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DeKalb County Nonprofit Study

Comprehensive Report 2017-2018 Northern Illinois University Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership


DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


iv

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Acknowledgements We are grateful for the Douglas

DCNP members who provided

survey, creating the distribution list,

C. and Lynn M. Roberts Family

feedback after the first study, and

and for their coordination of DCNP;

Foundation; without their generous

scanned the current nonprofit

Ben in particular for his leadership in

support this project would not be

landscape to ensure new issues were

creating the original study and for his

possible. Their vision for a cohesive

covered in this edition. Their honest

continued expertise and support.

nonprofit community is inspirational,

‘in-the-trenches’ feedback continues

and their financial support moves

to assure the relevancy of the data

inspiration to action. Additionally,

presented here.

The Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence (NICNE) for sharing the results of the study they

many other community members and organizations have stepped up

Northern Illinois University’s Center

conducted in collaboration with the

to help move forward the mission

for Nonprofit and NGO Studies for

United Way of Rock River Valley.

of the DeKalb County Nonprofit

overseeing the project. Specifically:

Partnership (DCNP). We appreciate

Anne Hanley for her oversight of the

the collaboration of these valued

project; Jennifer Gregory for her

partners.

invaluable administrative support; Uche Eseosa Ekhator for her expertise

The idea for this project was originally

and economic viewpoint in analyzing

suggested by DeKalb County

data and reporting results; Nathan

All of those who took personal time to test the online survey and offer valuable feedback. Our Northern Illinois University colleague Tony Wedick for designing and creating the graphic art for this

nonprofit leaders. Their desire for

Tripp for his valuable survey skills;

continued professionalism and

Danielle Hoske and Rodrigo Martinez

innovative problem solving are what

for their superb research skills; and

The 34 nonprofit professionals

helped make this second edition of

Julie Ann O’Connell for managing the

who responded to this survey. We

the Nonprofit Study not only possible, but a reality. No project of this size is done alone and as is fitting for a partnership organization, many different

report.

recognize the time and effort required

project.

for you to participate. Thank you! Sherrie Taylor, from NIU’s Center for Governmental Studies, for her willingness to help unearth vital

Our desire is that this second edition of the DeKalb County Nonprofit

research information.

Survey will help the nonprofit

their time and expertise to this study,

Ben Bingle, Anita Zurbrugg, and

do best: make the community a better

including:

Sarah Trygstad for promoting the

place for all those who live here.

individuals generously contributed

organizations in our area do what they

—DCNP Steering Committee

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

v


Co-Authors/Principal Investigators Julie Ann O’Connell, M.Ed., Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies, Northern Illinois University Anne Hanley, Ph.D., Northern Illinois University Uche Eseosa Ekhator, M.S., Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies, Northern Illinois University

Research Assistants Danielle Hoske Nathan Tripp, M.P.A.

Advisors and Reviewers Ben Bingle, Ph.D., DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership Micki Chulick, Community Member Chris EInolf, Ph.D., Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies, Northern Illinois University Jennifer Gregory, Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies, Northern Illinois University Dawn Littlefield, Kishwaukee United Way Kristin Clark Miller, Community Member Alicia Schatteman, Ph.D., Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies and Department of Public Administration, Northern Illinois University Lucy Sosa, Safe Passage Dan Templin, M.S., DeKalb County Community Foundation Anita Zurbrugg, J.D., DeKalb County Community Foundation

About the DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership The DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership (DCNP) is a membership-based program of the DeKalb County Community Foundation that works to increase the capacity of organizations located in and/or serving DeKalb County, Illinois through training and programming, access to resources, and professional development opportunities. DCNP is guided by a representative Steering Committee and its mission is to strengthen the nonprofit sector through leadership, professional development, and collaboration.

About the Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies The Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies (NNGO) is an interdisciplinary unit at Northern Illinois University that works with students, faculty, researchers and nonprofit leaders. Created in 2010, NNGO offers an undergraduate major, minor, and certificate in Nonprofit and NGO Studies (formerly Community Leadership and Civic Engagement) to educate the next generation of nonprofit and community leaders.

vi

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Contents Part 1 Executive Summary

1

DeKalb County at a Glance

2

Part 2 Nonprofit Sector in Illinois and DeKalb County

4

Part 3 Respondent Demographics

6

Finance, Funding and Challenges

7

Clients and Programs

9

Social Media

13

Volunteers

14

Human Resources

15

Strategic Plan

24

Boards and Governance

25

DCNP Membership

26

Methodology

27

Endnotes

29

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

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viii DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Executive Summary

For over 180 years, people have been drawn to DeKalb County for its rich natural environment and resources. And for nearly as long, nonprofit organizations have worked side by side with community members to enhance life for citizens of this county. The 2017-2018 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study, the second in a three-part series, describes the demographic realities of the county and state, and highlights the experiences of 34 local nonprofit organizations who responded to an email survey. When the original study was completed in 2015, Illinois was at the very beginning of its two-year run without an official budget, and it was not until July 2017 that a state budget was finalized. Across the state, hundreds of nonprofit organizations and agencies resorted to cutting programs, laying off staff, and reducing services to vulnerable populations. Despite the challenges associated with funding, 93 percent of survey respondents report no decrease in the services or programs offered to clients. DeKalb County added 52 nonprofit organizations between 2015 and 2017, a nearly 11 percent increase. The most common sources of revenue for DeKalb County nonprofit respondents were individual donations (78.8 percent), fundraising events (60.6 percent), and foundation grants (54.5 percent), with only a minority of respondents receiving funding from government grants (24.2 percent) and government contracts (15.2 percent). More nonprofits (29.4 percent) expect their financial outlook to improve in the next year than expect their financial outlook to worsen (17.6 percent), but the majority (52.9 percent) expect their financial situation to remain the same. The majority (64 percent) expect to expand programs and services over the next three years. Nearly all (93.5 percent) DeKalb County nonprofit respondents report that they track, measure and evaluate their programs and services, and 42.9 percent use continuous evaluation processes. However, local nonprofits primarily track the number of clients served, the number of activities offered, and short-term client satisfaction; only a minority track long-term client satisfaction and community impact. Offering a competitive salary (85.7 percent) and benefits (64.3 percent) were the main staff recruitment challenges for respondents, followed by locating (35.7 percent) and hiring (21.4 percent) qualified staff. About a third (35.7 percent) anticipated increasing staff in the next year. The top challenges for retention were the inability to offer competitive pay (76.9 percent), excessive workload (61.5 percent) and staff burnout (46.2 percent). Nearly all (96.3 percent) DeKalb County nonprofits use volunteers, and the majority follow best practices in management such as training volunteers and using written job descriptions. Recruitment is most nonprofits’ biggest challenge in managing volunteers. Local nonprofit respondents have expanded their use of social media, with 96.9 percent using Facebook, 39.4 percent using Twitter, 15.2 percent YouTube, 15.2 percent Instagram, 12.1 percent Pinterest, and 6.1 percent using LinkedIn. The majority of respondents use social media for event promotion, general organizational visibility, publicity and fundraising. DeKalb County nonprofits have strengths in governance and planning. Most (88 percent) respondents agreed or strongly agreed that their board of directors is a strong asset of their organization, and nearly 58 percent report having a strategic plan in place. The number of nonprofit organizations belonging to the DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership continues to grow, and survey respondents added their suggestions on what kinds of training topics would be helpful for their organizations. The robust nonprofit community continues to strive to meet the many demands of the diverse citizenry of the 180-year-old DeKalb County.

