings were small and others were packed to overflowing. Several outdoor degrees were held this summer and I attended as many as I could. These events in various locations — from Lodge-owned grounds, to a quarry to a cemetery, to a farm — are enjoyable and more Districts should consider them. Ohio Masonic Home Day this year was held at the Western Reserve Masonic Community in Medina. This is the newest campus for The Home, and I thought that you might have a better opportunity to see how beautiful it is if we held the event there. The day was a success, with hundreds of brethren and their wives continued on page 13

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ADAPTS TO MARKETPLACE WHILE ADHERING TO TRADITIONAL MISSION by David R. Stacy, CFO and Interim CEO, The Ohio Masonic Home

The Ohio Masonic Home has changed during the years, but Ohio Masons and their wives or widows remain foremost in its mission. Through the 1980s and 1990s The Home was known as a rest home. Many who lived at The Home needed care around the clock, while others needed room and board, occasional care, and companionship. Until 1995, all residents except for Masonic Square were under the Asset Surrender program. 2

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Mason and his wife or widow may Residents today may choose from lack the financial resources to live in several levels of care depending on an assisted living or congregate their need. Some require skilled nursing care, while others need a less apartment at Masonic Retirement Village, Browning Masonic intensive assisted living setting. Community or Western Other residents Reserve Masonic need the occasional The Ohio Masonic Community. The care, housekeeping Home has changed Masonic Financial and meal services Assistance Program provided in during the years, but congregate Ohio Masons and their (MFAP) is available for them based on their apartments, while wives or widows remain financial need. others prefer the MFAP replaced the independence of foremost in its mission. Asset Surrender patio homes. program and is managed through Residents no longer admit under Asset Surrender. They pay as they go Masonic Retirement Village. It is an important way in which The Home for care and accommodations, and remains focused on its traditional Medicare or Medicaid may pay for mission to Ohio Masons. their skilled nursing care. An Ohio


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Capstone Camp another success in 2004 The third annual Capstone Camp, sponsored by Ohio Freemasonry for “at risk” young persons, was another success. A total of 47 campers, referred to the camp through the Grand Lodge’s Masonic Model Student Assistance Program, arrived at Craftsmen Park in Akron. The campers, aged 11-16, have been identified as “at risk” or are being treated for such disorders as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). For many of these youngsters, Capstone was their first time away from home, and it was not without its share of homesickness. This year’s camp included such activities as traversing a low-ropes obstacle course, several group discussions, team-building activities, and even some time on a trampoline with world-class trampoline athlete Charles Manning. Each of the activities or discussions is intended to focus on the development of life-skills, including decision-making, relationship-building, trusting and communication. By the end of camp, the campers had not only learned how to canoe and how to get their group over a 10-foot wall, but also the more difficult skills of being confident in themselves and being able to place trust in each other. For more information on Capstone Camp 2004, as well as pictures, please visit www.freemason.com and click on Masonic Model.

The week-long camp culminates with The Wall, a 10’ barrier challenge that requires communication, problem-solving and teamwork.

One of the campers traverses a tightrope with the assistance of his peer team.

Masons to bring ‘Wildlife Encounter’ to Capstone 2005 Next year’s Capstone Campers will be treated to a new experience in the camp. The Grand Lodge of Ohio’s Masonic Model program, in a partnership with Wildlife Live, will be sponsoring a “Wildlife Encounter”. This program will allow the campers to visit Wildlife Live’s 192-acre River Ridge Ranch in Guernsey County to experience such wildlife as whitetail deer in a “petting zoo” atmosphere. Also planned are guided walks through the ranch with various “learning and encounter” stations, where the campers will learn about nature, conservation, and different animals. Wildlife Live is a nonprofit organization established for the education and research of whitetail deer and the eastern wild turkey. Since its establishment in 2000 by Brothers Dan Parrott, of Mt. Zion #9, and Ron Lidderdale, of Bolivar #330, Wildlife Live has incorporated “streaming” video to their website of several sections of the ranch, and they have recently started fundraising for the construction of the new research facility. Some of the first studies to be conducted by students from leading colleges and universities will cover Chronic Waste Disease and developing the first whitetail deer plasma bank in North America. For more information on Wildlife Live, including webcams, their fundraising efforts, and information on visiting the ranch, please visit their website, www.wildlifelive.org. Beacon / Summer 2004

