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northern british columbia Travel guide 2017

N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M.C O M


NOR TH E R N B R I TI S H C OLU M B I A TR A V E L G U I DE 2 0 1 7

75 Years

contents

1942 - 2017

L I A R D V A L L E Y O N T H E A L A S K A H I G H W A Y - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  E M A N U E L S M E D B O L

N O R T H E R N B . C . - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  J E R E M Y K O R E S K I

L I A R D H O T S P R I N G S - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M E G A N M C L E L L A N

Celebrating the World Famous Alaska Highway Take the ultimate road trip this year and celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Alaska Highway, a route carved through the wilderness of northeastern British Columbia to the Yukon and Alaska beyond. Look for more information in this guide on attractions and celebrations happening in communities along the highway from the official “Mile 0” in Dawson Creek, all the way up to the Liard River Hot Springs.

PHOTO CREDITS (LEFT - RIGHT) TOP: THE SOUTH PEACE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, SIMON RATCLIFFE - CHANNEL COLLECTIVE, THE SOUTH PEACE HISTORICAL SOCIETY BOTTOM: ANDREW STRAIN, THE SOUTH PEACE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, ANDREW STRAIN

FLY FISHING NORTHERN B.C. - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  J E R E M Y K O R E S K I

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PUBLISHER: Northern British Columbia Tourism Association Project Manager: Hilary Erasmus

PUBLISHED FOR: Northern British Columbia Tourism Association 1274 5th Avenue Prince George, B.C. V2L 3L2 Telephone: 250-561-0432 Email: info@NBCtourism.com

D E S I G N / L AY O U T: Concept Design Ltd. Suite 201 - 1389 Third Avenue Prince George, B.C. V2L 3E8 Telephone: 250-564-1309 www.conceptdesign.ca

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SECTION 2: NORTHWEST BRITISH COLUMBIA

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NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA INTRODUCTION

TOTEM POLE CARVING AT THE HAIDA HERITAGE CENTRE - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  K E N T B E R N A D E T

NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA MAP

PRINTED IN CANADA For Free Distribution

FOR ACCOMMODATION RESERVATIONS AND TRAVEL IDEAS VISIT H E L L O B C .C O M

S E C T I O N 3: H A I D A G WA I I BRITISH COLUMBIA

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T R AV E L T I P S : THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

COVER PHOTO: Muncho Lake, Alaska Highway - Destination BC / Andrew Strain

CHECK OUT NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA ON: /northernbc

@tourismbcnorth

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©2017 - Northern British Columbia Tourism Association (the”Region”). All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited. This Guide does not constitute, and should not be construed as, an endorsement or recommendation of any carrier, hotel, restaurant or any other facility, attraction or activity in British Columbia, for which neither Destination BC Corp. nor the Region assumes any responsibility. Super, Natural British Columbia®, Hello BC®, Visitor Centre and all associated logos  /  trade-marks are trade-marks or Official Marks of Destination BC Corp. Admission fees and other terms and conditions may apply to attractions and facilities referenced in this Guide. Errors and omissions excepted.


I NTR ODU C TI ON: NOR TH ER N B R I TI S H C O L U M BI A C ANA DA

ALASKA HIGHWAY - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Regions of the

north

Section 1:

Prince George, and points east and north, are described in Section 1: Northeast British Columbia (NE).

Traveling from Prince George east to Tete Jaune Cache and north to the Yukon border.

B.C. points west and northwest of Prince George are described in Section 2: Northwest British Columbia (NW).

Northeast bc

KSAN HISTORICAL VILLAGE & MUSEUM - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

hg

nw

ne PRINCE GEORGE

Haida Gwaii / Queen Charlotte Islands are described in Section 3: Haida Gwaii British Columbia (HG). Each section is also identified by a corresponding colour.

Section 2:

Northwest bc British columbia CANADA

Traveling from Vanderhoof north up to Atlin, then back to Terrace and out to Prince Rupert.

COX ISLAND, HAIDA GWAII - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

“If you’re looking for pristine natural beauty, rich history, fascinating aboriginal culture and genuine people, you’ve come to the right place: Northern British Columbia has it all.”

How this guide works:

For ease of use, this guide is divided into sections that roughly parallel major travel routes.

Section 3:

Haida gwaii bc Traveling from your arrival at Sandspit and moving up island to Masset and Old Massett.

With 500,000 square kilometers of astonishingly diverse geography, northern B.C. boasts recreation and wildlife-viewing opportunities year-round. More than 60 provincial, national and marine parks and wildlife refuges offer access to unique ecosystems and priceless cultural heritage treasures. Of course, the tone of any place is set by its people. Fewer than 500,000 residents make northern B.C. one of the least densely populated places in North America. But those who do call it home are as passionate about the recreational assets in their backyards as they are about its vibrant culture and colorful past — and eager to share it with you. Experience the friendly hospitality of northern British Columbians, and you’ll be back again and again.

( L E F T ) S T O N E M O U N T A I N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  E M A N U E L S M E D B O L

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Section 1 6

nw northWest

K I N U S E O F A L L S , M O N K M A N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K , T U M B L E R R I D G E U N E S C O G L O B A L G E O P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M I K E S E E H A G E L

ne northEast BRITISH COLUMBIA

h

Haida

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S E C TI ON 1 : NO R T H E A ST BC

Section 1

NorthEast British Columbia

“Riotous wildflowers in the alpine meadows of Stone Mountain Provincial Park. Stone’s sheep, and jade-green waters, of Muncho Lake Provincial Park.”

Your northern B.C. tour will almost certainly include a stop in Prince George, B.C.’s unofficial northern capital city and an important transportation hub. Take time in Prince George to learn about characters who have shaped the north’s fascinating history — by visiting the galleries and museums that tell stories about northern B.C. First Nations, explorers, fur-traders, gold-seekers, pioneers, railroaders and lumberjacks. Glimpse its future, too, by visiting one of Canada’s most distinguished small universities — the University of Northern B.C. and the new Wood Innovation and Design Centre. If you head north from Prince George on Highway 97, you’ll discover

the youthful, entrepreneurial heart of northeastern B.C. Feel its dynamism, expressed in industries such as mining, oil and gas; in engineering wonders like the WAC Bennett Dam (In most years, it produces about one-quarter of the electricity consumed by BC Hydro’s domestic customers); and in communities like Fort St. John — one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities. The landscape is characterized by rolling hills, thick forests and fertile

valleys cut by winding rivers and sparkling waterfalls. Its resource wealth is paralleled by equally resourceful people. Potent examples are found in towns like Tumbler Ridge, southeast of Chetwynd on Highway 29. After making discoveries of dinosaur tracks, fossils and bones, this mining town recast itself as a compelling visitor attraction and centre for palaeontological research. Dino-seeking visitors can’t resist visiting Kinuseo Falls, whose thunderous height surpasses Niagara Falls, and the new Tumbler Ridge UNESCO Global Geopark, only the second such park in North America. Continue north to reach the aweinspiring Alaska Highway, driving

( L E F T ) N O R T H R O C K I E S L O D G E I N M U N C H O L A K E P R O V I N C I A L P A R K O N T H E A L A S K A H I G H W A Y - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M E G A N M C L E L L A N

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SE C T I O N 1 : NO R T HEAST BC NORTHEAST BC – CONTINUED…

through some of North America’s most scarcely populated territory, and you’ll come to understand why this route is so often identified with adventure. To really appreciate this feat of civic engineering and its strategic role in U.S. military history, visit Alaska Highwayrelated attractions in Dawson Creek, Fort St. John and Fort Nelson. The Alaska Highway also offers access to some of B.C.’s best kept secrets: Mesozoic-Era marine fossils and rare arctic butterflies in Pink Mountain Provincial Park. Riotous wildflowers in the alpine meadows of Stone Mountain Provincial Park. Stone’s sheep, and jadegreen waters, of Muncho Lake Provincial Park. Everyone who journeys the remote Alaska Highway should reward themselves, at least once, with a visit to Liard River Hot Springs Provincial Park. Although popular in summer, the springs are truly resplendent on frosty winter days. One restorative dip in this steaming oasis, and you’ll see why these mineralized pools and diverse flora have drawn human visitors for millennia. Travel east of Prince George on Highway 16, and arrive in the Robson Valley — the western slope of the Rocky Mountains and the birthplace of the mighty Fraser River. Communities like Dunster and McBride offer excellent bases

for outdoor adventurers exploring by foot, ski, jet boat or snowmobile. From here, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies beckons from the provincial park of the same name: Mount Robson. Considered a crown jewel among the world’s parks, Mount Robson offers experiences for every taste — from vehicle-accessible camping to pristine locales that humans rarely see. Winter brings a whole new slate of recreation opportunities to northeastern B.C. Heliski east of Prince George, or cross-country ski on groomed trails just minutes from downtown. Snowmobile on 300 kilometers of glorious trails near Tumbler Ridge, and skate on free, outdoor rinks found at many northeastern B.C. lakes and townsites. Some winter activities are unique: try a round of snowgolf at Fort St. John’s High on Ice carnival. Bundle up, and get swept up by the infectious enthusiasm of howling dog teams at sled dog races which have drawn international competitors to Fort Nelson for almost 50 years. Whichever season or direction you travel, you’ll meet friendly northeastern British Columbians who are as passionate about play as they are work — and as you discover their backyard, you’ll understand why.

Get Northern BC in the palm of your hand.

BISON NEAR LIARD RIVER HOT SPRINGS PROVINCIAL PARK - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N SUMMIT LAKE, STONE MOUNTAIN PROVINCIAL PARK - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

Introducing the Northern BC app. It’s free to download and features an interactive map to locate attractions and destinations throughout the Northern BC region. Find restaurants and accommodations on the go, or use it to plan your trip in advance. Stay connected through integrated social media and share experiences, photos and video of your trip. Now available at the App store for Apple devices and Google Play for Android.

M U N C H O L A K E - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

Central British Columbia Railway & Forestry Museum Prince George www.pgrfm.bc.ca Huble Homestead Historic Site Prince George www.hublehomestead.ca Mackenzie & District Museum Mackenzie www.mackenziemuseum.ca

DISCOVER NORTH CENTRAL BC’S PREMIER

MUSEUMS, GALLERIES & CULTURAL ATTRACTIONS.

Barkerville Historic Town Barkerville www.barkerville.ca Fort St. James National Historic Site Fort St. James www.pc.gc.ca/stjames Valemount Museum Valemount www.valemountmuseum.ca Valley Museum & Archives McBride www.valleymuseumarchives.ca Whistle Stop Gallery McBride www.whistlestopgallery.org The Exploration Place Museum & Science Centre Prince George www.theexplorationplace.com Two Rivers Gallery Prince George www.tworiversgallery.ca

A GOLDEN RAVEN EXPERIENCE ARTS | CULTURE | HERITAGE For money-saving coupons, upcoming events, and more, visit…

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www.goldenraven.ca

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA - SIMON RATCLIFFE

PRINCE GEORGE - SIMON RATCLIFFE DOWNTOWN PRINCE GEORGE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

PRINCE GEORGE GOLF & CURLING CLUB - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Prince George

Inviting you to enjoy: • Comfortable Beds • Free Internet • Exercise Facilities •

And so much more!

Fort St. John: 250.787.0779 Chetwynd: 250.788.3000 Fort Nelson: 250.233.5001

For a complete listing of all our hotels, visit LakeviewHotels.com or call 1.877.355.3500. 12

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Near the geographical heart of the province, Prince George has a solid claim to the title of B.C.’s northern capital. Located at the convergence of Highways 97 and 16, north / south and east / west-bound railways, and the Nechako and Fraser Rivers, it is a major hub of transport, commerce, services and culture. The region was first inhabited by the Lheidli T’enneh, a Carrier-speaking First Nation. Their first contact with European colonizers may have been 1793, when Scottish explorer Alexander Mackenzie canoed past what is now Prince George. But it was fur trader Simon Fraser, in 1807, who built a fur trading outpost on the group’s traditional territory and named it Fort George, in honour of King George III. The post remained comparatively isolated until 1903, when plans for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (later CN Rail) began to fuel land speculation and agricultural settlement. In 1915, the city of Prince George was incorporated, and is named after the fourth son of King George V. Prince George struggled over the difficult years of the Great War, a Spanish Flu epidemic in 1918, and the Great Depression, but its economy sprang to life in World War II, when a new army camp of 6,000 soldiers bolstered demand for services. As post-war reconstruction efforts fuelled a

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growing international demand for lumber, Prince George’s forest industry took root. In 1981, it was the second largest city in B.C. Despite changes wrought by forest industry consolidation, globalization and B.C.’s mountain pine beetle epidemic, wood remains one of the city’s primary economic drivers.

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hosts high-profile athletic events, such as the 2012 World Baseball Challenge and the 2007 Royal Bank Cup National Junior A Hockey Championships. Prince George hosted the Canada Winter Games in February 2015. Ethnic restaurants, specialty stores, and diverse cultural activities cater to increasingly cosmopolitan tastes of Prince Georgians. Convenient air links and the shooting of several productions have made Prince George increasingly attractive to film crews. The vibrant University of Northern B.C., Canada’s Green University celebrated its 25th year in 2015. This researched-focused academic powerhouse is consistently recognized as one of Canada’s top-ranked small universities, named #1 in the Primarily Undergraduate category of Maclean’s 2016 University Rankings and it has recently claimed space in the new Wood Innovation and Design Centre, a six-storey wood frame building. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N P R I N C E G E O R G E Δ Get your art fix at the Two Rivers Gallery, which offers an ever-changing selection of top-quality works by local, regional and national artists. Source the gallery’s gift store, and downtown shops for quality crafts and highend creative gifts.

(TOP) TWO RIVERS GALLERY - SIMON RATCLIFFE (BOTTOM) CENTRAL BC RAILWAY & FORESTRY MUSEUM - SIMON RATCLIFFE

PRINCE GEORGE – CONTINUED…

Prince George continues to bloom in other respects. Its active, sport-loving citizens are enthusiastic supporters of the Western Hockey League Prince George Cougars and the BCHL Prince George Spruce Kings. The city regularly

HUBLE HOMESTEAD HISTORIC SITE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ View one of the largest vintage rail collections in B.C., at the Central British Columbia Railway & Forestry Museum on River Road. Artifacts date from 1899, and include buildings, locomotives, rail cars and artifacts from the steam and diesel railway eras, as well as vintage logging, mining and agricultural machinery. Inquire about special events hosted year-round. Δ Step back in time at the Huble Homestead, 40 km (25 mi) north of town off Highway 97. This living heritage site includes a restored turn-of-the-century homestead, general store and trading post, blacksmith shop, post office and First Nations fish camp. Walk the Giscome Portage, an 8.5 km (5 mi) trail that originates at the homestead and crosses the Continental Divide. Originally used by the Carrier people, it was later made into a wagon road to accommodate Gold Rush-era traffic.

SANDMAN INN SMITHERS

SANDMAN HOTEL & SUITES PRINCE GEORGE

So Many Reasons to Stay: Centrally located | Complimentary high speed Internet | On-site dining | Meeting & banquet facilities | Pet friendly | Fitness facilities | Complimentary parking *Amenities vary by location

at SANDMAN SIGNATURE PRINCE GEORGE HOTEL

• New fitness centre • Newly renovated rooms • Tropical gardens • Breakfast promotions

Book online using promo code ‘NORTHBC’ or call and ask for the ‘NORTHBC’ rate to receive exclusive offers! Sandman Hotels, Inns & Suites: Prince George | McBride | Terrace | Smithers Sandman Signature Hotels & Resorts: Prince George

Guests ages 6 and under stay and eat free!

sandmanhotels.com 1 800 SANDMAN (726 3626)

www.esthersinn.com 1151 Commercial Cres • Prince George, BC • 1-800-663-6844

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SANDMAN HOTEL & SUITES PRINCE GEORGE

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Prince Rupert

YEAR-ROUND FARMERS' MARKET - DOWNTOWN PRINCE GEORGE

EXPLORATION PLACE SCIENCE CENTRE & MUSEUM - SIMON RATCLIFFE

OKANAGAN VALLEY

Smithers

1 Kelowna 2 Vernon 3 Salmon Arm

PRINCE GEORGE – CONTINUED…

pet friendly

some places have it all... aren’t you glad you know about this one

Here in the Northern Gateway of Prince George, we’re known for our hospitality – few places can match the warm welcome you’ll feel when you stay at the Coast Inn of the North.

amenities Pet-friendly rooms

Shogun Restaurant Winston’s Resto-Bar Coffee Garden Cafe

Complimentary Wi-Fi

local gems Local hiking

Beautiful scenery and parks

Mountain biking

Heli-skiing, skiing and snowmobiling

coastinnofthenorth.com 16

KOOTENAY ROCKIES

Δ Enjoy live entertainment, home-baked goods, local crafts and organic produce at the Farmers’ Market, Saturday mornings, year round (at 1074 - 6th Avenue).

800.663.1144

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Δ Stimulate your brain at the Exploration Place Science Centre and Museum, located in Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park. Full-sized dinosaur models, 70-millionyear old fossils, a wide ranging selection of live critters, hands-on games for kids, First Nations artifacts, an operable Nickelodeon player piano, an authentic jail cell, an interactive sports machine that tests your abilities at five sports — these are just some of the experiences that await. Δ Visit a park! Enjoy Shane Lake, and 15 km (9 mi) of trails at Prince George’s largest park: Forests For The World. Delight in lush flower gardens and a panoramic view from Connaught Hill Park, behind the downtown public library. Take a ride on the narrow-gauge steam train on summer weekends and holidays. Catch live entertainment, bring the kids to the Rotary water-spray playground. From here, you can walk, bike or blade the Heritage River Trail, which follows the Fraser and Nechako Rivers, to Cottonwood Island Park.