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

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Map of DeKalb County

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DeKalb County is one of 102 counties in the state of Illinois3, and is the 20th largest county in Illinois by population.4 DeKalb County covers just over 631 square miles and has a population of 104,528. 5

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Fertile soil, abundant wildlife, and access to streams and timber are what brought the first settlers to what is now known as DeKalb County, Illinois.1 Established in 1837, DeKalb County is home to Cortland, DeKalb, Genoa, Hinckley, Kingston, Kirkland, Lee, Malta, Maple Park, Sandwich, Shabbona, Somonauk, Sycamore, and Waterman. 2 It is important to note that DeKalb County is home to both a community college and a university. The demographic and economic characteristics of students at these institutions are “noticeably reflected” in the characteristics of the county.

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DeKalb County at a Glance

7

61.9%

14.7%

Illinois

104,528

12,801,539

Total Population

Total Population

49.5%

49.1% 7.6% 16.9% 10.9% 0.1%

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61.9%

Female Male 13.3%

United States

323,127,513

White Black

Total Population

Hispanic/Latino

49.2%

American Indian 17.6%

Asian Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

1.2% 0.2% 5.6%

2

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Education

25-49 years

50-74 years

75-84 years

22.9%

3.3% 1.7% 4.2% 1.9% 4.3% 1.9%

United States

28.2% 27.9%

Illinois

< 25 years

30.1%

DeKalb County

32.8% 33.4%

The median age of people in DeKalb County is 30.3.10

41.8%

9

32.7% 32.8%

Distribution by Age

>84 years

11

DeKalb County…

• Continues to have a high school graduation rate that is substantially higher than either the state or the nation, while the percentage of citizens holding a bachelor’s degree is comparable to the entire United States (but lower than the Illinois state average).

Educational Attainment High School Grad or Higher DeKalb County

92.2%

Illinois

87.9%

United States

86.7%

Bachelor’s of Arts Degree or Higher DeKalb County

30.0%

Illinois

32.3%

United States

29.8%

Poverty and Income

12

DeKalb County…

• Continues to have a higher percentage of people living below the federally established poverty level than either the state or the nation.

Per Capita Income (2011-2015, in 2015 dollars) DeKalb County

$24,025

Illinois

$30,494

United States

$28,930

Median Household Income (2011-2015, in 2015 dollars) DeKalb County

$54,101

Illinois

$57,574

United States

$53,889

Persons Below the Poverty Level DeKalb County

16.2%

Illinois

13.6%

United States

13.5%

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

3


Nonprofit Sector in Illinois and DeKalb County Illinois

Illinois Nonprofit Organizations

14

All Nonprofit Organizations 66,053 Nonprofit organizations filing financial information on IRS Form 990 26,705 501(c)3 Public Charities 41,852 501(c)3 Public Charities filing financial information on IRS Form 990 14,411 501(c)3 Private Foundations 5,934 501(c)3 Private Foundations filing financial information on IRS Form 990 5,476 Total Nonprofit Revenue 111,211,505,267 Total Nonprofit Assets 297,886,097,052

Volunteerism in Illinois

15

Nearly 25 percent of Illinois residents volunteer, ranking them 31st among the 50 states and Washington, DC — a drop of five places since 2013. • 2.43 million volunteers. • 286.6 million hours of service. • $7.3 billion of service contributed. • 26.5 volunteer hours per capita.

Map of Illinois.13

Number of Nonprofit Organizations in 16 DeKalb County and Surrounding Counties Boone 163 DeKalb 542 Grundy 307 Kane 1000+ Kendall 284

4

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

LaSalle 590 Lee 210 McHenry 1000+ Ogle 269 Winnebago 1000+


DeKalb County

17

All Registered Nonprofit Organizations 542 Registered nonprofits filing financial information on IRS Form 990 204 Registered 501(c)3 Public Charities 350 501(c)3 public charities filing financial information on IRS Form 990 119 Registered 501(c)3 Private Foundations 36 501(c)3 private foundations filing financial information on IRS Form 990 34 Total Nonprofit Revenue $458,202,110 Total Nonprofit Assets $1,049,324,605

All registered nonprofit organizations increased by 52 since the 2015 study, an 11 percent increase.

Tom Demmer

Nonprofit Employees as Percentage of Total Workforce: Private not-for-profit wage and salary workers: Total Median Earnings:

Robert Pritchard

18

90th District

8.7% (8.6% in 2010) 4,426 $44,646

Total Revenue of Nonprofit Organizations in DeKalb County

2016 $458,202,110

Nonprofit Data by State Representative

Total Assets of Nonprofit Organizations in DeKalb County

2012 $523,088,217

Of the 542 organizations, 204 had some financial activity to report. This means that nearly 62 percent of nonprofit organizations in DeKalb County generated no reportable revenue, according to the IRS. This suggests the organizations may be volunteer-run, or have gross receipts and assets below certain thresholds. • Total Revenue of Nonprofit Organizations in DeKalb County in 2016: $458,202,110 — almost $65 million less than 2012 ($523,088,217). • Total Assets of Nonprofit Organizations in DeKalb County in 2016: $1,049,324,605 — almost $202 million more than in 2012 ($847,588,226). • Of the 102 counties in Illinois, DeKalb County is one of 21 counties with more than $400 million in nonprofit revenue and over $1 billion in nonprofit assets.

