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• Woman alerts cops after she saw man possessing item that she claims was stolen from her

and disorderly conduct in the second degree. There may be other charges pending further investigation. 0$cers were first alerted to Eckel after a victim of a theft informed police that she had seen Eckel in possession of an item that had been sto­ By Don lier len from her near the Willow The Observer Grocery on Cove Avenue. An A man was arrested office r attempted to contact Thursday afternoon after Eckel, who fled for several blocks, attempting to hide. attempting to flee police on 0$cers eventually captured Cove Avenue in La Grande. Nehemiah Joseph Eckel, Eckel in the 1400 block of Willow Street, near Willow 31, has been charged with possession ofa controlled sub­ Elementary School. The Union County Sheriff's stance, methamphetamine; trespass in the second degree; 0$ce assisted in the arrest.

• Bicycle rider taken to Grande Ronde Hospital, then flown to another facility; woman charged with injury hit and run

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Union County Sheriff's Office photo

Police arrest Nehemiah Joseph Eckel after Eckel attempted to flee police on Cove Avenue Thursday afternoon. From left, are Officer Mike Harris, Detective Jason Hays, arresting Eckel, and Sgt. Gary Bell.

A La Grande woman was arrested Thursday night following a crash at Pine Street and Cove Avenue inLa Grande that left a bicyclist seriously injured. Details were sketchy this morning, but Lt. Derick Red­ dingtonofthe La Grande Police Department said the male cycl istwas transported to Grande Ronde Hospital by ambulance,then flown by air to another facility. The

crash occurred about 10:20 p.m. Reddington said this morning reports about the incident were still being compiled and he could release no further information. The woman arrested in the incident was Kendrah Marie Snyder, 30, of 1703 0 Avenue. She was charged with injury hit and run. No other injuries were reported.

Wildfire danger No Powder elementaryexpanding promptsgoNto • $1.1 million project

declarestate ofemergencY • Action will allow National Guard helicopters to fight blaze southwest of Lakeview

PORTLAND iAPl — Gov. John Kitzhaber declared a state of emergency in Oregon on Thursday, citing an imminent threat of wildfire. The governor said that much of the state faces extreme fire danger and weather fore­ casts call for hot, dry, windy conditions. The declaration authorizes the immediate use of National Guard helicopters to help fight the Barry Point Fire in southern Oregon. It's an open-ended declaration that can be used in other wildfires through the end of this fire season, likely sometime in Septem­ ber, said Kitzhaber spokesman Cameron Smith. Still, Smith said the declaration is "not a blank check" and use of Guard helicopters w ill be considered on acase by casebasis. "Oregon and the nation are heading into a challenging stretch of fire season," the gover­ nor said in a statement. "As national firefight­ ing resources are constricted, my top priority is to ensure the state is able to effectively contain wildfires to keep the public and our firefighters safe." The Barry Point Fire is burning southwest of Lakeview and straddles the Oregon­ California border. The fire has burned across about 123 square miles, or 79,000 acres, fire spokeswoman Renee Snyder said Thursday. Fire lines have been established around about a third of that, and officials said they had moved personnel and equipment to the southern side of the fire where the potential for spreading was extreme. On Wednesday, fi re crews dug and burned protective strips around two houses in south­ central Oregon to save them from the fire. The operation included coating the houses with protective gel, Snyder said. "Everything was successful, and the homes were saved," she said.

INDEX Classified.......5B Comics...........4B Crossword..... 7 B Dear Abby ...12B Health ............1B

will add 3 classrooms, cafeteria and kitchen By Dick Mason The Observer

North Powder elementary stu­ dents will be taking fewer steps up flights of stairs at Powder Valley High School in 2012-13.

Why? A $1.1 million expansion project is now airborne at North Powder Elementary School. Work is under way on a con­ struction project at North Pow­ der Elementary that will add threeclassrooms,a cafeteria and a kitchen. The cafeteria should be complete by November, and the classrooms will be finished by January, said North Powder School District Superintendent Lance Dixon. The 10,000-square footexpansion isneeded to ac­ commodatethe schooldistrict's growth. cWe were running out of room," Dixon said. North Powder had 218 stu­ dents four years ago and is ex­ pected to have between 280 and 285 when school starts Sept.4. Dick Mason/The Observer Completion of the expansion Work is under way on a major expansion project for North Powder's elementary school. The SeeProject / Page 3A 10,000-square foot expansion is needed to accommodate the school district's growth.

Citv councilaskedtohelSchangefederal timberpolicies Lindsay Warness, policy ana­ lyst for Boise's Inland Region, BoiseCascade'slocalforest told the council during the Aug. policy analyst appeared before 8 sessionshe personallyfeels the La Grande city council last lucky to have been able to return week, drawing a grim picture of to La Grande after a time away closed lumber mills and lost jobs and go to work in a timber in Northeast Oregon, and urging industry job that pays a decent council members to get involved wage. in efforts to change federal She said that with one of the timber policies. region's top industries in decline, By Bill Rautenstrauch

The Observer

WE A T H E R Horoscope.....7B Opinion..........4A Hunting .........1C Spiritual Life 6A Lottery............2A Sports ............SA Record ...........5A Television ......7C Obituaries......5A Weather...... 12B

~ 57 bOW Clear

the lossof1,200jobs. Those closures included the shutting of Boise Cascade's La Grande sawmill in 2009. The mill has since reopened, but Warness said it's nothing like it was in its heyday. cThe La Grande mill is run­ ning at 13 percent capacity. There's a lot of room for growth SeePolicies / Page 3A

CONTACT US

Fu l l forecast on the back of B section

Friday

familywage jobs aregetting harder to come by. cWe're finding that a lot of young people don't have the op­ portunity to move back here and make a living," she said. Warness came to the meeting armed with statistics to back up her case. For one thing, she said the closure of 17 lumber mills in theregion since 1992 adds up to

Saturday

Sunday

95/60

93/58

Partly cloudy and hot

Slight chance of thunderstorms

541-963-3161 Issue 143 3 sections, 32 pages La Grande, Oregon

WQNILY Fl SPQRTP REcAPs QF EQU vOLLEYBALL, sOccER PLAY • 0 • • 0 •

Email story ideas to newsC~/agrande observer.corn. More contact info on Page 4A.

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2A — THE OBSERVER

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

LOCAL

DAfLY PLANNER

LOCAL BRIEFING From staff reports

Old-time fiddlers perform for dinner-show

TODAY Today is Friday, Aug. 17, the 230th day of 201 2. There are 136 days left in the year. In history: On Aug. 17, 1982, the first commer­ cially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA's "The Visitors," were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany.

Fiddlers from throughout the Northwest will perform for the Blue Mountain Old-Time Fiddlers show Saturday at the Elgin Fire Department. Dinner starts at 5 p.m. and the show at 6. The show is sponsored by the Elgin Fire Department.

relatedto theplan. Meetings are open to the public. For further informa­ tionand/ordirections contact Tara Bishop at 541-278-5675 or tbishop@capeco-works.org.

Lead based paint certified renovator training set Aug. 30

17-24-25-27-39-41

CUCU sponsors Monday night jam

Powerball: Current jackpot $337 million

Revive in the summer heat! The Coalition of Union County

The Northeast Oregon Home Builders Association will hold a lead based paint certified renovator training Aug. 30. The training will be held at the Elgin Stam­ pede Rodeo Grounds, 71112 Highway 82, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The training, which is required by the EPA to work on homes built before

06-27-46-51-56, PB 21

Ukuleles iCUCP will sponsor

1978, costs$175 form em­

Admission is $5, $4 with old-time fiddlers member­ ship. Children 12 and younger get in for free.

LOTTERY Megabucks: Current jackpot $3.8 million

its regularly-scheduled third bers, $225 for non-members. Monday night jam at Acker­ For more information call Joe man Hall on the campus of EOU on Aug. 20 &om 7 to 8:30. Bring your uke iwe have some to bormw if you are just getting started),10 copiesofa song to share if you have one or two and a fun attitude. No experience is necessary. We will teach you in an accepting, no-pressure atmosphere. For more information, contact Sha­ ron Porter at 541.786.2051 or visit www.cucuorchestra.org.

Win for Life:

09-21-29-62 Pick 4: Aug. 15 • 1 p.m.: 3-0-0-1 • 4 p.m.: 9-4-3-0 • 7 p. m.: 5-7-0-0 • 10 p.m .: 1-8-7-2 Pick 4: Aug. 16 • 1 p.m.: 0-1-8-7 • 4 p.m.: 4-2-3-0 • 7 p.m.: 0-1-9-5 • 10 p.m.: 8-7-2-8

Scale at 541-962-0823, Dave Bondurant at 541-571-7535, or Larry Ables at

503-789-3868.

Flood forces move

While construction is going on at the previous address we encourage folkstovisit the new office space and di­ rectallm attersthere.

Aug. 20-23. Some activities will be a tour of EOU, fishing at Morgan Lake and a water

day. Costis$45 perchild. Attendance will allow free ac­ cess to the Dr. Seuss carnival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 23. For more information, call Minnie Tucker at 541­ 962-1352, ext.201,or em ail mtucker@city oflagrande.org.

Due to severe flooding, Or­ Summer Fun Camp egon Rural Action has tempo­ coming Aug. 20-23 rarily moved offices and has The La Grande Parks and relocatedat 1015Adams Recreation Department final Ave., near Expressions Salon. Summer Fun Camp will be

THE DENTURE LADY

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MARKETS Wall Street at noon: • Dow Jones average — Up 16 at 13,266 Broader stock indicators: • SBtP 5001ndex — Up 1 at 1,416 • Tech-heavy Nasdaq com­ posite index — Up 7 at 3,069 • NYSE — Up 1 at 8,091 • Russell — Up 2 at 815 Gold and silver: • Gold — Up 60 cents at

Page Turners Book Club sets meeting Cook Memorial Library's Page Turners Book Club is reading 'The Poisonwood Bible" by Barbara Kingsolver foritsSept.13m eeting. Meetings are held the second Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. in the library. Please join us as new members are always welcome Cook Memorial Library is at 2006 Fourth St. Call 541-962-1339 formore information orvisit the library online at www. cityoflagrande.org/library.

$1,615.30 • Silver — Down 14 cents at

$28. 08

GRAIN REPORT Portland grain bids were not available at press time this morning.

NEWSPAPER LATE? Every effort is made to deliver your Observer in a timely manner. Occasionally conditions exist that make delivery more difficult. If you are not on a mo­ tor route,deliveryshould be before 5:30 p.m. If you do not receive your paper by 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, please call 541-963-3161 by 6 p.m. If your delivery is by motor carrier, delivery should be by 6 p.m. For calls after 6, please call 541­ 975-1690, leave your name, address and phone number. Your paper will be delivered the next business

Line dance class set in La Grande, Union Line dance class will be Monday at the senior center in LaGrande at1:30 p.m .and at the VFW in Union at 6 p.m. On Wednesday, line dance class will be at the senior cen­ terin LaGrande at6 p.m .

Workforce board sets meetingMonday The Partners of the Region 13 Workforce Investment Board will hold a meet­ ing Monday at 10 a.m. at WorkSource Oregon, 1901 Adams Ave. The purpose of the meeting will be to review components of the Local Strategic Plan and to com­ plete compliance documents

day. QUOTE OFTHE DAY "The secret of happiness is to make others believe they are the cause of it." — Al Batt

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER — 3A

LOCAL

POLICIES

Cascade, restated often by company officials, is a lack of timber harvest on nearby Continued from Page1A national forests.According to in that area, but we lost a W arness's report,thefederal lot of jobs when we shut it government owns 75 percent oftheregion'sforestlands, down," she said. Warness said jobs in the but in 2010, contributed timber industry typically only 20 percent of the total harvest. pay about $46,000, but the Warness said mill closures average wage in Union County is about $31,000. She and joblossesareonly apart added that another economic of what the region suffers. Forestmortality and risksof consequence of the decline is falling enrollment in local catastrophic fires are key is­ schools. sues. Warness said Boise has She said that enrollment a stake in keeping forests in the La Grande School healthy. ''We have a very danger­ District has fallen by 710 students since 1992. The ous situation. Seventy-five drop in enrollment coincides percentoftheforestsis at with dwindling timber sales risk for uncharacteristic fire," on federal forests,she said. she said. "No one wants to go A major problem for Boise in and decimate the forests.

PROJECT

the new cafeteria and a scheduled move of the dis­ trict library to the elemen­ Continued from Page1A tary school. work will mean that elemen­ Dixon said this is a plus for a number of reasons. One is tary students will make far fewer trips to Powder Valley that children will no longer High School. Grade school­ have to cross Fourth Street ers have been going to the each day, which they have high school to eat lunch in its had to do while walking to and from the high school. cafeteriaand useitslibrary for many years. The street has light traffic, These trips will no longer but it does pose a risk Dixon be necessary once the expan­ would prefer that children sion is finished because of not face.

'A major problemfor Boise Cascade,restated often by company officials, is a lack of timber harvest on nearby nationalforests. According to Warness'sreport, thefederal government owns 75percent of the region's forest lands, butin 201 0, contributed only 20 percent fo thetotalharvest." We all want to see them here in 150 years." Warness said Boise is pin­ ning hopes on the proposed Federal Forest County Rev­ enue and Jobs Act of 2012, legislation that establishes federalland trustsforcoun­ ties with a minimum harvest levelon nationalforestseach year. The minimum sale level would equal 50 percent of the average harvest from 1980 to 2000. Sixty-five percent

of revenues from the trust would be paid tocountiesfor services such as school and road funding.

Another plus of the expansion project is that it will allow North Pow­ der'ssixth-grade classto be moved out of the high school. The district's sixth­ grade classroom will be transferred to a room in the health clinic building. The classroom space will be free because North Pow­ der's fifth grade, which has been using it, will be moved to the main elementary building.

Dixon said it is best that sixth-gradersnotbebased at the high school. He said he believes sixth­ graders are too young to be a in a high school environment all day. Sixth-graders have been based in a separate classroom at the high school for years. The elementary school expansion project is being

Become involved Warness asked council members to become involved in the effort to help the timber industry by providing comments on proposed For­ estService projects,designat­ ing representatives to forest collaborati ves,and contact­ ing federal legislators.

Warness gave her talk dur­ ing the public comments por­ tionofthe council'sregular meeting. In other business, the council: • reopened and recessed a public hearing on land devel­ opment code amendments. • heard first readings by title of ordinances on an alley right-of-way vacation, a prop­ erty rezone, and penalties for non-compliance with city ordinances. Also, the council approved an addition to a joint memo­ randum of agreement with the Chamber of Commerce. The chamber provides tourism-related services for both the city and Union County. Executive Director Judy Hector asked that the agreementbe amended to

change hours of operation for the chamber'svisitorcenter. Under the joint agreement, the chamber isto operate the center 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. M onday-Friday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Hector asked that the chamber beallowed to close the center on Saturdays, exceptduring selectevents. She said traffic through the center is typically light on Saturdays. The council approved the amendment. There will be a sign on the chamber's office door on Saturdays directing visitors to the nearby Red Cross Drug. The drug store will maintain a rack with literature for visitors, and also respond to questions.

loan. The district will make

program with significantly more space. This will be very welcome, said Vicky Brown the dis­ trict's head cook. Brown said it will provide much more space for food storage, pro­ videopportunitiesto teach studentsabout food process­ ing and cooking techniques for healthy foods and more. "It will be a classroom for hands-on learning about nutrition."

paymentsofabout$40,000 a year for the next 30 years to pay off the loan. John Frieboes, the school district facilities director, is theschooldistrictrepresen­ tativefortheproject.The contractor for the work is Gyllenberg Construction of Baker City. The new cafeteria will serve as the dining hall forthe entire districtand providethe food service

paidforwith $300,000 from the district building fund and a $750,000 low interest

PET OF THE WEEK

State news online:

www.lagrandeobserver.corn

Check out Hound Week at shelter

and has had great success to gearher attention towards her job. She has a great voice in his short career. He would box as well, so patience with love to be worked again as he that is necessary. istooyoung to retire. Next up is Cooper, a 2-year­ Come on out and let this old male Redbone Hound. He guy go to work for you. loves other dog companions, Since it is Hound Week, and would make the perfect we are offering Houliscous hunting, hiking or just hang­ specials. Molly's adoption ing around buddy. Cooper fees are 100 percent spon­ Ain't nothin' but a hound shows goodpotentialfor sored this week by one of dog thing! This week' s hunting instincts, although our magnificent employees. featureddogs allare from that has not been put to the Dozer and Cooper will be the hound dog class, which test, but his potential shines. $75 each. That fee will pay are keen hunters with their And the last, but certainly for their neuter, vaccines and superb sense of smell. This not least ... Dozer. You gotta microchip. sense of smell has commonly come meet this wonderful If you are not a dog person, 2-year-old Walker Hound. been used for rescuing lost and you are looking for a travelers. This guy is so versatile, he cat, well we have specials on This breed also has a would fit in, in just about any them as well. All cat adop­ phenomenal gift of stamina home. Heloves to beactive tions are $49 inclusive of and can keep up with the but also can just sit on your spay and neuter, vaccines, most avid of runners. Hounds lap and watch TV. Dozer and microchip. Also, if you are also extremely loyal and came from a hunting family adoptany other catorcats will stick with their human companion forever. They do, however, have a distinctive voice and like to talk. But the sound of a hound will /jr f melt your heart once you get attached. This week come on out and check out our Hound Week. We have three to choose from. First on the docket is ( 4 I I I I I I (' Molly. Molly is a 1-year-old female Coonhound. Molly has been hunt tested and passed with flying colors. She has all of the instinct and obedienceto getthejob done. ,a She does need to be a loner or with a smaller group of dogs I' 1F<O Iir m I'OIre iiniifgOI~ r imait iOInIieatlll i1­962:O I3<O

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FRIDAY/AUGUST 17, 2012 La Grande, Oregon

THE Write a letter news@lagrandeobserver.corn

SERVING UNION AND WALLOWA COUNTIES SINCE I 666

OUR VIEW

~II a<Y B,IPgN

c res onse IsyyIGINJs p0 GT P%%T ouses wil Are >~cowl ~' Kudos to the firefighters whose quick response extinguished the fire that erupted Monday on Pump­

kin Ridge. Two bulldozers were called in to create fire lines. Two helicopters and an air attack plane also re­ sponded, as did the Elgin Rural Fire Department. Fire departments from throughout the area — Im­ bler, La Grande, Cove, Union and North Powder­ all responded quickly to a mutual aid call. Considering the devastation caused by the Cle Elum, Wash., fire, with at least 70 homes burned and 900 peopleevacuated,we gotoA'lucky. Fire danger remains extreme. The heat wave con­ tinues. It's time to be especially cautious so North­ east Oregon stays green.

GUEST EDITORIAL

Fight over safe net: Seeing through the Medicare spin The following editorial appeared in the Dal­ Be patient, voters. As you can tell, we las Morning News on Wednesday, Aug. 15: Americansare fairly outofpractice atra­ tional, reasonable debate over an issue that trulyaffectseveryone'sfuture.Me dicare,as Paul Ryan, as you no doubt have heard, one of the big three federal entitlements, with wants "to end Medicare as we know it." He Medicaid and Social Security, certainly is wants to steal Medicare money and give tax breaks to the rich. And by choosing Ryan as that. his running mate, Mitt Romney endorses a Debt piles ever higher plan to yank the health care safety net Rom beneath seniors, leaving them to die in penni­ Even as annual deficits pile accumulated less misery. debteverhigher,M edicare costscontinue to No, no, no, Republicans argue back. How chew up the federal budget. Predictions of its can Romney-Ryan kill Medicare when solvencydisappearing by 2024 orearlier are President Barack Obama is already "gut­ increasingly common and no longer thought ting" it? alarmist. He wants to whack $700 billion Rom Medi­ At least we' re talking about big things, care to fund his health-care reform, leaving passionately if not always straightforwardly. seniors to die in penniless misery. Pretending the problem doesn't exist obvi­ Oh, yeah? iMore spin here.) ously doesn't make it go away. And both sides know it. So here's a Oh, yeah? iAngry rebuttal spin here.)

bit of unspinning: The Democrats' plan does reduce future growth in Medicare spending by about $700 billion to help fund other parts of the Afford­ able Care Act, also known as Obamacare. The Obama plan places greater emphasis on government oversight to hold down future costs, particularly in restricting payments to doctorsand hospitals. The Ryan plan, as revealed in his two latest H ouse-passed budgets,effectively acceptsthe Obamacare cuts. The difference is how his plan goes after that reduced Medicare spending. Ryan would emphasize private-sector competition, placing his faith in the free market over government regulation. Importantly, Ryan revised his 2013 budget with a key improvement. Instead of phasing out government-run Medicare, he now offers

future recipients younger than 55 a choice: a voucher to buy private insurance or today' s Medicare. The vouchers, whose rate would be setby a bidding process,would cover govern­ ment-approved plans; if voucher holders want a more expensive plan, they would pay the extra.