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Prince George

Golden Radium Hot Springs Cranbrook Nelson Resort Nelson Inn Rossland

VANCOUVER ISLAND

10 Sooke

NORTHERN BC 11 Prince George 12 Smithers 13 Prince Rupert

We Invite You To Discover Prestige Accommodations

Prestige Treasure Cove Hotel Prince George

Prestige Ocean Front Resort Sooke

www.prestigehotelsandresorts.com

Prestige Lakeside Resort Nelson

Toll Free: 1.87.PRESTIGE | 1.877.737.8443


S E C T I O N 1 : NO R T H EAST BC

S E C TI ON 1 : NO R T H E A ST BC PRINCE GEORGE – CONTINUED…

Δ Embrace Prince George winters — on groomed crosscountry ski trails convenient to downtown, three nearby ski hills and enough indoor and outdoor ice to keep skaters, curlers and hockey players moving! Δ Take in a musical masterpiece, performed by the Prince George Symphony Orchestra or visiting big name acts at the CN Centre. Δ Visit the newly opened Northern Lights Estate Winery, B.C.'s most northern winery situated on the banks of the Nechako River. The winery specializes in fruit wine. Δ Tour the award-winning University of Northern B.C. campus. Maclean’s Magazine has consistently ranked UNBC as one of the top small universities in Canada. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PRINCE GEORGE Visit www.tourismpg.com or call Tourism Prince George at 1-800-668-7646 or the Prince George Visitor Centre at 250-562-3700

NORTHERN LIGHTS ESTATE WINERY - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Northern BC Tourism Ad 2017.pdf

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2016-11-25

11:45 AM

Get insider tips and tricks for your Prince George adventure. Stop by our Visitor Centre for information on local eateries, shops, cultural attractions and accommodations. You can even borrow a bicycle, fishing rod, life jacket, tackle box, or ice auger - all for free!

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Our gear, your adventure.

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McBride McBride is on Highway 16 — 208 km (125 mi) east of Prince George. In 1913, this railway town became the divisional point for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, and for some time it was the largest rail yard between Winnipeg and Prince Rupert. Today, it’s a great base for all-season exploration of the recreation paradise of the Robson Valley. Agriculture, forestry and tourism employ most of its 586 residents, and McBride’s stunning surroundings inspire local artists.

Δ Stock up on local, organic produce at farmers markets, held Friday afternoons in McBride and Saturday mornings in nearby Dunster.

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N M C B R I D E

Δ Hear an eclectic lineup of music at the Robson Valley Music Festival, held in late August.

Δ Explore the Robson Valley independently or with professional guides — on foot, snowshoe, skis, snowmobile or horseback, by boat, kayak, canoe or via helicopter-facilitated skiing and hiking tours. Δ Source high-quality, locally produced arts and crafts and arrange artists’ studio tours, at the Whistle Stop Gallery in the Heritage Railway Station. Δ Stroll the Fire Hydrant Tour; each one is painted by an accomplished artist.

Δ Picnic on the banks of the Fraser, at Koeneman Regional Park just east of town. Δ Observe plentiful birds from the viewing platform and gazebo at Horseshoe Lake.

Δ Attend the Robson Valley Fall Fair, an old fashioned country fair held on the last weekend in August. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MCBRIDE Drop in or call the Visitor Centre, open year round in the railway station, at 1-866-569-3366, and visit www.mcbride.ca

Δ View local artifacts and travelling shows, at the Valley Museum and Archives. Δ In August, watch spawning Chinook salmon continue their journey (from the distant Pacific!) up the Beaver Falls.

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CMY

CRESCENT SPUR LOOS - CAROL FAIRHURST

#101-1300 First Avenue 1-800-668-7646 18

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Tete Jaune Cache Discover Tete Jaune Cache (pop. 500) near the junction of Highways 5 and 16. Like the Yellowhead Highway and Pass, Tete Jaune (“yellow head” in French) was named after Pierre Hastination, a blond Iroquois-Metis trapper and trader who guided for the Hudson’s Bay Company. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T E T E J A U N E C A C H E Δ During late August and early September, view the mighty Chinook Salmon jumping up Rearguard Falls after having swum 1200 km (746 mi) from the mouth of the Fraser River to spawn.

Δ Jet-boat or whitewater raft the Fraser River rapids. Δ Camp and explore extensive trails in one of B.C.’s crown jewels: Mount Robson Provincial Park, just 11 km (7 mi) east on Highway 16. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TETE JAUNE CACHE For more info about the park, visit www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks

MORFEE LAKE - CLINT FRASER (ABOVE) MACKENZIE - CLINT FRASER (RIGHT) CHAINSAW CARVING, CHETWYND - VINCE SCOTT

< At this point >

Δ Watch birds at the Mackenzie Nature Observatory, in the abundant Mugaha Marsh. Learn about migration monitoring, which occurs from about July 20 to September 20.

From here you can continue east along Highway 16 and on to Mount Robson. For the purposes of this guide you will now be routed north of Prince George on Highway 97 to Mackenzie, B.C.

Δ Explore one of B.C.’s newest parks: Heather-Dina Lakes Provincial Park, 25 km (16 mi) north of town. Hike and camp at primitive sites; canoe and fish its numerous small lakes.

FOR REFERENCE, SEE THE MAP ON PAGE 48

Δ Enjoy nine holes of golf at the Mackenzie Golf & Country Club. Δ Shop for local crafts, and visit the arts centre and museum, at the Ernie Bodin Community Centre.

Mackenzie The District of Mackenzie is only 185 scenic kilometers (115 mi) north of Prince George and 188 km (117 mi) southwest of Chetwynd. Named for Alexander Mackenzie, the Scottish explorer who camped near here in 1793 en route to the Pacific Coast, Mackenzie is a forestry-based community of 3,507. It boasts remarkable recreation

Azouzetta Lake Lodge & CAMPGROUND

Tent & trailer sites with hookups, cabins & suites.

Large dock for fishing, kayaking & boating.

Two Hours North of Prince George on the John Hart Highway. 1-250-227-8245

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opportunities, including hiking, mountain biking, camping, wildlife viewing, photography, snowmobiling, skiing and year-round fishing. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N M A C K E N Z I E Δ Climb Morfee Mountain on foot, bike, ATV or snowmobile, for breathtaking views of Mackenzie and its rugged, mountainous terrain. Δ Swim, boat, kayak, canoe, water-ski and fish on picturesque Morfee Lake. Picnic, barbecue and play volleyball at its sandy beach (includes fire pits and volleyball nets). Δ Walk, jog or hike the trails of John Dahl Park, for great views of Morfee Lake. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

Δ In winter, fire up your snowmobile for the porch-topowder experience, and enjoy enviable snow conditions and diverse trails that make Mackenzie a sledder’s dream. Δ Ski downhill or toboggan at Little Mac Ski Hill, and explore Mackenzie’s groomed, lit cross-country ski trails — just seconds from downtown. Δ Enjoy intermediate-level downhill skiing at Powder King Mountain Resort, 67 km (42 mi) northeast of Mackenzie on Highway 97. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MACKENZIE Call the Chamber of Commerce at 1-877-622-5360 or the District of Mackenzie at 250-997-3221, or visit www.district.mackenzie.bc.ca

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Chetwynd The bustling, hospitable community of Chetwynd is positioned at the junction of Highways 29 and 97, where the eastern foothills of the Rockies open up to the expansive, prairie-like Peace River country. A transportation hub for the Peace River region, the District of Chetwynd is blessed with abundant natural resources, a stunning mountain backdrop, and the gently rolling topography which inspired early European settlers to call it “Little Prairie”. Such assets, and a diverse economic W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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base of forestry, energy, mining, ranching and tourism, appeal to its outdoor-loving, family-oriented population. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N C H E T W Y N D Δ Discover and photograph Chetwynd’s impressive collection of more than 150 detailed chainsaw sculptures, depicting everything from mermaids to wildlife. Watch accomplished chainsaw carvers the second weekend in June, when Chetwynd hosts the International Chainsaw Carving Competition.

DISTRICT OF CHETWYND P E A C E R I V E R - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

Δ Visit Chetwynd’s first-rate recreation centre, which includes a wave pool, team-size hot tub, sauna, curling rink, ice arena, indoor climbing wall, track, squash court and skateboard park.

Hudson’s Hope Midway between Chetwynd and Fort St. John, you’ll encounter Hudson’s Hope — a friendly community of 970 on the banks of the Peace River. This Playground of the Peace offers endless outdoor adventure and wildlife viewing opportunities. Power projects, agriculture, and forestry have long been economic drivers here, but oil and gas exploration, guide-outfitting and eco-tourism are growing in importance.

Δ Tee up at Chetwynd’s nine-hole golf course overlooking Moberly Lake. Δ Camp, picnic, fish, boat, or take a bracing dip in one of Chetwynd’s crystal-clear lakes. Δ Hike and bike Chetwynd area trails, which range from easy to challenging; for directions, consult the Greenspace Trail Map, available at the Visitor Centre.

HUDSON'S HOPE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N H U D S O N ’ S H O P E Δ Tour the Hudson’s Hope Museum. View some of North America’s finest fossilized footprints from the dinosaur era, as well as artifacts from area First Nations, trappers, minors and pioneers — all in a Hudson’s Bay Trading Post.

HUDSON'S HOPE - SIMON RATCLIFFE HUDSON'S HOPE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ In winter, explore Chetwynd terrain by snowmobile, snowshoe or cross-country skis, and enjoy intermediatelevel downhill skiing at Powder King Mountain Resort, 110 km (68 mi) southwest on Highway 97. Δ Visit Little Prairie Heritage Museum. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT CHETWYND Call the Chetwynd Visitor Centre at 250-788-1943, and visit www.gochetwynd.com

Take the scenic Hudson’s Hope loop: Municipal Campgrounds (open May - September)

Community carved by success!

CHETWYND

rnational 13th Annual Inte CARVING

SIMPLE. BEAUTIFUL. UNFORGETTABLE.

CHAINSAWIONSHIP CHAMP 2017

• Museum • Fossil Displays • Annual Fishing Derby • Outdoor Swimming Pool • Walking Trails

JUNE 8-11,

Over 150 Carvings

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For more information, contact our Visitor Centre: 250-783-9154 (May - September) 250-783-9901 (Off Season) Email: visitorinfo@hudsonshope.ca

• WAC Bennett & Peace Canyon Dams • Ski Hill • Cross Country Skiing at Cameron Lake

www.hudsonshope.ca

gochetwynd.com

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• Hiking • Baseball Fields • ATV Trails • Skating/Curling Rinks • High School Rodeo

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• Dinosaur Lake • Cameron Lake • King Gething • Alwin Holland • 3 private RV parks

Enjoy a variety of scenic camping options:

Join us on Facebook W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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Δ Visit one of the largest dams of its kind: the WAC Bennett Dam, 23 km (14 mi) west of Hudson’s Hope on Canyon Drive. The new WAC Bennett Dam Visitor Centre offers an exciting new interactive area, a theatre, gift shop and café. Open from Victoria Day long weekend to Labour Day long weekend. Δ Visit the Peace Canyon Dam, 8 km (5 mi) south of Hudson’s Hope on Highway 29. It re-uses water that has already generated electricity at the WAC Bennett Dam. The new viewing deck offers a great photo opportunity. Δ Stay at one of Four Municipal Campgrounds located along the water.

Get a new perspective on power as we celebrate 50 years at the W.A.C. Bennett Dam. We’re 50 years old this year so join us all season to celebrate. From May 20 to September 4, 2017 we’re open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with underground tours every hour starting at 10:30 a.m. Our last tour leaves at 3:30 p.m. sharp so arrive early to avoid disappointment. Be sure to enjoy our outdoor exhibits, grab a bite to eat at our café or purchase a souvenir from our gift shop. To book your tour email bennett@bchydro.com or call 250 783 5048.

Admission charges apply. BCH16-589

Δ Cast a line and try your luck fishing along the river or at one of the local lakes. Δ Explore the Peace River by canoe or power boat. Δ Enjoy a round of golf at Moberly Lake & District Golf Club, a nine-hole course 35 km (22 mi) south of Hudson’s Hope on Highway 29. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HUDSON’S HOPE Visit www.hudsonshope.ca, email visitorinfo@hudsonshope.ca or call the Hudson’s Hope Visitor Centre at 250-783-9154 (May through September) or the District Office 250-783-9901 (October through April)

SHIPYARD TITANIC HIKING TRAIL, ON MOUNT BABCOCK, TUMBLER RIDGE U N E S C O G L O B A L G E O P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M I K E S E E H A G E L

Tumbler Ridge Tumbler Ridge (pop. 2,500), found at the junction of Highways 29 and 52, near the confluence of Flatbed Creek and the Murray and Wolverine Rivers, is British Columbia’s youngest community. It is home to the Tumbler Ridge UNESCO Global Geopark, where paleontological history was made in 2000 when two local kids discovered dinosaur tracks in Flatbed Creek. The Geopark boasts British Columbia’s first dinosaur bone beds, comprised of dozens to hundreds of specimens, and nearly 100 dinosaur track sites ranging in age from 135 to 74 million years in age. The Triassic marine reptiles and fish fossils are some of the oldest in the world and of international significance.

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The Dinosaur Discovery Gallery and paleontological research centre provide the public with a chance to see examples of these finds, with research contributing new

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W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T U M B L E R R I D G E Δ Visit the Dinosaur Discovery Gallery to see and learn about fossil finds from the region and ongoing research. Δ Take a dinosaur Trackway Tour. The Flatbed Creek and Wolverine River tours interpret dozens of fossil dinosaur footprints accessed by hiking trails. Guided evening lantern tours illuminate tracks less visible by day, with the sounds of dinosaurs echoing off the valley walls provided by tour guides. Δ Treat the kids to a day or week long Dinosaur Camp, including field trips, excavations of dinosaur replicas, and interactive introductions to palaeontology and geology.

TUMBLER RIDGE – CONTINUED…

Δ Explore 37 maintained trails within the Geopark to alpine meadows, old-growth forests, jagged peaks, magnificent waterfalls and ancient canyons.

discoveries annually. In addition to walking in the footsteps of dinosaurs, visitors can take in breathtaking alpine vistas and sparkling waterfalls from the impressive network of nearly 40 maintained trails, five provincial parks and nine provincial recreation sites.

Δ Be inspired by Kinuseo Falls. Visit Monkman Provincial Park to view the impressive falls from the onsite platform, the short hiking trail, or by pre-booking a riverboat tour through the Visitor’s Centre. Spend the night at the nearby Monkman Campground.

DINOSAUR DISCOVERY GALLERY - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ Explore the Monkman Pass Trail along the historic Monkman Pass Highway, and discover the Cascades, a series of 10 waterfalls in succession, Monkman Lake, and the Monkman Tarns. Δ Camp, hike, canoe, motor boat and fish at beautiful Gwillim Lake Provincial Park, 45 km (28 mi) northwest off Highway 29. Δ Drive the self-guided interpretive tour, learning about the fascinating history of the Monkman Pass Highway through free brochures. Δ Golf at Tumbler Ridge’s scenic and challenging ninehole course. Watch for wildlife! Take the family sledding and skating here in the winter for free at the hill and outdoor rink. Δ Take in live music at Grizfest, with world class rock and country musicians on the long weekend in August. Δ Go off-road in your 4x4, ATV or side by side on the Grizzly Valley ATV Club’s established routes.

KINUSEO FALLS, MONKMAN PROVINCIAL PARK, TUMBLER RIDGE U N E S C O G L O B A L G E O P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M I K E S E E H A G E L

Imagine seeing and touching real dinosaur footprints still imprinted in the rocks from millions of years ago.

NEW ADVENTURES…

NEW DISCOVERIES! www.visitTumblerRidge.ca

www.trgg.ca

Small T RIdge for Tshirt B&W.PDF

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2016-11-22

A scenic drive from Chetwynd or Dawson Creek, British Columbia featuring picturesque river and mountain views — Tumbler Ridge is an excellent RV destination with seemingly endless hiking trails, accessible alpine meadows and sparkling waterfalls.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 250-242-3123 • E: tourism@dtr.ca • info@trgg.ca

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 250-242-3123 • E: tourism@dtr.ca • info@trgg.ca

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Tumbler Ridge UNESCO Global Geopark

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Tourism

( T O P L E F T ) H I K I N G N E A R T U M B L E R R I D G E - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  E M A N U E L S M E D B O L (TOP RIGHT) MILE '0' POST, DAWSON CREEK - SIMON RATCLIFFE (BOTTOM RIGHT) ALASKA HIGHWAY HOUSE, DAWSON CREEK - SIMON RATCLIFFE

TUMBLER RIDGE – CONTINUED…

Δ Explore the winter landscape on over 300 km of maintained trail by snowmobile, over 10 km of groomed trails with cross-country skis, and explore the Geopark’s snowshoeing, skiing and ice climbing. Δ Unwind after an active day in the whirlpool, sauna or steam room at the Aquatic Centre. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TUMBLER RIDGE Drop in to the Tumbler Ridge Visitor Centre, call them at 1-877-729-3466 or 250-242-3123 and visit www.VisitTumblerRidge.ca and www.trgg.ca

HELICOPTER SERVICE www.ridgerotors.com Come Come fly with us to see Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark’s fly with us to see Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark's incredibleincredible lakes, waterfalls and pristine mountain peakspeaks all right lakes, waterfalls and pristine mountain all hereright in our British British Columbia backyard! hereNorthern in our Northern Columbia backyard!