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6,000 teddy bears donated by Ohio Masons More than 6,000 cuddly bears have been distributed by Ohio Lodges to a variety of local police and emergency units, to help calm children involved in tragedies or police action. In response to one donation by Amelia #590, Clermont County Sheriff Tim Rodenberg, Jr., said, “The public service that organizations, such as yours, provide our community is priceless and contributes greatly to our quality of life.” Each bear wears a yellow shirt with the motto “Masons Care.” To order a quantity of the bears for local distribution, a check for $6 per bear should be made out to the Grand Lodge of Ohio and mailed to James A. Langmead, Cleveland Masonic Center, 3615 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115-3570. More information is also available on the Grand Lodge web site, www.freemason.com, by clicking on “programs.” In a related Grand Master’s program, more than 7,000 Child I.D. kits have been donated by Lodges to local schools for families to create permanent records of children’s fingerprints and other identifying items, in case the child is ever missing.

Clermont County Sheriff A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg, Jr., holds one of the bears given to him by Amelia Lodge Worshipful Master DeWayne Sexton, left, and Lee Roy Watson, Amelia Lodge member.

Unifying brotherhood night planned in Cincinnati The second annual Brotherhood Night in Cincinnati, bringing together Masons from the Grand Lodge of Ohio and the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Ohio, has adopted the slogan: “Bringing Unity Into Our Community.” The dinner and program will be held at the Cincinnati Masonic Center in downtown Cincinnati on November 22, 2004. The event is open to all friends and family members of Masons, as well as the general public. Last year, more than 400 persons attended and experienced an enjoyable and enlightening evening. All proceeds from the evening are donated to four charities. Tickets, $35 for adults and $15 for youth under 18, can be obtained from Robert Fletcher, 1309 Longacre Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45240, or Troy Tidwell, 6549 Iris, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Make checks payable to Brotherhood Night. The general chairmen of the event are David Find and Maxwell Davis.

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Northern Light Lodge helps Kidney Foundation Northern Light #40, in Maumee, has been saluted for its efforts to assist persons with chronic kidney disease. The Northwest Ohio Kidney Foundation has recognized Brother Doug Towslee and Northern Light Lodge for raising more than $30,000 in the last 15 years. This year, the Lodge raised $1,100 in the Foundation’s annual Lollipop Sale and $5,200 by hosting a pancake breakfast. It is the sixth consecutive year that Northern Light has organized the breakfast. “Without Northern Light Lodge, it would be hard to continue our services to the community, such as providing assistance in the form of nutritional supplements, medication, emergency ID tags, and transportation to and from dialysis,” Amanda Barker, of the Kidney Foundation, said.

Gerard Lodge donates defibrillator Gerard Lodge, #428, presented the Newtown Police with a portable defibrillator, a life-saving device to be carried in patrol cars. According to Worshipful Master Mike Stapleton, the Lodge learned of the need and held a number of fundraising projects to purchase the device for donation.


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WRMC meets and exceeds ‘Home Day’ challenge Western Reserve Masonic Community (WRMC) made history as the first Ohio Masonic Home satellite campus to host the annual “Home Day” event on June 6. More than 1,100 visiting Masons and their families, WRMC residents and their families, WRMC employees and their families and campus visitors enjoyed an entertainment filled, perfect day. Cleveland’s Al Koran Shrine, under the leadership of Potentate Sherman Allen and the Nobles, provided most of the parade units and the great Al Koran Concert Band to end the day’s activities. Next year “Home Day” is scheduled to return to the Springfield campus and be held on Sunday, June 5, 2005. Mark your calendar now and be ready for a large extravaganza.

HOBO BAND — A toe taping hit with everyone was the Hobo Band.