Throwing in a wrinkle Romney, the actual presidential candidate, throws a wrinkle by insisting that his Medi­ care plan is not precisely Ryan's. Both are committed to repealing Obamacare, but the Romney campaign says it would not preserve the Obamacare-driven cuts, as the Ryan plan would. Clear now? Give it some time. We have conventions and debates and more than two months of study time ahead. Make use of it. Doing nothing really isn't an option.

Your views Feral and dumped cat problem claws at heart

with a very long cord or battery operated. It is called a Bird-XYard To the Editor: Gard Ultrasonic Animal Repeller The last column Rom Dory's Di­ and sells for $34.97. It is effective ary brings to light the very serious up to 4,000 square feet and features problem facing La Grande today. In a built-in motion sensor. It would be so nice if a business here in the past the animal shelter would take in and put down approxi­ La Grande would sell them, but I mately 600 feral and unwanted cats have not found one that does. a year Rom throughout the valley. I have three going and so far The shelter no longer does that the birds are safe. It will not help nor do they take in domesticated to keep unwanted cats Rom being cats due to no room. The feral cats dumped or the feral cat population to multiply, but for a while it will and dumped cats have now had their spring litters and that will protect your petsand thewild birds soon multiply. These poor cats and in your yard. kittens will be starving and this Nell Locken winter &eezing to death. La Grande Those cats and kittens are at this time seeking food Rom the wild Help needy families of bird population and the squirrels. deployed citizen soldiers Sad for those folks that enjoy bird watching or appreciating the insects To the Editor: Our citizen soldiers often give they eat. Our wild bird population will be destroyed in a short time. up their regular income when they The unwanted cats will be are deployed, which means their families make financial sacrifices. spreading diseases like autoim­ mune disease, leukemia and rabies Back to school is an expensive time for families with school age to our pet dogs and cats. There is hope. Amazon.corn on children. If you are interested in the internet sells a cat and animal helping children who have parents repeller that runs on electricity serving our country with the Or­

egon National Guard, please send gift cards for any amount, from any store in Oregon that sells school supplies and clothing. The gift cards aredistributed to Oregon National Guard families all around Oregon who are most in need. You can send gift cards in any amount to General Mike Caldwell, Oregon National Guard, P.O. Box 14350, Salem, OR

97309. Becky Cartier LakeOswego

Public transportation service hurts cab drivers To the Editor: I have driven a cab in Union County for over seven years. Since the genesis of the Northeast Oregon Public Transportation Service there has been a continuing decline in business for the taxi service. NOPT is a non-profit entity that offers a limited service ii.e., hours, days, routes, etc.lthatoperatesata daily loss and exists on grants, not profits. The cabserviceofferson call,door­ to-door service, 24/7 365 days a year iwith few exceptions). It is nice to know if one misses a ride to work, is

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late getting ready or just misses the bus, there is an alternative means of transportation to help. Unfortunate­ ly,we receiveno grantsorsubsidies and cannot survive on occasional last minute fares, and EOU stu­ dents. And when there is a special event ii.e., county fair, Vietnam Wall) they put on a special route and run outside of normal days and hours to even more negatively impact our ability to make a living. When I started driving, 15-16 fares was a slow day. Now itis six to eight and one driver got one run in a 12-hour shift. A good day was 35 or more. Now breaking 20 is a rarity. It is a shame. If things do not change, we will be gone and so will be the only on-call transportation opportunity in Union and Wallowa counties. Just saying. Tom P. Anderson La Grande

Bikes should stop at stop signs, the same as cars To the Editor: The article in the Aug. 8 letters to the editor prompts me to drop you a note. I live on the corner of Greenwood

and Y Avenue. I have lived here for seven years and have seen hun­ dreds of families on bikes. Eight out of10 donot stop atthe stop signif there are no cars coming. If Mom and Dad don't stop, why should the kids? Aren't the laws the same for bikes as for cars? Not only should the cars watch out for the kids, the kids should watch out for cars. Please, parents, your children are learning bad habits Rom you. I dread the day I have to call 911 toreporta collision between a bike and a car. Pray your children aren' t the ones involved. Joan Rose La Grande

Write to us The Observer welcomes letters to the editor. Letters are limited to 350 words and must be signed and carry the author' s address and phone number (for verification purposes only). Email your letters to news@ lagrandeobserver.corn or mail them to the address below.

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Publisher.........................................Kan Borgen Circulation district manager....Megan Petersen Editor ................................................................ Customer service rep .................. Garne Lewis Ad director.................................. Glenas Orcutt Advertising representative .... Karnne Brogoitti Operations director ......................................... Advertising representative .......Angle Carlson Circulation director .................. Carolyn Gibson Advertising representative ............ John Winn Bookkeeper ............................... Heidi Kennedy Graphic designer supervisor ....Dorothy Kautz Sports editor ............................... Brad Masher Graphic designer .................... Cheryl Chnstian Sports writer................................ Casey Kellas Lead pressman..........................CurtBlackman News editor/Go!......................... Jeff Petersen Pressman.......................................... KCKunkle Schools, outdoors ........................Dick Mason Pressman.............................. Keith Stubblefield Photo/design editor ...................... Phil Bullock Distribution center supervisor.........Jon Silver Photographer ................................Chas Baxter Distribution center lead ........... Tomi Johnston Wallowa County ........................... Katy Nesbitt Distribution center.................... Terry Evendge City, business, politics........ Bill Rautenstrauch Distribution center................................TC Hull News assistant ................................................ Distribution center..................Charles Pietrzak Circulation specialist........................ KellyCraft Distri bution center.................Joshua Johnson Classifieds ............................... Katelyn Winkler Customer service rep .............. Cindie Crumley

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER — 5A

LOCAL

OBITUARIES Kenneth Gene Roberts Wallowa

Services for 75-year-old Kenneth Gene Roberts, of Wallowa, who died on Aug. 12, will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Wallowa Cem­ etery in Wallowa. Memorials may be given to the family for a prostate awareness fund. A potluck will follow at the Wallowa Senior Center.

Thon<as Ralph Bobbitt La Grande 1953-201 2 Thomas Ralph Bobbitt, 59, of La Grande, died Aug. 10 at his home. He

Survivors include his siblings, Pat Zbylut, Kathy Lepper, Carl Bobbitt, Dick Bobbitt and David Zimmer; nieces and nephews, Danelle Delancey, Tim Delancey, Dawn Lepper, J.P. Zbylut and Hannah Johnson; and their children whom he held dear, Robert, Daniel, Katelynn, Alan and Charli, Baylin and otherrelatives. Arrangements are entrust­ ed to Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebra­ tion Center. Tom will be buried in the family's Lostine property next to the river. A celebration of life will be held there later in September.

Editor's note: Asurvivor's name rvas omitted from Wednesday s obituary forShirleyD urfee.The

died as he had

Observer regrets the error.

lived his life­ without fear and without pain — with his loved ones sis­ Bobbitt ter Kathy and her husband Lep, his favorite nurse Diane and his coffee drinking fiiend Tom Fine, by his side. Thomas was born on Feb. 16, 1953, the son of Ralph and Roselene iLeiningerl Bobbitt in Torrance, Calif. He graduated from high school and attendedtrade schools after. He was a world trav­ eler and the world was his stomping ground. He loved exploring new areas and making new fiiends world­ wide. He was a man of many talents, owning and operat­ ing autobody shops, owning and operating a commercial fishing boat and working as a Merchant Marine. He thor­ oughly enjoyed good friends, good food and good coffee. He was honored and loved by his family and friends.

Shirley Louise Durfee formerly of Elgin 1932-201 2 Shirley Louise Durfee, for­ merly of Elgin, died on July 23, in Pendleton. She was 80 years old. A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, Aug. 18, at 11 a.m. at Elgin Chris­ tian Church. Memorial con­ tributions may be made to the Cove Christian Camp in care of the MunselleD urf e e Rhodes Funeral Home, 902 S. Main, Milton­ Freewater, OR 97862. Durfee was born on April 24, 1932, the daughter of John "Jack" and Ruby Brooks Pesheckin Dickinson, N.D. She was the youngest of three brothers and four sis­ ters. She lived with her fam­ ily on the cattle ranch they owned in the badlands of

south western North Dakota. In 1937, she moved with her family to a vegetable farm two miles north of Albany, where her family raised carrots, corn, sugar beets for seed, red beets, cucumbers and mint. She worked on her farm, as well as neighboring farms, hoeing in the mint fields and picking strawber­ ries. The hard work increased when her three brothers left the farm to join the army during World War II. She went to a two-room school in her elementary years and to Albany High School where she graduated in June, 1950. She met Dale Durfee, who was in the Army Air Corps and stationed in Tacoma, Wash. They married on July 1, 1950. The couple lived in Albany where all five of their sons were born. In 1967 they moved to Athena. In 1969, they moved their family to Elgin where Dale worked as a millwright until his retire­ ment in 1992. Shirley worked at Bob's Market in Elgin as a grocery clerk. She later graduated from La Grande Business College and worked as a receptionist and secretary at the First State Bank of Elgin. Her husband died in 1999. Durfee was a member and past president of the Pythian Sisters and a longtime mem­ ber of the Elgin Christian Church. She enjoyed yard sales, camping, gardening, walking, crocheting and loved to laugh with her family and friends. Survivors include her chil­ dren, Stan iCindyl Durfee,

iPhyllisl Pesheck, of Lake Tahoe, Calif., Don iMaryl Pesheck, of Lebanon; sisters Marion iStanl True, of Al­ bany, Beverly Santo, of Camp Verde, Ariz., and brother-in­ law Herb Schlappi of Seaside Her parents, infant son Steven, sister Jean Schlappi, brother Darrell Pesheck, sister-in-law Mary Pesheck and brother-in-law Talbot Sanot all preceded her in death.

Vandalism: A city public works employee Wednesday reported vandalism to the Ske Park. An officer responded and took a report. Arrested: Daniel J. Sandland, 20, address unavailable, was arrested Wednesday on a Union Count statewide misdemeanor warrant charging violation of a release agreement. The original charges were attempted theft in the second degree and criminal mischief in the third degree. Unauthorized entry: A woman in the 1000 block of Lake Avenue requested officer contactThurs­ day regarding an unauthorized entry into a motor vehicle. officersresponded and took a report. Follow up will be done. Larceny: A man in the 1000 block of Lake Avenue requested officer contactThursday regard­ ing the theft of his bike and other items. An officer made contact and took a report. Larceny: A citizen at an ad­ dress in the 2000 block of 0 Av­ enue requested officer contact

Thursday regarding a theft. An officer was advised. Crash: After responding Thursday night to a report of an injury motor vehicle crash at Pine Streetand Cove Avenue, an offi­ cer arrested Kendrah Marie Sny­ der, 30, La Grande, on a charge of hit and run with injuries.

J. iCushingl Rotz. She at­ tended school in Homestead where she graduated from

high school. She served her country in the military in the Navy atomic energy department, and received special recogni­ tion from the White House for her service. She married Hansen Lo r en J. Han­ sen. He died in

Barbara Hansen Island City 1933-201 2 Barbara Jean Hansen, 78, of Island City, died at the Grande Ronde Hospital in La Grande on Tuesday, Aug. 14, with her family by her side. At her request, there

1999. Hansen was a homemaker. She would say that her greatestachievements were her six children. She loved

MountainValley

her grandchildren. She en­ joyed going to the mountains and collecting old bottles. She enjoyed oil paintings and her

puppies. She was a New York Yan­ kees baseball fan. Hansen was a member of the Sale­ sian Mission. Hansen is survived by her children, Shannon Hansen of Beaver­ ton; Shawn Hansen of Umatilla; Shelia Grove of La Grande; Stacey Corthen and Shelley Buetner both of Boise, Idaho; Shayne Hansen of Moses Lake, Wash.; 13 grandchil­ dren and six great-grandchil­ dren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Loren, and her parents, Stephen and Mary Rotz. Condolences may be made online to the family at www. lovelandfuneralchapel. corn.

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Agency assist: An officer as­ sisted a medical crew with a call Thursday at Fourth Street and C Avenue. Disturbance: An officer responded to a possible distur­ bance Friday at the SK8 Park and searched the area but was unable to locate anything.

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6A —THE OBSERVER

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

LOCAL/NATIONAL •

Bibles and booze mix Sunday mornings at famous Fla. bar "People Get Ready," as home toabout 450 regular (APl— On abalmy Sunday congregants of Worship parishioners gathered morning at the Flora-Bama underneath an awning at the Water, an outreach Lounge, Package and Oyster service of the Perdido Bay adorned with rows of Land United Methodist Church. Shark beer flags on a recent Bar, barkeeps set up their More than 1,100 filled the stations as churchgoers fil­ Sunday. Most wore flip-flops and shorts, but some wore tered in under a Jack Daniels place on Easter Sunday. banner. Bible study is in the up­ swim suits. "If you look closely, you The iconic bar, which sits stairs bar. on the Florida and Alabama If Jesus returned to Earth, might see a few of the he'd probably kick back at churchgoers having a Bloody state line, is famous for its annual mullet-tossing con­ the Flora-Bama, said Jack de Mary or a bushwhacker," test — patrons gather on the Jarnette, a founding pastor of longtime bar employee Blitz the church. beach and throw dead fish Poston said. "It's really a "It's the sortofplaceheof­ wonderful thing that brings from Alabama into Florida. Bikini contests, bar brawls ten went and hung out with togetherpeople from all and drink specials are the walks of life." people," he said. 'When you day-to-day business of the cannotget people to come to Offerings are collected in church, the alternative is to neon tackle boxes placed beach bar that calls itself "America's last roadhouse." bring the church to them." throughout the bar. But for one hour every A band in tie-dyed T-shirts Pastor Jeremy Mount Sunday, the Flora-Bama is played Curtis Mayfield's wears Mardi Gras beads, PERDIDO KEY, Fla.

shorts, sandals and T-shirt that is fringed around the sleeves. 'There are seven places to drink and no place to wor­ ship God on this key," he said

' We feel like God has called us here to be a ministry. Where would there ever be a better place than the world­ renown Flora-Bama?" His sermon is one of re­ demption and hope, followed by a communion with bread and grapejuice instead of wine. Many members of his flock were regular churchgoers beforethey started attend­ ing the Flora-Bama service. Others have become regulars because they like the unique

setting, Mount said. "Some had never been to church, ever, but they felt so comfortable here in the Flora-Bama," he said. Church member Paul Hol­ land is a longtime fan of the Flora-Bama, which he says is a five-star honky-tonk filled with top-shelf rednecks. He has become an even bigger fan of the church service. "I don't want to be judged because I don't have a three­ piece-suit and I don't drive a brand-new car and this is that kind of church — they don't judge you. I feel like I'm more welcome in this church than any I' ve ever attended in my life," he said. The service is just a year

old, starting on July 4, 2011. Church volunteer Joye Fletcher was baptized behind the Flora-Bama in the Gulf of Mexico during Worship at the Water's first anniversary. "It's just an awesome spirit-led service," she said. The service isoften a surprise for the tourists who flock to the strip of snow­ white sand and turquoise water during the summer months, said Bruce Barrios, the bar's Sunday manager. ''We have people come in and when they see we are having church they pick up a Bloody Mary, a bushwhacker or a soft drink, sit down and listen to the sermon. It's re­ ally cool, you know."

the Christian community be strengthened to proclaim and teachproperly in orderthat as people listen and learn they are comforted in Jesus Christ. Faith Lutheran supports the longest running Chris­ tianoutreach radio program called "The Lutheran Hour" on KLMB 1450 in Union County, 1490 in Baker County, and on KWVR in Wallowa County.

11 a.m. in La Grande (2702 Adams Ave.l. A fellowship picnic lunch will follow at Pioneer Park.

HIGHLIGHTS Visiting minister speaks on topic, 'Do You Like Bread?'

Grace Community continuesPentecost theme Sunday

"Do You Like Bread?" is the title of the message visit­ ing minister The Rev. Mike Lavelle is delivering Sunday at 11 a.m. to the congregants at the United Methodist Church in Union. Refieshments, fellowship and an administrative boardmeetingfollow the service. This coming week we host the Food Bank Fresh Alliance program onMonday from 12:30 to 1p.m., and a meal for seniors will take place on Tuesday. We welcome the community to join us.

Grace Community Lu­ theran Church continues the Pentecost theme with Pastor Carladdressing the Bread of Life from John 6: 51-58. Worship service is held at the Cove Seventh-day Adventist Church start­ ing at 9:30 a.m. Fellowship follows the service. Men' s all-denomination Bible study and breakfast meets every Thursday starting at 7:30 a.m. at the church. Please come and join us.

'Feasting on the Word' is topic of Sunday sermon First Presbyterian Church Sunday will see Pastor Keith Hudson preaching with a sermon titled "Feast­ ing on the Word" based on Ephesians 5:15-20 and John 6:51-58. Worship beginsat 9:30 a.m.

also in the chapel. On Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon, there will be a rummage sale in the parish hall, featuring books, cloth­ ing, toys, electronics and household items.

Zion Lutheran gathering for communion

Zion Lutheran will gather this Sunday for worship and celebration of Holy Commu­ nion beginning at 9:30a.m.at902 Fourth St. in LaGrande.At Zion,we believe that Christ is truly present in, with and under Episcopal church will the bread and wine at com­ observe 12th Sunday munion. All those who are aRer Pentecost baptized and trust in this truepresence areinvited to St. Peter's Episcopal Church will observe the 12th come forwardand receive the Sunday after Pentecost with gifts of God that are given in Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m. the Lord's Supper. The Rev. Kathryn Macek One of the scriptures to will preside and preach. The be read in church this week vestry will meet following the is Proverbs 9:1-6. Here we service. A midweek Eucharist learn that wisdom invites the will be held on Wednesday simple to her banquet of wine and bread. Those who are not at 5:45 p.m. in the chapel. Morning Prayer is offered wise receive wisdom in the Tuesdays and Thursdays, banquet. So too Jesus invites

us to his table, not because we are good but so that we can become good.

Cove food pantry moved to Aug. 25 becauseoffestival The church service in the Cove United Method­ ist Church begins at 9 a.m. Rev. Mike Lavelle will be continuing a message on Communion. The Cove Food Pantry will be moved to Aug. 25 because of the Cherry Fair taking place on the Aug. 18. We wish to thank all who contribute to the pantry to make it a success.