Dawson Creek With a rich pioneer and World War II history, Dawson Creek is a city of 11,583 people with an economy based on agriculture, forestry, energy and tourism. Located at the junction of four highways, Dawson Creek is Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway. In 1942, only months after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbour, Hawaii, Dawson Creek became a staging point of the U.S. government’s ambitious building project: a 2,400 km (1,491 mi) road through vast wilderness stretching from the end of the railway at Dawson Creek to Fairbanks, Alaska. Within a month, the small hamlet of Dawson Creek witnessed the arrival of 10,000 American troops, military vehicles, road equipment and civilian workers. Originating in Dawson Creek, the “Alaskan-Canadian or Alcan Highway” is a bucket list trip for RVers as the great Alaska Highway adventure. Local attractions celebrate the city’s unique history.

TourismDawsonCreek.com

Cell: 250-242-1599 Tollfree: 1-877-242-4211 Cell: 250-242-1599 • Toll •Free: 1-877-242-4211 ridgerotors@ridgerotors.com Email: Email: ridgerotors@ridgerotors.com

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W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M


Dawson Creek Visitor Centre The Visitor Centre, housed in NAR Railway Station Museum, is operated by Tourism Dawson Creek in cooperation with Destination British Columbia. To best serve visitors in Dawson Creek the Visitor Centre is open Year-round. Well trained counsellors are available to provide travel information. Basic facilities are also available at the Visitor Centre such as parking, and public washrooms.

NAR Park 900 Alaska Avenue. T: 250-782-9595 TF: 1-866-645-3022

Your Souvenir Headquarters! As well as providing travel info to visitors, our gift shop has a variety of souvenirs: Postcards, clothing, books, videos & much more!

Want to learn about our rich history? Treat yourself to a couple of hours exploring Tourism Dawson Creek’s Signature Experiences.

Children under 13 Free GST Included in all admission prices Call the Dawson Creek Visitor Centre for more information, 250-782-9595

Alaska Highway Command Centre

Guided Historic Walking Tour

Alaska Highway House

Relax in an authentic Military Tent while you listen to our storytellers reveal how the construction of the Alaska Highway changed Dawson Creek forever.

Join our visitor centre staff on the short interpretive Downtown Historic Walking Tour. Wrap up your journey back in time with a visit to the Alaska Highway House.

Stroll back to the 1940s and glimpse into the lives of the soldiers and civilians who worked to build the Alaska Highway through interpretive exhibits, artifacts and movie.

Contact Visitor Centre for show times (250-782-9595) (1/2 hour weather permitting) Tickets: $6.00 Tickets at the Visitor Centre

Contact Visitor Centre for show times (250-782-9595) (1/2 hour weather permitting) Tickets: $5.00 Tickets at the Visitor Centre

Tourism Dawson Creek

Summer Hours: 7 days a week, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, Winter Hours: Monday to Friday, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm (approx. 1 1/2 hours) Tickets: $7.00 Tickets at the Visitor Centre or Alaska Highway House

 Facebook.com/alaskahighway

TF: 1-866-645-3022

TourismDawsonCreek.com


S E C T I O N 1 : NO R T H EAST BC

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Δ Visit the Dawson Creek Art Gallery, creatively housed in a renovated 1930s-era grain elevator, for art, handicrafts and displays of historic photos. Δ Pick up the Downtown Historic Walking Tour brochure from the Visitor Centre, and use the route map to unlock Dawson Creek’s past through narration, heritage buildings, local mural projects and archival photos.

MILE '0' CAIRN, DAWSON CREEK - SIMON RATCLIFFE

DAWSON CREEK – CONTINUED…

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N D AW S O N C R E E K Δ Take your photo at the Mile 0 Cairn, designated by U.S. army surveyors as the exact beginning of the Alaska Highway, and at the Mile 0 Post, a landmark which celebrates this famous route.

DAWSON CREEK ART GALLERY - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ Visit Alaska Highway House, opened in 2007, for exhibits and interactive displays about the Alaska Highway story. See fascinating WW II propaganda, video footage, war artifacts, a Willy jeep and take in a screening of the PBS documentary “Building the Alaska Highway”. Pop into the booth to send a personal video postcard to friends and relatives.

Δ Tour the Dawson Creek Station Museum in the Northern Alberta Railways Park. View the video documentary on the history of the Alaska Highway, northern wildlife displays, the original 1931 living quarters of the station master and the railroad depot office. Δ During summer, visit Mile 0 Park. At Walter Wright Pioneer Village, stroll the boardwalks with the complimentary village historic walking tour brochure. View heritage buildings, memorabilia and artifacts, antique vehicles and farm machinery. Savour the eleven colourful, themed gardens of Gardens North. Picnic, swim and relax with the locals at Rotary Lake. Δ Sample local produce, handicrafts and baked goods. The Farmer’s Market is open Saturdays February through December at 10300-8th Street. The Gathering, an Artisan Market, is also open Saturdays throughout the summer at Walter Wright Pioneer Village. POUCE COUPE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ Enjoy free wireless internet access at hotspots in Northern Alberta Railways Park, downtown Dawson Creek, and Walter Wright Pioneer Village. Δ Walk, jog, blade or cycle the 4.5 km (2.8 mi) Dawson Creek Trail, an asphalt path which hugs the creek and traverses the city.

We’re glad you are here for our 75th!

F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T D AW S O N C R E E K Call the Dawson Creek Visitor Centre at 250-782-9595, toll-free 1-866-645-3022, email info@tourismdawsoncreek.com and visit www.tourismdawsoncreek.com

Pouce Coupe Pouce Coupe, population 740, is 10 km (6 mi) east of Dawson Creek. Services include a post office, restaurants, motel, hotel, gas bar / convenience store, RV facilities, and a laundromat. Pouce Coupe is the erroneously translated name of a local First Nations chief, Pooscapee.

Pouce Coupe

British ColumbiaCanada

Housed in a renovated grain elevator situated in the NAR Park in the center of Dawson Creek. We have: • The Alaska Highway Photo Exhibit on display • Local and Touring Exhibits • The Grainery Artisan & Gift Shop • The Bin Top Studio: Hosting Children’s & Adult Programming

Visit www.ouralaskahighway.com to explore our history & heritage Alaska Highway Community Society

Working to raise awareness of and protect the history and heritage of the Alaska Highway’s cultural landscape PO Box 6850, Fort St John, BC V1J 4J3 - Email: info@ouralaskahighway.com

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The gift shop showcases local artists & craftsmen featuring pottery, woodwork, jewellery, jade, metalwork, weaving and souvenirs. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

Hours: Summer (Mid May to Aug) 8am to 5pm 7 days a week Fall/Winter (Sep. to Early May) 10am to 5pm ~ Tuesday to Friday 12pm to 4pm Saturdays 101 - 816 Alaska Avenue Tel: 250-782-2601 Fax: 250-782-8801 Email: artadmin@dcartgallery.ca www.dcartgallery.ca

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Pouce Coupe River Valley, located in the Northeast corner of BC.

Come and visit the Pouce Coupe Museum and journey back to a period long ago, with displays from the very founding of the village, including a heritage house, trapper’s cabin, caboose and the original Northern Alberta Railway Station, which houses the Museum. You can take a self-guided walking tour of the Village and visit the wooden trestle bridge. Come for the annual Canada Day Parade and festivities held on July 1. As well as the Annual Truck Light Parade (around the 2-3 week in November). 5011 - 49th Ave., PO Box 190, Pouce Coupe, BC, Canada V0C 2C0 Ph: 250-786-5794 • Fax: 250-786-5257 www.poucecoupe.ca W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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POUCE COUPE - SIMON RATCLIFFE

W H E A T F I E L D N E A R F O R T S T . J O H N - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

POUCE COUPE – CONTINUED…

Δ Access the internet at the Library.

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N P O U C E C O U P E

Δ Camp riverside at Pouce Coupe Park.

Δ View the Pouce Coupe Museum.

Δ Visit the rustic local pub, housed in the 1928 Hart Hotel.

Δ See if you dare walk on the vintage wooden railway trestle. Δ Attend the July 1 Canada Day parade and barbecue at Pouce Coupe Park.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT POUCE COUPE Call the Visitor Centre 250-786-5555 (May - September) or the Pouce Coupe village office at 250-786-5794, and visit www.poucecoupe.ca

Taylor Peace Island Park

Lone Wolf Golf Course

Gold Panning Championships

Home of the World’s Invitational Gold Panning Championships August long weekend Peace Island Park • RV Sites • Trailer & Tenting • Playgrounds • Nature Trails

• Historic Forts • Boat Launch • Horseshoe Pits • Free Sanidump

Lone Wolf Golf Course

• 18 Hole • Full Service Pro Shop • Cart & Club Rentals • Licensed Club House & Restaurant Call 250.789.3711 for tee times

Call 250.789.9295 for reservations District of

www.districtoftaylor.com T: 250.789.3392

District of Taylor

@DistrictTaylor

Visitor Centre: Open May – September, 9:00am – 5:00pm T: 250.789.9015 E: Info@districtoftaylor.com

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Δ Golf at Lone Wolf Golf Club’s 18-hole par 72 public championship course, mid-April to late September. Amenities include driving and practice ranges, pro lessons, equipment rentals, clubhouse, restaurant, and full-service shop. The Club also hosts tournaments.

Δ Jet boat in the Peace River and ask Visitor Centre about any upcoming jet boat events.

Δ Watch or join in the dancing at the annual Spirit of the Peace Pow Wow, held each June. Dancing, drumming, food and handicrafts are highlights of this colourful and family oriented competition. Everyone is welcome.

F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T TAY L O R Call the District of Taylor at 250-789-3392, or the Taylor Visitor Centre at 250-789-9015 (May to September) and visit www.districtoftaylor.com

Δ Attend the World’s Invitational Gold Panning Championships, held on the August long weekend / B.C. Day. Family-oriented festivities include a parade, gold-panning demos and competitions, claim-staking, metal-detecting, bannock-baking, an arts and crafts fair, children’s activities, barbeque and pancake breakfast. Δ Walk the mostly level 3.5 km (2.1 mi) ParticipACTION Trail, which affords views of the golf course and the wide-open Peace Region landscape. Δ Enjoy Taylor’s amenities and award-winning recreation facilities: the Ice Centre, curling club, pool, parks,

PRESENT THE

Sited 56 km (35 mi) north of Dawson Creek on the banks of the Peace River, Taylor prides itself as a quickly growing, business-friendly community — but at 1,373 people, it still offers small-town charm. Originally settled by farmers drawn to its fertile soils (including D.H. “Herbie” Taylor, for whom it the town was named), Taylor’s fortunes are now tied to the oil and gas, lumber and pulp industries. Motels, restaurants and campgrounds await visitors in this community that touts itself as “the place where peace and prosperity meet.” W H AT T O S E E & D O I N TAY L O R

Δ Visit Peace Island Park (late May to the end of September), a popular family destination featuring well-serviced campsites, adventure playgrounds, horseshoe pits, swimming, a boat launch, fishing, walking / hiking trails and wildlife viewing. Δ Check out the Rocky Mountain Historic Forts (in Peace Island Park) — a replica of forts used by the Rocky Mountain Rangers — and its excellent collection of local hunting, trapping and gold-panning artifacts. Interpretive campfire presentations are planned for July and August; reservations are recommended for these, call 250-789-9295. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

ball diamonds, tennis courts, a motocross track and speedway, community hall and market gardens.

Fort St. John Located in the heart of the Peace Country, Fort St. John is called the “Energetic City” for good reason. Backed by a strong agricultural community and forest industry, the city is the undisputed oil and gas capital of B.C. As the largest B.C. city on the Alaska Highway and the transportation and supply hub of the area, this economic powerhouse serves a trading area of more than 60,000 people. The 23,000 residents that call this city home like to work hard and play hard. The city offers many top-notch recreational facilities,

CONTACT FOR MORE DETAILS:

250-785-5356 9519 111TH STREET, FORT ST. JOHN, BC

IN CELEBRATION OF THE ALASKA HIGHWAY’S 75th ANNIVERSARY

BRING THE COUPON FROM THE Northern British Columbia 2017 Travel Guide TO THE

FRONT DESK TO RECEIVE THE

SPECIAL RATE of $75.00 for the 1st NIGHT* *This offer expires December 31st, 2017 and can not be combined with any other offers or discounts.

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W H AT T O S E E & D O I N F O R T S T. J O H N

FORT ST. JOHN – CONTINUED…

as well as over 18 km (11.18 miles) of walking trails. With 17 hotels, numerous restaurants, plenty of shopping, and its central location, Fort St. John makes a good jumping off point for day trips touring around northern B.C.

Visit mile 47•Fort St. John, BC

Δ Check out the Pomeroy Sport Centre that hosts an indoor Olympic sized ice oval (only 1 of 4 in North America), 2 NHL ice rinks and a free walking track. Δ Discover Fort St John’s history through the downtown Pioneer Pathway. Panels depict the pioneer days starting back to the 1920s. Call the Visitor Centre for more information 1-877-785-6037 or visit 9234 96 Street. Δ Visit the Museum located at 9323 100 Street to explore a tepee, trapper’s cabin, 1921 school room and browse the gift shop. Δ Take in a show: Visit www.npcc.bc.ca for info on live theatre, dance and concerts at the North Peace Cultural Centre, or www.thelido.ca for events at The Lido, originally built as a movie theatre in 1957 and recently reborn as a venue for cultural events. Δ On the Family Day long weekend celebrate High on Ice, B.C’s only ice carving competition. The event also features snow carving, ice slides, a dodgeball tournament, snow slo-pitch, ice fishing, sleigh rides, sledding and children’s entertainment. Visit www.fortstjohn.ca/ice for more information.

Celebrating our 75 year on the historic Alaska Highway th

Fort St. John Visitor Centre 1.877.785.6037 fortstjohn.ca/tourism

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Δ Annual pond hockey tournament on Charlie Lake. The Crystal Cup has something for everyone; enter a team, or just enjoy live music, an ice bar and children’s activities. More information at www.thecrystalcup.ca Δ Start your engines! Drag racing, stock car racing and moto-X racing takes place throughout the summer months. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M


S E C T I O N 1 : NO R T H EAST BC

FORT ST. JOHN – CONTINUED…

Δ Grab local produce and items from the Farmer’s Market, open from May to October. Δ Check out the Charlie Lake Marsh and Monument at Mile 52 of the Alaska Highway, a beautiful spot to bird watch with a playground and boat launch. Δ Camp at Charlie Lake Provincial Park or Beatton Provincial Park, with 12 kms of forested trails great for snowshoeing, cross country skiing or hiking. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T F O R T S T. J O H N Call the Fort St. John Visitor Centre at 250-785-3033. Email: visitorinfo@fortstjohn.ca, or visit www.fortstjohn.ca

Pink Mountain Halfway between Fort St. John and Fort Nelson is the tiny hamlet of Pink Mountain. Look west for the similarly named peak, which exudes a rosy glow at sunrise and under the late-summer blaze of fireweed blossoms. Reach Pink Mountain Provincial Park by turning west off the highway onto seasonal road #192. Wildlife includes B.C.’s only wild Plains Bison, and rare populations of arctic butterflies. Large Mesozoic Era marine fossils, including the largest icthyosaur ever discovered, were found here.

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Fort Nelson and the Northern Rockies Initially established as a fur trading post in 1805, Fort Nelson later became “Mile 300” of the Alaska Highway, contributing labour, supplies and logistical support to the epic 1942 construction effort. Today, this resource community of 3,000 is focusing its efforts to diversify beyond the oil and gas and forestry industries. Anchored by the Alaska Highway, tourism continues to grow in importance, as the town has been discovered as a natural base for backcountry exploration of some of B.C.’s most magnificent landscapes. Cross-country skiers, photographers, backpackers canoeists, and kayakers flock to Fort Nelson, eager to explore eight provincial parks located within an easy drive. Plentiful wildlife makes big game hunting and fly-in fishing popular. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N F O R T N E L S O N AND THE NORTHERN ROCKIES Δ Join in the celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the Alaska Highway throughout 2017, from the Trapper’s Rendezvous to the Travelling Alaska Highway Roadshow. Δ Step back into Fort Nelson’s past at the Fort Nelson Heritage Museum. Collections include running antique vehicles and artifacts from the construction of the Alaska Highway. A “don’t miss” experience!