GRAND MASTER — Most Worshipful Brother Steven J. Krekus welcomed the more than 1,100 visitors to Western Reserve Masonic Community’s Home Day celebration. MWB Krekus and the Grand Lodge officers personally greeted and spoke to almost everyone who attended Home Day. ON YOUR MARK...GET SET... — While drivers waited for the green flag, spectators wondered just how fast these little red cars would go? DOGS TO GO — This baseball fan is also a parttime, expert chef playing home plate on the grill.

HOME DAY IS FAMILY DAY — What a great time for the entire family to enjoy a day together. COMMUNITY SPIRIT — Medina County Commissioner Patricia G. Geissman gave the official Medina welcome to the campus visitors.

EVERYONE LOVES A CLOWN — A big hit with kids of all ages were the Shrine clowns that brought smiles to everyone.

FROM TIMES PAST — Trolleys and vintage automobiles transport visitors’ imaginations back to a slower, simpler culture.

AL KORAN SHRINE — Potentate Sherman Allen and the Nobles from Al Koran Temple marched in the parade and provided most of the parade units that delighted the spectators. Beacon / Summer 2004

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F OUNDATIONS

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FOR THE FUTURE

by RWB Timothy B. Strawn CAE, President, The Ohio Masonic Home Benevolent Endowment Foundation

As you may recall, in the Winter 2004 issue of the Beacon which focused on the ways we say thanks, we mentioned that an additional, special type of thank you would debut this year and we’d tell you about it later. Later has arrived! And, actually, there are two additional types of thank you’s we want to share with you. On Sunday, April 18th, we said thank you to Brother Clyde (New England #4) and Sister Marguerite (Worthington #287, OES) Wooley for a wonderful, major gift by naming and dedicating the Chapel on the Springfield campus in their honor. A beautiful spring day, a number of good friends, some insightful

comments on our two donors, the wonderful sense of humor and sincerity of Brother Wooley’s remarks...all came together to mark a memorable day of thanks and celebration. Long-time members of their respective Masonic organizations (Clyde is also a member of Worthington #287), the Wooleys have been dedicated in many ways to those organizations and causes which mean a great deal to them. They have truly, in a very humble and unassuming way, left a legacy which will represent them, their interests and their values for many years to come. We are proud and honored to have such an important part of our Springfield campus now carry their name. Thank you again, Clyde and Marguerite! On Tuesday, June 29th, we hosted our first ever Donor Recognition Luncheon for those who have given,

Learn More About Naming/Recognition Opportunities To receive information about naming/recognition opportunities, please complete this form and return to: Benevolent Endowment Foundation Five Masonic Drive, Springfield, Ohio 45504-3658 Please call me about a personal visit. Please send me information about naming and recognition opportunities. I’ve named The Ohio Masonic Home in my will, trust or other planned gift. Please send me information about the Rickly Society.

____________________________________________________________________________ Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________ City State Zip ____________________________________________________________________________ Telephone E-mail ____________________________________________________________________________ Lodge

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cumulatively, in excess of $1,000 in support of The Home/Foundation. Fourteen honorees were recognized for their gifts and dedication! This event marked the launching of the Rickly Society, our heritage club to recognize and thank those who have made a planned gift (via will, trust, charitable gift annuity or another type of charitable giving vehicle) to The Home/Foundation and the Bushnell Circle, our major gift recognition club for gifts to The Home/Foundation ranging from $10,000 to $100,000. (The Rickly Society is named for Brother Ralph R. Rickly who provided the gift that enabled us to build what was originally the Rickly Memorial Hospital, now the Rickly building which houses the residents of Masonic Health Care. Bushnell Circle is named for Brother Asa Bushnell who arranged for the original gift of land on which The Home was established in 1892.) Chairman of the Board of Trustees of The Home, Most Excellent Companion William M. Berry, provided a heartwarming reflection of his youthful years growing up near The Home and delivering papers on the campus as well as the guidance he received from residents and The Home’s administrator, at the time, Most Excellent Companion Burleigh Cartmell. As President of the Foundation, I was honored and pleased to greet and personally thank each of the honorees, presenting them with the recognition items appropriate to their gift, including beautifully framed pen and ink prints of Bushnell Hall or the Rickly building. Additional naming and recognition opportunities remain on each of The Home’s campuses; the donor recognition luncheon will be an annual event. We hope we may be able to include you in one or more “thank you” events in the future! For information about naming/recognition opportunities, please call the Foundation office toll free at 888/248-2664. And, to each of you for all your support, thank you!