Is it not true that change in behavior usually comes Sermons based only when the pain of staying on Gospel of 3ohn thesame becomes greater at FaithLutheran than the pain of changing? Church in August Join Pastor Mike Armayor this Saturday morning as The sermons at Faith Lutheran Church through he explores the discipline of looking deep into our own August are based on the hearts to expose the dark Gospel of John, chapter six. For this Sunday the sermon things to the transforming will expound upon verse power of the gospelin part2 forty five, in which Jesus of Issues of the Heart. Join explained, "Everyone who lis­ us at the Cove Seventh-day tens to the Father and learns Adventist Church (Church from Him comes to Me." May Street) at 9:30 a.m. and

I Piejoicein the Lord always! The Lording near! Phil. 4: 4&'5

901 Penn Avenue 963-2623 web: firstchristianlagrande.ore

440 RUCKMAN, IMBLER

(Disciples of Christ)

P.O. Box 260

sunday school sunday worship sunday Evening

9:30 am 10:45 am 6:00 pm

Wednesday Night Life GrouPs:7:00Pm Call for locntion Preacher: Doug Edmonds 541-805-5070

CovE UNITED METHoDIsT CHURcH Hwy. 237 • Cove, OR

Worship 10:00 a.m. Sunday School 8:45 -Join us at The Lord's Table­

534-2201 Sunday Services 9:00 a.m.

Worship Service

Sunday School During Services forkid>age threeto 5th Grade

First Baptist Church Crossroads SIXTH 8c SPRING • 963-3911 Community Church

UNIoN UNITED METHoDIsT CHURcH 601 Jefferson Ave., La Grande Hwy. 237• Union, OR

JOIN US... Catch the Spirit! Worship: 9:00 a.m. Cove orship: 11:00 Unio

Cove: 541-7S6-0100(Nevaj Union: 541-562-5748 Sue

Kingdom Kids - Youth in Action

"...where you can begin again"

LA GRANDE CELEBRATIQN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CQMMUNITY CHURCH 2620 Bearco Loop Pastor Dave Tierce• 541-605-0215 NEW LOCATION 10200 N. McAllister, Island City

Sundays at 10 a.m. DCIn Mielke 541-663-6122

www.celebrationcomm unitychurch.org ROMANCATHOLICCHURCHSERVICES La Grande -OurLadyofthe Valley -1002 LAvenue Saturday 5:00 pmMass Sunday 7:00 am &9:30 amMass Suday 3:II pm Traditional Latin Mass 2" & last Sunday I I:00 amSpanish Mass Weekday 8:00 amMass

n

Union-Sacred Heart-340 South loth Avenue Sunday 8:00 amMass Wednesday6:00 pmMass

Elgin -Saint Mary's- 12th andAlder Sunday I I:00 amMass Thursday 6:00 pmMass

North Powder - Saint Anthony's- 500 E Street Sunday 6:00 pmMass Tuesday 6:00 pmMass

Weuse the King JamesVersion Bible Sunday School — 10:00 am Worship I I:00 am Sunday Afternoon Bible Study — 2;00 pm Wednesday Evening — 6:30 pm

"Where you canfind TRUTH according Io the scriptures" www,lagrandemissionarybaptist,corn

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH 1114 Y Avenue, La Grande (Corner of 'Y" Avenue and N Birch Street)

(541) 663-0610 9 am Sunday School 11 am Worship

Exalting God Edifying Believers Evangelizing Unbelievers Solus Chnstus, Sola Scriptura, SolaGraua,Sola Fide, Salt Deo Glona

The La Grande United Methodist Church meets for worship at 10 a.m. Sunday. Guest pastor Mike Lamb will present the message, 'The Airport Baggage Claim." Fel­ lowship coffee hour follows the service. All are welcome.

Submissions Churches and faith­ based groups are encouraged to submit Highlights for the Spiritual Life page by 4 p.m.Tuesday for publication Friday. Submit by email to news@ lagrandeobserver.corn (with Highlights in the subject line), by fax to 541-963-7804, or by hand to the office.

JesusChrist­ The Hope for Today

i ioN

Zion Lutheran gh u r c

902 FourthStreet,La Grande, OR (541) 963-599S 9:30 am - Worship 10:30 am - Fellowship & Refreshments

NurseryAvailable

Pastor Richard Young - An ELCA church

eve.ziontagrande.org

CHURCH OF THE

NA Z A R E N E

(541) 963-4342 Sunday Worship 10:00 am Wednesday Night 6:15 pm

Claim' at Methodist

I

IMBLER CHRISTIAN CHURCH

CHURCH OF CHRIST First Christian Church 2107 Gekeler Lane, La Grande 805-5070

Adventist s focus on change in behavior in Saturday service

Sermon entitled 'Airport Baggage

109 1SthStreet •963-3402 istAlone IckyTaecthcrQ n Chr

Sun. 8:45 AM — Bible Classes Sun. 10:00 AM — Worship Wed. 6:15 PM — AWANA

Son Rise

Sunday School 9 '.15 a.m. SundayWorship 10'.30 a.m. Pastor TimGerdes

Union

Church Community Church1531Baptist S, Main St,, Union• 562-5531 Holding Services ac Seventh Day Adventist Church

2702 Adams Ave, La Grande PO Box 3373

(541) 663-1735 Regular services 9:00 am Sunday School Classes 10:00 am Sunday Worship Service

LA GRANDE UNITED METHODISTCHURCH

Pastor Dave 805-9445

s unday school 9:45 a m Morning Worship 11 am sunday Night 6 pm Wednesday Night 6:30 pm Thursday AWANA 6 : 3 0 pm

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j (ust east of ci~ pool)

Sunday Worship 10:02 am COIII e and Share in a IiIIIe OfWOrShiP, prayer and the study of God's word withus.

Come Celebrate the Lord with us!

Faith Center

La Grande Seventh-day Adventist Church

Foursquare Church

1612 4th Street —963-2498 Pastor Steve Wolff SUNDAY SERVICE TIMES: IgumcC eoni.corn www.lgumchurch.org Brst Service 9:00 AM — 10:30AM Office Hours: Mon-Thur 9am-Noon SecondServiceII:00 A M — 12:30 PM Fellowship Coffee Hour I I:00 am

963-0340• 507 Palmer Ave

Worship includesco~~union onSunday. www.vafleyfel.org Email: church@vafleyfel.org

"OPEN HEARTS,OPENMINDS,OPEN DOORS"

Worship 10:00am

VALLEY FELLOWSHIP

Sanctuary 6:00 PM — 7:30 PM www.lg4square.corn I0300South "D" Street - Island City OR97850 (54I) 963-8063

A Place where hoPeisfound in Jesus Come join with us io Worsbip and Fellowship Meetingevery Saturday 9:30 a.m.- B>ble Study/Fellowsh>p 10:45 a.m.- Worsh>p Serv>ce

2702Adams Avenue, La Grande • 963-4018 Learningfor Todayand Eternily Little Friends Christian Preschool/Childcare 963-6390 La Grande Adventist School Christian Education K-8th Grade 963-6203


FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER — 7A

LOCAL/REGION

By Trish Yerges The Observer

The city council hired Mike Little as Elgin's official city ordinance and animal control officer effective July 1. The city created this new position because thecontract for law enforcement be­ tween the City of Elgin and the Union County SherifFs Department does not include city ordinance enforcement. Little will spend 40 hours each month on duty keep­ ing a watch for residents living within the city limits who are not complying with city ordinances. He will also be respondingtoreportsof animal problems. Residents not in compli­ ancewillbecontacted,given a copy of the ordinance in question and given a reason­ able amount of time to make remedial changes. Of course, as alastresort,Littlehasthe authority to levy fines and present noncompliant resi­ dentswith ordersto appear before the municipal court to resolvetheirissues. Little admitted that there are many details in the ordi­

Photo/Tn sh Yerges

Mike Little, Elgin city ordinance and animal control officer nances that even he was not aware of. "I was given a book of the ordinances to read, and I'm going to fry to enforce them," said Little. "Among other things, I will deal with lost dogs, barking dogs, nuisance dogs, roosters and other animal ordinances." It will take time to help the general public get famil­ iar with all the ordinances, he said, so he's going to

hours or they fall into the definition of"stored" vehicles. Stored vehicles must be in a garage or other structure that meets code so that the vehicle is out of sight. During his first month of enforcement, Little said he has inspected about one quarter of the city. He has not fined anyone so far, but he did issue an order to one residentto appear before the municipal court for a nuisance dog issue. Little also caught a stray dog and spent two days searching for its owner. He was successful thanks to a m edical tag and a helpfulvet. Another dog was not as fortu­ nate, though, because it had no identification on it, and so Little took the lostdog tothe humane society. "I hated to take the one dog to the humane society, but it had no dog license or identification on it and no way for me to find its owner," saidLittle."Dogsneed to be licensed after they turn 6 months old." Residents may purchase dog licenses fiom City Hall at a

ease into his job slowly and progressively. '%e haven't had an ordi­ nance officer for so long that I decidedIcouldn'task people totake careofeverything all at once," said Little. "So I picked a few ordinances to focus on like tall grass, unkempt grass and fields, excessive debris and junk in general." Tall grass is defined as anything over 10 inches in height, Little said, and it's a greater fire hazard this time of year. "I'm trying to go through town and talk to people who have the tallestgrassand convince them to take care of the problem," he said. "I will also give them a copy of the ordinance." Another ordinance Little will enforce is about free limbs that are hanging too low over sidewalks and park­ ing lanes. Boughs need to be trimmed atleast8feetabove sidewalks. He will also be looking at parked vehicles. He said parked vehicles must be movedatleastevery 72

reasonable price, but they need to show proof that their dog has had its annual rabies shot. Little said his approach to this job will be one of educa­ tion and respect. "I will listen to the people, and I won't push them," said Little. "I want to fry to help them get things straight, and when they do, I' ll go back and thank them." He added, "Most of this work is an educational thing, teaching people what needs to be done to comply. People are willing to comply when they know what the ordi­ nance says." Little takes pride in the town he's called home for the past 54 years. He said he has worked at Boise'sparticle boardplantforthepast37 years, but is willing to work this added part-time job to help his town. "I'm doing this for the simple fact that Elgin needs cleaning up and it can be done easily if people just cooperate," said Little. "I'm getting a very good response so far, and I'm giving people a good length of time to make

the necessary changes. I' ll try to show reasonableness." Little said he received greatcooperation from Boise Cascade who mowed the tall grassalong theirfence line and from Sam Horrell, whose workers cleaned up some of his properties in question. Little will continue to cover another quarter section of the city in August, doing drive-by inspections on week­ days and weekends. "I received an old Dodge pick-up truck donated by the Union County SherifFs De­ partment," said Little. '%e'll put some kind of metallic signs on the side ipanelsl that say City Ordinance Offi­ cer and Animal Control, and the truck will have some dog boxes on the back. The city will also issue an identifica­ tionbadge forme towear while I'm working." If any Elgin resident has questions about a city ordi­ nance, or they want to ask Little tolook ata property or report an animal problem, they may contact Little or call City Hall at 541-437-2253.

Residents urged to be careful with burn barrels

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By Trish Yerges

burn barrels and incinera­ the ordinance, remember tors and have prohibited that any person violating With hot, dry conditions, open burning during cer­ the ordinance could face a residents living outside tain times. maximum fine of $2,500 or 'You can use burn bar­ a maximum of one year in Imbler city limits need to be careful to follow the rels between 6 a.m. and 10 county jail. burn barrel ordinances. a.m.," said Teeter. "I inter­ For the protection 'This ordinance has pret that to mean the fire ofpropertyoutside city been around for 20 years," must be out by 10 a.m." limits, including homes, saidTerrieTeeter,business This ordinance applies outbuildings and valu­ secretary for the Imbler Ru­ during the fire season able crops, residents are ral Fire Protection District. beginning July 1 through remindedtoobserve the The Union County Sept. 30 each year. burn barrel ordinance. Board of Commissioners Although Teeter said For questions, call Tee­ haveregulatedthe useof her office does not enforce ter at 541-534-6625. Observer Correspondent

Submitted photo

The Wallowa Union Scenic Railway excursion train begins its August/September schedule.

Wallowa Union Scenic Railway sets schedule By Trish Yerges Observer Correspondent

ages. The Two Rivers Train departs from Elgin at 10 a.m. Aug. 25 and Sept. 8. Its route begins at Elgin to Minam and back to Elgin again, a five-hour train excursion. If passengers are under time constraints, they have the option of taking a bus from Minam back to Elgin, making the trip a total of three hours, including bus travel to Elgin. The bus fare to

fluence with the Wallowa River and then up the Wallowa River corridor to Minam. Enjoy the wildlife, the sound of rushing waters and the sweet smell of pine and fir trees along the route. The second train excursion available to passengers is the Chief Joseph Express. This train includes rail diesel cars with coach and table seating. Tickets for adults and seniors

The Wallowa Union Scenic Railway has announced its new train schedule for the months of August and Sep­ tember. The new train schedule supersedes any previously published schedules and will include two choices in scenic trainrides for passengers. "Details for exciting new fall special event trains are Elgin is $8. is $20 and for youth $10. being finalized and will be Passengers remaining for the The Chief Joseph Express announced soon," said Janet entire ride may look forward to departs at 10 a.m. on Aug. Dodson, media coordinator an hour lunch break atMinim 24 and Sept. 7 and 28 from for the Wallowa Union Scenic along the Wallowa River. Joseph to Enterprise and back "At Minam passengers can Railway. "In addition, the much to Joseph. "These shorter trips from anticipated1915 Blue Goose leave the train and enjoy a Steam engine is scheduled to catered lunch," said Dodson. Joseph to Enterprise and back "Passengers must make lunch areperfectforfam iliesand a arrive in September." The first choice in train reservations when booking greatway to geta taste oftrain rides is the Two Rivers tickets or bring your own lunch traveland view the area's Excursion Train. The equip­ and picnic on the lawn beside scenic wonders," said Dodson. 'The trips take about one hour ment used includes rail diesel the Wallowa River. After the cars, coach and table seating hour break, the train returns and are sure to leave many and the new arrival, the red to Elgin." passengers wanting more." caboose. The Two Rivers Excursion For information and fre­ "Up to 12 passengers and Train operates on a section quent updates about Wallowa an attendant have exclusive of the historic Joseph Branch Union Scenic Railway excur­ caboose access with indoor and between Elgin and Minam. sions, go to www.eaglecaptrain. outdoor seating and bever­ Passengers have frequently corn or www.wurailway.corn. ages," said Dodson. commented about the spec­ For tickets,contactAlegre Ticketsare $65for seniors tacular view from their coach Travelattravel@alegretravel. 65 and older, $35 for youths windows as it takes its scenic corn or 541-963-9000 or 800­ 323-7330 from outside Union age 3 to 12 and the caboose ride along the Grande Ronde tickets are $85 for riders of all River downstream to its con­ County.

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Summeruille manhurtin crash An 89-year-old Sum­ merville man was hurt and a City of La Grande employee escaped injury in a two-vehicle crash on Hunter Road in rural Union County Wednesday. Capt. Craig Ward of the Union County SherifFs 0$ce said that about 10 a.m., a Ford pick-up truck owned by the city and driven by building depart­ ment employee Timothy Samples had its blinker

UNION COUNTY SENIOR CENTER MONDAY, AUG. 20 Tacos served with salsa, sour cream, chips, salad greens, rice and flan TUESDAY, AUG. 21 Cashew chicken salad served in pita bread, fresh fruit salad, chips and a cookie WEDNESDAY, AUG. 22 Fried chicken, sea­

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rest in a yard. Ward said Samples, 42, of La Grande, claimed no injuries and was not transported. Irby, however, was taken by ambulance to Grande Ronde Hospi­ tal with undetermined injuries. Wednesday afternoon, Grande Ronde Hospital said Irby was treated, then transferredto another facility. Other details of his condition were not im­ mediately available.

Somie rkillers

SENIQR MENUs soned red potatoes, gravy, steamed peas, fruited Jell-0 rolls and cobbler THURSDAY, AUG. 23 Barbecue ribs served with baked beans, cole­ slaw, watermelon and sherbet FRIDAY, AUG. 24 Lasagna served with salad greens, steamed carrot, garlic bread and dessert

iIIAfghaniStan PORTLAND iAPl — The Defense Department says

a 22-year-oldsoldier from Tigard, Ore., has been killed in Afghanistan. Pfc. Andrew J. Keller died Wednesday in Charkh, Afghanistan, when enemy forces attacked his unit wit h small arms fire. He was as­ signed to the 1st Battalion,

503rd Infantry Regiment.

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Making Downtown La QI'ande euen better.

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Sidewalk im)rovements, benches, trees and more< • 0 •

on and was attempting to make a left turn off Hunter about a quarter mile south of Monroe Lane. Comingfrom behind and traveling in the same direction was a Chevrolet Equinox driven by Royce Irby, 89, of Summerville. Irby pulled out to pass the truck. W ard said thevehicles collided, slid off the road and knocked over a mail­ box before coming to

LA GRANDE URBAN RENEWAL AGENCY

Xe're stitt open f' or business! O Vf NYO & f N L A GR A N D E , OR E G Q N

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Shop, eat ... just satI hetto! • 0 •


August 17, 2012 The Observer

AT A GLANCE

High school tryouts set Tryouts for La Grande High School boys and girls soccer will be held Mon­ day at 8 a.m. at the middle school soccer field. Those who are in­ terested are encour­ aged to attend. For more infor­ mation, call Wade Wright at 541-975­ 3113 or Jessy Watson at 541-910-6447.

Opbmist club holding sign-ups Sign-ups and gear handouts for 2012 Optimist football and cheerleading for fourth through sixth grades will be held Aug. 20-22 from 6-8 p.m. at Pioneer Park. Cost is $65 for football and $40 for cheerleading. For information call KirkTravis at 541­ 786-0553 or Jason Wilson at 541-805­ 9145. For cheerleading call Jessie Wilson at 541-805-9146 or go online at www. Igoptimist.org.

NFL not doseon deal with rels NEWYORK (AP) — Less than three weeks before the seasonkicksoff ,the NFL and the NFL Referees Association are no closer to an agreement to end the lockout of the officials. As replace­ ment officials work preseason games — and generally get criticized for their performances — the league and officials disputed such issues as full-time em­ ployees and adding officiating crews. On Sept. 5, the Cowboys visit the Gi­ ants to open the sea­ son. Not since 2001 has the NFL played games that count in the standings with replacement officials, and that was for one week. This lockout began June 3.

NFL givesjudge 'bounty' files NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The NFL on Thursday provided a federal judge with what it says is evidenceCommis­ sioner Roger Goodell did not improperly pre-judge the four players suspended in the bounty investiga­ tion. Attorneys for Jonathan Vilma, who has sued separately, and NFLPA lawyers representing the three other punished players have argued Goodell showed improper bias with comments he made before sending the players notice of their suspensions on May 2. Attorneys forthe players have been given until Friday to file their own evidence and briefs on the matter.

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im ers onitetosulort soccerc u s

kind of way. The Portland Timbers have Many high schools in Ore­ donated a youth jersey signed gon are constantly faced with by the entire squad, as well tight budgets, and with that as 150 bilingual booklets that will be offered in a silent auc­ comes talk of cutting back tion at the Tigers 10th annual certain clubs and athletics. One of the first sports that alumni game scheduled to take place Saturday. comes up in these talks is The booklets are maga­ soccer. zines written in English and Because of that, teams are Spanish and offer informa­ always looking for ways to raise money that will help tion on proper nutrition, a with travel and equipment. photo essay with strength This year, the La Grande and conditioning tips, as well High School soccer program is as testimonials from Timbers getting help in a major way. players and other soccer play­ A Major League Soccer ers around the state. By Casey Kellas

1l,l ly g+ re

The Observer

~ r]j ~ is~ M 'The goal is to showcase that everyone's path to suc­ cess is not the same," Kristel Wissel, a representative with the Timbers, said. Some of the testimonials offered in the magazine are

from Darlington Nagbe, who was the Timbers' first ever draftselection,Roberto Far­ fan, an Oregon State soccer playerwho also competes for the Timbers' under-23 squad, and many others. Wissel said that this is just one of many efforts the Timbers are involved in. ''We' re always looking for opportunities around the state to try and further the sport of soccer. ''We want to try and reach as many kids as we can," she said. Manuel Arceo, an LHS and

Eastern Oregon University alumni, was also involved in getting the donations. Arceo was previously an intern for Wissel. The alumni game is sched­ uledtostartat5 p.m .atthe middle school soccer field. The silent auction will run during a BBQ that will be held following the game. Along with the memorabil­ ia,thechance fora free,large one-topping pizza every week for a year from Dominos will alsobe auctioned,according to co-coach of the LHS boys soccer team, Jessy Watson.