Fort Nelson Heritage Museum Alaska highway construction equipment and displays, vintage autos and machinery, wildlife displays, trapper’s cabin, and much more! Open mid-May to early September, and by appointment. Box 716, Fort Nelson, BC V0C 1R0 Phone/Fax 250-774-3536 www.fortnelsonmuseum.ca

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( L E F T ) S U M M I T P E A K T R A I L - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N ( C E N T E R ) F O R T N E L S O N H E R I T A G E M U S E U M - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N ( R I G H T ) M U N C H O L A K E P R O V I N C I A L P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

Δ Plan a hiking adventure with a local guide available at the Visitor Centre, and the many trail maps available online. Trailhead signage is visible from points along the Alaska Highway, displaying GPS waypoints, maps and trail descriptions. Δ Learn about the “Serengeti of the North” by visiting the Muskwa-Kechika kiosk at the Visitor Centre, or at interpretive panels at sites along the Alaska Highway. Δ Enjoy nine holes of golf, with views of the Northern Rockies, at Poplar Hills Golf & Country Club. Facilities include driving range, grass greens, pro shop, club and power cart rentals, lounge, and RV parking. In midsummer, play a red-eye round at midnight in broad daylight at B.C.’s northern-most course. Δ Hire a guide for tours of the Northern Rockies on foot, horseback, canoe, riverboat, whitewater raft, or charter flight. Δ November to February enjoy the Aurora Borealis in clear night skies. Meteor showers can add to the excitement, making any photographer’s dream come true. Δ In the Spring, cheer on the dog teams, at the Canadian Open Dog Sled Championship, an international event held in Fort Nelson for almost 50 years. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT FORT NELSON AND THE NORTHERN ROCKIES Call the Visitor Centre at 250-774-6400 year round, and visit www.tourismnorthernrockies.ca

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Stone Mountain Provincial Park About 100 km (62 mi) west of Fort Nelson, you’ll enter the northern tip of Stone Mountain Provincial Park — a 257 km2 (99 mi2) preserve of pristine wilderness. Spend a couple nights at the Tetsa River Regional Park, camping on the banks, fishing for grayling, and enjoying day hikes including the Tetsa #1 Trail. At Summit Lake, from mid-May to September, 28 vehicleaccessible, limited-service campsites are available on a firstcome, first-serve basis. Self-sufficient walk-in camping is also permitted in many areas beyond Summit Lake, where several short day hikes start from the camping area. Unforgettable views reward well-equipped, experienced backcountry adventurers exploring the park on multi-day treks. Not far beyond, experience the small but welcoming community of Toad River, where the local residents are as abundant in character as the hats on the ceiling of the Toad River Lodge. Take in the 360 degree view of the Sentinel Ranges from the top of Nonda Creek trail, or for the more adventurous, launch a canoe or kayak near Centennial Falls and float the Toad River for the afternoon to the wooden bridge just before Stone Mountain Safaris. Ranked Class 1 and 2 for canoeing. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T S T O N E M O U N TA I N P R O V I N C I A L PA R K Visit www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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S E C T I O N 1 : NO R T H EAST BC

Muncho Lake Provincial Park

EXPERIENCE

Just 86 km (53 mi) northwest from Stone Mountain Park, explore another Northern Rockies treasure, Muncho Lake Provincial Park. Private lodges, RV parks, and 30 lakeshore campsites offer easy access to the jade waters of this 12 km (7 mi) long glacial lake. It was named “Muncho” (“big lake”) by the Kaska people, who have sourced food here for millennia. Catch (and preferably, release!) lake trout, bull trout, mountain whitefish, and Arctic grayling. Scale the range opposite the lake for a truly one-of-a-kind view, or explore the alluvial fans that open up to the shores of the lake. Also watch for moose, caribou, and Stone’s sheep, or the odd black bear looking for a cold drink from the lake.

THE NORTHERN ROCKIES

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MUNCHO LAKE P R O V I N C I A L PA R K Visit www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks

Liard River Hot Springs Provincial Park

C A N O E O N M U N C H O L A K E - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

About 60 km (38 mi) beyond Muncho Lake Provincial Park, experience an unforgettable natural phenomenon: Liard River Hot Springs. The springs are comprised of two pools, which fill naturally with water that has been heated deep underground by the earth’s core, pressurized and forced back to the surface along faults in sedimentary rock under the park. Water temperatures reach up to 52˚C (126˚F), creating an oasis-like microclimate that is as appreciated by birds and animals as it has been by humans for millennia. This unique ecosystem hosts a unique diversity of plant life, including orchids, ostrich ferns, cow parsnip and carnivorous aquatic plants. The springs

Experience Sights... Thirteen Provincial Parks, the world-famous Alaska Highway, the Muskwa Kechika & all the stops in between. Experience Adventure... Hiking, biking, ATV’ing, boating, fishing, geocaching, camping in a living, breathing backcountry.

L I A R D R I V E R H O T S P R I N G S - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  A N D R E W S T R A I N

are quite magical in winter, when sub-zero temperatures combine with steam to fringe surrounding vegetation with shimmering hoarfrost. Seasonally, rustic campsites (some can be reserved ahead), are available, and washrooms, change rooms and boardwalk are open all year. A nominal fee is charged for camping and day use, with an onsite operator for guests’ comfort. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT LIARD RIVER HOT S P R I N G S P R O V I N C I A L PA R K Call 1-800-689-9025 or visit www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks To reserve a site, visit www.discovercamping.ca

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Experience the Northern Rockies... We proudly welcome you to explore our world - and to dream with your eyes wide open.

www.TourismNorthernRockies.ca


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ne

northE

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Section 2

NorthWest British Columbia

“Serene glacial lakes, salmon-rich rivers and impossibly long summer Days. Soaring glaciers, frozen waterfalls and reliably deep powder snow in winter.”

Alpine meadows and sun-bleached sea shells. Playful orcas and elusive “spirit” bears. Eclectic festivals and rollicking rodeos. Follow Highway 16 west from Prince George, and watch B.C.’s northwest open these treasures to you. The forestry and agriculture town of Vanderhoof offers easy access to Fort St. James, western Canada’s oldest fur trading post restored to the year 1896. At Fort Fraser and Fraser Lake, you’re near the start of B.C.’s very own Lakes District and the area’s campsites and resorts will tempt you to stay and play in variety of clear, sparkling lakes. In Burns Lake, mountain bike trails, from easy to challenging, draw avid

cyclists. The village also makes a great jumping-off point for adventure in the wilds of Tweedsmuir Provincial Park. Just outside of Houston, where you can enjoy incredible steelhead fishing and explore unparalleled snowmobile trail networks, Highway 16 crests Hungry Hill — heralding a dramatic change in landscape. Meet the glacier-crowned Bulkley Valley, with its neighbouring towns of Telkwa and Smithers. Limitless kayaking and

canoeing opportunities, backcountry trails to suit all levels of hiker and cross-country skier, skiing and boarding on Hudson’s Bay Mountain, and a flourishing local music scene explain why these towns are a mecca for creatives and outdoors-lovers. Journey westward and feel the history and vitality of First Nations cultures. In late summer, watch Wet’suwet’en fishermen netfish the raging waters of the Moricetown Canyon for salmon — as they have since time immemorial. At ’Ksan, a recreated Gitxsan village and an interpretive centre in Old Hazelton, take a narrated longhouse tour to learn about pre and postEuropean contact life. In nearby villages like Kispiox and Gitanyow,

( L E F T ) D U N E Z A K E Y I H P R O V I N C I A L P A R K , S T I K I N E R E G I O N - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  T A Y L O R B U R K

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Vanderhoof

NORTHWEST BC – CONTINUED…

ponder the legends of nearly 50 standing totem poles. At Kitwanga Junction, a decision awaits: head north on Highway 37 (a.k.a. the Stewart-Cassiar) for the 725 km (450 mi) drive toward the Yukon, or continue west on Highway 16 toward the coastal city of Prince Rupert. The Stewart-Cassiar Highway (37) offers dazzling, sparsely populated landscapes. For breathtaking glaciers, bear-viewing opportunities and some colourful Canada / U.S. border-town history, take Highway 37A to visit the communities of Stewart, B.C. and Hyder Alaska. Upon returning to Highway 37, treat yourself to deluxe food and four-star accommodation at Bell II Lodge before approaching the best of northwestern B.C. wilderness parks: Mount Edziza, the Spatsizi Plateau and the aweinspiring Stikine River Provincial Park. Before continuing on toward the Yukon, take a refreshing dip in the aquamarine waters of Boya Lake. Equally memorable attractions await, if you choose to continue west on Highway 16, past Kitwanga. In Terrace find out why record-breaking salmon fishing lures anglers from around the world 10 months of the year. Discover firstrate whitewater that draws

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paddlers in droves, or ski the steep, deep powder at Canada’s first non-profit, co-op ski hill, My Mountain Co-op / Shames Mountain. Explore First Nations culture at Kitselas Canyon, and Terrace’s Freda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art, part of Northwest Community College. Before carrying on to Prince Rupert, make a sidetrip down Highway 37 south to Kitimat for excellent saltwater fishing, or perhaps detour to Kitamaat Village, to visit Haisla First Nation artists. At Port Edward, the North Pacific Cannery National Historic site offers a compelling look at the region’s multicultural past. Return to Highway 16 to the coast to arrive at Prince Rupert. Besides important ferry connections, this port city offers phenomenal fishing and wildlife-viewing opportunities, sophisticated galleries and restaurants, and magnificent museums — all seasoned by the cultural influence of the Tsimshian people and the many moods of the northern rainforest. Where else in the world could you find all of this, but northwestern B.C.?

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D E N N I S L A K E , S M I T H E R S - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Nestled in the fertile Nechako Valley, on the banks of the Nechako River, Vanderhoof is the geographical centre of British Columbia. Vanderhoof is also the home of the Nechako White Sturgeon and a Migratory Bird Sanctuary. The Vanderhoof area has been occupied by the Carrier people for millennia. Envisioned as a writers’ and artists’ retreat by Herbert Vanderhoof, the Chicago writer for whom this community was later named, the town was ultimately founded by ranchers. This friendly forestry and ranching community of 4,480 claims status as B.C.’s oldest European-settled agricultural community. It was home to Order of Canada recipient, activist and local author, Mary John, as well as rancher Rich Hobson, author of “Nothing To Good For A Cowboy”. With four distinct seasons, there are many entertaining activities to experience in and around our community. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N VA N D E R H O O F

F L Y F I S H I N G I N N O R T H E R N B . C . - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  J E R E M Y K O R E S K I N O R T H P A C I F I C C A N N E R Y - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ Visit the Vanderhoof Community Museum. Open from May to September, its heritage buildings include the OK Hotel and (still operating) Café which once offered meals for 50 cents! Δ In the spring and fall watch birds (ducks, geese, swans, etc.) at the Vanderhoof Migratory Bird Sanctuary. A Nature Guide and a bird watching checklist is available. Δ Walk the Community Trail Network. There are four sections that skirt the community, each with a tour card and a kiosk explaining the significance of the trail section. Δ Fun for the entire family? Riverside Park and Campground includes RV and tenting sites (some with electricity and water), sani-dump, flush toilets and showers, covered picnic area, children’s playground, outdoor fitness equipment, lit walking track and a beach volleyball net. Ferland Park is equipped with a children’s playground and Spray Park. The “Concert in the Park” is also held here annually. Δ Enjoy hockey, curling, golfing, biking, bowling, soccer, tennis, cross-country skiing, rugby, slo-pitch, football and many other recreational activities throughout the year. Δ Hike, fish and hunt at numerous lakes in Big River Country south of Vanderhoof. Check out Kenney Dam and Cheslatta Falls for an interesting day trip. The Camping, Fishing, Hunting, and Hiking Guide to

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VANDERHOOF - CLINT FRASER

the Nechako Valley highlights more options for your wilderness adventure. Δ Join us in various celebrations throughout the year including Canada Day, Fall Fair, Airshow, Pumpkin Walk and Parade of Lights. Δ Self-guided tour cards have been produced to guide you to local discoveries such as the Grand Reo Theatre. Once a parlour and now a movie theatre, it has stood at this corner with its original façade for 90 years. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T VA N D E R H O O F Call the Visitor Centre at 250-567-2124 or 1-800-752-4094 and visit at www.vanderhoofchamber.com

Fort St. James Fort St. James is located on the shores of Stuart Lake, 62 km (37 mi) north of Vanderhoof, on Highway 27. This town of 2,000 is one of B.C.’s oldest permanent settlements, established in 1806 by Simon Fraser. He called the area New Caledonia to honour his Scottish home. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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REGIONS OF THE NORTH NORTHEAST BC

Juneau

NORTHWEST BC

NortherN BriTisH CoLumBia

HAIDA GWAII BC

Fort Nelson Dawson Creek Prince Rupert

Prince George Jasper

Sandspit

PACIFIC OCEAN

Kamloops Kelowna Vancouver

Cranbrook

DISTANCE CHART IN KILOMETRES Distances given are for the shortest highway routes. Visit www.NorthernBCTourism.com for more detailed distance information.

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S E C T I O N 2 : NO R T H W EST BC FORT ST. JAMES – CONTINUED…

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N F O R T S T. J A M E S Δ Visit the Fort St. James Historic Site (June to late September). This original trading post and compound has the largest group of original wood buildings representing the Canadian fur trade, and artifacts from the 1880s. Δ Canoe the magnificent 112 km (70 mi) Nation Lakes Canoe Route, which spans four lakes and three rivers. Δ Camp at Sowchea Bay or Paarens Beach on Stuart Lake. Δ Tip your hat to bush pilot legend Russ Baker (1910-1958), at a memorial on the bluffs overlooking the lake near the Cottonwood Marina. Renowned for daring rescue operations, Baker helped make Fort St. James one of the largest bush plane bases in northern B.C. View the scale replica of a 1920s-era Junkers W-34 at Cottonwood Park. Δ Hike and rock climb in Mount Pope Provincial Park. A 6.5 km (4 mi) trail to the peak offers panoramic views of Stuart Lake and mountains. FORT ST. JAMES NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE - CLINT FRASER

Δ Ski, board or cross-country ski at Murray Ridge Ski Hill. Its T-bar is the longest in North America. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T F O R T S T. J A M E S Call the Fort St. James Chamber of Commerce at 250-996-7023 or visit www.fortstjames.ca

Fort Fraser

TWEEDSMUIR PARK - BARRY SCOTT BEAUMONT PROVINCIAL PARK - CLINT FRASER

Only 37 km (22 mi) from Vanderhoof, discover one of B.C.’s oldest European-founded settlements: Fort Fraser. Established in 1806 by Simon Fraser, it’s also where the last spike was driven, in 1914, on the railway which opened up central B.C., the Grand Trunk Pacific. This community of under 1,000 includes a post office, motel, gas station / restaurant, laundromat, and churches.

Beaumont Provincial Park Camp, picnic, swim, and fish in Fraser Lake in Beaumont Provincial Park — just 4 km (2.5 mi) west of Fort Fraser. The shallow water makes it a great place to take small children.

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Free admission every day in 2017 at Fort St. James National Historic Site.


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Fraser Lake Situated at the eastern edge of the Lakes District, 20 km (13 mi) west of Fort Fraser, Fraser Lake’s 1,150 residents enjoy all the outdoor recreation activities the area has to offer. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N F R A S E R L A K E Δ Drop by the Fraser Lake Museum & Visitor Center, located on highway 16, and learn about the community’s history. Δ Visit White Swan Park on the shores of Fraser Lake for a walk, a swim or to enjoy the waterfront scenery. 11 free RV waterfront campsites are available and a boat launch provides easy access to the lake. Δ Enjoy several vantage points along the Mouse Mountain trails. The summit of this 4 km (2.5 mi) walking and hiking trail system offers breath taking views. Δ Fish the world class Stellako River that flows from Francois Lake to Fraser Lake for trophy-class wild native rainbow trout to anglers. As a catch and release river, great fishing is sure to endure.

(LEFT, TOP) MOUSE MOUNTAIN, FRASER LAKE - JAMES OAKLEY (LEFT BOTTOM) FLY FISHING IN NORTHERN BC - JEREMY KORESKI (RIGHT) BURNS LAKE - MARGUS RIGA

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT FRASER LAKE Call the village at 250-699-6257 or visit www.fraserlake.ca

Δ Attend music festivals, the fall fair, Aboriginal Day celebration, mountain bike races and hockey tournaments.

Burns Lake

Δ Ski 25 km (15.53 mi) of cross-country trails, groomed by the Omineca Ski Club.

Burns Lake is the heart of B.C.’s Lakes District, 70 km (44 mi) west of Fraser Lake. Forestry, agriculture, mining and tourism drive this community of 2,700.

Δ Visit the Lakes District Museum. Find out how the log building that served as a fur trading post and gambling den earned its macabre moniker, Bucket of Blood.

Δ Explore the north end of one of B.C.’s largest provincial parks: Tweedsmuir. Access it via float plane, boat, horseback or on foot via the Alexander Mackenzie Trail. Be well-equipped and experienced, or hire a guide.

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Bulkley-Nechako Discovery App

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT BURNS LAKE Visit or call the Burns Lake Visitor Centre at 250-692-3773, or visit www.visitburnslake.ca

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N B U R N S L A K E

Δ Mountain bike the extensive trail network that Bike Magazine called “some of the sweetest single track on earth”, at Burns Lake Mountain Bike Park.

Plan your visit using the

Granisle Δ Drive the Lakes District Circle Tour for views of Tweedsmuir Park, Mount Wells, Ootsa Lake and Nadina Mountain, and the free ferry ride on Francois Lake. Δ Camp or stay at cabins, RV parks and resorts at any of 4,800 km (3,000 mi) of lakes, including Uncha, Tchesinkut, and Takysie Lakes. Hike, boat, canoe or kayak — bring your own or rent from most resorts.

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To reach Granisle, drive 51 km (32 mi) west from Burns Lake (30 km / 17 mi east of Houston), and turn north at Topley onto Highway 118. The 49 km (30 mi) drive from here to Granisle often rewards visitors with glimpses of wildlife. This former mining town now serves yearround visitors exploring B.C.’s longest (177 km / 110 mi) freshwater lake: Babine Lake. Local services include a boat launch and marina, hotel, resort, campgrounds, restaurant, convenience store and a gas bar for auto and marine gas.

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mining, and tourism. Houston is the gateway to the Nanika — Kidprice Provincial Park known for its world class back country canoe route. W H AT T O S E E A N D D O I N H O U S T O N Δ Golf nine holes at the Willow Grove Golf and Country Club.