2012 $847,588,226

There were 542 registered nonprofit organizations in DeKalb County in 2016, according to the Internal Revenue Service, an increase of almost 11 percent in the past two years. Organizations include fully-staffed, multi-million dollar entities as well as volunteer-only organizations with no financial activity. It is important to note that this number includes all 501(c) organizations — including religious, labor, fraternal, foundations, and other nonprofit organizations — as well as the public charities most often associated with nonprofit organizations.

2016 $1,049,324,605

DeKalb Nonprofit Organizations

70th District

Nonprofit Employees as Percentage of Total Workforce: Private not-for-profit wage and salary workers: Total Median Earnings:

Nonprofit Data by State Senator

6.5% (5.8% in 2010) 3,505 $38,783

19

Tim Bivins

Nonprofit Employees as Percentage of Total Workforce: Private not-for-profit wage and salary workers: Total Median Earnings:

Dave Syverson

45th District 8.9% (8.8% in 2010) 9,123 $41,444

35th District

Nonprofit Employees as Percentage of Total Workforce: Private not-for-profit wage and salary workers: Total Median Earnings:

7.2% (6.7% in 2010) 7,599 $45,009 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

5


Respondent Demographics DeKalb County is fortunate to be home to a wide variety of community-based nonprofit resources. A cross-section of these organizations responded to the DeKalb County Nonprofit Study in 2017.

Organization Age

Sector

While the majority of respondents report their nonprofit was created in the twenty-first century, two organizations report being initiated in the 1800s.

The National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE) is the system used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) since the mid-1990s to categorize nonprofit organizations. The NTEE classification system includes 26 major groups that fall under ten general categories or subsectors: • Arts, Culture, and Humanities • Education 31.4% Human • Environment and Animals Services • Health • Human Services 17.6% • International, Foreign Affairs Education • Public, Societal Benefit • Religion Related • Mutual/Membership Benefit 9.8% 13.7% • Unknown, Unclassified Environment Public, and Animals Societal Benefit When a nonprofit organization is

Year Range Number 1850-1899 2 1900-1949 1 1950-1999 12 2000-2017 19

first recognized, the IRS classifies it based on descriptive data in the organization’s application for recognition of tax-exempt status. The majority of respondents who answered represent Human Services organizations, which is consistent with the largest subsector reported nationally.

enges the Biggest challof s who ranked respondent ge ng The percenta eatest challe cs as the gr pi to g in w follo n: organizatio

e for their

76.9% Funding

15 .4% Client

/Community

Services

eer Services 7.7% Volunt

6

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

3.9%

Healthcare

3.9%

3.9%

International, Foreign Affairs

Mutual/ Membership Benefit

3.9%

Religion

Service Area

71.9% of respondents indicate they serve all of DeKalb County • The bulk of programs and services are offered in DeKalb and Sycamore; Hinckley, Shabbona, and Waterman follow closely behind. • Lee is the town LEAST served by respondents (9.4%). • 25% of respondents indicate they serve multiple counties • 6.3% of respondents provide most of their services outside of DeKalb County.


Finance, Funding and Challenges

Funding continues to be a major challenge for DeKalb County nonprofit organizations. The data from this survey was collected during the state of Illinois’ budget impasse. To a certain degree, the results reflect the impact of the state budget scenario. Where do DeKalb County nonprofits get their revenue?

• Individual Donations/ Annual Appeal = 78.8% • Fundraising Events = 60.6% • Foundation Grants = 54.5% • • • • • • • • •

Corporate Gifts or Sponsorship = 33.3% United Way Funding = 24.2% Government Grants = 24.2% Earned Income/Fees = 24.2% Endowment Distribution = 21.2% Government Contracts = 15.2% Insurance Reimbursement = 3% Bank Loans = 3% Other = 21.2%

Biggest challenges

Financial Outlook

29.4 percent of respondents expect their organizations’ financial health to improve in the next year, while 17.6 percent anticipate it will be worse. 52.9 percent predict their finances will be about the same as they are today. Of the respondents that said they expect their financial health to be worse next year, 50 percent of the respondents say their prediction of the financial health of their organization is based on the state budget impasse. One hundred percent of respondents expecting funding changes in the next year are making organizational adjustments to accommodate these changes.

29.4%

“We are aggressively pursuing funding other than state funding to support the financial needs of the organization.”

42 .9% When asked Acquiring their Donors greatest 30.3% challenge 40% in terms of Obtaining State 20% Funding in County funding, General respondent s 15.2% said: Loss of Governmen t Funding

“We will have to focus more on our largest stakeholders to retain the funding they provide.”

Expections of Future Financial Health

Improve

52.9%

Stay the Same

17.6% Worsen

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

7


Finance, Funding and Challenges continued Operating Budget by Sector Sector Arts, Culture and Humanities Education Environment and Animals Health Human Services International, Foreign Affairs Public, Societal Benefit Religion Related Mutual, Membership Benefit ALL Respondents

Average Minimum Maximum $102,864 $500 $380,000 $239,056 $1,500 $945,00 $34,125 $1,500 $110,000 $86,500 $3,000 $170,000 $1,112,149 $34,000 $5,000,000 $19,500 $5,000 $34,000 $7,500 $1,500 $17,000 $110,000 $110,000 $110,000 $51,500 $17,000 $86,000 $497,703 $500 $5,000,000

Challenges

“We are downsizing and/or closing programs, laying off staff.”

“We are trying to come up with more fundraising ideas. Changing how we hire musicians for each performance, re-using music we’ve done previously.”

The following percentage of respondents say that their boards have discussed but not implemented: • Restructuring the organization: 38.2% • Coordinating service delivery with another agency: 8.8% • Merging: 14.7% • Staff Layoffs: 8.8% • Closing the organization: 11.8% • 58.8 percent of respondents say their boards have not discussed any of the above. The following percentage of respondents say that their boards did the following: • Restructured the organization: 24.3% • Coordinated service delivery with another agency: 5.4% • Merged: 2.7% • Implemented staff layoffs: 2.7% • 64.9 percent say their organization did not do any of the above.

8

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

“Trying to raise more local funding. Considering memberships and fundraisers.”

“We provide funds for spay/ neuter of cats, and will not be able to provide the funds for as many this year”


Clients and Programs Demand for Programs and Services DeKalb County counts on nonprofit organizations to meet the many demands of the diverse citizenry in the community. From provision of direct human services to the offering of arts and entertainment, nonprofit organizations face a variety of challenges in the course of meeting the needs of their clients. Respondents were asked about their biggest challenge in terms of client services and community connection. 36.4 percent enhancing visibility and reputation. 30.3 percent long term planning. 15.2 percent determining how to serve increasingly diverse clients. 15.2 percent capacity to serve current and new clients. 2.9 percent say it is not a concern or challenge. 57.6 percent of respondents report that demand for programs increased over the last year, 33.3 percent report that it has remained the same while 9.1 percent report that it has decreased. 64 percent report that programs and services will expand over the next three years; 16 percent anticipate reduction, and 20 percent anticipate that programs and services will remain unchanged.