New coaches aplen for La Grande High School By Casey Kellas The Observer

It's that time of year again. Coaches dusting off their whistles and prepping for the fast-approachingfallsports season. And with any new season, there comes new faces. And for La Grande High School, this fall welcomes the debut of four new head coaches. Or five ,depending on how you look at it. Kenny Mace takes over the football team after the resignation of Dave Collin­ sworth; Sam Brown will lead thegirlssoccerteam; Wade Wright and Jessy Watson will co-coach the boys soccer team; and Talia Welch will head the cross country team. Welcome to fall camp. All of the incoming coaches aren't entirely new. All of them have been in­ volved with the team in some capacity in recent seasons. For Mace, he has been a coordinatorand assistant for the past six years. Brown helped Elena Nightingale coach the girls soccerteam a couple ofyears ago, then coached the junior varsityboys lastseason. Watson helped Dan Mielke coach the varsity boys soccer team last year, and Wright has coachedat some levelfor the betterpartof16years, including one season assisting Watson at Eastern Oregon University. Welch, who was just hired on Monday, has a daughter on the cross country team and watched all of the LHS meets last year. She said she is familiar with most of the returning runners. It should make for an inter­ esting year on the field, on the pitch, and on the course.

Wright, Watsontake charge Wright and Watson step in for the departed Mielke, who stepped down due to time conflicts with a new position

at EOU. The new coaches lead an LHS squad that struggled to a 2-9-2 record last year, including a 2-6-1 mark in the Greater Oregon League. The Tigers scored just 13 goals, while allowing 36. But Wright, who played col­ legiately at Cascade College, is hoping for a turn around this year. With co-head coaches, Wright thinks the boys soc­ cerprogram willbe m ore stable, and allow some of the younger players to progress a little faster. ''We have a unique coach­ ing style," Wright said of him and Watson. ''We' re all going to train together as one team," Wright said. "The junior varsity and varsity. So when a kid steps in as a freshman, he will play through one system his whole way through." Wright said there have been open conditioning sessions this summer, with offic ialpracticessetto begin Monday. H e said he anticipates32­ 35 players tocome out. As far as his expectations, he beli eves the Tigerscan get back to their winning ways. "I believe we' ll be competi­ tive in the district. I think we have as good of a shot as anyone. "The players are excited and they have a great at­ titude. ''We have high expectations this first season."

What can Brown do for yOLI? Brown takes over for Elena Nightingale, who had three successful seasons as head coach, but stepped away to spend more time with her family. The Lady Tigers went 11-3-1 overall and won the GOL with an 8-1 record in 2011. LHS outscored its oppo­ nents 57-17.

Observer file photo

Jessy Watson is just one new coach for La Grande High School this fall. Brown, 36, has never been a head varsity coach, but brings plenty of coaching experience. He said that the Lady Ti­ gers' motto this season will be 'Play to win for real as one.' ''We' re going to seek to play hard. Our style of soccer is influenced by Spanish soccer — FC Barcelona in particu­ lar," Brown said. He added that LHS will focuson lotsofpossession and passing. The Lady Tigers attended three tournaments this sum­ mer and have been working on conditioning. So is a repeat as district champs in the near future for this team? 'The girls have played together a lot. I think we can have a very promising season. ''We hope to win the GOL and competeata higherlevel with teams on the western side of the state," Brown said. 0$cial practices start Mon­ day for the Lady Tigers.

Welch steps up Talia Welch comes into a situation with little time to prepare. After Wright was hired away from the cross country

team tocoach the boys soccer team, track and field coach Peter Fry was hired to take over cross country at LHS. But Fry took a job in his hometown recently, leaving the cross country squad with no leader. So Welch stepped up on short notice. "I'm all about running. And I want the program to continue," Welch said. She brings a wealth of experienceto aprogram that has seen success but has lacked numbers in recent years. She has coached at EOU fora totalof10years and spent five seasons coach­ ing the LHS track and field program. Her husband, Ben, is the cross country and track and field coach at EOU. And her daughter, Amanda, will be a sophomore runner this fall for LHS. Amanda Welch qualified for the state meet as a freshman a year ago. The new coach thinks there will be a little more participa­ tion this season, with eight girls and four boys showing interest already. But even with the season

just a couple of weeks away, Welch doesn't want to rush things with her runners. "Every kid is an individual. We want to help them achieve a goal that makes them feel

good. ''We want a good effortfor the team and for themselves. But we have to take it slow and let them develop," Welch said. The Tigers first meet will be in Vale Aug. 31.

Mace now the man For Mace, becoming a head coach has been something he has worked hard for since his days as a player ended. He has coached every as­ pectofthe game as an assis­ tant with LHS, from running special teams,tocoordinating both the offense and defense. Now he's responsible for it all. He will try and lead the Tigers to their first winning season since 2006. ''We have realistic goals, but they are going to challenge us," Mace said. The Tigers start the season against Nyssa Aug. 31 at Community Stadium.

Ebel, Miller compete at Western Zone swim meet GRAND JUNCTION, Colo.— Bryce Ebel and Jared Miller, both of the La Grande Swim Club, competed at the Western Zone swim meet in Grand Junction, Colo., last week. Ebel and Miller were competing against some of the top 13-14-year-old swimmers in the West. Ebel swam in six events, with his highest finish coming in the 50 freestyle i27.34l and the 200 butterfly i2:30.28l where he placed 14th. He finished in 19th place in the 100 butterfly i1:06. 85l,21stin the 100 backstroke i1:10.21l

Observer file photo

La Grande Swim Club member Bryce Ebel finished in 14th place in the 200 butterfly at the Western Zone swim meet last week.

and 25thin the 200freestyle i2:166.43l. "This was the first time for Bryce to obtain the Western Zone time standard," coach Darren Dutto said. "He placedwellforattending thislarge meet for the first time. I was particularly impressed by his 200 butterfly, it was an outstanding swim resulting in a six-second time

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improvment. I fully expect Bryce to attend these big meets with greater frequency." Miller had a 10th-place finish in the 200 backstroke i2:26.23l and placed 12th in the

100 backstroke i1:07.80l. He finished 23rd in both the 200 freestyle

i2:15.69l and the 400 freestyle i4:43.32l. Miller swam to 32nd place in the 100 free­ style i1:02.65l and 34th in the 100 butterfly

i1:10.68l. "Jared has been to a zone meet before. He had agood meet forbeing atthe bottom of his age group," Dutto said of Miller, who is 13 years old. "Both backstrokes went well. Particularly the 200backstroke.Itw as agreatswim. "Bryce and Jared represented La Grande with pride at this meet. "I am extremely proud of their performances," the coach added.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER — 9A

SPORTS

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Tackling Tiger

irstperfectlame

SEATTLE (APl — As he playofF appearance, Her­ rode down in the crowded elevatorwearing awide grin after watching Felix Hernandez twirl baseball history, Seattle general manager Jack Zduriencik felt like having a little fun. He pulled out his cell­ phone, held it to his ear and listened for a moment. "No, we' re not trading Felix Hernandez," Zdurien­

cik jokingly said. Not after Wednesday. Not anytime soon. Hernandez pitched the Seattle Mariners' first per­ fect game and the 23rd in baseball history,overpow­ ering the Tampa Bay Rays in a brilliant 1-0 victory Wednesday. The 2010 AL Cy Young Award winner has never hid his desire for pitching

perfec ti on.Forafranchise on its way to an 11th straight season without a

nandez is the one constant keeping fans interested in Mariners baseball. Hernandez (11-5l rewarded those fans with a 12-strikeout gem on Wednesday afternoon. He baSed the Rays using his sharp curve and blistering fastball to keep the Rays guessing all day. It finally culminated in the ninth inning when Her­ nandez struck out pinch­ hitter Desmond Jennings, got pinch-hitter Jeff Kep­ pinger to ground out and closedout theperfecto by falling behind Sean Rodri­ guez 2-0 and then throwing threeperfectpitches. His teammates had spent most of the game leaving Hernandez to himself, but after the right­ hander was done pointing at the sky, he was engulfed in celebration.

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Eleven-year old Justin Comfort tackles the bag with gusto during Tuesday's Tiger Football Camp at La Grande High School.

First-ever mudd voile ball tournament in El n raises $3,200 for food banks By Tiish Yerges The Observer

ELGIN — Thirteen vol­ leyball teams Rom Union County converged upon the Elgin Stampede grounds Aug. 11 for the first annual "Muddy for a Mission" volley­ ball tournament that raised

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$3,200 to benefit food banks in four Eastern Oregon counties. "Oh,mygosh! Itwas so much fun." said Carmen Gentry, Community Connec­ tion Manager and Food Bank Manager. "All the teams were from UnionCounty,butwe did have some players Rom Baker County who were placed on existing teams." Three nets were set up on the grounds that would accommodate six teams play­ ing concurrently. The top five winning teams moved into the champion­ shipbracket.A lotofcom peti­ tion mixed with a lot of mud produced one hilariously entertaining fundraiser. "Legacy Ford's Filthy Ver­ mins team won first place," said Gentry, "and they will get free team entry into next year's tournament and brag­ ging rights. 'They will be the team to beat next year." Second place went to the Political Junkies and third place went to Subway's team. All the teams won trophies and medals.

Brad Masher/The Observer

Legacy Ford's Filthy Vermin players Lasa Baxter, Amanda Timm, Brandon May and Melinda Becker (far right) cel­ ebrate winning the Muddy for a Mission Mud Volleyball tournament Saturday in the Elgin Stampede arena, while teammate Nic Laquerica gives tournament director Carmen Gentry a muddy hug. Looking back Gentry said there were only a few things she would like to tweek to make it an even better event next year. "One thing we did learn is that there's so much going on the second week of August that we may have to bump it a weekend," said Gentry. 'There was just a lot of stufF going on this weekend. "Next year we may look at the third weekend of August. We' ll check everyone else' s calendar and see what's go­ ing on." Spectator attendance was low,partly because ofcompet­ ing community events, but

Gentry was very pleased that

theyraised $3,200 in spite of the busy calendar. Next year, Gentry also wants to amend the play schedule if possible. "Definitely next year we' re going to cut the play time down to 15 minutes instead of 20 minutes. We ended about two hours earlier than we expected. If we can get more teams next year then bumping the full play down to 15 minutes for each one of those morning games will be a lot better." Gentry also thought about starting a little later around 10 a.m. so by the time the

championship games are being played, they can put on the stadium and rodeo lights and make it a moonlight championship. 'The silent auction was amazing. They raised over

$1,000 for us. 'To all the local merchants who contributed, I want to give a huge thank you to all of them because that would not have been possible with­ out their generosity," said Gentry. The enthusiasm for the tournament was so strong that Gentry said most of the teams she talked to are returning to play next year.

Some players already had plans to recruit their own teams. "I think next year we will probably double our teams," said Gentry. "It's going to be that popular. It may go to 26 teams, but it all depends on how many games I can get in on a day. I' ll check with the tournament scheduler. I hope togetmore representa­ tion Rom all four counties to benefit them." The dignitaries who volunteered for the "Dunk your Dignitary" event had a splashinggood time too. "I'm not so sure if more kids didn't dunk them than

adults," Gentry said. "There was a whole line of kids over there. They were having a good time." Gentry wanted to thank the Elgin Stampeders for the use of their grounds for the tournament. It was a mutu­ ally beneficial event. "The Stampeders were able to do concessions, and they had the beer garden," said Gentry. "Theykeptthe funds Rom their sales in lieu of rent Rom us. It worked out just perfectly." Community Connection of Northeast Oregon, Inc. will use the $3,200 they raised to purchasefood and distribute it to Wallowa, Union, Baker and Grant county food banks. For those interested in enrolling a team for the 2013 Muddy for a Mission vol­ leyball tournament, contact Gentryat541-963-7532 Ext 12 or visit Community Con­ nection's Facebook page. Community Connection doesacceptmail-in donations to benefit their food banks. If anyone would like to senda tax deductible donation, please address it to Community Connec­ tion, 1504 Albany Street, La Grande, Oregon 97850 or visit their website at www. ceno.org. 'Your donation will stay in the county in which you reside," said Gentry.

Rangers top Yankees, Red Sax avoid sweep by Orioles NEW YORK (APl — Craig Gen­ try, starting for the first time in two weeks, hit a two-out, two-run single in the seventh inning that put Texas ahead in a 10-6 victory over New York on Thursday. Adrian Beltre had three RBIs while Josh Hamilton doubled twice and scoredthree times forthe Rangers, who avoided a four-game sweep in a matchup of AL division leaders. Texas had lost eight straight at Yankee Stadium overall. The Rang­ ers had done little in this series, too, totaling four runs before Thursday. Ichiro Suzuki got three hits for the Yankees. The Yankees rallied for a 5-4 lead before the Rangers came back with three runs in the seventh. David Murphy hit a tying RBI double ofF Boone Logan (4-1l and, after an intentional walk that loaded the bases, Gentry lined a tiebreaking single up the middle ofF Joba Chamberlain.

RED SOX 6, ORIOLES 3 BALTIMORE (APl — Clay Buchholz shook ofF a rocky start to earn his 11th win, Dustin Pedroia singled in the tiebreaking run in the sixth inning, and Boston beat Baltimoreto avoid athree-game sweep. Adrian Gonzalez had two RBIs,

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and Cody Ross chipped in with three hits to help Boston to its third win in nine games. Serving as des­ ignated hitter for the first time this season, Jacoby Ellsbury went 0 for 4 to end his 38-game hitting streak against Baltimore. After giving up three runs and six hits over the first two innings, Buchholz (11-3l kept the Orioles at bay, and the Red Sox rebounded Rom a 3-1 deficit. He allowed three runs, eight hits and three walks in eight innings and struck out seven. Albedo Aceves worked a perfect ninth for his 24th save. Mark Reynolds homered and Adam Jones had two RBIs for the Oriole s.

WHITE SOX 7, BLUE 3AYS 2 TORONTO (APl — Alex Rios hit a three-run homer against his former team, and Francisco Liriano earned his first victory as the Chi­ cago White Sox topped Toronto. Tyler Flowers, Dayan Viciedo, Alexei Ramirez and Dewayne Wise all hit solo home runs as the White Sox matched a season high by going deep five times. Chicago has hit 28 home runs in 13 games, and the power surge helped the White Sox win their first series in Toronto since 2006. Viciedo and Flowers hit consecu­ tive long balls in the fifth inning, the eighth time this season the

White Sox have gone back-to-back. Liriano (4-10l allowed two runs and three hits in 6 1-3 innings to win for the first time since July 6 at Texas, while pitching for Minnesota.

ATHLETICS 3, ROYALS 0 KANSAS CITY, Mo. (APl — Coco Crisp and Yoenis Cespedes hom­ ered, and Dan Straily earned his first major league victory in Oak­ land's win over Kansas City. Crisp, who played for the Royals in 2009,was 2 for27 this season against Kansas City before the home run. His drive hit high ofF a green wall beyond the fence and caromed back onto the field. It was first ruled a double, but after A' s manager Bob Melvin disputed the call, umpires viewed replays and changed it to a home run.

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Straily (1-Ol held the Royals to three singles over 6 1-3 innings in his third major league start. Straily, MCT photo who walked two and struck out two, Boston RedSox Nick Punto advances to second base as Baltimore pitched out of a bases loaded jam in Orioles' second baseman Omar Quintanilla tries to grab the throw in the second inning. the second inning at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Luke Hochevar (7-11l gave up three runs and four hits in seven­ seven innings for his AL-leading Angels. Los Angeles has gone 32 plus innings. Hochevar is 0-8 with 16th victory, and Tampa Bay got consecutive innings without scoring a 6.52 ERA in nine career starts home runs from Evan Longoria, against a stafF that leads the AL in against Oakland. B.J. Upton and Ben Zobrist in a win ERA, opponents' batting average over the Los Angeles Angels. and strikeouts. RAYS 7, ANGELS 0 Burke Badenhop and Wade Davis Price(16-4lstruck outeight, ANAHEIM, Calif. (APl — David each worked one inning in the Rays' walked two and lowered his ERA to Price pitched three-hit ball over third straight shutout against the 2.39, third in the AL.

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10A — THE OBSERVER

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

LOCAL

Memories abound as old worse for wear barn hits century mark he barn has sat there for 100 years. It has had no big fanfare orspecial appreciation. It has just sat there quietly counting up its years — one by one — until it reached the century mark. It is worse for its wear, but it seems as sturdy now as it was when the brawn behind stone, lumber, saw, hammer and nails first put it together in 1912. Snow waters draining off the hill have washed through it; soil erosion had to be shoveled from it from time to time. The wood weathered and the hinges loosened, boards came loose and dropped away, but still it stands beneath the fading coatofbarn red paint. I remember it when it was still in its prime of life. Cows stood in its stanchions and milkers brought forth the pails of foaming white nutri­ tious protein. The animals munched hay, gave produce, and then parted company to graze the hillside. Rabbits filled hutches in the barn and, next door, chickens fenced within the yard of the brick and stucco chicken house clucked and scratchedthe earth,pecking here and pecking there, then sat on cozy nests to show their gratitude in the way of

birthday greeting in the August month of 2012? DORY'S DIARY Are there stillthose who remember the hooting of owls, the the broken or lost hinges, the visit of the rare pigmy owl, window panes. Or, maybe its the creaking of the barn's life-span is in closer mode timbers, the rustle of dried like we humans whose bodies grass, the howling of coyotes, come to the point of being thestealthiness ofcougars, irreparable. the treedamage ofbears, It needs someone who can the bobcats climbing up do the work who loves resto­ the Douglas pine tree, the ration rather than to simply rat-a-tat -tatofwoodpeckers, tearitdown and startover. the quail's song and numer­ Regardless of how the sto­ ous other song birds, the ry ends, the barn has stood darting of hummingbirds, sentry over the valley for a the numerous small hillside wondrous time of service or animals, the smell of chang­ ing seasons. just plain being. It has served the century The 88 steps to the home's well in housing the original front porch are gone and so family, then as a shelter is the spring of sweet water for stock. It has heard the from acrossthe road,but bawling of cows and calves, the wildflowers continue to knickers of horses, cluckings bloom in the spring and the sign "Edelweiss Acres," hung of hens, crowing of roosters, cooing of homing pigeons. there in 1963 by the latest It has heard the echo of owners, still reminds us of its children's laughter playing in Swiss heritage. and around its stately pres­ ence as they climbed into the loft and jumped into the piles of stored hay below. It has feltthe scrape ofpitchfork and shovel as workers stored winter hay or cleaned its in­ ner oors, fl stalls,and gutters. It has felt the wind singing through its open portals and heard the rain upon its roof, listened to the twittering of nesting birds.

Does anyone remember? Yes, I'm glad to say. There are still those who do and will. So, on becoming a cen­ tury old, I say "Happy 100th

Birthday!" to the barn that first graced the hill along Mill Canyon Road, now known as Morgan Lake Road, from your descendents and others

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who do still remember. Veteran newspaperwoman Dorothy Swart Fleshman is a La Grande native. Reach her at news@lagrandeobserver.corn.

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Sun-drenched timbers

The barn had a life before I came along. It was already 14 years old when I was born and waited another six before our family claimed it as our own for a brief stay. It wasn't until the barn was half a century old before the Fleshmans settled into the farmhouse for good. The dairy herd of the Hofinanns and Lovans had vanished by then as a dairy and as a temporary fam­ ily home in the beginning, but the Swiss emblem was refurbished on the side of the barn, signs were hung naming it Edelweiss Acres, and Randy's canton shields adorned the 49-year-old chalet. Now I have lived here for almost half of the old barn's existence. It is slowly aging, repairable maybe by some­ one who knows how and can replacethe missing boards,

The barn has nestled doe and fawn beside its timbers on the warm sun-drenched sides. Ithasfeltthedam­ aging wrath of forest fire and driving rain. Snow has cuddled it through the winter and its girth against the summer heat. The barn has bornethelossofgenerations of loved ones as the years

fled by. Itsforestofover 100 year timber, that grew there before the barn came into being, gracing the hillside to be drawn upon for lumber to build the barn, house, out-buildings, and dancehall, was mainly denuded through theravaging 1973 forestfi re, then renewed through plant­ ings and nature itself. Does the barn know that we still maintain its vigil and that there are some who will remember to wish it a 100th

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Friday, July 17, 2012 The Observer & Baker City Herald

Indian spice

U er rOm a on?