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$135,000 record donation made to Special Olympics On behalf of The Grand Lodge of Ohio, Grand Master Brother Steven J. Krekus made a record donation of $135,000 to the Ohio Special Olympics at the Summer Games in Columbus on June 25. As in previous years, Masons of Ohio led the Parade of Athletes into the Jesse Owens Track and Field Arena at The Ohio State University to kick off this wonderful event. The money was raised through the efforts of individual donations as well as Lodge fundraisers like spaghetti dinners, breakfasts, and bake sales. This year’s donation brings the accumulated total over the years to $1,662,700. Below is a list of those Lodges that will be recognized for giving amounts of $500, $1,000, $1,500 or more. #783 #774 #005 #745 #633 #550 #501 #477 #002 #033 #779 #058 #786 #074 #077 #123 #152 #750 #427

Sunrise . . . . . . . . Knollwood . . . . . . Lodge of Amity . . George A. Holly . . Heights-Lion Heart Proctorville . . . . . Heber . . . . . . . . . Gettysburg . . . . . N. C. Harmony . . Ebenezer . . . . . . . Millennium . . . . . Medina . . . . . . . . Black River . . . . . . Seville . . . . . . . . . Tiffin . . . . . . . . . . Phoenix . . . . . . . . Venus . . . . . . . . . Barberton . . . . . . Green Springs . . .

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.$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$500.00 .$510.00 .$537.00 .$540.00

Ohio Masons lead the Parade of Athletes into the Jessie Owens Track and Field Arena.

#598 #310 #020 #104 #339 #457 #623 #777 #305 #174 #544 #583 #449 #376 #596 #656 #144 #730 #006

E T Carson . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550.00 Eden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$600.00 Magnolia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$600.00 Batavia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$600.00 Blendon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$610.00 Collingwood . . . . . . . . . . .$650.00 West Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . .$665.00 Huber Heights . . . . . . . . . .$700.00 Stokes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700.00 Tippecanoe . . . . . . . . . . . .$754.00 Shiloh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Bloomingburg . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Bellville . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Brookville . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Capital City . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Toledo-Ft Industry . . . . . .$1,000.00 Solar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00 Scioto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000.00

Neoacacia . . . . New England . Unity . . . . . . . . Dresden . . . . . Waynesville . . . Muskingum . . . St. Andrew’s . . University . . . . Canton . . . . . . Xenia . . . . . . . York . . . . . . . . Franklin . . . . . . Western Star . . Yellow Springs Coshocton . . . Pickaway . . . . . Center . . . . . . Goodale . . . . . Rubicon . . . . .

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.$1,030.00 .$1,030.00 .$1,115.00 .$1,117.76 .$1,335.00 .$1,400.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,500.00 .$1,600.00 .$1,800.00 .$2,000.00 .$2,150.00 .$2,596.00 .$2,953.40 .$3,775.00

Lodge in Norwalk recognized for longevity

7th Masonic District plays golf to support scholarships The annual Joe Taylor Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing, sponsored by the Seventh Masonic District, was held in May at the Running Fox Golf Course in Chillicothe, and more than $900 was raised for the academic scholarship fund. Forty men registered and a total of 17 Lodges participated in the successful event. Numerous prizes were presented and all participating had an enjoyable day.

#595 #004 #012 #103 #163 #368 #619 #631 #060 #049 #563 #014 #021 #421 #096 #023 #086 #372 #237

SOLDIER IN IRAQ — Adrian Garrison, a member of Orient Lodge, #321, in Waverly, displays his helmet with a Masonic symbol on it. Brother Garrison was serving in Iraq as the crew chief on a Black Hawk helicopter.