NORTHERN BC - TIM SWANKY

GRANISLE – CONTINUED…

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N G R A N I S L E Δ Fish for rainbow trout, as well as steelhead and sockeye in season. Δ Drop in to the Visitor Centre and Museum, located in a log building near the entrance of town. This building also showcases work by local crafters. Δ Picnic and camp at Lion’s Beach Campground or the user-maintained Bear Island. Δ Camp, picnic, swim and relax at Red Bluff Provincial Park and stroll a lovely trail between Red Bluff and the marina. Δ Visit the world’s largest sockeye salmon spawning channels, 11 km (6.83 mi) south of town: the Fulton River Spawning Channels. August is the best time to visit. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT GRANISLE Call the seasonally operated Visitor Centre at 250-697-2428, email infocentre@villageofgranisle.ca year-round or visit www.granisle.ca

Houston Nestled in the Pleasant Valley located near the confluence of the Bulkley and Morice Rivers is the home to the community of Houston. An outdoor enthusiast’s playground providing outdoor opportunities from world class steelhead fishing to snowmobiling the pristine mountain ranges that surround the community. Houston’s population of 3,200 is supported mainly by forestry,

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Δ Take a selfie at the world’s largest freestanding (18 m / 60 ft) fly rod. Its located in Steelhead Park along Highway 16 beside the Houston Visitor Centre. The park also features a wolf totem pole, a steelhead sculpture fountain, a 975 lb. mounted grizzly bear, and the replica ancient silver grinding stone which was a gift to Equity Silver Mines from its sister mine in Mexico. Δ Visit the Houston Museum Society’s “Walk Through History” (adjacent to the Visitor Centre) to view Houston’s first school house from 1916, first Anglican Church, fire truck of the community and much more. Δ Enjoy a day at the Houston leisure facility. An amazing facility that offers a fitness centre, hot tub, steam room, therapeutic leisure pool with a lazy river and a four lane competition pool.

STEELHEAD PARK, HOUSTON - REGIONAL DISTRICT OF BULKLEY-NECHAKO

TELKWA PASS - REGIONAL DISTRICT OF BULKLEY-NECHAKO

Δ Mountain bike the trails at Mt. Harry Davis. The Broken Spokes and Sticks and Stones, both moderate trails, offer great views of the valley. The advanced Twisted Metal features switchbacks down steep terrain, challenging riders. Rated easy are De-Railed Trail and Chutes’n’Roots, a fun flowy trail that winds down the mountain through a growing plantation. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HOUSTON Call 250-845-7640 and visit www.houstonchamber.ca

Telkwa Discover Telkwa’s vintage charm, 14 km (9 mi) south of Smithers on Highway 16. This rural village of 1,300 borders Tyhee Lake Provincial Park and straddles the banks of the Bulkley and Telkwa Rivers. Residents and visitors alike are captivated by Telkwa’s optimistic spirit, abundant recreation opportunities and snow-capped mountains.

Δ Cross Country Ski the groomed Morice Mountain Ski trails with 26 km of various terrain ranging from easy, moderate and difficult trails through a beautiful scenic forest. Enjoy the 2 km lit trails for night skiing.

Naturally Amazing

Δ Snowmobile adventurous areas in its pristine beauty of the Telkwa Mountain Range, Dungate Meadows, Tableland Mountain and the Rhine Ridge and Sibola Mountain.

Drawing visitors from around the world, the steelhead fishing here is legendary. In fact, Houston is known as the Steelhead Capital of Canada.

Δ Fish the world class Morice River known for its largest Steelhead return in the world, as well as amazing returns of Pink, Chum, Sockeye and Coho.

Houston is situated in an area that is rife with wildlife, waterways and a wide variety of activities suited to every season. For the fisherman, the hiker, the camper…there’s something for everyone. Come to Houston to experience the welcome hospitality and one of BC’s best kept secrets.

Δ For the avid hiker explore the amazing hiking trails from beginner to advanced levels enjoying waterfalls, Forest Service look out stations, or the famous China Knows Mountain trail. Δ Visit the Pleasant Valley Community Market Fridays June to September. Δ Explore the provincial parks from hiking, canoeing to boating. Houston is the gateway to Nadina Mountain, Morice Lake, Little Andrews Bay and Nanika-Kidprice Provincial parks. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

District of Houston

250.845.2238 www.houston.ca

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Houston & District Chamber of Commerce

250.845.7640 www.houstonchamber.ca

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W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T E L K WA Δ Flyfish the plentiful Bulkley and Telkwa Rivers. Δ Explore limitless hiking in the Telkwa environs — from easy family walks to rugged multi-day excursions to backcountry cabins. Δ Join the Bulkley Valley Backpackers for guided day hikes and ski excursions on Sunday mornings. Δ Camp, canoe and fish at numerous lakes and streams. Δ Kayak or raft area rivers and fabulous whitewater. Δ Enjoy a walking tour of Telkwa’s 26 restored heritage buildings, including the 1910 St. Stephen’s Anglican Church, Hong Chong’s Laundry and Bath House and the Interior Creamery (c. 1939). Δ Stroll community trails between Tyhee Lake Provincial Park campground, the former Aldermere townsite, and Telkwa’s downtown. Δ Tour Narnia Farms, a working organic farm with gorgeous display gardens, a shop and home-made refreshments. Δ Seniors, inquire about regular activities hosted by the Telkwa Seniors Centre. Δ Attend July 1 Canada Day celebrations. Δ On Labour Day weekend, attend the Telkwa Barbeque — a weekend of softball, demolition derby and concerts. Δ In winter, skate free at one of Telkwa’s two outdoor rinks — and when conditions are right, on the expansive ice of Tyhee Lake! Δ Cross-country ski at Tyhee Lake Provincial Park, and have a winter picnic at its two covered, firewood-stocked shelters. Ski into several backcountry wilderness cabins, maintained by BC Parks, private companies or volunteer associations (typically require fees and reservations). Δ Snowmobile extensive trail networks at places like the Big Onion, Dome Mountain and the Microwave. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T T E L K WA Call Telkwa Village at 250-846-9572, and visit www.telkwa.com

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Smithers Just 14 km (9 mi) west of Telkwa on Highway 16, you’ll arrive at Smithers, pop. 5,400. Its red-bricked Main Street is graced by alpine-themed architecture and murals celebrating the Bulkley Valley landscape, and crowned by the monumental presence of Hudson Bay Mountain — all fitting in a town where people are crazy for mountains and the recreation possibilities they bring! Smithers’ friendly, active residents are employed in services, forestry, mining, agriculture and tourism. Meet them, and discover why this town is as easily identified with dynamism as it is year-round recreation opportunities. Smithereens value co-operation, entrepreneurial spirit and the arts. There’s a healthy local appetite for hosting, performing and learning diverse music styles, with numerous coffeehouses, house concerts, concerts, dances and instructional events. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N S M I T H E R S Δ Hike the Valley’s inexhaustible trail network, which range from quick and easy jaunts to challenging, multi-day excursions. Try the two-hour hike from the lift at Hudson Bay Mountain to Crater Lake — and take a bracing dip! Explore the Telkwa Range and Babine Mountain Provincial Park. Get great views of the valley, and the cooling spray of two towering waterfalls, at Glacier Gulch and Twin Falls, just 15 minutes’ drive from downtown. A two-hour hike up a rough, steep trail near the base of the falls ascends to the W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

glacier above. (Note: it is dangerous to walk on any glacier without appropriate equipment and experience.) Keep your eyes peeled for wildlife, like mountain goats! Δ Fish for coveted steelhead and four species of Pacific salmon. Δ Tour the Bulkley Valley trails on horseback or mountain bike — on your own or with a tour. View 50 millionyear-old fossils at nearby Driftwood Canyon. Δ Explore rivers, from serene to class four-plus whitewater, by boat, canoe, kayak or raft. Δ Explore the life cycle of the precious salmon resource, at the Toboggan Creek Salmon Hatchery. Δ Golf at two 18-hole golf courses. Δ Hear high-quality music, including more than 70 local, regional and national bands, at the three-day Midsummer Music Festival. Δ Attend any of Smithers’ frequent musical coffeehouses, concerts, dances or music-instruction camps. Find out more by asking at local bookstores. N O R T H E R N B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A T R AV E L G U I D E 2 0 17

Δ Uncover Smithers’ stories, at the Bulkley Valley Museum and the Smithers Art Gallery. Δ Look for books and documentaries produced by local writers. Δ Enjoy live entertainment, produce, home cooking and treats at the Bulkley Valley Farmers’ Market, Saturdays from May to October. Δ Ski and board at Hudson Bay Mountain, only 30 minutes from downtown Smithers. Δ Cross-country ski at the Bulkley Valley Nordic Centre, or to several backcountry cabins in the area (fees, reservations typically required for overnight stays). Δ Enjoy heli-skiing and ski mountaineering in nearby ranges. Backcountry ski or hike in the Hankin-Evelyn Backcountry Recreation area. Ask for details at the Visitor Centre. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SMITHERS Call the Visitor Centre at 1-800-542-6673 or 250-847-5072 and visit www.tourismsmithers.com

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Sure, everyone has their own pace. Some run and run and run. I’ve been there, I’ve done that. But for now, I’ve found a little rocky island in a river. When we’re not talking I can hear the gravel rolling in the shallows. A fox keeps his eye on us from the shore. If life needs me it will have to come and get me. For now, I’m watching the clouds twist and curl over the points and crags of Hudson Bay Mountain. Our friendly fire will talk to us for a little longer. The fox still watches us. We’re in good company.

www.tourismsmithers.com Somewhere on the Bulkley River near Smithers Grant Harder


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Moricetown Halfway between Smithers and New Hazelton is Moricetown — a Wet’suwet’en First Nation village of 800. View the late-summer spectacle of traditional aboriginal salmon fishing in the crashing whitewater of the Moricetown Canyon — as practised by the Wet’suwet’en for millennia. Visit the Moricetown Interpretive Centre, camp across the river at the Moricetown campground, and sport-fish with a permit.

The Hazeltons A handful of close communities are collectively referred to as the Hazeltons: the District of New Hazelton, 68 km (42 mi) northwest of Smithers on Highway 16, the Village of Hazelton, 7 km (4 mi) northwest at the confluence of the Skeena and Bulkley Rivers, and several unincorporated settlements including South Hazelton. Look west to see the magnificent peak of Roche de Boule — associated, in Gitxsan First Nation legend, with a shape-shifting goat who punishes villagers for thoughtless cruelty to animals.

H I K I N G I N T H E K I S P I O X V A L L E Y - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  E M A N U E L S M E D B O L

Δ Enjoy a walking tour through picturesque Old Hazelton. Heritage buildings recall the pre-railroad era of steamdriven sternwheelers that braved serious rapids to service the area from the coast. Δ Fish the world-class Kispiox River for steelhead, coho, rainbow, cutthroat and dolly varden. Δ Enjoy the Pioneer Day parade and celebrations in historic “Old Town”, the second Saturday in August.

( T O P ) M O R I C E T O W N C A N Y O N - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ Explore the backcountry on foot, or on skis. To access real adventure potential, hire a guide. Δ Canada Day celebrations at Allen Park, New Hazelton on July 1st. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T T H E H A Z E LT O N S Call the seasonally operated Visitor Centre at 250-842-6071, or the Village office year-round at 250-842-5991 or visit www.newhazelton.ca

S A L M O N G L A C I E R - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

(BOTTOM) STEELHEAD PARADISE - CLINT FRASER

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T H E H A Z E LT O N S Δ Tour the First Nations heritage site, ’Ksan Historical Village and Museum. Learn about Gitxsan history and culture, see traditional regalia and watch carvers at work. Δ Drive around the Totem Pole Capital of the World. More than 50 authentic, impressive totem poles can be seen in the Hazeltons and surrounding villages. Drive, or park your car so you can walk over Hagwilget Bridge. It’s one of the highest suspension bridges in North America, and views from here are truly inspiring.

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< At this point > You can either continue along Highway 16 west or you can turn north and experience the Stewart-Cassiar Highway. Information on this northern trek is provided next. A further description of what awaits you if you are to continue along Highway 16 resumes on page 68 — with a description of majestic Terrace. FOR REFERENCE, SEE THE MAP ON PAGE 48

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Stewart The border towns of Stewart (Canada’s most northerly ice-free port) and Hyder (friendliest little ghost town in Alaska) sit at the head of the Portland Canal. These communities are linked to the Stewart-Cassiar Highway by the Bear Pass, which cuts through the coastal mountain range with over 20 hanging glaciers visible from the road. World-famous bear watching, glacier tours and breathtaking scenery make this trip a must. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N S T E WA R T Δ Stop to photograph the Bear Glacier, located along Highway 37A.

GITWANGAK - TIM SWANKY

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N K I T WA N G A A N D G I TA N Y O W Δ Admire authentic totem poles (about 11 in Kitwanga, more than 15 in Gitanyow), recounting Gitxsan history and legend. These poles inspired famous works by the renowned B.C. painter, Emily Carr, who visited in the late 1920s. Δ Visit Gitwangak Battle Hill National Historic Site. A trail to a steep mound, known as Ta’awdzep or Battle Hill, is all that remains of a palisade and five cedar plank longhouses that were occupied for at least 100 years. They burned down around 1835, after a tribal war over fishing sites and trade routes. Seven panels along the trail tell the story.

KITWANGA - TIM SWANKY

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Δ Visit the seasonally operated Gitanyow Museum.

Kitwanga & Gitanyow

Meziadin Junction

The Gitxsan village of Kitwanga, also known by its Gitxsan name, Gitwangak, is found at the junction of Highways 16 and 37. Prince Rupert-bound travellers continue west on Highway 16, while Yukon-bound travellers turn north onto Highway 37 (the StewartCassiar). Just 4 km (2.5 mi) over the Skeena River bridge on Highway 37, encounter another Gitxsan village — Gitanyow, formerly known as Kitwancool.

About 155 km (100 mi) north of Kitwanga, reach the Meziadin Junction. A tough choice awaits: head west on the aptly named Glacier Highway 37A for an extraordinary drive to the communities of Stewart and Hyder, or continue north on Highway 37 through the Coast Mountains, towards the Yukon. While you decide, you can camp (June 1 - September 15), swim, water-ski, fish, and during late summer, watch spawning salmon ascend the fish ladder in scenic Meziadin Lake Provincial Park. Watch for bears!

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Δ Take the self-guided auto tour or arrange a tour up to the Salmon Glacier — Canada’s largest glacier accessible by road (seasonally, by 4 wheel drive). Δ Watch grizzly and black bears feed on salmon, at the viewing area located at Fish Creek, 11 km (7 mi) from Stewart, on the Alaska Panhandle. Δ Visit Bear River Interpretive Centre — a non profit centre open from May to September. Δ Enjoy year-round salt water and fresh water fishing. Δ Charter a boat for a sight-seeing or fishing trip on the Portland Canal. Δ Charter a helicopter, to take in the spectacular aerial view of the water, mountains and glaciers.

S A L M O N G L A C I E R - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ Hike on your own or with a guide on one of the many hiking trails in the Stewart area. Δ Visit the Museum, located in the 100 year old Stewart Firehall, to learn about the history of Stewart, experience the glory days of mining and find out about the many feature films that have been filmed in the area. Δ Remember your passport if you are planning on crossing into Hyder, Alaska.

Nestled in the coast mountains at the end of a glacial river you will find a hidden treasure…

Stewart, BC

Nature – up close and personal

Δ Stroll out onto the boardwalk for a spectacular view of the Portland Canal and bird-watching. Stop at the pavilion for a picnic.

www.districtofstewart.com

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Dease Lake

STEWART – CONTINUED…

Δ Take the heritage walking tour to see Stewart’s heritage homes and buildings.

C I T Y O F S T E W A R T - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ Attend Stewart / Hyder International Days held annually July 1 to 4. Events include games for all ages, parades, entertainment, fireworks, community dinner, slo-pitch tournament and much more.

About 83 km (52 mi) north of Iskut, meet the community of Dease Lake (pop. 303). This former Hudson’s Bay trading post (established in 1838) is today the centre of services for Highway 37 communities. It’s also proximate to very significant jade reserves, prompting the community to bill itself as the “Jade Capital of the World.” Visitor services include fuel, supplies, restaurants and accommodation.

Δ Attend the Bear Arts Festival held annually on the second weekend in August.

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N D E A S E L A K E

F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T S T E WA R T The Stewart Visitor Centre is operated seasonally by the Stewart Chamber of Commerce. Year round contact information: phone 250-636-9224 or 1-888-366-5999 or visit www.districtofstewart.com

Bell II BELL II LODGE - STEVE ROSSET

LINKING BC’S NORTHWEST WITH THE YUKON & ALASKA

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Bell 2, 96 km (60 mi) north of Meziadin, was so named because it’s the second bridge across the Bell Irving River. Bell 2 Lodge offers four-star accommodation, a full service restaurant, campsites for RV’s and tents, as well as a gas station with coffee shop. In the winter months, Bell 2 Lodge is home to Last Frontier Heliskiing.

Tatogga Lake & Iskut Drive 148 km (92 mi) north of Bell II to reach Tatogga Lake. Visitor services here include fuel, a restaurant, resort accommodation, boat rentals, flight-seeing tours and minor car repairs. Camping is also available at nearby Kinaskan Lake. Eight km (5 mi) further, the tiny Tahltan village of Iskut includes a post office, gas station and grocery store. Both are departure points for exploration of spectacular wilderness parks: Mount Edziza and Spatsizi Plateau.

Δ Book a guided tour (including horseback, whitewater rafting and flight-seeing!) into the awe-inspiring Stikine River Provincial Park and the Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness Park. Well-equipped, fit and experienced hikers can explore this challenging terrain independently. Δ Fish for grayling in the Tanzilla River, and char in Dease and Boya Lakes. Δ If you’re a well-equipped, experienced paddler, explore Dease River by kayak.