What to avoid, what to eat

1s ntce and

healthy

Inflammation is at the root of manydiseases.Good food choices can play a role in preventing inflammation.

Interested in Indian food? Want to try some Thai? Some ethnic foods and in­ gredients not only have pow­ erful, distinctive flavors, they might have nutritional and health benefits, according to Janet Carver, a culinary team leaderatIngredion, Inc., an Illinois-based food ingredient manufacturer formerly called Corn Prod­ ucts. And, using ethnic spices can help a cook reduce salt and fat without diminishing flavor, said Carver. Studies have reported that ginger, found in many Asian foods, reduces muscle pain and soreness. Cinnamon may help maintain healthy bloodsugar levels.Turmeric, ginger and garlic may block fat absorption. Oregano has as many antioxidants as spinach. "Ethnic recipes can deliver overtwo grams ofspicesand herbs per serving," said Diego Serrano, directorofproduct development at McCormick & Co, a spice and season­ ingcompany.Forexample, Indian food typically contains twice as many spices as usual American fare.

Which foods are the most inflammatory? Everyone should try to avoid refined sugar, artificial sweeteners and processed foods.

Source: Dr. Lisa Uri, a family practitioner at High Lakes Health Care in Bend

— Anne Aurand, WesComNews Service

Which foods are the most anti-inflammatory?

Source: Institute of FoodTechnologists

Junk food

Cherries, berries, onions, ginger, turmeric, broccoli, walnuts, almonds and fatty fish are some of the foods that research has suggested can lower levels of inflammation gk '

laws are seen

to help curb kids' obesity Laws strictly curbing school sales of junk food and sweet­ ened drinks may play a role in slowing childhood obesity, ac­ cording to a study that seems to offer the first evidence such efforts could pay oK The results come from the first large national look at the effectiveness ofthe state laws over time. They are not a slam-dunk, and even obesityexpertswho praised the study acknowledge the measures are a political hot potato, smacking of a "nanny state" and opposed by industry and cash-strapped schools relying on food pro­ cessors' money. Children in the study gained less weight from fifth through eighth grades if they lived in states with strong, consistent laws versus no laws governing snacks avail­ able in schools. For example, kids who were 5 feet tall and 100 pounds gained on average 2.2 fewer pounds if they lived in states with strong laws in the three years studied. Also, children who were overweight or obese in fifth grade were more likely to reach a healthy weight by eighth grade if they lived in states with the strongest laws.

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Source: Jill Souto-Maior, a registered dietitian with St. Charles Bend Greg Cross /Wescom News Sennce

Change in diet might help • Inflammatory foods may include gluten, dairy for some

That inflammation can lead to cancerisgenerall y accepted,butthe mechanisms behind this relation­ ship remain largely unresolved, the article said. Anne Aurand Malignancies often arise from Wescom News Service areas of infection and inflammation, Linda Smith, 62, of Powell Butte, wrote the study's author, Lisa Cous­ eats more salads now, after she sens. This has been seen with colon stopped eating inflammatory foods cancers in people with inflamma­ such as white flour, refined sugar tory bowel diseases, chronic ulcer­ and processed foods. Smith was ative colitis and Crohn's disease, prediabetic ,had high blood pressure, for example. Also, people who have had issues similar to arthritis and had a hepatitis C infection have a was 20 pounds overweight. She feels predisposition to liver cancer, the better and is taking fewer medica­ study said. tionsnow."It'seasy to prescribe a The significance of inflammation's role in abnormal cell growth is also pill to fix the symptoms but that wasn't getting to the bottom of it," highlighted by studies that show she said. "Medicines made the aches the use of some anti-inflammatory and pain go away but I still felt slug­ drugs iNSAIDsl has been associated with a 40 to 50 percent reduced risk gish. Mentally, ichanging my diet) has helped me feel like, 'Wow, I can of colon cancer and a lower risk of be normal.' " lung, esophagus and stomach cancer. Inflammation is at the root of Anti-inflammatory medications, many ailments, from cancer to however, come with a slew of side chronicpain,according to research effects, the worst of which include and local health experts. The idea potential kidney or liver failure. Chronic inflammation can be thatcertain foodscan play a role in creating or preventing inflam­ detectedthrough blood teststhat mation is gaining traction in some look for certain biochemical mark­ medical circles, especially those that ers. For example, rheumatologists emphasize integrative medicine and find higher levels of those biomark­ nutrition. ersinrheumatoid arthritispatients, ''What is inflammation caused indicating that inflammation is asso­ from? Food can clearly play a role," ciated with the autoimmune disease, said Dr. Lisa Uri, a family practitioner Uri said. Sometimes doctors check at High Lakes Health Care in Bend. inflammation biomarkers to assess However, she added, 'This is not what a patient' srisk ofheartdisease,she we learned in medical school." said. But in most cases of chronic in­ flammation, the person is unaware What is inflammation? of what's happening at the cellular Inflammation is a complex biochemical response to harmful level, silently inside the body. stimuli. It's the body's attempt to heal an injury or trauma. White Inflammatory foods blood cells, full of healing nutrients Eatingthe rightfoodsisgood over­ and immune cells, target areas in all preventive health care, said Uri. Exactly how pro-inflammatory need of repair. Inflammation can be good, or it foods may contribute to certain health problems is not something can be bad. The good kind is what people see Uri, who is studying integrative medicine and nutrition to comple­ as the redness and swelling associ­ ated with injuries and infections. It' s ment her medical degree, can a sign that the white blood cells have specifically explain. It's a new area ofresearch. flooded the area and are attacking the problem. This usually resolves From an evolutionary perspective, itself in time. Uri said, human bodies are meant to But inflammation becomes prob­ m etabolize foodssuch asvegetables, lematic when it lingers undetected grains, nuts and meat. But in more and untreated. recent times, she said, "we' ve asked Itcan affecta variety offunctions our bodies to suddenly figure out and has been associated with many what to do with all this other stufF conditions and diseases including — processed foods,high fructose corn syrup. Our bodies aren't devel­ obesity, heartdisease,stroke,Type 2 diabetes, cancer and autoimmune oped to metabolizethose things and disorders. itithe body)works harder todo that. It can cause the broad definition of Some types of white blood cells that are part of the immune system inflammation, where the body reacts negatively." produce cytokines, molecules that signal cellular communication. Some She and others said the most cytokines are pro-inflammatory. inflammatory foods are processed Chronically inflamed tissues carbohydrates and refined sugars. and the prolonged presence of pro­ An article in the March 2002 inflammatory cytokines can lead American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested an association to abnormal cell growth, which, for example, is atthe rootofcancers,ac­ between inflammatory biomarkers cording to the article "Inflammation and high-glycemic foods — rapidly and Cancer" published in Nature, digestedcarbohydrates thatraise a science and medicine journal, in bloodsugar fast,such aswhitebread 2002. See Foods / Prfge 2B

— AP

Golfing 1s a good workout Golfing is good for fitness. Consider these findings from a new report: • Walking an 18-hole round of golf, carrying a bag or using a pull cart, is equivalent to about a five-mile walk. • Walking 18 holes and carrying clubs burns about 2,000 calories. Riding in a cart reduces the game'scaloric expenditure to 1,300 calories. • When walk­ ing 18 holes, blood glucose levels fall by up to 20 percent for young players, 10 percent for the

middle-aged, and 30 percent for the elderly players. • Oldergolfers tend tohave better static and dynamic balance control and confidence than non­ golfing older, healthy adults. • Regardless of handicap, sex, or course played, golf­ ers exceed 10,000 steps during a typicalround ofgolf — which meets the guideline for exercise recommended by most medical and clinical physicians. — Anne Aurand, WesComNews Service Source: The Health Hr Wellness Benefits of Golf report by

Walker Research G roupfor GOLF 20/20

Meditation, eXerCISe

may limit cold, Hu Meditation or exercise may lower the rate, length and severity of the flu or common cold, according to prelimi­ nary ndi fi ngs ofa study conducted in Wisconsin. The randomized controlled trial sug­ gestspreventing the common cold may not ~ust be limited to practices such as frequent hand washing or covering the mouth when sneezing or cough­ ing. "The bottom line is both the mental health and physi­ cal health matter in helping improve

ithel flu and cold," said physician Bruce Barrett, author of the study. — MCT

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2B — THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

HEALTH 8 F I T N ESS

tion can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, bleeding, Continued from 1B constipation or bloating. In Delmonico's private practice, and tablesugar.Itsaid these she said her patients who foods appeared to exacerbate have adopted an anti-inflam­ the pro-inflammatory process mation diet have reduced and increase the risk of heart ailments such as gastrointes­ tinal problems and chronic disease. But the study did not explain exactly how. headaches. Uri figures, generally '%hat peoplehave found speaking,thatwhen the body by trial and error is that is working overtime to me­ an anti-inflammatory diet tabolizethosekinds offoods, makes them feel better," it'sunable totakecareofits Delmonico said. An anti­ other functions as well. For inflammation diet can't solve example, if the adrenal sys­ every problem, but it's one tem, which is responsible for relatively simple thing we metabolizing blood sugar, is have control over, she said. strained by metabolizing in­ Delmonico's anti-inflam­ flammatory foods, it wouldn' t mation diet guidelines are: Everyone can benefit from be as adept at regulating growth and development, sex eating vegetables, lean hormones and reproductive proteins and whole grains. functions. Some people should limit or Another example, she avoid dairy or gluten. Most everyone should avoid white said, is when the body's response to metabolizing lour,hydrogenated oilsand f inflammatory foods irritates processed sugar. the bloodvessels.In that Eating sugar seems par­ ticularly linked with chronic scenario, cholesterol, which helps maintain cells, gets pain, she said, which could be directedto vesselsthatneed from fibromyalgia or arthri­ Rob Kerr /WesCom News Service tis. Chronicfatigue seems to Linda Smith, 62, of Powell Butte, eats more salads now, to be repaired, resulting in a cholesterol build-up in the improve when people wean after she stopped eating inflammatory foods such as themselvesoffsugar,too,she white flour, refined sugar and processed foods. bloodvesselsand increasing the risk ofheartdisease,U ri SRld. This was the case for Terri refined sugar and starchy away but I still felt sluggish. SRld. Individuals experience Cumbie, owner of Dudley's foods such as potatoes and Mentally, this has helped inflammatory responses in BookShop Cafe in Bend, who corn. She gave up fast food, me feel like, 'Wow, I can be different ways, and what' s has dealt with inflammation normal.' " chips, and comfort food like and pain in both of her shoul­ macaroni. She incorporated Dr. Uri believes that all the bothersome to one person body's systems are connected might be fine to another. ders from tom rotator cuffs more salads and fruits into For some people, dairy can for more than 10 years. The her diet. and there are links between 'Within two weeks I was be an inflammatory food, being overweight, having pain affected her ability to lift Uri said. Individuals may boxes of books, to think and feeling better," she said. silent inflammation and Within two months, her developing disease. be experiencing inflamma­ to talk to people, she said. It wasn't until she eliminated tion if they have digestive dentist said her gums and Bolstering that idea,a recent study published in discomfort, general fatigue processed sugar and reduced tongue appeared healthier. or chronic pain. The only carbohydrates such as bread Afterabout 30 yearsof Cancer Research, a journal of and pasta in her diet that the taking blood pressure medi­ the American Association for way to know what is caus­ ing it is to change the diet, cations, at age 62 she now Cancer Research, said that pam waned. Linda Smith, of Powell no longer needs them. She postmenopausal women who she said. Carol Delmonico, a reg­ Butte, said eliminating has lost almost 20 pounds, were overweight or obese and istered nurse and wellness inflammatory foods has im­ feelsmore energeticand is who lost atleast5 percent of hopingtogetoffherdiabetes their body weight measur­ coach in Bend, said some proved her life dramatically. medicine soon. ably reduced markers of people with gluten sensitivi­ Last spring, Uri sent Smith "It's easy to prescribe a pill inflammation. to a nutritionist because tiesgetinflamed digestive "Both obesity and inflam­ Smith was prediabetic, had to fix the symptoms but that tracts when they eat gluten, wasn't getting to the bottom high blood pressure and was mation have been shown to a proteinfound in many 20 pounds overweight. Smith of it," she said. "Medicines be relatedto severaltypesof grains such as wheat, rye stopped eating white flour, made the aches and pain go cancer, and this study shows and barley. That inflamma­

FOODS

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Study: Higher egg yolk consumption leads to accelerated thickening of arteries By Melissa Healy

sessthe role ofeggyolks,and dietary cholesterol in general, as arisk factorfor coronary heart disease," the study authors write. In recent years, nutrition­ ists have begun to agree with egg purveyors that chicken

Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Just as you were ready to tuck into a nice three-egg omelet again, comforted by the reassur­ ing news that eggs are not so bad for you, here comes a study warning that for those over 40, the number of egg yolks consumed per week accelerates the thickening of arteries almost asseverely as doescigarette smoking. Server, can you make that an egg-white omelet instead,

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eggs — cheap and packed

please? The study, published Tuesday in the journal Ath­ erosclerosis ,m easured the carotid wall thickness — a key indicator ofheartdisease risk— of1,231 patientsre­ ferred to a vascular preven­ tion clinic, and asked each to detail a wide range of their health habits, from smoking and exercise to their con­ sumption of egg yolks. Just as smoking is often tallied as "pack-years" ithe number of cigarette packs smoked per day for how many years), egg-yolk consumption was tallied as "egg yolk years" ithe number of egg yolks consumed per week times the number of years they were eaten). The study subjects were typically referred to the clinic afterhaving suffered a clot­ induced stroke or a transient ischemic attack — a "mini­ stroke" in which symptoms may disappear quickly but which often presage a more seriousstroke to come. Smoking tobacco and eating egg yolks increased carotid wall thickness in sim­ ilar fashion — which is to say, the rateofincrease acceler­ ated with each stair-step up in cigarette smoking or yolk consumption. By contrast, for those who did not smoke,

that if you reduce weight, you associations — suggest that can reduce inflammation as populations that eatalotof well," said Dr. Anne McTier­ vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, nan, director of the Preven­ healthy oils and fatty fish tion Center at the Fred have lower rates of chronic Hutchinson Cancer Research diseases related to inflamma­ Center in Seattle. tory markers, such as heart Researchers noted that disease, rheumatoid arthritis exercise alone, without a di­ and Type 2 diabetes. etary weight loss component, Clinical studies have had little effect on inflamma­ isolated compounds in some tion markers. plant substances that act on "This study adds to the metabolic pathways in the growing understanding we body that prevent inflamma­ have about the link between tion. These include apples, obesity and cancer, and it cherries, berries, onions, appears we can affect inflam­ ginger, turmeric, cauliflower, mation directly through broccoli. non-pharmaceutical means," Cherries, for example, are said Mc Tiernan. antioxidants that contain el­ lagic acid, which inhibits the Anti-inflammatory growth of cancer cells; perillyl alcohol, which affects growth foods Healthprofessionals are of cancer cells; and antiocy­ trying to figure out what anthins, which shut down enzymes that cause inflam­ foods and nutrients could mation, Souto-Maior said. reduce inflammation. "A plethora of nutrients '%hen you take these and other food components foods, you may not immedi­ atelyfeeltheeffectofa cup of have been found to reduce inflammation — at least in berries the same way you do laboratory animals and cell if you took an aspirin. But if culture systems," according you eat them regularly, over time ... you do," Souto-Maior to a study published in the 2012 article in the Journal of said. "Twenty-five cherries is Nutrition. The study looked the equivalent of taking an ibuprofen."Inflammation is at the nutrient vitamin B6. It said higher levels of the at the root of many diseases. vitamin in a person's blood Good food choices can play a role in preventing infla­ were associated with lower levelsofm arkers ofchronic mmatio. inflammation. The study urgedforadditionalresearch Which foods on this relationship. are the most Science-based evidence has anti-inflammatory? shown that many healthy Cherries, berries, onions, foods have anti-inflammatory ginger, turmeric, broccoli, walnuts, almonds and fatty properties, said Jill Souto­ Maior, a registered dietitian fish are some of the foods with St. Charles Bend. that research has suggested For example, omega-3 fatty can lower levels of infla­ acids are known to decrease mmatio. inflammation, she said, espe­ cially when the omega-3 fatty W hich foods arethe acids — prevalentinfish oils most inflammatory? and walnuts — are eaten in­ Everyone should try to steadofomega-6 fatty acids, avoid refined sugar, artificial prevalent in many vegetable sweeteners and processed oils and snack foods. foods. Epidemiologic studies­ sources: Dr. usa Un, a family practitioner at High Lakes Health Care in Bend; Jill ones that can't prove cause Souto-Maior, a registered dietitian with St. Charles Bend and effect but can show

File photo

A study finds for those over 40, the number of egg yolks consumed per week accelerates the thickening of arteries. or who rarely consumed egg yolks, carotid wall thickness increasedafter40,butata slow-steady rate. For those whose consump­ tion of whole eggs was in the highest 20 percent, the narrowing of the carotid artery was on average about two-thirds that of the study's heaviest smokers. '%e believe our study m akes it im perativeto reas­

with protein — have gotten a bad rap as a dangerous source of cholesterol. Some studies have suggested that eggs may increase HDL, or "good cholesterol" thatprotects against heart disease, even asitcontrib­ utes to the artery-clogging LDL cholesterol, making egg consumption something of a wash. And regular egg-eaters may form larger lipoprotein particles thathelp clear the bloodoffatparticles and are not as likely to settle in artery walls. Still, the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute recommends that to limit their risk of developing heart disease, Americans limit their cholesterol intake to no more than 300 mg per day ian egg yolk has just over 200 m gl, and eatnomore than four whole eggs weekly, in­ cluding those in baked goods or processed foods. Those who already have heart disease, diabetes or high LDL cholesterol, or who have had a stroke, should limit their cholesterol tolessthan 200 mg per day.