Biggest challe nges

Biggest chal lenge in term s of client services and community connection.

30.3% Long-Term Planning 36.4% Enhancing Visibility an d Reputation

15 .2% How to Serv Diverse Clie e nts

15 .2% Serve Curre nt and New Clie nts 2.9% Not a Concern or Challeng e

64%

Expand

20%

Stay the Same

16%

Reduction

Programs/Services Offered Despite the challenges associated with funding, 93.1 percent of the respondents report no decrease in the services/programs offered to clients.

Clients Served Respondents report the following regarding number of clients served:

79.3% No Decrease in Number of Clients Served 13.8% Up to 20% Fewer Clients 3.4% 3.4% Between Between 51-60% 81-90% Fewer Clients Fewer Clients

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

9


Clients and Programs continued Designing Programs and Services Programming is a cornerstone of many nonprofit organizations. Determining how best to serve the needs of the community is of paramount importance. DeKalb County nonprofits consult with a variety of stakeholders to determine what programs and services to offer:

81.3%

Board of Directors

65.6% Clients

59.4% Staff

53.1%

Community at Large

43.8%

Funders

Respondents have this to say about how programs and services are developed:

“Our organization determines programs/ services offered based on funds available and community need.” “Programs/Services are determined by community need and our ability to adequately fund.” “Through our strategic plan and community needs. Some services may be decreased, others may increase and we will develop some new service lines not currently offered. Our plan is to collaborate more with other social services agencies.” “Joint board/staff review and visioning.” “We evaluate each program annually. We will divest those that are not in demand, funded, nor within our organizational capacity. New programs will emerge that bring new efficiencies to our work and meeting our goals.”

10 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Evaluating Programs and Services 93.5 percent of respondents report tracking/measuring/evaluating their programs and services, while 6.5 percent do not. Some organizations track outputs (the number of activities, services, people, etc.).

96.4%

Number of Clients Served

67.9%

Number of Activities/Programs Offered

46.4%

Demographics of People Served

25.0%

Programmatic Milestones

Some organizations track outcomes (or the changes or impact made by the outputs).

60.7%

Client Satisfaction Short-Term

32.1%

Client Satisfaction Long-Term

7.1%

Concrete Measures Long Term Success

14.3%

Supporting Data from Outside Sources

10.7%

Long Term Impact on Community

3.6%

Results Compared to Control Group

Ongoing evaluation is becoming more prevalent, with 42.9 percent of respondents indicating they evaluate programs and services continuously.

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

11


Clients and Programs continued Client Demographics Nonprofit organizations face both challenges and opportunities as the demographics of DeKalb County continue to shift. The following shows who respondent organizations say they are serving.

100%

Serve Caucasian or White

92.9%

Serve African American

71.4%

Serve Latino/a or Hispanic

42.9% Serve “Other”

• The median age of clients respondents serve is 40 (compared to median age of people in DeKalb County, 30, and in Illinois, 38). In general, survey respondents serve clients that are older than the typical resident of DeKalb County. • The largest percentage of respondents say they serve Caucasian clients, followed by African American and Latino/a clients.

100%

Serve Female Clients

86.7%

Serve Male Clients

• A larger percentage of respondents also report serving female clients than male clients.

12

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Social Media

Rapidly evolving technology continues to influence the manner in which nonprofits impact their communities. Facebook algorithms are changing how individual users see content, and Millennials are pushing nonprofit organizations to use new social media outlets to capture their attention. Of the nonprofits surveyed, 94.3 percent of organizations use social media while 5.7 percent do not. â&#x20AC;˘ Of the 5.7 percent that do not, half of them say they are unsure how to use social media. Top social media sites used, in percentage of respondents:

96.9%

Facebook

New and Intere st

ing

At least one local nonpro fit sponsors podcasts to connect with the commun ity.

39.4% Twitter

15.2%

15.2%

Instagram

YouTube

12.1%

Pinterest

6.1%

LinkedIn

Top purposes for which nonprofits use social media:

93.9%

Event Promotion

90.9%

Visibility and Publicity

63.6%

Fundraising

Nonprofits also use social media for for advocacy (39.4 percent), hiring (15.2 percent), recruiting volunteers (39.4 percent) and transparency (27.3 percent.)

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

13


Volunteers

In a rapidly evolving national landscape, more people than ever are realizing that their support can make a difference. Volunteer time and talent make a substantial impact in DeKalb County. • 96.3 percent of respondent organizations utilize volunteers; 3.7 percent do not utilize volunteers. • 57.7 percent require training for volunteers; 42.3 percent do not. • 50 percent of those who use volunteers have volunteer position descriptions; 50 percent do not. • Of those organizations who utilize volunteers, the median number of volunteers utilized annually is 25. • This ranges widely, however, from two volunteers used each year to 500 on the high end. • Websites and Facebook continue to be the most commonly used methods for advertising volunteer positions. Email, word of mouth, and online services like Volunteer Match are also used.

Volunteers by Subsector Subsector Arts, Culture and Humanities Education Environment and Animals Health Human Services International, Foreign Affairs Public, Societal Benefit Religion Related Mutual/Membership Benefit All Sectors

Median Minimum Maximum 25 7 150 20 7 50 12 12 12 2 2 2 43 15 500 25 25 25 15 10 30 25 20 30 33 15 50 25 2 500

Biggest challe nges

For those th at utilize vo lunteers , the biggest chal lenges are:

79.2% Recruiting Volunteers

20.8% Managing Volunteers

14 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Human Resources “The nonprofit sector continues to experience growth while the private sector remains stable.” – Nonprofit HR, 2016.20 The following covers information about the employment, compensation and human resources practices of survey respondents.

Biggest challe nges

• 100 percent of responding organizations with paid staff have position descriptions for staff. • 65.2 percent have position descriptions for interns.