Sixteen of Norwalk’s oldest civic organizations and businesses were honored in April by the city mayor, Sue Lesch, and the Norwalk Economic Development Corp. The oldest entity in the city is Mt. Vernon #64, chartered in 1821. Worshipful Master Frederick Stanford, known to many persons locally as Fritz the Clown, accepted the award for the Lodge. He received his 50-year membership award this year as well. The Lodge became a Charter Member on the community’s Century Club. Beacon / Summer 2004

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Grand Master’s Scrapbook GRAND MASTER AND WORTHY GRAND MATRON — Grand Master Steven J. Krekus greets Sandra Edmisten, of Winchester, Worthy Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, of Ohio. They were together during the Grand Master’s Reception in the Sixth Masonic District on April 30.

OHIO MISS JOBS DAUGHTERS AND GRAND MASTER — Alexis Kollay, of Boardman, Ohio Miss Jobs Daughters for 2004-2005, received from Grand Master Steven J. Krekus, the Excellence in Youth Award during the Grand Master’s Reception in the Twenty-Fifth Masonic District on May 8. Alexis is active in the Jobs Daughters Bethel in Niles.

TWO NEW LODGE CHARTERS PRESENTED — A new Charter was presented to Niles McKinley Lodge, 794, during the Grand Master’s Reception in the TwentyFifth District on May 8. Niles McKinley is a consolidation of Mahoning Lodge, #394, and Sincerity Lodge, #694. Grand Master Steven J. Krekus, left, hands the Charter to Worshipful Master Charles W. Chagnot, Jr. A new Charter was also presented by the Grand Master on April 24 to Larry Ellison, Worshipful Master of the new Paragon #788, during the Grand Master’s Reception in the Eleventh Masonic District. Paragon Lodge was created by the consolidation of Lotus #625, Port Lawrence #685, and Yondota #572, all in Toledo.

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106-YEAR-OLD AWARDED COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD — Grand Master Steve J. Krekus presents the Community Service Award for the Fifth Masonic District to Dorothy Biddle, who is 106 years old. Her longtime community service and philanthropy in Wauseon were cited in the award presentation.

TOLEDO DOCTOR RECEIVES RUFUS PUTNAM AWARD — The 2003 Rufus Putnam Award was presented by Grand Master Steven J. Krekus to Elizabeth Spencer Ruppert, M.D., for her “dedicated and impassioned service to her community and to its children.” She is Emeritus Professor of the Department of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Ohio in Toledo. The Putnam Award, the highest award of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, was presented at the Grand Master’s Reception in the Eleventh Masonic District in April.


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Follow-up reports on two grants from Charitable Foundation How do your contributions to the Grand Lodge Charitable Foundation translate into help for individuals in need? The Charitable Foundation, since its first grant in late 1995, has given out 125 grants totaling $180,000. Here are two stories, showing the results of assistance Ohio Masons have made possible: Past Grand Master Thomas D. Zahler had a chance meeting with the parents of Eric Fritz recently, and was thrilled to see the progress being made by threeyear-old Eric. The Charitable Foundation had contributed to relieve his medical expenses. An article in the

June 20, 2004, Canton Repository newspaper tells more: “Shortly after his birth three years ago, Eric Fritz was diagnosed with biliary atresia, a rare disease of the liver and bile ducts. The little guy from Canton received a liver transplant at Cincinnati Hospital Children’s Medical Center last August. He is doing so well that he’ll throw out the first pitch at the Akron Aeros game at Canal Park.” In another example, Robert W. Fellure, District Deputy Grand Master in the Twelfth Masonic District, wrote this letter to the Foundation: “I just wanted to inform you that the Worshipful Master of Vinton Lodge, No.

Wauseon brethren provide entertainment at District reception

A group of musicians — all brethren from Wauseon # 349 — provided the pleasing background sounds during dinner at the Grand Master’s Reception in the Fifth Masonic District this year. They played in various combinations and in solo arrangements. From left are Ralph Gascche on harmonica, Gary Smith on trumpet, Chris King on the keyboard, and Worshipful Master Bill Frank on the guitar.

Time capsule in jail rescued When Past Grand Master Douglas O. Brenneman realized that the old Knox County jail was being torn down, he alerted officials that they should be aware of a time capsule, placed there in a Masonic ceremony 91 years earlier. So, when the facility was razed in

March, care was taken to uncover the time capsule. Its historic significance resulted in a page one story in the Mount Vernon News about the items found in the capsule and the Masonic connection to the original cornerstone laying.