Bring your lunch and latm chairs to the park and enjoy the music, Suggested donation $5 Per Person

Pounder River Music Review concert series is presented to raise funds to build a bandstand pavilion in the center of dreiser-P ollman Park, Thanks to the musicians for donating their time and talent for this fund raising effort, Brochure and brick order forms uphill be available at ureekly concerts or may be doumloaded at ururur,facebook,corn/BAKERCIVYBANDSTAND for anyone interested in Purchasing an engraved brick to be Placed in the stage(foundation of the net ban stand Pavilion,

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD — 3B

HEALTH 8 F I T N ESS

S e enta war erst

Ssorts nutrition eeerts oler hYdralion reminders

s tan i n e s

By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tnbune

CHICAGO — At Groupon's Chicago office, it's easy to look up to Joel Hadley. During most of his eight-hour-plus workday, Hadley stands at his desk, his head more than afootabove seated col­ leagues. Hadley says standing makes him feel alert, focused and ener­ gized. He also has less back and neck pain than when he used a chair. But it's not necessarily the standing that makes Hadley feel better. Instead, the trick may be that the 29-year-old sales analyst rarely sits down. Thirty minutes of exercise a day used to be thought ofasprotec­ tion against the damaging effects of a desk job. Studies now show that even for those who work out during the day, prolonged sitting can increase the long-term risk of illness or death. As a result, some office workers are literally standing up for their health — shunning expensive er­ gonomically correct chairs, build­ ing makeshift standing desks and even slowly walking on treadmill desks, also called walkstations. Hundreds of companies, includ­ ing Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, Dell and Google, offer employees standing and treadmill desk op­ tions. It's not just a Silicon Valley movement; employees at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the National Institutes of Health, the Mayo Clinic and dozens of universities have all purchased some formofa standing ortread­ mill desk. "In our society, many people are literally living with a stalled met­ abolic rate similar to an anesthe­ tizedpatient forover 80 percent of theday,"said inactivity researcher Mare Hamilton, a professor at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. "No wonder we have an unsustainable health crisis." In thepast severaldecades, increaseduse ofcars,computers and television has contributed to disease, expertssay.Some people are either lying down or sitting 20 hours a day, raising their risk of heart disease,obesity,diabetes and some cancers, said Hamilton. "Itwas a huge oversight to ever think traditional forms of exercise, such as hopping on your treadmill for a few hours a week, can pro­ videthe specifi c antidote to spend­ ing 140 hours a week resting," said Hamilton, who pioneered the fledgling field of"inactivity physi­ ology." "Sitting too much isn't the same as exercising too little." Since 2003, several of Ham­ ilton's studies have found that physical inactivity, such as sitting, can impair key mechanisms in the body that regulate fat and cholesterol metabolism — chang­ es thataren'treversed by exercise. Sitting also dramatically reduces contractions or electrical activ­ ity in skeletal muscles, because the chair is supporting the body's weight, Hamilton said. ''When you' re standing or walking, your leg muscles are constantly working, which helps to clear glucose and fatsfrom the bloodstream," said Hidde van der Ploeg, a senior researcher at the Department of Public and Occupational Health and the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. "If you' re sitting, this isn't happening because the m uscles aren'tactive." Even if you' re meeting the World Health Organization standards for 30 minutes of ex­ ercise a day, "it's still important what you do in the remaining

By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald

Zbigniew Bzdak/ChicagoTnbune

Groupon employee Joel Hadley, 29, right, uses a standing desk during his work hours at the office in Chicago leastas im portant asexercising more." Sedentary behavior may also encourage weight gain — a risk factorfora hostofillnesses— by reducing the amount of inciden­ tal activity in a person's life. In one recent study by Hamilton, volunteerswere asked to sitfor a day and fed limited calories. The participants — even those who were lean and exercised regularly — rapidly developed insulin resistance, the key cause ofdiabetes.Theresultssuggest that "while exercise and healthy diet are good for some things, they do not immunize you from sitting too much," said Hamilton. Chicago adventurer, running coach and fitness expert Jenny Hadfield routinely exercises, but when she transitioned from man­ aging a corporate fitness center to writing full time, she found she was moving considerably less dur­ ing the day. "Whether it's writing or social media, you get so lost in what you' re doing, and the next thing you know it's midnight," said Had­ field. "My body was hurting more. I had less mobility in my joints and some weight gain." Hadfield started getting up ev­ ery 30 minutes or so to do a small chore. She also placed a board she bought for $15 at Home Depot can suppress production of an en­ acrossthe arms ofhertreadmill. zyme in the skeletal muscle called Her computer rests on the board. "It's not a workout, said Hadfield. lipoprotein lipase, or LPL. When "It's literally moving one mile an lab animals were slightly active, the enzyme was not suppressed, hour and I'm answering email, he found. talking on the phone." LPL helps regulate the produc­ There's no proven solution tion of triglycerides, free fatty ac­ to the harm of sitting; it isn' t ids and cholesterol. After a meal, clear what time limits would for example, levels of triglycerides help or the best way to take a and glucose initially rise; then break. Learning to use stand­ they gradually decline as the body ing and treadmill desks often removes and stores the nutrients takes several weeks, and the delivered by circulating blood. "It' s benefits of walking have to be theorized that sitting may reduce weighed against the costs and the efficiency of these processes," practicality of a treadmill desk said researcher David Dunstan, or other contraptions, such as head of the physical activity labo­ an elliptical machine desk that ratory at the Baker IDI Heart & Hammacher Schlemmer sells for Diabetes Institute in Australia. $8,000. ''We move from chair to chair Experts say miniature exercise throughout the day, from in the bikes, which allow users to pedal under their desk while sitting in home, to the car, at work, to the car and again at home," Dunstan an office chair, do not solve the added. "Sitting less may be at problem of sitting.

STAND-UP ADVICE:

were a little uncomfortable, like • Change positions every 20 when you start a new exercise or 30 minutes. Even if you don' t regimen," said Ben Shive, 37, a want to get a standing desk, mobile software developer in simply standing up can help. Lansdale, Pa. But Shive now has Sitting increases the pressure on only one complaint: "I need new the disks in your back, said Dr. pants after losing an inch off my Joel Press, medical director of waist." • Wear comfortable shoes. the Spine and Sports Rehabilita­ tion Center at the Rehabilitation Also try a chef's mat or a stand­ Institute of Chicago. Movement ing desk mat to help with foot provides nutrition to the disks fatigue. • Pay attention to your by helping move fluids in and out, Press said. posture. A computer monitor • Start small. Before investing should be at eye level. Your in anexpensive standing desk, hands, wrists and forearms experiment with a low-cost should be straight and roughly homemade version. Books, parallel to the floor. The elbows monitor risers, shoe risers or should be bent approximately even an ironing board can all 90 degrees. "Keep your body work. RonaldThisted, chairman weightevenly spaced between of the Department of Health both feet and symmetrically Studies at the University of between your big toe, little Chicago, initially used stacks of toe and heel," said physical academic journals before taking therapist Melissa Kolski, educa­ the plunge and mounting his tion program manager for the computer on an adjustable sit­ Rehabilitation Institute. "Make stand desk. sure to keep your pelvis neutral, • Expect an adjustment pe­ such that if it was a bucket of riod. You' ll likely feel tired, and water it wouldn't tip forward or some things — such as typing backward." If you need a rest or using a highlighter while break every once in a while, "try walking on a treadmill — may propping your foot on a stool or be more difficult in the begin­ riser," Kolski said. ning. "The first couple weeks — Julie Deardorff

hours of the waking day," van der Ploeg said. Van der Ploeg's most recent study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that adultsage 45 and olderwho sat 11 or more hours per day had a 40 percent increased risk ofdying in the next three years compared with those who sat for less than four hours a day. Though the absolute risk of death was small for everyone, the study showed that "in people who do a similar amount of physical activity, those who sit less will have a lower risk of dying, com­ paredtothose who sitmore,"said van der Ploeg. It's not clear how marathon sit­ ting sessions can increase the risk of death and illness. Hamilton's researchsuggeststhatthelossof muscle contractions that typically occurs while sitting or lying down

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Headaches. Fatigue. Lack of alert­ ness. These are tell-tale signs of dehy­ dration — the excessive loss of fluids from the body. W e' ve heard itbefore.W ateristhe most abundant nutrient in our body. It's the primary ingredient in muscles, blood and other body cells. Without it, body processes become sluggish and inefficient. No doubt, lack of fluids can kill us much quicker than lack of food. Athletes have special fluid needs be­ cause ... they are athletes. For exam­ ple, I learned that well-trained athletes sweat more — not less — than the rest of us. Why? Because water iperspira­ tionl is what keeps these extremely active bodiesfrom overheating.Cool. Here are some hydration reminders from sports nutrition experts: Check your urine: If it's the color of straw orlemonade, you're appropriate­ ly hydrated, say experts. Dark or apple juice-colored urine signals dehydration, or the need for more fluids. Check your weight: Before you ex­ ercise. After you exercise. Performance suffers with as little as 2 percent loss of fluid. Restore every pound you lose during exercise with a pound or so i16 to 24 ounces) of fluid. Drink plain water before you exercise: It'sthe bestchoicefor m ost of ouractivitiesthatlastlessthan 90 minutes. Sip on about 4 ounces i'/2 cupl of fluid after about 15 to 20 minutes of exercise. If your workout goes beyond 90 minutes, add a sports drink that contains some carbohydrates isugarl plus electrolytes such as sodium and potassium.Good choicesforsports drinks, according to sports nutrition experts, arethose thatare moderate in calories iabout 50 to 70 calories per 8-ounce cupl, moderate in sodium inot more than 110 to 220 milligramsl, and high in potassium. BTW ... cold bever­ ages help cool the body and have been found to be betterabsorbed. Replenish energy stores and elec­ trolytes after intense exercise. Eating or drinking foods that contain protein AND carbohydrates within a half hour after vigorous exercise can store energy back into depleted muscles, say re­ searchers. Chocolate milk, for example, has been found to have the perfect ratioofcarbohydrates to protein for recoveryafter an activity thatlasts more than an hour. Pay attention to calcium and magnesium-rich foods. Muscle cramps can result when these minerals are low. Good sources of calcium and magne­ sium? Milk, yogurt, spinach, nuts and seeds, whole grain breads, cereals, crackers. Take it easy with protein drinks. Beverages loaded with extra protein can actually increase the risk for dehy­ dration. They are not recommended as fluid replacement drinks.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD — 5B

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday DISPLAY ADS:

Baker City Herald: 541-523-3673 ewww.bakercityherald. corn• classifiedsObakercityhera Id. corn• Fax: 541-523-64zi The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.co m • classifiedsOlagrandeobserver.corn• Fax: 541-963-367 100 - Announcements

105 - Announce­ ments

600 - FarmersMarket

105 - Announcements 110- Self Help Groups 120 - Community Calendar

605 - Market Basket

130 - Auction Sales

630- Feeds 640- Horse, Stock Trailers

650- Horses,Mules,Tack

FINAL WEEK

660 - Livestock 670 - Poultry 675 - Rabbits, Small Animals

(LOSING SALE

610 - Boarding/Training 620 - FarmEquipment BSupplies

140- Yard, GarageSales, Baker Co 143- Wallowa Co 145- Union Co

150 - Bazaars,Fundraisers 160- Lost B Found 170 - Love Lines

200 -Employment

75 OFF

700 - Rentals

ENTIRE INVENTORY

210- Help Wanted, Baker Co 220- Union Co 230- Out of Area 280 - Situations Wanted

701 - Wanted to Rent 705 - Roommate Wanted 710- Rooms for Rent

720- Apartment Rentals 730 - FurnishedApartments 740 - Duplex Rentals

300 - Financial/Service

760 - Commercial Rentals

Call to 523-3673 to start

your new subscription and read new listings every day!

TRUST WHAT HE DID, not what you are doing, or have done.

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800 - Real Estate

360 - Schools B Instruction

~~A Looking for 160 - Lost & Found ~~a aneWJOb? FOUND: G R O CERY

...everything necessary to save your never dying soul,

790 - Property Management 795 Mobile HomeSpaces

350- Day CareBaker Co 355 - Day CareUnion Co

405 - Antiques 410- Arts B Crafts 415 - Building Materials 420 - Christmas Trees

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Absolute Auction Selling Regardless of Price!

Snake River Ranch !

850- Lots B Property, BakerCo 855 - Lots BProperty, Union Co 860 - Ranches,Farms 870 - Investment Property 880 - Commercial Property

425 - Computers/Electronics 430- For Sale or Trade

435 - FuelSupplies 440 - Household Items 445 - Lawns B Gardens

450 - Miscellaneous

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910 - ATVs,Motorcycles,Snowmobiles

470 - Tools

915 - Boats B Motors

475-Waned to Buy

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925 - Motor Homes 930- Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels 940 - Utility Trailers

500 - Pets 8 Supplies 505- Free to a Good Home 510- Lost B Found

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530 - Pet Schools, Instruction 550- Pets, General

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MEET S I NGLES right now! No paid opera­ tors, lust real people l ike y o u . Bro w s e greetings, ex change m essages and c o n­ n ect live. Try it f r e e . CaII n o w : LOCAL VETERINARY Clinic is looking for a 877-955-5505. (P NDC) qualified receptionist to work PT; Fridays, Saturdays with some additional days to fill in as needed. Must have computer experience, c ustomer service e x ­ perience , pr ope r phone etiquette and be able to m u lti-task and follow d irection. 210 - Help Wanted­ Please submit resume Baker Co. & letters o f r e c o m­ m endation t o B l i n d LPN needed for the Box ¹ 170, c/o Baker top 100 best places City Herald, P.O. Box to work in health­ 807, Baker City, OR, care in the nation. 97814. FT w/great benefits. $17 — $19 per hr, BAKER SCHOOL DIS­ DOE. For more info TRICT 5J is currently or to apply got to: accepting applications www. ohos ice.corn for a .6 FTE 260 day, Youth Transition Spe­ cialist (YPT) position S OCIAL W O R K E R for Union County. For needed for the top 100 best places to a complete descnption o f th e p o s i t ion a n d work in healthcare q ualifications g o t o : i n the n a t i on . F T www.baker.k12.or.us w/great b e n e f its. or contact the employ­ $20 — $24 per hr, m ent d i v i s i on . Y o u DOE. For more info m ay a I s o ca I I or to apply got to: 541-524-2261 or email www. ohos ice.corn

Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012

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process purchase or­ d ers, r e c o ncile a c ­ counts receivable and i nventory. Use c o m­ p uterized system t o process orders, pricing a nd bills o f l a d i n g . W eighmaste r and timecard preparation responsibilities. Work a s part o f a n o f f i c e team. Excellent verbal and written communi­ cation skills. Full time position with excellent benefit package. Or­ ganized, experienced candidates should ap­ ply to: Crop Production S ervices I n c . 2 3 3 1 11th St, Baker City, OR Contact: Lenard Porfily Branch Manager Phone: 541-963-3735 EOE/AA Employer

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140 - Yard, Garage Sales-Baker Co.

140 - Yard, Garage Sales-Baker Co.

MULTI-FAMILY SALE S UMPTER I S THE 70 YRS Accumulation! 815 3rd St., — Haines p PLACE TO BE THIS 950 "D" St. — 8a - 3p Fn. & Sat. WEEKEND! Mu sic in E Thurs., Fn. & Sat. Brass bed, washer, 7AM-7 PM the Meadow kicks off Tools, collectibles, ngid dryer, couch, Friday from 4-10p & kitchenware pipe, threader, wood Sat. 8a -10p. Bands, & much more! stove, radial arm saw, Beer Garden & Food.

140 - Yard, Garage Sales-Baker Co.

2545 COLLEGE ST. ESTATE SALE. 1736945 ELM St. Sat. & Sun.; H(ln carport on "A" St.) J Baker St. Fn.; 8 AM­ M7 AM — 3 PM. Pontoon Fnday, 8 AM - 4 PM 6 PM & Sat.; 8 AM — 5 boats, boat motors & Saturday, 8 AM — Noon PM. No early sales! lots of misc. Six foot high cyclone fence for dog run $100, 2118 COLORADO Ave 1985 Sierra long bed HUGE SALE. N Fri.; 9 AM — 1 P M train set & much more! P lus, C om m u n i t y GMC pickup w/canopy, K 16 40 Valley Ave. I tems priced t o g o For more info call, 1725 ASH ST. Breakfast Sat 8 - 10a $500, Portable adiustable Fn.; 8AM -2 PM & Name brand clothes 541-51 9-5860 at the Schoolhouse. F at A uburn Ave. basketball hoop,$100, Sat.; 8 AM — 1 PM. misc. Thurs., Fn., & Sat. Train is running & the housewares, women' s Lots of stuff! 70 YEAR Accumulation Guys & girls stuff. Dredge is open. And plus size clothing, doors, B 1 190 E St 8/ 1 7 so will be MAXFIELD Gate opens at 6:30 am! windows & misc. 8/18. 8 AM — 5 PM 970 "F" St. Sat., 8/18 CHURCH SALE. 1820 ORIGINALS!We are a p Estes St. S a t . , 8/18; I, only. 8AM -3 PM MULIT-FAMILY SALE. unique gift & home de­ DECK SALE.815 "D" St DON'T M ISS th is nice Fabnc, large Chnstmas 8 AM — 2PM. Kitchen cor shop w/ a wide va­ items, camping items, 2460 Clark St. Aug. 17 g Sat., 8/18; 8AM-12PM garage — yard sale and c ollection, s p o r t i n g bicycles & other misc guy things too. & 18; 8 A M - 2 P M . nety of product & ex­ Rain cancels goods & misc cellent prices! O pen 2819 College St. Sat. H ousehold item s , this Sat. & Sun. 9a — 5p & Sun.; 8Am -4 PM trolling motor, f a bnc, each d ay . L o c a t ed collections, c l o t hes, across f rom t he plants, kittens & much Dredge parking lot at more!!! 602 S Mill St.

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Position Title: Developmental

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140 - Yard, Garage Sales-Baker Co.

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180 - Personals

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MOUNTAIN VALLEY Mental Health Programs, Inc.

FOUND: H U F FY, 1 8 speed bike at R iver­

LOST. M , b l a c k m i n i Australian Shepherd. B aker A i rport a r e a . 541-51 9-5662

C O . YAR D 8 G A R A G E S A L E Jl

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OUTLET p arki n g , Disabilities 9:30am, Mon. Did you Service Coordinator l ose s o m e pap e r bills/money? MVMHP has an opening 541-975-9275 for a Developmental

LOST TOY black Shih Tzu "Buddy" near 4th St., wearing a green­ colla r. 541-963-8097.

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950- Heavy Equipment

520 - PetGrooming 525 - Pet Boarding/Training

Place

information

employees regarding HR policies, benefits, forms, records a nd practices. Greets em­ ployees and guests in t he l obby a n d a n ­ s wers p h o ne s a s needed. Please apply online: ht tp://www. sa inta I­ phonsus.org/baker­ c I vt /

identify. 541-523-4421. Outstanding c u stomer service skills needed to handle c u stomer LOST FEMALE black calls, order, shipments bunny, near 10th & M, and billing. Detailed in­ late 8/8. 541-786-2641. d ividual n e e de d t o

902 - Aviation

465 - Sporting Goods

Auburn 5

HR ASSISTANT, Saint Alphonsus: Provides

FOUND: WOMEN'S nng near Spnng Garden & E ast. Baker. Call t o

900 - Transportation

460 - Musical Column

s»er viewAaes

210 - Help Wanted­ Baker Co.

ties. Position requires

840- Mobile Homes, Baker Co 845 - Mobile Homes, Union Co

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541-963-6096

810- Condos,Townhouses,Baker Co 815 - Condos,Townhouses,Union Co 820 - Housesfor Sale, Baker Co 825 - Housesfor Sale, Union Co

400 - General Merchandise

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,

801 - Wanted to Buy

380 - Service Directory

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110 - Self-Help Group Meetings NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS HELP

2 days prior to publication date

www.quaiindgegreens.corn

ourgracegospel.corn

2034 Main 541.523.9382

770 - Vacation Rentals 780 - Storage Units

340- Adult Care Baker Co 345 - Adult Care Union Co

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Final Day is August 18th

750 - Houses for Rent

310- Mortgages,Contracts, Loans 320 - BusinessInvestments 330- BusinessOpportunities

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Barbara Jeans

690 - Pasture

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LINE-1-800-766-3724 Meetings: 8:OOPM:Sunday, Mon­ 110 - Self-Help 105 - Announce­ day, Tuesday, Wednes­ Group Meetings ments day, Thursday, Fnday Noon: Thursday VENDORS WANTED AL-ANON-HELP FOR 6:OOPM: Monday,Tues­ S ister S h i c pr e s e n t s families & fnends of al­ c oho l i c s . U n i on day, Wednesday, Thurs­ SHABULOUS. An out­ day (Women' s) County. 568 — 4856 or door shabby-chic an­ 7:OOPM: Saturday 562-5772 t ique & c r af t s h o w . H eld on O ctober 6 . AlcoholicsAnonymous Rear Basement En­ Find us on Facebook & NE Oregon 24 Hour trance at 1501 0 Ave. onIine at Hotline sistershic.blogspot.co 1-866-285-061 7. m. 0 r ca I I 541-91 0-561 8. rt

680 - Irrigation

180 - Personals

PAY FOR 18 in month of August & enter to win a Vegas getaway!