Biggest chal

lenges in te

22 .9% Providing Be nefits (e.g. Health Insurance) 28 .6% Offering Competitive Salaries

“We have an extremely qualified staff.”

rms of human

resources:

5.7% Hiring

Qualified St aff 5.7% Locatin g/Identif ying Qualified 2. 8% Achiev Staff ing Gender, Age and Ethnic/Cultu ral Diversity

34 .3% Said Employ Services no ee Challenge t a

Staff

36.4 percent of respondents report no paid staff in their organizations, while 63.6 percent indicated they have paid employees. On average, respondents report 67.1 percent of employees live in DeKalb County. Those who report employees from outside DeKalb County have staff coming from Kane, Ogle, Cook, DuPage, Boone, Lee, McHenry, and Winnebago counties. Respondents designate “full time” employment differently. The following percentages show how respondents classify “full-time”:

60% 40 hrs/ a week

20% 37.5 hrs/ a week 13.3% 35 hrs/a week 6.7% Other

93.3 percent of organizations report that their staff receives annual reviews or other regular performance evaluation while 6.7 percent report that they do not.

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

15


Human Resources continued The average respondent’s organization employs about 57 full-time staff members. The largest staff reported is 850 full-time employees, which skews the average. A more appropriate measure in this instance is the median value, which is two employees. This is more indicative of the typical respondent’s full-time staff size.

On average, respondents indicate they have about nine part-time workers. One organization reports 50 part-time employees, which is the largest by far. Again, this large value skews the average so the median provides a more appropriate idea of part-time staff size. The median organization employs two part-time workers.

68.8% 1-10 Staff 18.8% 0 Staff

64.2% 1-10 Staff 14.3% 0 Staff

0% 11-20 Staff 6.3% 21-30 Staff 6.3% 31+ Staff

7.1% 11-20 Staff 7.1% 21-30 Staff 7.1% 31+ Staff

Salary Responding organizations report the amount of payroll taxes paid each year: $1,325 is minimum $27,643 is median $75,659 is average

On average, 54.4 percent of the typical respondent’s operating budget goes towards wages; although 28.6 percent of respondents report that over 70 percent of their budget goes towards wages.

$385,000 is maximum

Respondents report the frequency of salary increases as follows:

60% Once a year

6.7% Every other year 33.3% Other

Of those that chose other, respondents answered: • At the first year of employment • As able to • Depends on funding • We’ve had a hiring/salary increase freeze for the last several years

Those reporting raises indicate 75 percent gave 2-3 percent salary increases and 16.6 percent gave 4-5 percent increases.

16 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Salary The following table includes the salaries of various nonprofit positions in DeKalb County. Minimum, maximum, average, and median values are shown for survey respondents. This data can be compared to similar data from the Rockford area and to national results. The Rockford data are from a survey conducted by the Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence (NICNE) in collaboration with the United Way of Rock River Valley. 21 The national data derive from The Nonprofit Times. 22

DeKalb County Rockford Area United States

POSITION

MIN MAX AVG MED

Accountant

* * * * 20,800 68,162 48,089 * 27,100 107,714 48,918 46,253

Administrative Assistant

6,000 39,604 24,121 26,000 17,160 49,920 26,729 * 16,640 72,450 34,304 33,514

Bookkeeper

7,000 31,000 19,000 19,000 1,800 62,233.6 31,706 * 18,000 65,000 38,544 36,000

Case Manager

28,000 28,000 28,000 28,000 26,000 52,000 34,828 * 20,800 48,000 31,930 31,800

Case Supervisor

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 24,960 90,964 52,145 * * * * *

CEO/ Executive Director

26,000 90,000 57,875 57,000 20,800 229,382 77,570 * 20,000 749,390 135,206 105,400

Certified Nurseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assistant (CNA)

* * * * 26,000 31,990 28,274 * * * * *

CFO/ Director of Finance

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 24,960 165,006 74,189 * 35,000 344,251 118,602 98,002

Communications Manager/ Development Associate

* * * * * * * * 18,000 75,000 42,729 40,250

Chief Operating Officer (COO)

52,500 55,000 53,750 53,750 33,280 184,704 96,533 * 29,500 401,100 118,633 101,987

Counsellor/ Therapist

30,000 34,000 32,000 32,000 31,720 52,000 37,993 * 20,492 55,000 38,233 39,800

Data Entry / Data Specialist

* * * * 19,760 31,200 26,633 * 20,000 60,000 34,177 32,539

Director of Casework Services/ Clinical Supervisor

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 * * * * * * * *

Director of Development

45,000 90,000 67,500 67,500 37,003 113,900 62,350 * 30,000 151,900 74,650 68,500

Director of Marketing

* * * * 20,800 90,043 53,605 * 30,000 155,000 70,683 67,850

Driver

* * * * 20,800 39,749 24,775 * 14,388 42,890 27,306 30,000

Executive Assistant

31,000 36,000 33,500 33,500 * * * * 22,000 95,000 47,631 45,000

Facilities Manager

24,000 48,000 36,000 36,000 20,800 68,370 42,756 * 18,000 121,600 55,336 53,431

Food Service Staff

* * * * * * * * 12,702 34,400 22,281 22,058

Food Service Supervisor

* * * * 20,280 32,510 25,500 * 20,000 67,000 38,949 37,900

Grant Writer

* * * * 27,040 156,000 77,970 28,000 87,560 54,232 48,400

Human Resources Director

* * * * * * * * 24,500 150,000 71,910 67,450

Continued on next page.

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17


Human Resources continued Continued from previous page.

Salary The following table includes the salaries of various nonprofit positions in DeKalb County. Minimum, maximum, average, and median values are shown for survey respondents. This data can be compared to similar data from the Rockford area and to national results. The Rockford data are from a survey conducted by the Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence (NICNE) in collaboration with the United Way of Rock River Valley. 23 The national data derive from The Nonprofit Times. 24

DeKalb County Rockford Area United States

POSITION

MIN MAX AVG MED

Information Technology (IT) Director/ IT Manager * * * * 24,960 89,648 52,678 * 25,000 120,000 70,204 66,000 Legal Advocate

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)

* * * * 39,686 39,686 39,686 * * * * *

Maintenance

27,040 27,040 27,040 27,040 17,160 44,137.6 26,003.62 * 20,800 71,000 35,355 31,600

Occupational Therapist

* * * * 104,000 145,600 124,800 * 41,891 79,500 59,619 59,640

Physical Therapist

* * * * * * * * 45,000 79,310 58,440 52,000

Physician

* * * * * * * * 88,900 254,800 174,983 172,800

Program Coordinator

36,500 38,147 37,324 37,324 22,360 72,800 39,480 * 14,000 116,000 44,162 41,662

Program Director

20,000 45,000 36,000 43,000 21,840 81,120 51,213 * 24,570 147,000 58,914 54,853

Program Staff

28,000 33,000 30,500 30,500 17,160 36,400 23,473 * 14,000 116,000 44,162 41,662

Receptionist

21,021 24,000 22,511 22,511 17,160 36,254 23,551 * 14,000 59,400 28,987 27,305

Recreation Leader/ Activity Worker/ Recreational Therapist * * * * * * * * 21,500 46,350 3,3534 33,602 Registered Nurse Rehabilitation/ Employment Counselor Sales Associate