Stewart Cassiar Hwy

www.stewartcassiarhighway.com

Telegraph Creek A 113 km (70 mi) gravel road from Dease Lake to Telegraph Creek passes several First Nations fishing camps, and offers sensational views of the lower Grand Canyon of the Stikine. However, take note: its narrow, steep, sharp switchbacks make it unsuited for large RVs and vehicles with trailers. This mostly Tahltan community, situated on two terraces above the Stikine River, is one of B.C.’s most remote. It was named for the overland B.C. / Yukon telegraph line that was constructed between 1866 and 1901, and later abandoned for wireless radio. Telegraph Creek is the hometown of celebrated First Nations carver Dempsey Bob. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T E L E G R A P H C R E E K Δ Camp, hike, fish for salmon and steelhead, kayak and canoe the Stikine River’s navigable sections.

Δ Enjoy a place that time seems to have forgotten.

c ulture • wi ldli fe

Δ Visit Stikine Riversong, a former Hudson Bay Trading Post.

w ww. Stewa r tC a s s ia rH ig hway.co m FREE Road Tour Guides available at Visitor Centres in Northwest BC & our website http://kaywa.me/wJC2I

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T E L E G R A P H C R E E K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M E G A N M C L E L L A N SALMON GLACIER - TIM SWANKY

Δ Follow the Telegraph Creek road another 19 km (12 mi) to its conclusion at Glenora, a ghost town that once hosted 5,000 gold-seekers. landscape • history

TELEGRAPH CREEK - TIM SWANKY

More StewartCassiar Gems

Continuing north from Dease Lake along Highway 37 toward the B.C. / Yukon border, note these stops of interest: Jade City (pop. 12!), host to the new 'Jade Fever' show on the Discovery Channel offers a gift shop featuring locally mined jade jewelry, sculpture and carvings, jade mining displays plus services for travellers. Boya Lake Provincial Park features a gorgeous, aquamarinehued lake, with waters warm enough to swim and first-come, first-served camping.

Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code!

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Δ Enjoy a production at the Globe Theatre, considered architecturally unique for 1917 when it was built. Δ Relax in the naturally warm springs off Warm Bay Road, 24 km (15 mi) from town. Δ Visit during Atlin Arts And Music Festival in July, but purchase tickets in advance. Δ Hire a local guide-outfitter for fishing, hunting or packhorse trips. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T AT L I N Call the Visitor Centre at 250-651-7522, and visit www.discoveratlin.com

( L E F T ) A T L I N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  J F B E R G E R O N

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Spirited 2017 Summer Events JUNE 21 National Aboriginal Days www.kermode_fs.com JULY 1 Canada Day Celebrations at Heritage Park www.heritageparkmuseum.com JULY 8 AND 9 Kitsumkalum Tempo Fishing Derby www.kitsumkalum.bc.ca AUGUST 4-13 Riverboat Days www.riverboatdays.ca AUGUST 10 Kermodei Tourism Backyard BBQ www.visitterrace.com AUGUST 12 Terrace Downtown Street Fair Medley www.tdia.com

< At this point >

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FISHING | S | FA

Δ Pan for gold (rent equipment at the museum), at the public claim on Spruce Creek.

west from the junction of Highway 37 you will come across a number of bustling communities that are in touch with their heritage and the environment. FOR REFERENCE, SEE THE MAP ON PAGE 48 W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

TERRACE

EVERY SATURDAY MORNING Skeena Valley Farmers Market

Follow us on Twitter @visitterrace

VisitTerrace.com 1.877.635.4944

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Δ Visit the Atlin Historical Museum (May 1 to Sept. 1), in Atlin’s first schoolhouse (est. 1920). Museum volunteers offer historic walking tours of Atlin; free, but donations gratefully accepted.

VISIT

VENTS | F N E ES

Δ Go flight-seeing over Llewellyn Glacier, which flows from the massive Juneau icefield into the southwest tip of Atlin Lake, and remote Atlin Provincial Park.

FU

Δ Explore and fish Atlin Lake, B.C.’s largest natural lake! Guides and boats, from kayaks to houseboats, are available for hire.

Δ See the restored MV Tarahne, an elegant touring boat that carried people and goods around the lake from 1916-1936.

Once you have completed your northern adventure you may wish to return to Highway 16 and continue west. You may have already decided to complete your journey along Highway 16 before making the decision to head north. No matter what your travel plans, once you continue further

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About 94 km (58 mi) south of Jake’s Corner off the Alaska Highway, Atlin is B.C.’s most northwesterly community, well off the beaten track and definitely worth the trip. This region has long been home to the semi-nomadic Taku River Tlingit people. Discoveries of gold at Pine Creek in 1898 drew 10,000 gold-seekers the following year. By the time gold finds had dwindled to a trickle in 1915, many had been seduced by the compelling beauty of Atlin’s landscape — and stayed. With its long summer days (19 hours of light at summer solstice!), this community of about 400 continues to attract artists and other restless souls.

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( A B O V E ) E X S T E W F A L L S N E A R T E R R A C E - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Terrace Positioned 210 km (130 mi) west of Smithers and 140 km (87 mi) east of Prince Rupert on Highway 16, Terrace is a commercial and transportation centre. Its hub status predates even the railway: decades before that was completed, Terrace was a regular stop for the steampowered sternwheelers that plied the Skeena from the coast. Its cultural history is much longer: for almost 10,000 years, Terrace and the Skeena Valley have been home to the Tsimshian First Nation. The city’s mascot is the Kermodei bear, a rarely seen cream-coloured subspecies of black bear. Unique to B.C.’s north coast, the “spirit bear” is increasingly imperilled by habitat loss. Comprehensive services await visitors to Terrace, including a wide range of accommodation, restaurants, pubs, wellness centres and spas. To really unlock this region’s adventure potential, hire a qualified guide. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T E R R A C E Δ Land one of the world-renowned salmon that draw anglers 10 months of the year. Fish the bountiful Skeena with a guide or on your own — perhaps from your campsite at the Ferry Island Municipal Campground.

( C E N T E R ) K I T S E L A S C A N Y O N - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ View pioneer-era log buildings, photographic exhibits and periodic live entertainment at the Heritage Park Museum.

Δ Arrange a tour of the new Freda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art, and watch First Nations artists at work. Δ Visit the Terrace Art Gallery, and take the mural art tour. Δ Ski or board Canada’s only non-profit community owned co-op ski hill, Shames Mountain, where the powder is deep and relatively cheap! Shames’ unparalleled backcountry beckons expert, self-sufficient recreationists at their own risk. Δ Visit the Skeena Valley Farmers’ Market, Saturdays May to October. Δ Attend Riverboat Days and the Riverside Music Festival in early August.

Δ Hike or cycle the Terrace Mountain trail, for great views of the city and environs. Explore other trails at Thornhill, Bornite, Maroon and Shames Mountains, Sleeping Beauty, Pine, Redsand and Gunsight Lakes. Δ Test your cycling skills at Terrace’s bike-skills park.

Hwy 16 W, Terrace, BC • 250-638-7874 • yellowcedarlodge.ca N O R T H E R N B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A T R AV E L G U I D E 2017

The Nass Valley holds many undiscovered wonders of nature and history. Tour the 26 km (16 mi) long lava beds to the volcanic cone or experience some of the world’s best fishing on the Portland Canal near the Alaska border. Visit the stunning new Nisga’a Museum in Greenville (Laxgalts’ap) and the Nisga’a Memorial Lava Bed Park. The park features a campground, Visitor Centre longhouse with displays of Nisga’a art including carvings, button blankets and masks and a pictorial history of the Nisga’a and the Nass Valley. At Nass Camp there is an RV campground with 16 sites with full services (electrical, water and dumping station), a restaurant and a bar.

Δ Explore George Little House. A restored home of the city’s founding father, it now hosts events and houses the Via Rail station and artists’.

Δ Golf at the 18-hole Skeena Valley Golf and Country Club.

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( R I G H T ) N I S G A ' A M E M O R I A L L A V A B E D P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  E M A N U E L S M E D B O L

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W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T H E N A S S VA L L E Y Δ Rock climb diverse routes and rock faces, at Copper Mountain, Exchamsiks River Provincial Park, Exstew Valley and Chist Creek. Δ Raft or kayak April through November. More than 20 first-rate whitewater runs exist near Terrace, typically graced by the majestic backdrop of deep canyons, verdant forests and the towering peaks and glaciers of the Coast Mountains. Δ Discover the Kitselas Canyon Historic Site, operated by the Kitselas First Nation. It includes an interpretive trail and four contemporary totem poles. Δ Cross-country ski Onion Lake’s 25 km (15 mi) of groomed trails (including 5 km lit). Δ Snowmobile on trails at Mount Maroon, Copper and Sterling Mountains. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TERRACE Call the Terrace Visitor Centre at 250-635-4944; Kermodei Tourism at 1-877-635-4944, 250-635-4944 or visit www.visitterrace.com N O R T H E R N B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A T R AV E L G U I D E 2 0 17

Δ Visit the Nisga’a Museum (Hli Goothl Wilp Adokshl Nisga’a), featuring the Ancestors Collection (Anhooya’ahl Ga’angigatgum’) with over 300 Nisga’a cultural treasures. This collection ranks as one of the preeminent collections of Northwest Coast aboriginal art. Δ Visit Gitlakdamix (New Aiyansh) to see the totem poles at the New Aiyansh Village Government Office. Shop at the General Store for gas, snacks and mementos, or visit one of the local artist’s workshops. Tour the Government Chambers and Lisims Government Building to learn more about these self-governed people. Δ Drive into Gitwinksilkw (Canyon City) across a bridge featuring four welcoming totem poles. Also visit the swaying suspension bridge that was once the only land access to the village. Δ Explore Gingolx (Kincolith) situated at the mouth of the Nass River, on the Portland Canal — it’s known as the Seafood Capital of the Nass Valley.

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MINETTE BAY - RUTH MILLS

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N K I T I M AT Δ World class fresh water fishing on the Kitimat River. Salt water fishing for halibut, salmon, cod and snapper, trap for prawns, shrimp and crab in the Douglas Channel independently or with a guide. Δ Canoe or kayak the Douglas Channel. Don’t miss the Weewanie and Bishop Bay hot springs in Douglas Channel! Δ Visit the world’s largest intact coast temperate rainforest: the Kitlope Conservancy. About a two hour boat ride from Kitimat and accessible only with permission and a guide, this protected backcountry park has 800-year-old trees. It provides critical habitat for grizzly, black bear, marbled murrelets and bald eagles. More information is available at www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/kitlope.html Δ Kitimat offers breath taking scenery, coastal mountains and abundant wildlife. Δ Hike! The Visitor Centre offers maps of trails from easy to advanced. SNOWMOBILING NEAR KITIMAT - PAUL ANDERSON

Kitimat Kitimat, pop. 8,335, is a young city, planned and built in the 1950s by Alcan Aluminum to house employees for its smelter which has become one of the world’s largest. This industrial city offers easy access to some of B.C.’s most remote, pristine landscapes. Its Haisla name means “People of the Snow” — an apt descriptor, as annual snowfalls here are among Canada’s highest.

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Δ View Giant Spruce Park — The remains of a previously registered “largest living Sitka Spruce in B.C.” can be found in the park. The 500-year old tree measures 11.2 m (36.7 ft) in circumference and once stood 50.32 m (165 ft) tall. Δ Visit the Kitimat Museum & Archives, for a fascinating display of natural history, visual arts, First Nations displays and gift shop. View local artists’ works at the Museum’s art gallery.

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KITIMAT – CONTINUED…

Δ Golf at the scenic and challenging 18-hole Hirsch Creek Golf and Winter Club. Δ Family fun at the Tamitik Sports Complex and Riverlodge Recreation Centre. Facilities include 2 ice arenas, Olympic size swimming pool with a lazy river, water slide and spray park, weight room, racquetball and squash courts. Δ Check out Kitimat’s other natural treasures and public green spaces: Centennial and Hirsch Creek Parks, Hospital Beach, Moore Creeks Falls and the Coghlin Park viewpoint. Δ Cross-country ski and snowmobile on a wide range of trails, described in brochures found at the Visitor Centre. Δ Check out the large aluminum snowflake! F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T K I T I M AT Call the Visitor Centre at 1-800-664-6554, 250-632-6294, email info@tourismkitimat.ca and visit www.tourismkitimat.ca

Kitamaat Village

PRINCE RUPERT - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Prince Rupert

The Haisla village of Kitamaat, meaning “People of the Snow”, is about 11 km (4 mi) south of Kitimat. It’s home to about 700 Haisla people. In 1905, the Canadian government “reserved” about 7 km2 for the Haisla’s exclusive use of approximately 13,000 km2 (about 5,000 mi2) traditionally used by this wide-ranging people. However, the Haisla remain connected to their spiritual traditions, the land, and hunting, fishing and gathering.

Prince Rupert is a booming little port city of about 12,500, in the heart of the North Coast’s lush rainforest. Outstanding marine and forest-based recreation opportunities are cherished by residents and visitors alike. Sport-fishing and wildlife-viewing here are the stuff of legend. The city’s architecture, superior museum collections, community events, trendy galleries, cafés and shops lend it cosmopolitan flavour and bear colourful witness to the profound influence of nature on daily life, an enduring respect for living First Nations culture, and a time-honoured tradition of welcoming visitors from afar. Located in the center of territory traditionally claimed by the Tsimshian First Nation, this region was one of North America’s most densely populated areas long before European explorers arrived. Initially, the British and Americans set up posts to trade sea otter pelts. Plentiful wild salmon, which have sustained the Tsimshian for over 10,000 years, drew dozens of canneries to the coast during the 1800s — along with a multi-cultural workforce. In the early 1900s, the Grand Trunk Railway selected Kaien Island as its Pacific terminus, and the City of Prince Rupert was incorporated in 1910. Prince Rupert earned a place on the map as the world’s

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N K I TA M A AT V I L L A G E Δ Inquire about Kitamaat’s highly accomplished artists and sculptors and arrange a studio visit. Δ View and photograph exceptional scenery and wildlife.

Princess Royal Island Plan in advance for your visit to Princess Royal Island — one of the last refuges of the famed Kermodei bear. Experts believe there are fewer than 200 of these cream-coloured “spirit” bears left. There are no permanent settlements on this island.

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( T O P L E F T ) C O W B A Y C A F É I N P R I N C E R U P E R T - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

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halibut capital, and during World War II, as the staging area for Allied troops and munitions on their way to the Aleutian Islands. In the post-war era, the city’s fortunes have primarily been tied to fishing and forestry. The city has long been a regional centre for commerce and transport: it’s the Pacific terminus of Highway 16 (the Yellowhead) and Via Rail, and the meeting point of ferries from Alaska, Haida Gwaii and points south. The past few years have seen Prince Rupert experience meteoric growth as a cargo port, due to major investment and the fact of it being the shortest ocean link between North America and Asia. The cruise ship terminal right beside quaint downtown Prince Rupert welcomes visitors from throughout the world.

985 3rd Ave West, Prince Rupert

250.624.2746 www.theargosy.ca

 W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

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Δ Guides know the best spots! View humpback, orcas and grey whales — from your boat, kayak or with a guided tour. With luck, humpback whales will offer a fascinating display of bubble-net feeding. Eagles, seabirds, seals, sea lions and porpoises are added bonuses! Δ Book your spot on a flight-seeing tour for a bird’s-eye view of coastal fjords, glaciers and nearby communities.

KHUTZEYMATEEN - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ Sample North Coast brew from the newly opened Wheelhouse Brewing Company. Δ Explore the outstanding collections of the Museum of Northern B.C., housed in a magnificent, northwest coast-style longhouse. Take a tour, and drop by its excellent gift shop for regionally made First Nations jewellery. Δ Experience Northwest Coast performance art in the museum’s adjacent longhouse. Δ Pay tribute to the mariners of Prince Rupert at Pacific Mariners’ Memorial Park. It features a statue, memorial wall and the Kazu Maru — a small fishing vessel that was found drifting near Haida Gwaii in 1987. Investigation revealed that the abandoned craft came from Owase, the Japanese sister city of Prince Rupert. Its owner had taken it for a day of fishing, and was never seen again.

WHEELHOUSE BREWING COMPANY, PRINCE RUPERT - SIMON RATCLIFFE

PRINCE RUPERT – CONTINUED…

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N P R I N C E R U P E R T Δ Enjoy some of the world’s best sport fishing, in salt and fresh water, for all five species of salmon, halibut, a variety of rockfish, or shrimp and crab. Δ Get a once-in-a-lifetime grizzly bear viewing experience, at Canada’s first grizzly bear sanctuary: the Khutzeymateen. Some 50 grizzlies inhabit this remote park. Day trips depart by boat from Prince Rupert and flight seeing and sailboat based adventures are available. Book ahead!

Δ Visit the Kwinitsa Railway Museum, for a glimpse of Prince Rupert’s journey from tent town at the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway terminus, to vital city in the 1920s. Δ Explore Prince Rupert’s history of fire-fighting and law enforcement, and view a restored 1925 REO Speedwagon fire engine, at the Firehall Museum. Δ Explore the community, searching out the many totem poles erected at public buildings and sprinkled through city parks. Δ Explore the galleries, boutiques, restaurants, cafés and shops of Cow Bay, a busy harbour and shopping district. Visit the Ice House Gallery in the Atlin Terminal at Cow Bay, and take in a show at Prince Rupert’s state-of-theart Lester Centre of the Arts. Δ Enjoy a quiet moment in the tranquil, volunteermaintained Sunken Garden, which faces the provincial courthouse built in 1923.