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Entertainmentcenter, Assorted powertools, TVsVCRsDVDs, Mirrors, 4drawerchest, Guitars,WoodenHawaiian lady statue, 7 1/2hpgamefish boatmotor,Wooddining table, BeaverState blanket, Coleman catalytic heater, Colemancampstove, Coleman Lantern, Oldercashregister, 6drawertop boxtool chest, Shotgun shell re-loader,Vintagehandtools, Agri Fad10ft utility tip trailer, Granadaradiant gasheater, 6tonjack stands, 4ft fluorescent fixtures, Books,LPrecords, Christmas decor, Vintagecoffee cans, Walnut coffeetable,Petkennel, Barrel pump,Jasontelescope, 8track tapesandholder, Nicewall pictures, Snowboogie board, Curity - disposablesleep pants, Assortedlamps, Settee, Hang­ ing wickeroutdoorchair, 4ft bamboorods, Assorted glass& stemware,Craftsmanscroll saw,Horsetack, Claypigeons, Daisy, BB rifle, Fireplacescreen,Vintage paymaster machine, Meat saw, Ottoman on legs, Scotch bindingsystem, Printer, Medicine cabinet withmirror, Welbilt hotdiggity dogger, Sixshelf bookcase, Binoculars„Baseballmitts,Helmets,Electric motors,Metalcart with spokewheel s,plusmuchmuchmore. Come meet us andcheck it out this Sunday! Check out Pictures at www.lagrandeauctions.corn

AUCTION CONDUCTED BY KRAMER AUCTION Manager - Phyllis Wright Call for more info: Phyllis at 541-91 0-0844, Jim at 541-910-4130 Auctioneer - David Kramer 541-91 0-4130, Paul Kramer

Buyers are responsible for their own merchandise. Not responsible for accidents, errors or omissions

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6B —THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday DISPLAY ADS: •

Baker City Herald: 541-523-3673e www.bakerci tyhera Id.corn • cl assifiedsO bakercityheraId.corn • Fax:541-523-6426 The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.corn • classifiedsOlagrandeobserver.corn • Fax: 541-963-3674 210 - Help Wanted­ Baker Co.

agement programs for the Tn-County area ad­ ministering the p lan­ ning, organization, di­ rection and evaluation

AG INSURANCE FT Admin Assistant Seeking an i n d ividual w ith a po sit i v e attitude to w ork in a team e n v i ronment. Office e x p e r i e nce

T he g o v e r n m e n t w e a r s m a n y h a t s . W e pu t t h e m a l l i n o n e p l a c e .

preferred. Insurance experience desired. Competitive wages (It benefits, D.O. E. To apply, send resume a nd cover letter to : hinn ©a n-nw.com.

L ook in g f o r o n e p l a c e t o g e t f a s t a n s w e r s t o y o u r q u e s t i o n s a b o u t g over n m e n t b e n e f i t s a n d s e r v i c e s ? U SA .go v i s y o u r o f f i c i a l s o u r c e f or all f e d e r a l , st at e a n d l o c a l g o v e r n m e n t i n f o r m a t i o n . N o w t h a t s s ome t h i n g y o u c a n h a n g y o u r h a t o n .

USA .gov

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143- Yard, Garage Sales-Wallowa Co.

145- Yard, Garage 145- Yard, Garage 145- Yard, Garage Sales-Union Co. Sales-Union Co. Sales-Union Co. RANCH TO Apartment ESTAT E S A LE . MOVING S A LE. Sat. RUMMAGE SALE I Downsizing Y a r d 8 16th-18th. 69566 Hae­ l68am-11pm. 1305 22nd St. Peter's Church at the Sale a t 60 0 S W . fer Lane, Cove. Tools, St. Furniture, toddler g3corner of 4th and O.

145- Yard, Garage Sales-Union Co.

YARD SA L E . S at . 8am-1pm. 1217 Hall ~9St. Gun, antiques, AC, Clothes, books, odds furniture, h o usehold (It ends, all at g r e at items. Tires/wheels, pnces. Sat. August 18, dog kennel, k i t chen 8am- Noon. items, clothes.

145 - Yard, Garage Sales-Union Co.

Montclair, Mill P o nd oak furniture, antiques, bed, antique desk. Storage Units, Enter­ l ots of M uran o , MT. EMILY Safe Center p rise, A ug . 1 8 t h B lenko, H u l l , a n d 36 Liquidation of 18th, 8am-3pm. Lawn more, new quilt books, I7Yard Sale. 2107 Third uDon's plumbing St. (In backyard). Fri., care equipment, en­ art, and frames. YARD S A LE. 61 2 3 7 YARD SA L E . S a t . Aug. 17th, 9am-4pm. 8r Heating" business 8r gine stand, furniture, Rd., Cove. 308am-2pm. 1305 7th St. household, large anvil, ESTATE SALE. Fn. (It Accepting d o n ations g4Conley personal items. Thurs.-S un., 8a m-6p m. Tons of baby stuff! Fu­ for items — nothing is range hood, antique 9 Sat. 8am-2pm. 10902 50-70 years of accumula­ S D. Furniture, house­ pnced! Antiques, old bottle,s t on, p l a y s t at io n 2 , post dnll press, tools, kerosene lamps, sad baby girl (It baby boy tion: old tools, shop bins, Plymouth Grand Cara­ h old i t e m s , t oo l s , MULTIFAMILY SALE. kitchen items, and lots irons, collectable toys, clothes! van, etc. sinks, toilets, col­ of vintage items. lsFI I. 5 p m -8pm . s a t . old snow sleds, power YARD SA L E . S at . antiques, lectibles, furniture, dishes, 8am. 1419 Madison. 145- Yard, Garage washer, old car parts, ESTATE SALE. Fn. -?. Antiques, lots of misc. decorativ e w o od 3l 8a m-2 p m. 64240 M t. tires and more. 70' shop full Sales-Union Co. G lenn Rd . L o t s o f lQ10200 W Railroad Ave. household items! stove, to much more of interesting items. 2 FAMILY backyard sale. Cookware , de s k , stuff! to list! MULTIFAMILY YARD Must seeto appreciate. g F urnishings, a p p l i ­ household goods. ances, books, clothes, lgSALE. 8am-4pm. Sat. YARD SALE. Fn. (It Sat. YARD SA L E . S a t . , Saturday, Aug. 18th 1205 Orchard St Cove. gs1 7th etc. Saturday 8 am to FUNDRAISER YA RD ( tI 18 t h , 3g8am-?. 10705 S Wal­ Doors open at 8am-2pm. 1105 E Ave. ton Rd. Jeep t r uck, Ii SALE . For "Beckie's ?. 1422 V Ave. H ousehol d it em s , 4-whee lers, furniture, Studio of Dance." 601 7 00 am - 3:30 pm clothes car items, of­ Some furniture. household , baby 2- FAMILY YARD SALE. G Ave, corner of G (It fice items (It tools. 2208 N. Pine St. YARD SALE. Fn. (It Sat. clothes, misc., lots of Cedar. 8am-3pm. SAT. 3 Fri (It Sat. 8am-1pm. stuff! (COrner Of uV" and pine) 1604 U Ave. Rubber c OREGON GRAIN Free a g67a m-? 3208 N S p ru e. Collectibles, tools, an­ stamps/access., entire GARAGE SALE. Sat. (It + non-profit organization tique,s books, horse YARD SALE. Sat., 8am YARD SALE. Fri. (It Sat. pig collection, house­ I~Sun. 8am. 701 Poplar is p ut t i n g o n a tack, furniture (It more! 33 505 N Ave. F urnit ure h old/kitchen i t e m s , St. Cove Multi-Family Yard Sale. 3~8am-5pm. 811 N Bell­ toys, clothing. books, and lots more! 1 801 X Av e . S a t . wood, U n ion. F u rni­ B ORROWED Y A R D , GRANDMA'S 8:30am-4:30pm. Fish­ OSHKOS H 19 2 2 ture, household goods, BIG 2 FA M ILY YARD l 3YARD SALE. S a t . ing gear, boat seats, 27 T REASURES microwave. MSteamer Trunk, gas 4 SALE. Sat. 8a m-1 p m. 8am-2pm, 61866 Rid­ tarps, baby c lothes, Estate Sale weed eater, clothes, No early birds! Camp­ d I e R d. S i I kf I owe rs, F n. 4p m-8p m, Sat. 8a m-? YARD SALE. Fn. (It Sat., household items, too g l as swea r, etc! The ing-fishing gear, kids collectables, antique, 10201 S . C S t., IC. five much to list. Proceeds 388am-4pm. Books (Dan­ bay garage at the things, clothes, house­ tea cart, books, sewe­ Couch/love seat, day­ dead end of SOUTH ielle Steele, Nora Rob­ go towards helping our hold. 111 Spnng Ave. i ng i t e m s , V H S bed, tools, chair, ok tv erts, etc.) household community, seniors (It 1 8th Street. Fri. t h e DVDs. s tand, to o m u c h t o items, tnke, bikes, bed disabled citizens. Your BIG YARD SALE at C's 17th from 8am-noon. mention! recliner, too many to support would be ap­ S Storage Units. 3107 ELEPHANT EARS are (It Sat. the 18th from l ist. NO EA RLY preciated! Cove Av e . Sat ., I4back. Yard Sale, Fri. Noon-4pm. Questions HUGE YARD SALE. Fn. SALES. CASH ONLY! 8:30am-3pm, Sa t. 963-7688 9a m-6pm. S un. m-4p m. 10701 W 4th St, IC. 8:30-3. Lots of m i sc. YARD/MOVING SALE. g87a 7am-2pm. 1807 Rus­ YARD SALE. Saturday, New items added on g3309 N Union St. LG. INSIDE YARD SALE. Air YARD SALE. Sat. (It Sun. sel Ave. Something for Fri. (It Sat. 8am-4pm. 4, 8 am-1pm. 267 S 1 s t Sat. 507 4th St. 3Sconditioned! Fn. (It Sat. 398am-4pm. 1 1 01 1 1 th. eve ry one! Something for every­ 6 St. 8am-3pm. 511 S Pio­ L ots o f ki t c h e n one! YARD SALE. Sat., 8am. neer Ct., Union. Oak houseware w o m ens ARD SALE. 1308 Penn, 67038 Hunter Rd. Mi­ h utch, ho u s e h o l d a nd c h i l d ren s a n d SA L E . S at . ~ La Grande. Thurs. 12-? crowave, kitchen ta­ YARD items, clothing, sport­ other random things. Fri. 9-? ICids (It adult gg 7a m-N oo n. 2605 N ing goods, toys, some­ ble, tools, small fndge, Birch, La Grande. clothes (It other items! D odge wheels, a n d thing for everyone! lots more!

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(Northeastern Oregon):

w ag e . Must pass drug screen (It background check. A pply i n p e r so n a t 4000 Cedar St. Only s erious ap p l i c a n t s please.

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The director coordinates n oxious w ee d m a n ­

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210 - Help Wanted­ 220 - Help Wanted Baker Co. Union Co. TRI-COUNTY SOCIAL SERVICE Direc­ COOPERATIVE WEED tor needed full time. MANAGEMENT AREA­ Vista Specialty Care is DIRECTOR POSITION looking for a c a ring,

CAREGIVERS, ARE you looking for a fun (It re­ warding work environ­ ment where your skills are truly valued? We are looking for a canng p erson t o l o i n o u r team at Meadowbrook Place. Seeking: A full time day shift caregiver/med aide (It a full t i m e g r a v eyard c aregiver/med a i d e .

Union County

2 days prior to publication date

• 0 •

e xperienc e soc i a l w orker to w ork w i t h our geriatric popula­ tion. Expenence in de­ mentia a plus. Bache­ lor's degree required,

a nd w i l lingness t o

transport residents to of programs to control a ppointments w h e n and eradicate noxious needed. Apply at 103 weeds in cooperation A dams Ave. o r c a l l 541-963-4184 and ask with Baker, Union, and Wallowa Counties and for Emily. other partners. Co n­ siderable ability to ne­ TRAINING A N D E m ­ gotiate w i t h o t h e r s, ployment Consortium explore and analyze al­ (TEC) is recruiting for a ternatives and imple­ full time position as a ment strategies is cnti­ Workforce cal to the success of Development Specialist the position. II (Case Manager) in La Knowledge of: Pnnci­ Grande Oregon. Pri­ ples and techniques of mary d ut ies i n c l ude weed control including work species identification search assistance, Iob and pesticide applica­ developmen t and tion; techniques and placement for Job Op­ methods of s u pervi­ p ortunity a n d B a s i c sion; relevant laws and Skills (JOBS) regulations; c r eating program participants. If a nd m a i n t a i n in g a selected, a p p licants yearly budget; adverse must pass a c r iminal e ffects o f nox i o u s a nd d r i v in g r e c o r d weeds. check A bility t o : De v e l o p pnor to employment. Ap­ and establish effective plication packet can be w eed c o n t ro l a n d p icked u p a t T E C , eradication programs; 1901 Adams Avenue, read and interpret fed­ La eral, state and l o cal Grande Monday through laws; create and im­ Friday, 8 am to noon p lement e d u c a t i o n a nd 1pm to 5 p m o r programs and m a ke may be requested by oral presentations; es­ calling tablish and m a i ntain (541) 963-7942 Ext. 36. effective working rela­ P osit i o n clo se s tionships with a diver­ 08/20/2012 at 4:00PM sity of o t hers; apply PST. T E C i s an and communicate per­ EOE/Program. suasive techniques in Auxiliary aids and serv­ seeking c o m p liance ices available upon re­ with weed laws; su­ quest t o i n d i v iduals pervise two e m ploy­ with disabilities. TTY ees as well as several (541) contractors. 962-0693. Employment Type: Full-time position with benefits. Starting Sal­

TRI-COUNTY COOP­ ERATIVEWEED a ry: $45,000-52,000 MANAGEMENT AREA (Depending on qualifi­ —DIRECTOR c ations). Loc a t i o n : POSITION (Northeast­ Baker City, OR ern Oregon): T o A p p ly : Pl e a s e The director coordinates p ick up a f ul l Iob descnption and require­ n oxious w ee d m a n ­ agement program for ment packet at your Tn-County area ad­ local O r egon S t ate the ministering the p lan­ employment d epart­ ning, organization, di­ ment office. Deadline: rection and evaluation August 27, 2012. Ad­ of programs to control ditional questions call and eradicate noxious Mark Porter at (541) weeds in cooperation 398-01 54. with Baker, Union, and Wallowa Counties and 220 - Help Wanted other partners. Consid­ Union Co. erable ability to negoti­ ALLEY BARBER (It Salon a te wit h o t h e rs, e x ­ in Pat's Alley has chair plore and analyze alter­ for lease. $275/month. natives and implement Call J ul i e at strategies is critical to 541-786-01 96. Ava il­ the success of the po­ able immediately. sition. CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC Knowledge of: Pnnciples in La Grande seeking l icensed m as s a g e t herapist f o r part time/full time position.

a nd t e c h n iques o f weed control including species identification and pesticide applica­ tion; techniques and methods of s u pervi­ sion; relevant laws and regulations; c r eating a nd m a i n t a i n in g a

Must be friendly, car­ ing, passionate about their work, and pos­ s ess a g r e a t w o r k ethic. Must be detailed o riented a n d ha v e yearly budget; adverse e ffects o f nox i o u s great communication skills. Will provide cur­ weeds. rent patients massage treatment and must be Ability to: Develop and e stablish ef f e c t i v e able to create own pa­ t ient b a se . I f i n t e r ­ w eed c o n t ro l a n d eradication programs; ested please drop by resume and fill out ap­ read and interpret fed­ eral, state and l o cal p lication at 2008 3 r d laws; create and im­ St. Suite B. p lement e d u c a t i o n programs and m a ke EXPERIENCED TRUCK oral presentations; es­ Driver tablish and m a i ntain effective working rela­

R.D.MAC'

tionships with a diver­

sity of o t hers; apply and communicate per­ suasive techniques in seeking c o m p liance with weed laws; su­ pervise two e m ploy­ ees as well as several contractors.

Pnvately owned con­ crete, sand, and gravel company in La Grande, has an opening for an EXPERIENCED TRUCIC WITH PUP DR IVE R. Applicant must be will­ ing to travel. To apply, E mployment Type: please send resume to Full-time position with )aye©rdmacinc.corn or benefits. Starting Sal­ apply in person at ary: $45,000-52,000 60831 S. McAlister (Depending on qualifi­ Road, La Grande. c ations). Lo c a t i o n : Baker City, OR. HVAC INSTALLER for r esidential and c o m ­ To Apply: Please pick-up m ercial heating a n d a full Iob description cooling systems con­ nd r eq ui r e m e n t tractor. E x p e r ience apacket at y our l ocal preferred, pay DOE. Oregon State employ­ D eliver resume a n d ment department of­ r eferences t o 2 7 0 1 fice. Deadline: August Bearco L o o p , La 27, 2012. Additional G rande, o r m a i l t o q uestions call M a r k 69272 Ruckle Road, Porter at (54 1) S u m m e rv i I I e 0 R 398-01 54. 97876.

HVAC SERVICE TECH UNION S C HOOL Dis­ for residential, co m­ mercial and RV sys­ tems. Experience re­

quired, pay DOE. De­ liver resume and refer­ ences to 2701 Bearco Loop, La Grande, or mail to 69272 Ruckle Road, Summerville OR 97876.

VISTA SPECIALTY Care is seeking a part-time Certified M e d i c ation Assistant. Competitive

wages, come apply at 103 Adams Ave. For more information call D irector o f Nu r s i n g (541) 963-4184.

t rict is

h i r ing a H i g h

S chool Lan g u a g e Arts/English Teacher. Please contact Super­ intendent Jon St. Ger­ maine at 541-562-5278 o r v i s i t t h e Un i o n S chool District w e b ­ site:

www.union.k12.or.us t f information.

(I( ir

Looking for a lace to ttve.

(p

Call to 523-3673 to start your new subscription and read new listings every day!

• 0 •


FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD —7B

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday /

/

DISPLAY ADS: •

Baker City Hera Id: 541-523-3673ewww.bakerci tyhera Id.corn • cl assifieds@ bakercityheraId.corn • Fax:541-523-6426 The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.corn • classifieds@lagrandeobserver.corn • Fax: 541-963-3674 220 - Help Wanted Union Co.

310 - Mortgages, Contracts, Loans

360 - Schools & 360 - Schools & 380 - Service Direc­ Instruction Instruction tory UNION COUNTY Exten­ EVER CONSIDER a Re­ ATTEND COLLEGEON­ OAK HAVEN ICindergar­ Jim' s

445- Lawns & Gar­ dens

620 - Farm Equip­ ment & Supplies

2 days prior to publication date

%El 730 - Furnished Apartments Baker Co.