* * * * 37,440 66,726 49,807 * 18,000 88,500 51,881 52,800 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 6,573 34,320 20,192 * * * * *

Senior Case Manager

* * * * * * * * 22,000 87,500 42,150 39,700

Special Education Teacher

* * * * 43,680 52,000 47,840 * * * * *

Supervisor

* * * * 28,850 56,160 40,649 * * * * *

Teacher, K-12

* * * * 22,880 52,000 33,345 * 25,000 74,536 46,405 44,300

Teacher, Pre-K

* * * * 21,320 46,800 32,465 * 19,637 40,000 28,069 27,115

Volunteer Coordinator

10,000 31,000 20,500 20,500 30,238 84,906 35,078 * 19,000 66,700 38,556 36,720

Office Manager

* * * * 20,800 76,960 37,034 * 21,900 89,000 44,541 44,000

Legal Counsellor/ Attorney/ Lawyer

* * * * * * * * 41,000 129,000 72,510 67,000

18 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Health Insurance Does your organization currently offer health insurance to any employee (either full- or part-time)?

DeKalb County

Rockford Area 25 40% No

71.4% No 60% Yes

28.6% Yes

Does your organization currently offer health insurance to part-time employees? 28.6 percent of DeKalb County organizations and 38 percent of Rockford area organizations do not currently offer health insurance to part-time employees. 26

What is the average cost per employee for health insurance in 2016, including both employer and employee costs?

DeKalb County 0% 20%

Rockford Area Less than $3,000

20%

$3,001 to $4,000

20%

0%

$4,001 to $5,000

5%

0%

$5,001 to $6,000

7%

0%

$6,001 to $7,000

7%

$7,001 to $8,000

7%

20% 0%

$8,001 to $10,000

10%

Over $10,000

15%

20%

27

If health insurance costs increased, by how much?

DeKalb County 33%

Rockford Area 27%

0% – 5% 0%

6% – 10%

17%

0%

11% – 15%

15%

16% – 20%

2%

0%

21% – 30%

2%

0%

31% – 40%

5%

67%

28

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

19


Human Resources continued

If health insurance costs increased, was the cost increase passed to employees?

DeKalb County 66.7% None of the Increase

33.3% Some of the Increase

How much of the monthly health insurance premium does the company pay for single coverage in 2016?

DeKalb County

Rockford Area

-

Not sure

8%

Company pays 100%

8%

Company pays 75% to 99%

6%

67% 33%

29

11%

0%

Company pays 50% to 74%

0%

Company pays 1% to 49%

5%

0%

Employee pays 100%

0%

How much of the monthly health insurance premium does the company pay for family coverage in 2016?

DeKalb County

Rockford Area Not sure

5%

0%

Company pays 100%

0%

0%

Company pays 75% to 99%

0%

Company pays 50% to 74%

11%

0%

Company pays 1% to 49%

5%

-

100%

Employee pays 100%

30

32%

16%

How important is your healthcare plan to attracting and retaining talent?

DeKalb County

Rockford Area 31 59% Critically Important

50% Critically Important

20 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

50% Somewhat Important

34% Somewhat Important 2% Neutral 5% Not Important


Other Benefits

Which of the following typical benefits are employees offered? Typical Benefits Paid Holidays Life Insurance Paid Vacation Long-term Disability Paid Sick Days Short-term Disability Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Wellness Program Tuition Reimbursement Paid Time Off (PTO) Professional Development (internal or external opportunities)

DeKalb County Full-time Part-time 80.0% 90.9% 33.0% - 66.7% 72.7% 26.7% - 66.7% 72.7% 33.3% - 26.7% 18.2% 20.0% 9.1% 6.7% - 40.0% - 73.3% 45.5%

Rockford Area 32 Full-time Part-time 89% 46% 52% 9% 75% 40% 37% 12% 66% 31% 37% 12% 23% 12% 18% 8% 18% 8% 34% 22% - -

Which of the following atypical benefits are employees offered? Atypical benefits Flextime Telecommuting Financial planning assistance Legal assistance programs Compressed workweek On-site fitness centers Commuter benefits Free or low-priced meals Sabbaticals Childcare referrals Job sharing On-site child care Cell/smart phone reimbursement Paid maternity leave Paid paternity leave

DeKalb County Rockford Area 33 Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time 33.3% 36.4% 43% 25% 33.3% 18.2% 24% 12% - - 16% 8% - - 8% 4% 13.3% 18.2% 8% 10% - - 4% 4% - - 6% 4% 6.7% 18.2% 8% 6% 13.3% - 4% 0% - - 4% 4% - - - 2% - - 4% 6% 20.0% - - 13.3% - - - - - -

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

21


Human Resources continued Recruitment

“In order to meet the demands of job growth, nonprofits need to increase investment in and improve approaches to recruitment and retention.” – Nonprofit HR, 2016.34

Top staffing challenges at organizations Offering competitive salary........................................................................................................... 85.7% Offering competitive benefits......................................................................................................64.3% Locating/identifying qualified staff........................................................................................... 35.7% Hiring qualified staff.......................................................................................................................... 21.4% Lack of recruitment budget...........................................................................................................14.3% Gap in talent between retiring leaders and emerging leaders.......................................14.3% Achieving gender, age and ethnic/cultural diversity..........................................................14.3%

Organizations use a variety of outlets to advertise open positions Organization’s website................................................................................................................... 60% Social media........................................................................................................................................ 60% Online job boards (Monster.com, Indeed.com, NPO.net, etc)....................................... 60% Local newspapers/publications...................................................................................................33.3% (Includes direct email, Chamber of Commerce, college job boards and industry-specific websites and forums.) Other.......................................................................................................................................................26.7%

Hiring forecast for the coming year

35.7% Increase in Staff

42.3% Stable/ No Change 7.1% Decrease in Staff 7.1% Hiring Freeze 7.1% Undecided

Of those respondents that anticipate hiring, they report the type of staff to be hired is as follows Marketing/public relations............................................................................................................ 40% Program staff...................................................................................................................................... 40% Administrative support................................................................................................................... 20% Counseling/case management................................................................................................... 20% Finance.................................................................................................................................................. 20% Fund/resource development....................................................................................................... 20%