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Convenient, Comfortable & Affordable • Complimentary continental breakfast • Close to all transportation terminals • Free hi-speed Internet • Free covered parking • Restaurant on Site 909 Third Avenue West, Prince Rupert BC V8J 1M9 Toll Free: 1-888-663-1999 • Ph: 250-627-1711 • Fax: 250-627-4212

www.pacificinn.bc.ca

CLEAN, COMFORTABLE AND QUIET ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Complimentary, continental breakfast Within walking distance of downtown Close to VIA Rail and Ferry terminals Parking for ferry passengers FREE high speed internet Kitchenettes available

www.totemlodge.com

Tel: (250) 624-6761 • Fax: (250) 624-3831 Toll Free: 1-800-550-0178

1335 Park Avenue Prince Rupert, BC V8J 1K3


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PRINCE RUPERT – CONTINUED…

Δ Explore the lush coastal rainforest in nearby provincial parks, such as Prudhomme Lake and Diana Lake. Complete exceptional, short hikes in McClymont and Moresby parks. Δ Enjoy interpretive trails at Butze Rapids and Grassy Bay, view dwarfed, bonsai-like trees at Oliver Lake, and stroll lovely trails within the city itself.

S EC TI ON 2 : NO R T H W E ST BC

PRINCE RUPERT GOLF CLUB - SIMON RATCLIFFE

Δ Challenge your golf skills at the 18-hole Prince Rupert Golf Course — but try not to get distracted by the gorgeous views! Δ Visit the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s Port Interpretive Centre, showcasing the history of trade in the region. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PRINCE RUPERT Call the Prince Rupert Visitor Centre at 250-624-5637 or www.visitprincerupert.com

N O R T H P A C I F I C C A N N E R Y N A T I O N A L H I S T O R I C S I T E - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N P O R T E D WA R D Δ Tour the North Pacific Cannery National Historic Site, May to October, and learn about the cannery village’s multicultural past.

NORTH PACIFIC CANNERY NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Port Edward Located at the mouth of the salmon-rich Skeena, Port Edward is home to about 544 people. For a century beginning in the 1880s, Port Edward and adjoining Inverness Passage were home to several thriving fish canneries, providing thousands of jobs to a multicultural work force of fishermen, boat builders and cannery workers. The area’s unique history lives on at the North Pacific Cannery National Historic Site, well worth the 12 km (7.45 mi) side-trip from Prince Rupert.

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Δ Take guided tours through working antique equipment, authentic houses, wooden boardwalks, a company store and café. Δ Overnight at one of Cassiar Cannery’s guest houses. Δ Ocean Fishing with protected marina and double boat launch provide easy access. Δ Picnic, swim and canoe at Diana Lake Provincial Park, just off Highway 16. Watch spawning salmon here August to September. F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T P O R T E D WA R D Call the District of Port Edward at 250-628-3667, and visit www.portedward.ca

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S PECI A L FEA T UR E

BC Ferries:

The Magnificent Journey

I T ’ S O F T E N S A I D T H AT T H E J O U R N E Y I S AT L E A S T A S I M P O R TA N T A S T H E D E S T I N AT I O N. N O W H E R E I S T H I S MORE TRUE THAN ON BC FERRIES. For British Columbians, BC Ferries is a critical link in the province’s transportation system. But for visitors and residents alike, BC Ferries voyages mean so much more: an opportunity to experience the magnificent B.C. coastline; to get up close to wildlife like orcas, grey whales, eagles, sea lions and porpoises; and a relaxing alternative to highway travel. BC Ferries provides service on 24 routes throughout coastal B.C., but two routes are particularly relevant to travellers in northern B.C. — the Inside Passage route, and the Prince Rupert / Haida Gwaii route. The Inside Passage route links Prince Rupert, gateway to northern B.C., to Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This 15hour voyage offers more than 400 kilometres of spectacular coastal scenery: regal mountains, dramatic fjords and lush, remote islands. It all takes place onboard the Northern Expedition or the Northern Adventure, two of the newest and most comfortable vessels in the BC Ferries fleet. Ship amenities include state rooms, excellent food services and a gift shop offering a great selection of First Nations art. The BC Ferries route between Prince Rupert and Haida Gwaii (a.k.a. the Queen Charlotte Islands) offers another memorable trip. The 173 km route offers access to one of the most pristine, culturally rich regions in the world. BOTH OF THESE POPUL AR R O U T E S R E Q U I R E A D VA N C E D R E S E R VAT I O N S . For current schedule and fare information, travel tips, directions to ferry terminals, and vehicle reservations, contact BC Ferries at www.bcferries.com; or call 1-888-223-3779 (toll-free in North America) or 250-386-3431 (from outside of North America).

HUMPBACK WHALE DIVES NEAR LANGARA ISLAND LODGE - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

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Seek northern shores.

F O R VA C AT I O N PA C K A G E S C O N TA C T www.bcferries.com/vacations, or call 1-888-BC FERRY, extension 3

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Ask about our Northern Packages including ferry travel, accommodation, tours and activities. Wherever you choose to visit, whatever you decide to do, there is no better way to discover the North than with BC Ferries Vacations.™

Three easy ways to book: · bcferries.com/vacations · 1-888-BC FERRY Ext. 3

· BC Ferries Vacations™ Centre at the Fairmont Pacific Rim 1010 Canada Place, Vancouver, BC BC Reg. 48839


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V O L C A N I C R O C K S A T T H E B L O W H O L E I N N A I K O O N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

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hg Haida Gwaii BRITISH COLUMBIA

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Section 3

HAIDA GWAII British Columbia

“A proud indigenous culture of seafarers, food-gatherers and artists. Dense, flourishing rainforests, windswept sand-dunes and endless beaches.”

A globally unique ecosystem that partially escaped the last ice age, and evokes comparisons to the equally isolated and biologically diverse Galápagos Islands. All this and more are found on glorious Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), an archipelago of more than 150 islands about 120 km (74 mi) off the northern B.C. coast. The two largest islands, Graham and Moresby, are home to most of its 5,000 residents. About half of these are Haida, the First Nation whose 12,000-year presence here is felt in every aspect of island life — truly making them the “islands of the people”.

Whichever place name you use, expect that your visit to the Haida Gwaii impart a lifetime’s worth of impressions: the strength and gentle humour of the Haida people, as present on young faces today as it is in the world-renowned art and artifacts showcased in the awardwinning Haida Heritage Centre at Kay Llnagaay. The mysterious gaze of mortuary poles over the pristine

magnificence of Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site — appropriately chosen as North America’s #1 Park by National Geographic Traveller Magazine. The pervasive influence of the sea, teeming with grey, orca, and humpback whales along with salmon, seals, sea lions, porpoises and marine birds. The continuing allure of life off the beaten track, which continues to draw creatives to the islands from around the world. And when you leave, don’t be surprised if your visit to Haida Gwaii has left you with the sense of having touched something sacred. You have.

( L E F T ) T O T E M P O L E I N H A I D A G W A I I - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

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Sandspit Sandspit, 13 km (8 mi) from the ferry landing at Alliford Bay, is the main community on Moresby Island. Visitor services here include a hotel, RV park, bed & breakfasts, restaurants, grocery store, and a well-serviced 80-berth marina. Sandspit offers scheduled air service to Vancouver, and access to South Moresby and one of the islands’ crown jewels: Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site. The protected areas are accessed only by boat or chartered aircraft. Kayakers should be very experienced and self-sufficient, or accompanied by a guide. H A I D A G W A I I - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N S A N D S P I T Δ Take your photo at the imposing, locally crafted cedar/ copper salmon sculpture, on the road to the airport. Δ Hike the Dover Trail, to access the forests of northern Moresby Island. Δ Camp and relax on the beach at Gray Bay, 21 km (13 mi) southeast of Sandspit.

Δ Enjoy fresh and saltwater fishing. Δ Visit Mosquito Lake Park, 44 km (27 mi) southwest of Sandspit. Δ In spring, watch grey whales from Onward Point. Δ Golf almost all year long, at Willows Golf Course. Δ Gear up for your kayak or zodiac adventure with local guides. Δ Catch the BC Ferry to Graham Island. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SANDSPIT Drop in or call the seasonally operated Visitor Centre at the airport, at 250-637-5362 or visit www.GoHaidaGwaii.ca

Skidegate Two BC Ferries dock at Skidegate Landing, linking passengers to Sandspit or Prince Rupert. Skidegate Village is 2 km (1.5 mi) from the terminal. Visitor services include restaurants, a gas bar, laundromat and bank; most accommodation is available in the nearby Village of Queen Charlotte. W H AT T O S E E & D O I N S K I D E G AT E Δ Visit the Haida Heritage Centre at Kay Llnagaay. This celebration of Haida Culture consists of six linked longhouses, which house the Haida Gwaii Museum, Performing House, Carving Shed, Canoe House, Bill Reid Teaching Centre and a gift shop. The complex is fronted by six monumental totem poles.

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L A N G A R A F I S H I N G A D V E N T U R E S , H A I D A G W A I I - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

S E C TI ON 3 : H A I DA G W A I I BC

LEPAS BAY, NEAR LANGARA ISLAND - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R N A I K O O N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

SKIDEGATE – CONTINUED…

Δ Don’t miss the Kay Anniversary on August 19. Join the commemoration of the opening of the Haida Heritage Centre with a clan parade, a welcome ceremony, food vendors, dance performances and competitions and Haida games. Δ Attend an orientation on Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site at the centre or take one of the several scheduled guided tours. Private tours of the centre can also be arranged. Δ View the Dogfish totem pole, carved by famed Haida carver Bill Reid at the Skidegate Haida Immersion Program longhouse on the waterfront. Δ Walk the 3 km (2 mi) Spirit Lake Trail. Its entrance is guarded by a fabulous cedar carving of the Wasco, a legendary sea monster. Δ Marvel at Balance Rock, a huge, precariously perched ice age boulder, just north of the village. Look for signs along the highway. Δ Watch grey whales from April to June and eagles and ravens year-round as well as other bird watching. Fishing charters and eco tours are available with local guiding companies, including from the Haida, which brings a special closeness and knowledge of the land. Δ In late July, attend Skidegate Days. This familyoriented celebration includes Haida canoe races, volleyball, bingo, a salmon barbecue and dance.

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Queen Charlotte

Tlell

The charming Village of Queen Charlotte overlooks bays and islands, 6 km (4 mi) west of the ferry terminal. The town is quaint and charming, with good visitor amenities and an excellent Visitor Centre for advice and excursion-booking. Marina services are available for ocean-going vessels.

Discover Tlell, 43 km (27 mi) north of Skidegate. This pastoral community of about 200 is identified with artists, artisans and others seeking alternative lifestyles. Several lovely bed & breakfasts, a small lodge and campsites host visitors. Tlell is also home to Haida Gwaii’s only cattle ranch.

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T H E V I L L A G E O F QUEEN CHARLOTTE

B A B Y S E A L , G R A H A M I S L A N D - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N T L E L L Δ Visit the many well-marked galleries, artists’ studios and shops. Δ Walk and picnic along the Tlell River.

KING! A T H T A E R B Y L P IM S E! L F F U O S E L R E P U O ÀC

Δ Stroll along the waterfront; check out bustling docks and circling eagles. Δ Source local art and great food in funky shops and cafés. Δ View art works by Haida and other locals, in the Visitor Centre’s gallery. Summer evenings feature slide presentations, performances by Haida youth dancers, and local artists painting, carving or crafting. Δ Book fishing charters to the west coast, and flights or boat trips to the Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site. Independent travellers to Gwaii Haanas (accessible only by air or water) must attend an orientation session with Parks Canada before entering the park reserve. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT QUEEN CHARLOTTE Drop in or call the Visitor Centre at 250-559-8316, and visit www.qcinfo.ca or www.GoHaidaGwaii.ca

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© Jason Shafto

Join the Celebration with Parks Canada!

Soyez de la fête avec Parcs Canada!

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation in 2017 by taking advantage of free admission to all Parks Canada places for the entire year.

Célébrez le 150e anniversaire de la Confédération en 2017 en profitant de l’entrée gratuite aux sites de Parcs Canada durant toute l’année.

parkscanada.gc.ca

parcscanada.gc.ca

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Port Clements Port Clements is centrally located on Graham Island at the southeast end of Masset Inlet, half an hour’s drive from Masset and 15 minutes from Tlell. Locally known as “Port”, this old forestry town also serves as a base for exploration of the islands’ rainforest, lakes and rivers via plentiful logging roads. SECRET PATH TO THE BEACH AT ALL THE BEACH YOU CAN EAT OCEANSIDE CABINS BETWEEN M A S S E T A N D T O W H I L L - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

N E A R A L A S K A V I E W L O D G E , M A S S E T - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N P O R T C L E M E N T S Δ Fish for salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout. Δ Relax, camp (RV services available) and watch marvelous sunsets at Sunset Park. Observe eagles, herons, ducks, geese, cranes and more, from the birdwatching tower overlooking the Yakoun River estuary.

TLELL – CONTINUED…

Δ Access the southeast end of Naikoon Provincial Park, a rich preserve of rainforest, sand dunes and beaches. Δ Beachcomb! Δ Hike to the remains of the Pesuta, a log barge shipwrecked at the mouth of the Tlell River in 1928. Δ In August, attend the eclectic and long-running Edge of the World Music Festival in the Tlell Fall Fair Grounds, across from the Naikoon Provincial Park Headquarters. Δ In season, dine at the restaurant at the Haida House at Tllaal.

Δ Explore the area’s logging and farming history at the Port Clements Museum. Δ Walk the short Golden Spruce Trail, and learn the intriguing and tragic story of the unusual tree for which it was named.

Δ Hike and beachcomb in Naikoon Provincial Park. Check out the Camp Fife Trail, Rose Spit and the basalt columns of Tow Hill. Δ Fish for spring and coho salmon, halibut and cutthroat trout. Δ See the totem poles located throughout the communities.

Δ Golf at Canada’s most westerly golf course: the Dixon Entrance Golf Course, 5 km (3 mi) east of town. Δ Preplan your salmon and halibut fishing trip to an exclusive saltwater fishing lodge on Langara Island or in the Masset area. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MASSET AND OLD MASSETT Call the Village office at 250-626-3995 or visit www.massetbc.com or www.GoHaidaGwaii.ca

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PORT CLEMENTS Call the village office at 250-557-4295 or visit www.portclements.ca or www.GoHaidaGwaii.ca

When you’ve reached the edge of your world, ours begins

Masset & OLD Massett Masset is 40 km (25 mi) north of Port Clements, near Graham Island’s north shore. Just 3 km (2 mi) northeast is Old Massett, a Haida village and administrative centre of the Council of the Haida Nation. These fishing villages are the gateway to the northern region of Naikoon Provincial Park and home to about 1,400 year-round residents, including many prominent Haida artists. Masset also hosts an airport with direct flights to Vancouver.

Photo credit: Alexander A MacDonald

BC PARKS RANGER RALPH STOCKER IN NAIKOON PROVINCIAL PARK - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  G R A N T H A R D E R

Δ Learn about the island’s maritime history at the Dixon Entrance Maritime Museum, in a restored heritage building which served as the communities’ first hospital (c. 1914).

W H AT T O S E E & D O I N M A S S E T A N D OLD MASSETT Δ View sculptures, carvings, jewelry, pottery, textiles at galleries and studios. Δ Visit Delkatla Wildlife Sanctuary, a critical migratory stopover for more than 150 species of birds from as far as Alaska, Russia and the Aleutians.

info@gohaidagwaii.ca

|

GoHaidaGwaii.ca

“Southeast Wind” appears with permission of the artist, Robert Davidson

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NOR TH ER N BC T R A V E L T IP S

BY RAIL Northern B.C. is roughly defined as the top half of British Columbia, which is Canada’s westernmost province. Prince George is northern B.C.’s largest city, and sits about 750 km (465 mi) west of Edmonton, north of Vancouver and east of Prince Rupert.

Northern BC

TraveL tips

Getting To AND Around Northern British Columbia BY ROAD Northern B.C. is accessed by three major Highways; 97, 16 and 37. Highway 16 (the “Yellowhead”) originates in Manitoba, crosses the prairies, winds through the Rocky Mountains, and continues west to B.C.’s north coast at Prince Rupert. It picks up again on Haida Gwaii, linking the village of Skidegate with Masset. In Prince George, the Yellowhead intersects Highway 97, which originates at the B.C. / U.S. boarder near Osoyoos and runs north through Prince George to the Yukon boarder. From Dawson Creek north, Highway 97 is synonymous with the Alaska Highway. The Alaska Highway renames to Highway 1 in the Yukon and Alaska Route 1 in Alaska. Highway 37, the “Stewart-Cassiar”, originates in Kitimat. This north / south route follows Highway 16 for a brief stretch before turning north at Kitwanga. From here it continues to its terminus near Watson Lake in the Yukon. A Stewart-Cassiar spur, Highway 37A leads to Stewart, near the southern tip of Alaska. Hyder, Alaska is accessed this way.

BY AIR

MAYFIELD LAKE, DUNE ZA KEYIH PROVINCIAL PARK, S T I K I N E R E G I O N - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  T A Y L O R B U R K

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Prince George is the site of northern B.C.’s busiest airport, which offers frequent scheduled flights to several major cities. Smaller regional airports are also found in Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Smithers, Terrace / Kitimat, Prince Rupert, Sandspit and Masset. Service is provided by Air Canada, WestJet, Central Mountain Air, Hawkair, Northern Thunderbird Air, Pacific Coastal Airlines, Harbour Air and many charter companies. ALL PERSONS traveling by air outside of the United States are required to present a passport book or other valid travel document to enter or re-enter the United States. W W W. N O R T H E R N B C T O U R I S M .C O M

Via Rail’s Skeena line roughly parallels Highway 16, and connects Prince Rupert to Jasper, Alberta. Travellers on this scenic route require overnight accommodation in Prince George, as the train stops here at night and reboards the following morning. For more information call Via Rail at 1-888-VIA-RAIL. Prince George has numerous hotels, but it is advised to pre-book.