131, James Casto, several Lodge officers and members, and I met at the Lodge hall on May 24, 2004, and presented the Kinney family with the $1,500 check from the Charitable Foundation. The Kinney family was emotionally overwhelmed that the Masons cared enough to help them in such a generous way in their time of need. Mr. Kinney stated that he wanted to be part of such a caring organization and has since petitioned Vinton Lodge. If all Masons could have witnessed this presentation, seen this family, and seen them express their sincere appreciation, they should have no problem answering the Grand Master’s request to donate $1 a month to the Charitable Foundation.”

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joining the fun and fellowship. The Charitable Foundation is very important to me and I asked you to contribute to it to aid those in need in Ohio. I am pleased to say that at this writing, more than $160,000 has been contributed by you for this worthwhile project. Thank you. The Special Olympics is a continuing commitment that the Grand Lodge has supported for several years. This year you raised $135,000 which I was honored to present on your behalf at the opening. Thank you. I asked Lodges to donate bears to their local safety forces to give to children involved in some traumatic emergency, to ease their concern. Already this year, more than 6,000 bears have been purchased and presented by Lodges throughout the State. Thank you. Also, the Child I.D. Program has been well received and thousands of kits have been distributed to schools and churches. Brethren, I thank all of you for supporting the programs and events that made this year a success. Thank you to the Grand Lodge Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters and Lodge Officers for all their hard work. Carol and I appreciate the courtesies we have received and friendships made through the year. It has been my honor to serve you and I hope to see you at Grand Lodge in Cleveland, October 15 and 16. God Bless each of you, God Bless Freemasonry and may God continue to Bless America. Beacon / Summer 2004

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More Light About Masonry FROM THE GRAND SECRETARY’S DESK

Ancient ceremony of cornerstone laying continues to prosper in Ohio By George O. Braatz, PGM The Masonic cornerstone laying ceremony – an ancient tradition, popular in the early years of this country – was brought to life again this May in Mansfield, Ohio. The cornerstone laying ceremony symbolically uses the working tools of the operative Mason to bring a special message of faith in the craftsmanship of a new building. While normally performed on Masonic edifices, the ceremony is also properly provided for public buildings. In Mansfield, a new high school was under construction, and the cornerstone from the previous high school – ceremonially laid by Masons nearly 80 years ago – was Grand Master Steven J. Krekus applies cement to moved to the new structure and again “laid” by several Grand Lodge cornerstone in Mansfield. Officers, under the leadership of landmark of this country, the Statue of Grand Master Steve J. Krekus. Liberty, was laid by the Grand Lodge of Our first president, Brother George New York on August 5, 1884. At that Washington, was closely connected with ceremony, in his remarks, the Grand the cornerstone laying tradition. Master asked this question, “Why call On September 18, 1793, the upon the Masonic Fraternity to lay the cornerstone of the United States Capitol cornerstone of such a structure as is here in Washington D.C. was laid. This to be erected?” His answer, which is as ceremony, important from both from the true today as it was then, was: “No historic and Masonic points of view, was institution has done more to promote conducted by the Grand Lodge of liberty and to free men from the Maryland, which asked President George trammels and chains of ignorance and Washington to preside over the activities. tyranny than has Freemasonry.” Brother Washington helped deposit the On July 4, 1795, Paul Revere, famous symbolic corn, wine, and oil, with for his late-night horse ride to warn explanations very similar to those used in villagers that the British were coming, Ohio in 2004. was serving as Grand Mater of the Grand Brother Benjamin Franklin helped lay Lodge of Massachusetts. He was asked by the cornerstone for the Philadelphia Governor Samuel Adams to lay the Statehouse. cornerstone of the Massachusetts State If you have ever walked around the House. Paul Revere was known as a man Washington Monument in our Nation’s of action, not as an orator, and perhaps Capitol and looked at the historic scenes the words he said that day at the in pictures displayed there, you will cornerstone laying may be his only formal notice that this landmark was the public speech that has been preserved. recipient of a Masonically laid Probably holding the working tools of cornerstone. Masonry in his hands, he said, “May we The cornerstone for another great so square our actions through life as to 14