22 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Retention What are the top three retention challenges at your organization? Inability to pay competitively.......................................................................................................76.9% Excessive workload........................................................................................................................... 61.5% Inability to offer competitive benefits......................................................................................53.8% Staff burnout....................................................................................................................................... 46.2% Inability to promote/advance top performing staff.......................................................... 30.8% Lack of formal retention strategy................................................................................................15.4% External competition (i.e., other employers recruit/attract our employees)...........15.4%

What is the average amount of time the typical employee stays with your organization? 1-3 Years.................................................................................................................................................26.7% 4-6 Years...............................................................................................................................................26.7% 7-9 Years............................................................................................................................................... 20% 10 Years or Longer.............................................................................................................................26.7%

Full-time Staff by Subsector (* indicates none reported) Subsector Arts, Culture and Humanities Education Environment and Animals Health Human Services International, Foreign Affairs Public, Societal Benefit Religion Related Mutual/Membership Benefit All Sectors

Average Minimum Maximum 2 1 3 3 1 5 1 1 1 * * * 112 1 850 * * * * * * * * * * * * 70 1 850

Part-time Staff by Subsector (* indicates none reported) Subsector Arts, Culture and Humanities Education Environment and Animals Health Human Services International, Foreign Affairs Public, Societal Benefit Religion Related Mutual/Membership Benefit All Sectors

Average Minimum Maximum 2 1 3 1 1 1 * * * * * * 16 2 50 * * * * * * 4 4 4 3 3 3 10 1 50

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

23


Strategic Plan

A strategic plan outlines the trajectory for an organization by providing direction, outlining measureable goals, and serving as a guide for organizational priorities. • 57.6 percent of respondents report having a plan in place while 42.4 percent report not having one. • Of those that report having a plan in place, 89.5 percent are currently implementing their strategic plan while 10.5 percent are not. The act of creating a strategic plan includes visioning, planning, and executing. This type of work is often challenging for nonprofit boards, but the payoff can be immense. Respondents shared their biggest challenges when implementing a strategic plan:

“The largest challenge has been allocating enough time for planning of events and programming. The strategic plan outlines the continued practice of holding events. A related challenge is getting the board committees to meet outside of the monthly board meeting to more fully plan events.” “Biggest challenge is we’re an all-volunteer organization, led by a volunteer board, which makes it difficult to hold people accountable on task completion to move the organization forward.” “Our staff is at full capacity most of the calendar year, and over-full in the spring as it is our busiest programming season. We consistently struggle to find time to work on our goals. Organizational Capacity is one of our goals for our FY18-FY19 strategic plan. It is a priority. We still need to find the time to implement the action plan.” “Lots of changing dynamics results in an ever-changing plan.”

For those without a strategic plan, the most commonly cited reasons for not having a plan are: • • • • •

Lack of board commitment (25%) Lack of funding (16.7%) Unaware of resources to assist with planning (16.7%) No time to engage in planning (33.3%) Other (50%) • • • • • •

“Caught up in day to day tasks with few volunteers” “Have not taken the time to engage in developing a plan” “New organization” “Project oriented only” “We are just starting the process” “We have no paid staff”

64.3 percent of respondents report they do not have a succession plan for the Executive Director/CEO, while 35.7 percent do.

24 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Boards and Governance The Importance of Boards

One aspect that sets a nonprofit organization apart from for-profit business is the requirement that the organization is governed by a board of directors. Among other things, it is the board’s responsibility to determine the organization’s mission and purpose, select and review the Executive Director/ CEO, ensure adequate funding and resources to meet organizational priorities, and serve as ambassadors by raising awareness about the organization. 88 percent of survey respondents agree or strongly agree that the board of directors is a strong asset of their organization.

Fundraising

While 56.5 percent rate their board average or above average in terms of fundraising performance, there were some very highly rated boards: 13 percent rated their board’s fundraising performance as far above average. On the other hand, 30.4 percent rate their board below or far below average in terms of fundraising performance.

“Our board now has a member who has been a fundraiser. We seek out ways in the community to participate in fundraising.”

Policies And Expectations

69.2% of respondents have written position descriptions for board members while 30.8% do not. 93.3% of respondents with paid employees have their Board of Directors evaluate the Executive Director/CEO annually. Governance policies are put in place by a Board to safeguard the organization from various liability issues: • 100% report a Conflict of Interest policy • 85% say they have a Code of Ethics • 65% report having a Whistleblower policy • 55% have a Drug-Free Workplace policy A “Give or Get” policy encourages board members to either donate or solicit a minimum amount of money each year to the organization. • While 29.6 percent of respondents have a “Give or Get” policy, 70.4 percent do not. Respondents rated their Board of Directors’ expected level of strategic competence (e.g., ability to articulate clear goals, guiding the direction of the organization, etc.): • Above or far above average = 69.2% • Average = 26.9% • Below average = 3.8% Respondents rated their board’s level of engagement (e.g., regular meeting attendance, volunteering for special events, willing and able to help as needed) • Above or far above average = 56% • Average = 32% • Below or far below average = 12%

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

25


DCNP Membership 76.9 percent of survey respondents are DCNP members while 23.1 percent are not.

DCNP offers many ways to get involved in the local nonprofit community. Programs for volunteers, board members, nonprofit staff, and community members are offered on a regular basis and suggestions from DCNP stakeholders are used to determine what types of programs to offer. Respondents were asked to describe the training topics their organization would find to be most beneficial, and they had this to say:

Fundraising and Capacity Building “Continue to offer current topics on fundraising, grant writing, social media, etc. but update the content as needs and relevance to the community change.” “Strengthening and building our donor base.” “Brainstorm sessions with other nonprofits regarding fundraising and marketing.”

Board Topics “How to navigate working with Boards that are outspoken and have their own agenda.” “Board engagement – people are busy!”

Other “Finance and accounting best practices. Strategic planning. How to make our organization better known in the community. Board best practices.” For DCNP membership or renewal information contact: DCNP Director 475 DeKalb Avenue Sycamore, IL 60178 815-748-5383 dcnp@dekalbccf.org

26 DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


Methodology Background

Prior to developing the original questionnaire, extensive research was conducted on existing nonprofit surveys. After the initial study in 2015, suggested changes to the survey were noted. For this edition of the study, nonprofit practitioners were asked what new data should be collected to help move the sector forward, and the survey was tested by a group of reviewers. Qualtrics survey software was used to administer the questionnaire and collect responses.