BY BUS Greyhound Canada offers bus service to many northern B.C. communities and connections to points throughout Canada and the U.S. For more information, call 1-800-661-8747, visit www.greyhound.ca. There is no scheduled bus service on Highway 37 north of Meziadin Junction.

BY SEA Prince Rupert is the southern terminus of the Alaska Marine Highway System, and a frequent stop for Vancouver- and Alaska-bound cruise ships. It’s also the terminus of BC Ferries routes up the Inside Passage from Port Hardy on Vancouver Island, and across the Hecate Strait from Haida Gwaii. For BC Ferries information, call 1-888-223-3779 toll-free in B.C., or visit www.bcferries.com. For Alaska Ferries information, call 1-800-642-0066. ALL PERSONS traveling by land and sea outside of the United States are required to present a passport book / card, or other valid travel documents to enter or re-enter the United States.

ENTERING CANADA All visitors to Canada are strongly advised to obtain or update passports. Other nationals arriving by land, sea or air must present valid passports and in some cases, visas. For detailed, current information, consult the Canadian Border Services Agency. www.cbsa.gc.ca

L E AV I N G C A N A D A T O E N T E R O R R E-E N T E R T H E U N I T E D S TAT E S Under American law known as the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI), all travellers, including U.S. citizens, will be required to present valid passports or other documents approved by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, when entering or re-entering the U.S. from anywhere within the western hemisphere.

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All travellers from Canada to the U.S. are strongly advised to have current passports or NEXUS cards. For current information, consult your travel agent or the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

DRIVING Seatbelts are mandatory in B.C. Operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol is a criminal offence. Speed limits and distances are posted in kilometers (km); 100 km equals about 62 miles.

E M E R G E N C Y I N F O R M AT I O N In larger towns in northern B.C., dial 911 for immediate access to police, ambulance, fire department and other emergency personnel. Where this service doesn’t exist, dial “O” to reach an operator or consult local telephone directories.

WEAPONS Revolvers, pistols, fully automatic firearms and other weapons as well as self-defense sprays (mace, pepper spray) are prohibited from entry into Canada. Hunting rifles and shotguns must be declared at the border. For detailed information, call the Canadian Firearms Program at 1-800-731-4000.

TOWING RESTRICTIONS Any towed trailer or vehicle over 1,400 kg (3,086 lbs) must be equipped with brakes on all wheels, plus a break-away device hooked to the trailer brake system. Three-unit RV combinations not permitted on B.C. highways. RVs may not be wider than 2.6 m (8.5 ft), nor may their combined length exceed 20 m (65.6 ft). Fact sheet: www.th.gov.bc.ca/cvse and search recreational vehicle towing.

H O S P I TA L & M E D I C A L S E R V I C E S Canadians from outside of B.C. should contact their provincial health services provider to find out if they need to purchase additional medical insurance while travelling in B.C. Foreign visitors should review their personal insurance policies to determine if they need to purchase additional health insurance before coming to B.C.

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ADVERTISER Directory

Your quick reference to all of the advertisers in this edition of the Northern BC Travel Guide.

S H I R E F A L L S , M O N K M A N P R O V I N C I A L P A R K , T U M B L E R R I D G E U N E S C O G L O B A L G E O P A R K - D E S T I N A T I O N B C  /  M I K E S E E H A G E L

64 12TH ANNUAL STEWART BEAR ARTS FESTIVAL Stewart, B.C. - August 11-13, 2017 32 ALASKA HIGHWAY COMMUNITY SOCIETY PO Box 6850, Fort St John, B.C. V1J 4J3 E: info@ouralaskahighway.com www.ouralaskahighway.com 20 AZOUZETTA LAKE LODGE & CAMPGROUND Two hours north of Prince George on the John Hart Highway P: 1-250-227-8245 11 A GOLDEN RAVEN EXPERIENCE www.goldenraven.ca BARKERVILLE HISTORIC TOWN Barkerville, B.C. www.barkerville.ca CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA RAILWAY & FORESTRY MUSEUM Prince George, B.C. www.pgrfm.bc.ca

Visitor Centre

Phone

Burns Lake Visitor Centre..................250-692-3773 Chetwynd Visitor Centre....................250-788-1943 Dawson Creek Visitor Centre.............250-782-9595 Fort Nelson Visitor Centre.................250-774-6400 Fort St James Visitor Centre...............250-996-7023 Fort St John Visitor Centre.................250-785-3033 Granisle Visitor Centre.......................250-697-2428 Houston Visitor Centre......................250-845-7640 Hudson’s Hope Visitor Centre............250-783-9154 Kitimat Visitor Centre........................250-632-6294 Mackenzie Visitor Centre...................250-997-5459 McBride Visitor Centre.......................250-569-3366 New Hazelton Visitor Centre.............250-842-6071 Prince George Visitor Centre.............250-562-3700 Prince Rupert Visitor Centre..............250-624-5637 Queen Charlotte Visitor Centre.........250-559-8316 Sandspit Visitor Centre......................250-637-5362 Smithers Visitor Centre......................250-847-5072 Stewart Visitor Centre........................250-636-9224 Taylor Visitor Centre..........................250-789-9015 Terrace Visitor Centre........................250-635-4944 Tumbler Ridge Visitor Centre............250-242-3123 Vanderhoof Visitor Centre.................250-567-2124

The Visitor Centres of Northern British Columbia Welcome You! We provide a wealth of information on the region to help visitors with their travels. We have many useful brochures and guides waiting for you. You’ll find our Visitor Centres located conveniently throughout the province. Watch for us, we are here for you.

FORT ST. JAMES NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE Fort St. James, B.C. www.pc.gc.ca/stjames HUBLE HOMESTEAD HISTORIC SITE Prince George, B.C. www.hublehomestead.ca MACKENZIE & DISTRICT MUSEUM Mackenzie, B.C. www.mackenziemuseum.ca THE EXPLORATION PLACE MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTRE Prince George, B.C. www.theexplorationplace.com TWO RIVERS GALLERY Prince George, B.C. www.tworiversgallery.ca VALEMOUNT MUSEUM Valemount, B.C. www.valemountmuseum.ca VALLEY MUSEUM & ARCHIVES McBride, B.C. www.valleymuseumarchives.ca WHISTLE STOP GALLERY McBride, B.C. www.whistlestopgallery.org

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79 BC FERRIES VACATIONS 1010 Canada Place, Vancouver, B.C. at the Fairmont Pacific Rim TF: 1-888-BC FERRY Ext. 3 www.bcferries.com/vacations 22 CHETWYND VISITOR CENTRE P: 1-250-788-1943 F: 1-250-788-1846 E: tourist@gochetwynd.com www.gochetwynd.com 13TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CHAINSAW CARVING CHAMPIONSHIP June 8 - 11, 2017 16 COAST INN OF THE NORTH TF: 800-663-1144 www.coastinnofthenorth.com 33 DAWSON CREEK ART GALLERY 101 - 816 Alaska Avenue, Dawson Creek, B.C. P: 1-250-782-2601 F: 1-250-782-8801 E: artadmin@dcgallery.ca www.dcartgallery.ca 23 DISTRICT OF HUDSON’S HOPE P: 1-250-783-9154 (May – September) P: 1-250-783-9901 (off season) E: visitorinfo@hudsonshope.ca www.hudsonshope.ca

51 FORT ST. JAMES NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE www.pc.gc.ca/stjames 38 FORT ST. JOHN NORTH PEACE MUSEUM 9323 100 Street, Fort St. John, B.C. 36 FORT ST. JOHN VISITOR CENTRE TF: 1-877-785-6037 www.fortstjohn.ca/tourism 75TH ANNIVERSARY ALASKA HIGHWAY www.celebratealaskahighway.com 87 GWAII HAANAS NATIONAL PARK RESERVE, NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREA RESERVE, AND HAIDA HERITAGE SITE www.parkscanada.gc.ca 89 HAIDA GWAII E: info@gohaidagwaii.ca www.gohaidagwaii.ca 84 HAIDA HERITAGE CENTRE AT KAY LLNAGAAY Highway 16, Skidegate, B.C. P: 250-559-7885 E: haidaheritagecentre@gmail.com www.haidaheritagecentre.com

63 DISTRICT OF STEWART www.districtofstewart.com

88 HAIDA STYLE EXPEDITIONS P: 250-637-1151 E: haidastyle@gmail.com www.haidastyle.com

34 DISTRICT OF TAYLOR P: 250-789-3392 www.districtoftaylor.com

75 HAWTHORNE / INVESTMENTS PAYNE GROUP

LONE WOLF GOLF COURSE P: 250-789-3711 PEACE ISLAND PARK P: 250-789-9295 VISITOR CENTRE P: 250-789-9015 E: info@districtoftaylor.com WORLD INVITATIONAL GOLD PANNING CHAMPIONSHIP August long weekend 14 ESTHER’S INN 1151 Commercial Crescent, Prince George, B.C. TF: 1-800-663-6844 www.esthersinn.com 38 FORT NELSON HERITAGE MUSEUM Open mid May – early September by appointment Box 716, Fort Nelson, B.C. V0C 1R0 P: 1-250-774-3536 F: 1-250-774-3536 www.fortnelsonmuseum.ca

INN ON THE HARBOUR 720 First Avenue West, Prince Rupert, B.C. P: 1-250-624-9107 TF: 1-800-663-8155 www.innontheharbour.com PACIFIC INN 909 Third Avenue West, Prince Rupert, B.C. V8J 1M9 TF: 1-888-663-1999 P: 1-250-627-1711 F: 1-250-627-4212 www.pacificinn.bc.ca TOTEM LODGE MOTEL 1335 Park Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C. V8J 1K3 P: 1-250-624-6761 F: 1-250-624-3831 TF: 1-800-550-0178 www.totemlodge.com 35 HOME 2 SUITES BY HILTON 9519 111th Street, Fort St. John, B.C. P: 250-785-5356

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ADV E R T I S E R DI R ECTORY 55 HOUSTON DISTRICT OF HOUSTON P: 250-845-2238 www.houston.ca HOUSTON & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE P: 1-250-845-7640 www.houstonchamber.ca 14 HUMBLE HOMESTEAD HISTORIC SITE 40 km north of Prince George just off Highway 97 on Mitchell Road P: 250-564-7033 www.hublehomestead.ca 63 KING EDWARD HOTEL & MOTEL Box 86 - 5th Avenue, Stewart, B.C. V0T 1W0 TF: 1-800-663-3126 P: 1-250-636-2244 F: 1-250-636-9160 www.kingedwardhotel.com 71 KITIMAT TF: 1-800-664-6554 www.kitimat.ca www.tourismkitimat.ca 12 LAKEVIEW HOTELS & RESORTS TF: 1-877-355-3500 www.lakeviewhotels.com LAKEVIEW INNS & SUITES Chetwynd, B.C. P: 250-788-3000 Fort St. John, B.C. P: 250-787-0779 Fort Nelson, B.C. P: 250-233-5001

17 PRESTIGE HOTELS & RESORTS TF: 1-877.737-8443 www.prestigehotelsandresorts.com Prince George, B.C. Prince Rupert, B.C. Smithers, B.C. 76 PRINCE RUPERT ADVENTURE TOURS Cow Bay, Prince Rupert, B.C. TF: 1-800-201-8377 www.adventuretours.net 74 PRINCE RUPERT SPECIAL EVENTS SOCIETY P: 250-624-9118 www.prspecialevents.com 13 RAMADA PLAZA Prince George, B.C. TF: 1-800-833-0055 www.ramadaprincegeorge.com 53 REGIONAL DISTRICT BULKLEY-NECHAKO www.visitbulkleynechako.ca 28 RIDGE ROTORS HELICOPTER SERVICE TF: 1-877-242-4211 C: 250-242-1599 E: ridgerotors@ridgerotors.com www.ridgerotors.com 15 SANDMAN HOTEL GROUP TF: 1-800-726-3626 www.sandmanhotels.com SANDMAN HOTELS, INNS & SUITES Prince George, B.C. McBride, B.C. Terrace, B.C. Smithers, B.C.

FOUR POINT BY SHERATON Prince George, B.C. P: 250-564-7100 BC LOVE NORTHERN BC www.lovenorthernbc.com 40 NORTHERN ROCKIES LODGE Mile 462 Alaska Highway, Muncho Lake, B.C. TF: 1-800-663-5269 www.nrlodge.com 85 OCEAN HOUSE AT STADS K’UNS GAWGA TF: 1-855-557-4600 www.haidahouse.com

SANDMAN SIGNATURE HOTELS & RESORTS Prince George, B.C. 64 STEWART - CASSIAR HIGHWAY www.StewartCassiarHighway.com 73 THE ARGOSY 985 - 3rd Avenue West, Prince Rupert, B.C. www.theargosy.ca 60 THE HAZELTONS VISITOR CENTRE P: 250-842-6071 E: tourism@newhazelton.ca www.newhazelton.ca www.hazeltonstourism.ca www.hazelton.ca

37 POMEROY LODGING www.pomeroylodging.com CHANCES FORT ST. JOHN P: 1-250-262-2005 www.ChancesFSJ.com

18 TOURISM PRINCE GEORGE #101 - 1300 First Avenue, Prince George, B.C. TF: 1-800-668-7646 www.tourismpg.com 95 TOURISM PRINCE RUPERT www.visitprincerupert.com 58 TOURISM SMITHERS www.tourismsmithers.com 19 TOURISM VALEMOUNT www.visitvalemount.ca 26 TUMBLER RIDGE GLOBAL GEOPARK 27 Tumbler Ridge, B.C. P: 250-242-3123 E: tourism@dtr.ca E: info@trgg.ca www.trgg.ca www.visittumblerridge.ca 13 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA www.unbc.ca/continuing-studies 33 VILLAGE OF POUCE COUPE 5011 - 49th Avenue, PO Box 190 Pouce Coupe, B.C. V0C 2C0 P: 1-250-786-5794 F: 1-250-786-5257 www.poucecoupe.ca 67 VISIT TERRACE TF: 1-877-635-4944 www.visitterrace.com 24 W.A.C. BENNETT DAM VISITOR CENTRE Open 10am - 5pm May 20 - September 4, 2017 P: 1-250-783-5048 E: bennett@bchydro.com www.bchydro.com/bennett 25 WILD RIVER ADVENTURE TOURS P: 1-780-830-8848 E: randy@wildrivertours.ca www.wildrivertours.ca 68 YELLOW CEDAR LODGE Highway 16 West, Terrace, B.C. P: 250-638-7874 www.yellowcedarlodge.ca

Prince Rupert is a vibrant town where nature, history, and personalities are larger than life. aboriginal culture and pioneer heritage alive, and the urban pleasure of good restaurants, fascinating shops, and colourful neighborhoods make Prince Rupert the ideal choice for a family vacation, a corporate retreat, or a solo getaway. En route to Alaska and Haida Gwaii (the Queen Charlotte Islands), Prince Rupert is easily accessible by air, rail, ferry, car, RV or cruise ship.

MILE ‘0’ PARK & CAMPGROUND P: 250-782-2590 E: mile0rvpark@gmail.com www.mile0park.ca

POMEROY INN & SUITES www.PomeroyInnAndSuites.com/FortStJohn

VisitPrinceRupert.com

19 TOURISM MCBRIDE www.visitmcbride.ca

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BRITISH COLUMBIA’S WILD AND BEAUTIFUL NORTHWEST COAST Legendary sport fishing, exceptional wildlife viewing, attractions that bring the coast’s ancient

DAWSON CREEK VISITOR CENTRE NAR Park 900 Alaska Avenue, Dawson Creek, B.C. TF: 1-866-645-3022 www.tourismdawsoncreek.com

POMEROY HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTRE www.PomeroyHotel.com/StJohn

DISCOVER

BLUEBERRIES - NORTHERN B.C.

75TH ANNIVERSARY ALASKA HIGHWAY www.celebratealaskahighway.com

JUST JACKS P: 1-250-262-2040

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75TH ANNIVERSARY ALASKA HIGHWAY www.celebratealaskahighway.com

29 TOURISM DAWSON CREEK

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS www.HIExpress.com/FortStJohn

STONEBRIDGE HOTEL www.StonebridgeHotel.ca/FortStJohn

41 TOURISM NORTHERN ROCKIES www.tourismnorthernrockies.ca

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Unique. Eclectic. Diverse.

Fort St John Taylor

Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hope

Dawson Creek

Northern BC is one of the most colourful, diverse and eclectic regions in Canada. The character of the area is largely shaped by the unique businesses and entrepreneurs that are at the heart of our vibrant communities.

Hazeltons Smithers Terrace Prince Rupert

L. A C O L G O RE G O HE

Fort St James Vanderhoof

Prince George

Quesnell Central Coast

Enjoy a true northern experience by discovering some of the 1,500 locally owned, independent businesses that call one of our 34 communities throughout the region home.

Chetwynd

Granisle

Telkwa Houston Burns Lake Kitimat Fraser Lake

Haida Gwaii

Mackenzie

W Wells Valemount

Williams Lake 100 Mile House

Lillooet

Ashcroft Logan Lake

2017 Northern BC Travel Guide