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show to the world of mankind that we mean to live within the compass of good citizens, that we wish to stand upon a level with them, that when we part we may be admitted into the Temple where reigns silence and peace.” While so prominent in the past, Masonic cornerstone laying ceremonies are no longer a frequent occurrence. In Ohio, the officers of the Grand Lodge are ready to perform this ceremony anytime an agreeable date and time can be arranged. The Masonic Information Center, a division of the Masonic Service Association, has prepared a brochure that explains the traditions and meanings of the Masonic cornerstone ceremony. The booklet encourages local groups and individuals to ask their Grand Lodges to perform these ceremonies, and gives tips on how to plan such an event. As we consider the Masonic cornerstone laying ceremony, may we reflect on the symbolic meaning this tradition has for us today – to work for brotherhood among all people, to insist on high moral character in all public and private dealings, and never to be too tired or busy to build and improve the communities and nation in which we live.

Ronald L. Winnett, Senior Grand Warden, assists Grand Master in cornerstone ceremony.


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OES, Masonic Home Gift Committee

Thank You For Your Generosity We offer our grateful appreciation to the estates, individuals, groups, or other Masonic bodies who have supported The Ohio Masonic Home with donations given between April 1 and June 30, 2004.

Members of the Grand Chapter, OES, Masonic Home Gift Committee met recently at the Springfield campus to determine gifts to be provided with the 2003-2004 year contributions. The committee is pictured below, including the Grand Officers present to observe the meeting: RWB Tim Strawn, President, Endowment Foundation; Kathy Jones, Grand Warder; Sandy Edmisten, WGM; Jake Fredrick, PWGP, Chairman; Marilyn Rowley, PWGM; Eloise Wyse, PWGM; Glen Place, PWGP, Secretary.

The Medicare prescription drug benefit

Masonic Retirement Village (MRV) residents talk with Dustina Monnier after her recent presentation “Clearing The Confusion On Drug Discount Cards.” This is one of a series of educational meetings arranged by the MRV Director of Health Services Mary Lough. More than 86 MRV residents at the Springfield campus attended the event.

Masonic Eastern Star

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Cincinnati area. The two person staff will each be able to assist more than 200 area Masons and their families who request help with finding community-based services that would allow them to remain in their homes rather than move to an assisted living or skilled nursing facility. “We made a special effort to try and keep MESC open and make it financially stable as long as we could,” said The Home’s Chief Operating Officer, Greg Holm. “However, a combination of factors, such as a saturated assisted living

and nursing facility marketplace led to operational losses, the age of the building, the lack of available land in the area to build a new facility, and the reduced federal reimbursements finally led to management’s recommendation to the Board of Trustees’ to close the facility,” said Holm. “There is no better health care staff in this area. They can be very proud of the quality care they provide to our residents. We will give our employees as much help as we can to find other jobs,”

$10,000+ Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Anderson Adam Boryczka C. E. Brister Elsie B. Hermann Rosemary W. Hollinger John O. Lamb Carl H. Lindner Lawrence Marquis Ellen L. Palmer Russell R. Peck Webster Sturdivant Dale L. Wolfe $2,000+ AASR, Valley of Cincinnati AASR, Valley of Dayton Evelyn Fester Grand Court Order of Amaranth Harding-Concordia Lodge #345 Helen M. Hosler Paul Mason George K. Moss Betty Oberle Vivian H. Schulze Howard M. Sheeler Ruth B. Tucker $1,000+ Paul & Anna Combs Coshocton Lodge #96 Carl Ender Eric Flasher Hiram Lodge #18 Dorothy J. Kendig Jack M. Kessler Pataskala Lodge #404 Robinson Locke Lodge #659 Donald Sparks

said Holm. The MESC residents will be given the option of moving to one of The Home’s other subsidiaries in Springfield, Waterville or Medina. They will also be given a list of other Cincinnati area assisted living and skilled nursing facilities to select from as well. Relatives of residents are urged to call MESC President Bonnie Hazelwood, at 513/542-6464 if they have any questions. Beacon / Summer 2004