Distribution List A list of 501(c)3 and 501(c)6 nonprofit organizations in DeKalb County was created. The list was developed from a variety of sources including the National Center for Charitable Statistics, Internal Revenue Service and the DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership. Due to the focus of the survey, foundations and other organizations that exist primarily to allocate financial resources were not included in the final distribution list, nor were primarily faith-based organizations. Additionally, the survey was not sent when an email address was not available. This process resulted in 112 organizations in the final list.

Timeline Results were collected over a four week period. An initial email introduced the project and included the survey link. This was followed by three reminder emails to encourage additional participation. February 21, 2017 March 2, 2017 March 9, 2017 March 15, 2017 March 20, 2017

Initial email, data collection begins First reminder email Second reminder email Final reminder email Survey closed, data collection ended

Data Confidentiality Survey responses collected through this project are presented in aggregate to protect the confidentiality of participating organizations.

Completions Representatives from 52 organizations opened the survey; a total of 29 organizations completed the entire survey. An additional five respondents completed the majority of the survey. These five respondents are considered partial completions. When combined, this results in 34 respondents in the data file.

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

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Methodology continued Response Rates Four response rates were calculated in an effort to accurately represent survey participation. One reason for multiple response rates has to do with the inclusion of partial completions as outlined above. Another reason justifying the use of multiple response rates is the fact that three emails were undeliverable. Alternative email addresses were identified for one case; however, given the confidentiality of the survey, there is no way to determine if the subsequent attempts were successfully delivered to an appropriate contact person. Response rate 1 – Most Conservative 29/112 = 25.9% This calculation only includes those that completed every question in the survey (29) and the two survey emails that were undeliverable are included (112). Response rate 2 29/110 = 26.4% This calculation only includes those that completed every question in the survey (29), but it excludes the two undeliverable survey emails from the denominator (110). Response rate 3 34/112 = 30.4% This calculation includes five partial completions along with actual completions, which increases the numerator to 34 while also including undeliverable survey emails in the denominator (112). Response rate 4 – Most Generous 34/110 = 30.9% This calculation includes all completions—partial and actual (34)—and excludes the two undeliverable survey emails (110). There are differing opinions about what constitutes an acceptable response rate. Overall, the trend appears to be that survey response rates are declining. For email surveys, a response rate of 30 percent or higher is typically considered acceptable according to the American Association for Public Opinion Research (aapor.org). This organization has noted the recent precipitous decline in survey response rates, and suggests that new research is showing that lower response rates do not indicate lack of validity. The web vendor Constant Contact suggests that a common response rate for an email survey is 10-20 percent.

Reporting of Data When possible, valid percentages are used in this report. Valid percentages are calculated by purposefully not including responses of “Don’t know/unsure” or those that opted not to answer the question. Furthermore, valid percentages eliminate the need to adjust the calculation for those that were not asked a question due to their answers to previous questions (i.e., survey design skip logic). Using valid percentages enhances accuracy and clarity in reporting.

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End Notes 1

Centennial, DeKalb, Illinois: DeKalb, 1856-1956 Progress Unlimited. (1956). Our Town. Retrieved from http://archive.org

2

DeKalb County Illinois Reference Year Book (2017). Retrieved from http://dekalbcounty.org

3

United States Census Bureau / American Fact Finder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016â&#x20AC;?. 2016 Population Estimates Program. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov.

4

Data USA. (2017). DeKalb County, IL. Retrieved from https://datausa.io/profile/geo/dekalb-county-il/

5

United States Census Bureau. (2016). DeKalb County, Illinois. State & County Quick Facts. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov

6

Ibid

7

Illinois County Map with County Seat Cities (2017). Retrieved from http://geology.com

8

United States Census Bureau. (2016). American Community Survey. Geography: DeKalb County, Illinois. Retrieved from https:// thedataweb.rm.census.gov

9

United States Census Bureau. (2013). DeKalb County, Illinois. State & County Quick Facts. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov

10

Data USA. (2017). DeKalb County, IL. Retrieved from https://datausa.io

11

United States Census Bureau. (2016). DeKalb County, Illinois. State & County Quick Facts. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov

12

United States Census Bureau. (2016). DeKalb County, Illinois. State & County Quick Facts. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov

13

Illinois County Map with County Seat Cities (2017). Retrieved from http://geology.com

14

National Center for Charitable Statistics (Aug., 2016) Data and Statistics: Custom Report Builder. Retrieved from www. nccsweb.urban.org

15

National & Community Service (2017) Trends and Highlights Overview. Retrieved from https://www.nationalservice.gov

16

National Center for Charitable Statistics (Aug., 2016) Data and Statistics: Custom Report Builder. Retrieved from www. nccsweb.urban.org

17

National Center for Charitable Statistics (Aug., 2016) Data and Statistics: Custom Report Builder. Retrieved from www. nccsweb.urban.org

18

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov

19

Ibid

20

Nonprofit HR. (2016) Nonprofit Employment Practices Survey Results: Guide Star. Retrieved from https://www.nonprofithr.com

21

The United Way of the Rock River Valley. (2016). Organizational Salary Survey. Rockford IL: United Way of Rock River Valley & the Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence of Rockford University.

22

The Nonprofit Times. (2017). Nonprofit Organizations Salary Report. Roswell, GA: Bluewater Nonprofit Solutions.

23

The United Way of the Rock River Valley. (2016). Organizational Salary Survey. Rockford IL: United Way of Rock River Valley & the Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence of Rockford University.

24

The Nonprofit Times. (2017). Nonprofit Organizations Salary Report. Roswell, GA: Bluewater Nonprofit Solutions.

25

The United Way of the Rock River Valley. (2016). Organizational Salary Survey. Rockford IL: United Way of Rock River Valley & the Northern Illinois Center for Nonprofit Excellence of Rockford University.

26

Ibid

27

Ibid

28

Ibid

29

Ibid

30

Ibid

31

Ibid

32

Ibid

33

Ibid

34

Nonprofit HR. (2016) Nonprofit Employment Practices Survey Results: Guide Star. Retrieved from https://www.nonprofithr.com

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018

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30

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018


475 DeKalb Avenue Sycamore, IL 60178 815-748-5383 dcnp.org

Zulauf Hall, Room 114 DeKalb, IL 60115 815-753-4410 niu.edu/nonprofit

Profile for Northern Illinois University

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018  

For over 180 years, people have been drawn to DeKalb County for its rich natural environment and resources. And for nearly as long, nonprofi...

DeKalb County Nonprofit Study 2017-2018  

For over 180 years, people have been drawn to DeKalb County for its rich natural environment and resources. And for nearly as long, nonprofi...