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Ohio Masons help organize 1st High Twelve Club in England Ohio Masons were instrumental in the chartering of the first High Twelve Club in England. High Twelve International is an association of luncheon clubs, with all members being Masons. Wallace B. McCartney, a Past Master of Marks Lodge, #359, in Huron, is current President of High Twelve International. In 2000, Robert E. Fisher, a Past Master of Frank H. Marquis Lodge, #690, in Mansfield, visited England and became friends with several English Masons. In June, 2002, a group of 12 brethren from England traveled to Ohio and visited Science Lodge, #50, in Sandusky, the Ohio Lodge of Research, the Royal Arch Chapter and Commandery in Mansfield, and the

With the American flag prominently displayed, Ohioan Wallace B. McCartney, International High Twelve President, presents the first High Twelve charter in England to Godwin Swift, president of the Essex club. At left is Robert Fisher, of Ohio, and to Brother McCartney’s left, partially hidden, is Ike Hoshauer, International High Twelve Secretary.

Hudson Lodge cleans after flood, thanks many who helped Hudson #510, is now functioning smoothly again after the Masonic Temple survived a devastating flood in July, 2003. The flood, which caused considerable damage to the city of Hudson and death of two persons, brought 3 1/2 feet of mud and water inside the Lodge’s building. It destroyed or badly damaged virtually all of the Lodge’s furnishing and paraphernalia. Lodges throughout Ohio, and particularly in the Twenty-first Masonic District, came to the rescue by sending unused items and loaned furniture. “So many Lodges responded that in all the confusion of cleaning up and repairing, it was impossible to keep track of all those who sent items,” said

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Leetonia Lodge sponsors Egg Hunt Leetonia Masonic Lodge, with the assistance of the Leetonia Volunteer Fire Department, sponsored the annual Easter Egg Hunt in Leetonia. The fun-filled family event was featured prominently in the local newspaper.

The Beacon is Published Quarterly Please report all changes of address to your Lodge Secretary, who, in turn, will notify the Grand Secretary, who maintains the database that produces The BEACON mailing labels.

James R. Amlung, Lodge Chaplain. “Therefore the officers and brethren of Hudson Lodge send a sincere thanks and gratitude to the Grand Lodge and to all those Lodges who came to our rescue in our time of need. We are up and running again!”

Tax Relief Legislation approved by Ohio House of Representatives A property tax-relief measure, that would help all Masonic owned buildings in the state, was approved in May by the Ohio House of Representatives. The legislation still must be approved by the Ohio Senate this fall. The bill will probably not be considered until after the November election. The legislation eliminates property tax for buildings used for meetings and

Mansfield High Twelve Club. According to Brother Fisher, they liked the High Twelve meeting so much, they sought information on forming one in Essex, England. After months of planning and preparation, on March 17, 2004, Brother Fisher and Brother McCartney, along with International High Twelve Secretary Ike Hoshauer, of Indiana, traveled to England and formally presented the Charter to First Essex, #729, High Twelve Club in England. While there, they met with other Masonic groups.

normal activities of all fraternal groups, who contribute heavily to charitable causes and who have been active in Ohio for more than 100 years. It would not cover income-producing buildings. Brother Jim Hughes, a Past Master of Goodale #372, was sponsor for the legislation in the Ohio House of Representatives.

The Ohio Masonic Home includes Masonic Health Care, Inc.; Masonic Retirement Village, Inc.; and the Benevolent Endowment Foundation, Inc., at the Springfield campus; the Browning Masonic Community, Inc., in Waterville; the Masonic Eastern Star Community, Inc., in Cincinnati; and the Western Reserve Masonic Community, Inc., in Medina. Jerry Guess, APR The Ohio Masonic Home, Director of Public Relations 2655 W. National Road Springfield, OH 45504-3698 937/525-3074 jguess@ohiomasonichome.org George Braatz, P.G.M., Grand Secretary at The Grand Lodge F.&A.M. of Ohio P.O. Box 629 Worthington, OH 43085 614/885-5318 gbraatz@freemason.com


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