MANTIS DELUXE Tiller. FORKS, HEAVY duty 1 1/2 BDRM, upstairs. 59"x 6", $1500. Snow N EW! FastStart e n ­ w/sm. fridge , m i cro­ SNACZ Program Coor­ I ea st 62 yea rs o Id? for Fall, Mon — Thurs. g ine. S h ip s F R E E . P low, 10'x 3' , g o o d wave & private bath. dinator stay in your home & ' C r i m i na l J u st i c e , 12-3, M. Ruth Daven­ One-Year Money-Back c ondition , $ 1500 . $ 400/mo p lu s d e p . Oregon State University i ncrease cash f l o w ! Guarantee when you L oader bucket 9 3 " x Some ut il i t i e s i n­ 'Hospital ity. Job port, 5 4 1-663-1528, Union County Exten­ Safe & Effective! Call 541-805-4972. buy DIRECT. Call for cluded. No smoking, placement assistance. 1 1/8 yd., fair condi­ sion Service is recruit­ Now for y our FREE Computer available. Fi­ the DVD and FREE no pets. References & tion, $4 00 . O p t ional SEWING ALTERA­ PIANO LESSONS i ng f o r a f ul l - t i m e , DVD! C a l l No w nancial Aid if qualified. Good S o i l boo k ! coupler system for all background check. Call TIONS 8E REPAIRS. Ages 48t Up fixed-term, Extension 888-785-5938. (PNDC) SCHEV certified. Call 877-357-5647. (PNDC) 3. Pictures available 541-51 9-0552 Hems, pockets, zippers, Jo ul Sounds Studio 4-H SNACZ Program 866-688-7078 email kkh711©q.corn. suits & gowns, any Where students develop a 740 - Duplex Rentals 541-523-449 9 or Coordinator. SNACZ is GET FREE OF CREDIT www.CenturaOnline.c 450 - Miscellaneous love of music & item. Leave msg: a 4 -ye a r , om (PNDC) 541-519-1670. Baker Baker Co. enjoy learning toplay CARD DEBT NOW! 541-786-5512. LG research-based, 4-H piano! ATTENTION DIABET­ Cut payments by up to 1 BDRM, all u t ilities youth leadership pro­ ICS wi t h M e d i c are. 630 - Feeds 541-91 0-3992 paid. No smoking, no half. Sto p c r e d itors gram. The coordinator MONTESSORI joyfulsounds88.corn SOCIAL SECURITY D I S­ Get a F REE talking pets. $ 6 7 5 m o n t h, from calling. AB IL ITY B EN E F ITS. will provide oversight PRESCHOOL m eter a n d d i a b e t i c CERTIFIED WEED free 866-775-9621. (PNDC) $ 60 0 depos it . a nd l e adership f o r WIN or Pay Nothing! testing supplies at NO is now enrolling 3­ 380 - Service Direc­ Alfalfa an d o r c hard 541-91 0-3696. SNACZ Teams which Start Your Application COST, p l u s F REE g rass, $ 1 0/bale o r and 4-year olds for tory w ill a d v o c at e f or 330 - Business Op­ In Under 60 Seconds. home delivery! Best of Tuesday, W ednes­ $180/ton. healthy snacks in five portunities Call Today! Contact A CLASSIFIED ad is an day, and Thursda all, this m e ter e l imi­ CLOSE T O EO U. 1 541-523-5081 elementary s c h ools Disability Group, Inc. EASY W AY TO nates painful f i n ger bdrm, new vinyl, new morning classes in a nd n e a r b y f ood REACH over 3 million Licensed Attorneys & p ric k i n g ! Cal l t he Fal l . Ope n paint, no smoking, no stores. R e sponsibili­ BBB Accredited. Call Pacific Northwestern­ 888-739-7199. (PNDC) 650 - Horses, Mules H ouses a t 1612 pets. $ 4 0 0 m o n t h, 888-782-4075. (PNDC) ties include curnculum ers. $ 5 2 5 / 25-word F ourth St. w i l l b e $ 30 0 depos it . d evelopment, y o u t h AVAILABLE AT classified ad in 30 daily MULES AND horse sale: 541-91 0-3696. Monday, Aug. 13th, and volunteer leader newspap er s f o r THE OBSERVER H e I I s C a n y o n M u I e I ND EPEND ENT 6:00-8:OOPM, Thurs­ recruitment, and com­ Days, Saturday, Sept. 745 - Duplex Rentals CONTRACTED 3-days. Call the Pacific d ay, A u g . 23r d , NEWSPAPER m unication w i t h r e ­ Northwest Daily Con­ 8th at 6:00pm, Enter­ Union Co. HAULER 11:OOAM-1:OOPM BUNDLES search faculty and the nection (916) 288-6019 needed forthe pnse. Managed by In­ Burning or packing? and 6:00-8:OOPM, BD R M , 1 bat h, community. Minimum 0I emaiI termountain Livestock. 2 Baker City Herald on and W e d nesday, $1.00 each $450/mo, $450 dep., qualifications include a More info/consigning, Monday, Wednesday elizabeth©cnpa.corn A ug. 2 9 t h , f ro m NEWSPRINT bachelor's degree in and Fnday afternoons. for more info (PNDC) call IML 541-963-2158 w/d hookup, w/s/gin­ 11:OOAM-1:OOPM ROLL ENDS c lud e d , no h ealth promotion o r or 800-824-5298. Sale Please fill out an and 6:00-8:OOPM. Art prolects & more! HUD/pets/smoking, elementary/middle VACATION forms online at hells­ information sheet at the P lease bring y o u r ADVERTISE Super for young artists! 541-963-4907. SPECIALS to 3 million school education, or can onmuleda s.corn Baker City Herald, c hild fo r a vis i t . $2.00 8t up equivalent c o m b i na­ Pacific Northwestern­ 435 - Fuel Supplies 1915 First St., Phone 963-6908 for Stop in today! tion of education and ers! 30 daily newspa­ Baker City QUIET 6 year old sorrel 2 BDRM, 1 bath, new re­ more information. modeled, w/d h ook­ experience. P r e f e r­ 7:30 a.m. — 5:00 p.m. p ers, s ix s t at es . 1406 Fifth Street mare, ridden some in 2 5-word c l a s s i f i e d A MIXED SPLIT, $175. ups, quiet location, Ig. ence will be given to 541-963-31 61 Monday through Friday past. $250 or trade for Red fir in round $175, candidates with a mas­ $525 for a 3-day ad. y ard, s t o r a ge , no 2012-2013 gun. 541-805-9115 split $200. 541r910-4661 CANADA DRUG Center pets/smoking. $600 a t er's d e gree i n t h e 8eckie's Studio of Dance Call (916) 288-6019 or INDEPENDENT is your choice for safe 211 Fir, La Grande. month. 541-786-6058 specified area and a visit CONTRACTED and affordable medica­ Offers: Tumble ballet, www.pnna.corn/adver­ F IREWOOD $ 18 5 8 E background in nutntion NEWSPAPER tions. Our licensed Ca­ EXCELLENT 2 bdrm du­ b allet, p o i n te , t a p , t ising pndc.cfm f o r $200 in t h e r o u nds; and/or expenence with WANTED mail order phar­ plex, garage, storage, Iazz/hip-hop, modern. the Pacific Northwest youth leadership pro­ CARRIERS $210 & $225 split, sea­ nadian Deliver The Obserer macy will provide you quiet l o c a t i on , no All skill levels ages 3 D aily Co nn e c t i o n . grams. Salary is com­ soned, delivered in the to homes in with savings of up to pets/smoking, mensurate with educa­ 1/2 to adult. (PNDC) valley. L a G r a n d e, 90 percent on all your COVE $ 650/month . Cal l tion and e x perience. Reigstration: Thurs. (541 ) 786-0407. Mon. Wed. & Fn. medication needs. Call 541-963-4907. Aug 23, Fri. Aug 24, ANTIQUE FURNITURE To review posting and The Observer Today 888-419-5190 REPAIR and Mon, Aug 27. a pply, p l e as e v i s i t Contact 541-963-31 61. f or $10.00 off y o u r 710 - Rooms for Call Max (541)523-2480 FIREWOOD TAMARAK, TRI-PLEX 5 b d r m , 5 9am-10am 8t http: //oregonstate.edu/ R ed Fi r m i x , $ 1 6 5 first prescription and Rent bath, no smoking, no 5:30pm-6:30pm. Iobs. Apply to posting ANYTHING FOR c ord. $2 0 0 s pl i t . free shippinq. (PNDC) pets. All utilities pd. 541-962-0800, ¹ 0009399 . C l o s i n g 345 - Adult Care ROOM FOR rent, $320. A BUCK 541-805-1 971 . $800 mo., $700 dep 541-805-831 7 date: August 19, 2012 Union Co. OVER 30 Million Women Utilities included, par­ Same owner for 21 yrs. 541-91 0-3696. . OSU is an AA/EOE. Suffer From Hair Loss! tially furnished, plus 541-910-6013 ADULT FOSTER home S EASONED FI R E ­ Do you? If So We have cable. 541-962-7708. 750 - Houses For 230 - Help Wanted CCB¹101518, LG in La Grande has im­ DANCE ARTS Inc. Reg­ WOOD, deli v e r ed. a Solution! CALL RERA­ LG istration 2012-2013 m ediate opening f o r Rent Baker Co. out of area Mixed $150, Tamarack Season. Classes begin N IQU TO FIND COLTON male or female resi­ $180. 541-786-2112. 1-BDRM, 1 bath house. OUT M O R E 720 - Apartment ATTN E L K Hu n t e r s. d ent, p r i vat e r o o m . September 10th: Crea­ COMPUTERS 877-475-2521. (PNDC) Rentals Baker Co. Very clean. $525/mo Guide Iobs avail. If you tive dance, m o dern, offers affordable, WOOD FOR sale: 4 1/2 are a n e x p e rienced Ca II 541-91 0-7557. plus dep 541-403-2220 ballet, Iazz, hip hop, reliable computer 460 - Musical Col­ cords of s easoned CLEAN, QUIET 2-bdrm.: "archery" elk hunter traveling competition services. Call wood in blocks. $600 S tove, f r i dge, d i s h­ umn 2-BDRM, 1 bath. All ap­ w/ good e l k c a lling NEED A Caregiver for teams. Ages 3 and up. 1-541-406-0380 w asher, $ 4 0 0 / m o . pliances, W/D hook­ firm. Deliver in Baker skills & 6-15 wks avail­ l oved ones w hile o n Classes taught by Pa­ or visit us at: OLD UPRIGHT piano in C ity. 541-805-0024 Contact Nelson Real u ps. Storage s h e d . ability for the CO sea­ vacation? Call Dottie tricia Sandlin, over 35 www.coltonre a>r.corn g ood condition w i t h Estate, 541-523-6485 $575/m o, $600 s e c u­ s ons contact u s a t : years of teaching ex­ 541-963-5787. stool. 541-51 9-7658 0I e ven i n g s nty dep. 541-519-6654 41 7-594-081 6. penence. Visit the new CT LAWN Service: Mow 440 - Household 541-856-3932. website for more infor­ weed eat & f l o w e r­ Items 355 Day Care Union 470 Tools LIVINGSTON HEALTH­ FOR RENT: Sm. 2-bdrm m at i o n at beds 541-519-5113 or CARE in L i v i ngston, Co. IN BAKER: Studio, $300 house in c o u ntry. 8 1950'S VINTAGE lawn d anceartsinc.net. O r 541-523-9006. Ba ker Montana has an excel­ LIBBY'S CHILD CARE rent. Most utilities pd. miles f r o m t ow n . swing. All metal. $20. I NDUSTRIAL L I N D E call 541-910-2205 or wire welder i n g r eat lent opportunity for a No pets. $ 300/dep. has openings for all 541-523-3011 541-963-7383. EXTREME VALUE Ad­ 541-523-3560 well-qualified Finance cond. 541-519-7658 ages. Mon. t h rough 541-853-231 3 v ertising! 3 0 Dai l y Director. For more in­ HOME SWEET HOME F ri. W a r m , l o v i n g , newspapers SALE: 2 refreigera­ 480 - FREE Items formation or to apply 725 - Apartment Cute clean 2 & 3 bdrms. homelike atmosphere. $525/25-word classi­ FOR tors, 1 upright freezer. 1 sm. pet considered. go to www.Livingston­ Call (541)786-8790 for HEIDI HO Christian Pre­ fied, 3-days. Reach 3 Rentals Union Co. $ 100/ea. 1 k i t c h e n Healthcare.org (PNDC) school & Kindergarten No smoking. details. million Pacific North­ FREE GOLF: DORM R OOM $2 0 0 . range, $50. All in good is celebrating 40 years Ed Moses:541-519-1814 westerners. For more SIGN UP NOW Economical off-street w orkin g o r d e r . www.quailndgegreens.corn of education and car­ 360 - Schools & information call (916) office spaces, . All VERY CLEAN 2 — bdrm, ing for young children. 2 88-6019 o r e m a i l : 541-524-1 637 Instruction utilites paid. Northeast 1 bath w/basement & Now enrolling chil­ elizabeth©cnpa.corn Propert y M g mt AIRLINES ARE HIRING­ dren ages 3-5 for the fenced yard. Nice loca­ for the Pacific North­ REFRIGERATOR FOR 541-91 0-03 54. T rain fo r h a nd s o n 2 012-2013 s c h o o l west D a ily C o n nec­ sale. $50/OBO. Clean t ion at 2 55 5 7t h S t . Aviation Maintenance year. W e a r e S t a t e tion. (PNDC) $ 575/mo p lu s d e p . a nd w o r k s gr e a t ! CENTURY 21 Career. FAA approved C ertified a n d o f f e r Yard maintenance in­ 509-641-2227 PROPERTY program. Financial aid o n-site c h ildcare f o r FRANCES ANNE cluded. 509-641-2227 MANAGEMENT if qualified — Housing YAGGIE INTERIOR 8E 445- Lawns & Gar­ students before and 752 - Houses for READY FOR A CHANGE? available. Call Aviation EXTERIOR PAINTING, after school. Contact dens Don't lust sit there, let the La randeRentals.co I nstitute o f M a i n t e ­ us for more informa­ Commercial @ Rent Union Co. 505 - Free to a good classified help wanted col­ nance. tion Residential. Neat & 4X12 G R AY Te r r ace 2 BDRM house in Union, home umn find anew and chal­ 1-877-804-5293. bncks. 200 plus. $1/ea. schoolhh©eonucom or efficient. CCB¹137675. H UD approved, n o lenging lob for you. (541)963-1210 (PNDC) 541-524-0369 541-523-9021 (541 ) 963-8795. 5 KITTENS: 6 wks old. gets w/ s pro v i d e d, Super fnendly. Baker. $600/month. CIMMARON MANOR 541-51 8-1 042. 541-562-579 0 or ICingsview Apts. 503-630-7098 8 KITTENS & mom. 4-F, 2 bd, 1 ba. Call Century 4-M. There are 4 w/o 21, Eagle Cap Realty. 2 B D RM, 1 b a t h L a ta ils. 541-524-9089 541-963-1210 Grande mobile home. Quiet park. $525 plus FOUR KITTENS, 8 wks CLEAN 1 bdrm in old, Call after 4pm for $725 security w / s/g Tn-Plex, w/s/g pd, m ore i nf o r m a t i o n , pd. No pets/smoking. HUD approved, $350, 541-91 0-0056. 541-786-8684 541-963-4071 . G ORG E O U S G RA Y 2 BDRM, MH in Union. m ale k i t t e n , po t t y CLOSE T O EO U, 1 s enio r d is c o un t , t rained & ke nne l bdrm, most u t i lites 541-91 0-0811. pd. No smoking/ pets, trained. Needs a very c oin-o p l au nd r y , 3 BDRM duplex, on 2nd g oo d ho m e ! L~lt)54, 'iit', E %%%,Hr ~a% (Hw~C PX~ 0(; P1V,<) 6'6C '-ted%» 541-605-0265 $375/month $300 dep, St. Q u ie t n e i g h bor­ 541-91 0-3696. DANFORTH CONSTRUCTION hood, $800/mo. Dep. Dozer Work LEGACY FORD Whirl pool' and KitchenAid' JOVFlll SOUNDS YELLOW LAB & black Piano Studio Paul Soward Sales Consultant req. Hdwd floors, big APPLIANCES Fire Line Brush Clearing Property Wayne Dalton Garage Doors newfoundland, older & CLOSE T O E O U 2 , Sales • Installation• Service 541 -786-5751 541-963-2161 backyard, dishwasher. - Free Delivery­ 1hinning Four wheeler trails f ixed, n e e d good bdrm, 3rd floor, most Rick 963-0144 786-4440 541-91 0-9523 24 Hour Towing ELGIN ELECTRIC f4'1-810-t07f home! 541-962-7134. No Job Too Small utilities paid, coin-op Saturday Service •Rental Cars 43 N. 8th Elgin rrwwjoyfulsounds88.corn laundry, no smoking, 3 BDRM, 2 bath home Call For Quote 2906Island Ave.,La Grande,OR 541 437 2054 LREJ(' ll 5f J!'(j'j;s no pets, $450/month. with updated intenor, 2 08-573 6 5 8 5 $400 dep. very clean well mani­ ')I!(t) ')<)3' 'zX i~) >tl'Pirl RE IMAGO 541-91 0-3696. cured yard in I sland AAlL' V L".L,'u C.B.'S, LLC Septic TankCleaning sion

Se r v i c e 4- H

verse Mortgage? At

L INE f r o m H o m e . 'Medical, 'Business,

Intenor Installations, Replacements & Repai rs.541-420-3922 ccb¹ 172628

ten registration open

SMA IIl+ONI|

Laurence's Auto Body 8 Paint 1208 North Willow St La Grande, OR

541-963-3427 <tlattUXLL"J"~

(rtt ItopI clotptrrr BACK TOSCHOOL DESIGNER CLOTHING 1431 Adams Ave., La Grande t C),'J'U;I/ tv Jj),'

+~ GALERUST CONSTRUC TION Homes - PoleBuildings - Remodels - Barns -Decks -Fencing - Siding - Windows -Garages

54l-9l0-4489 or 54I-562-5005

Licensed —Bonded —Insured CCB¹183563

Serving EOSince1969

Lt.o (8 LIE'), j( tL~IL,'K­ .,

Teddi's Dog Grooming 1118 '/~ Adams Ave. Across from Red Cross Drug

Grooming by appointment 7 Days a Week

541-910-7829

Final Expense for "SENIORS

Embroidery by... Blue Mountain Design 1920 Court Ave Baker City, OR 97814

shfit h r

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541-523-7163 541-663-0933

C(~'IU!EJ5 %Pi:~'

Clover Haven

Therapeutic Riding Programs for Youth Equine-facilitated Psychotherapy cloverhaven.org 541-663-1528

g~ 's~iire RILEY EXCAVATION ac 29 years Experience

Excavator,Ba:khoe, Mini-Excavator, Dozer, Grader, DumpTruck & Treler

541 -805-9777

nleyexcavahon@ gmal.corn ccBr 168468

FENCING Barbwire,T-Pos(sandMore!! No Job Too Big or Small Can

2 08-573 - 6 5 8 5 LD~ L ' j ii),D.I .:

GradyRawls

541-398-1 825 GRawls2©gmail.corn

5)!IL%il)HE(~ jI„5r lEt

MAID TOORDER Licenseda Insured Commercial & Residential

Call Angie © 963-MAID IslandCity

Montessori-based Preschool and Kindergarten — Morning andAfternoon Programs

541-663-1528 CC,'EK'ELi,rJ ALL OFFSET COMMERCIAL PRINTING TABS,BROADSHEET, FULLCOLOR

Camera ready orwecan set up for

KEN'S YARD CARE Since 1982 Mow, trim, edge, fertilize, leaf removal, tree I shrub trimming

9 63- 0 3 5 8

xx~~ xmze.«~nm Northeast Property Management, I.I.C

Commeraa!8Residential LarrySch!esser . LicensedPropertyManager ta Grande,OR

License ¹163912

541-910-0354

TM LAWN CARE

hV~9, b-W5'b

RESIDENTIAL and COMMERCIAL FOR UNION k 6AKER COUNTIES Over 10 Years Experience!

Troy Martin

1-208-741-01 66 ("Where the Green GrassGrows!" )

Martin Financial Services CONFIDENTIAL-COURTEOUS

City. No p e ts . A v ail.

& PortableRestrooms ServingNortheastOregon for over 40 years!

School & Kindergarten

you. CO tilatl TheObserver 963.3767

Se Hable Espano/ Small loans to $5,000 RAYNOR GARAGE No Prepayment Penalty DOORS 800-725-7372 SALES• SERVICE • INSTALLATION 541-523-7372 Bob Fager • 963-3701 • ccB.232721932 First Street Baker City

THE DOOR GUY

Oak Haven

DEQr351 86

CLOSE TO EOU, studio, all u tilities p d . $425 .

91 0-0811

541-963-5231

CLOSE TO park & pool, 2 bdrm , no 3 BDRM, 2 bath, mobile home. W o o d / elect. smoking/pets,coin op BLUE MOUNTAINSOLAR, INC. KERNS RASPBERRIES: heat. $750/mo, $500 laundry, $405/month, Get yourelectricity fromSunlight! $25/FLAT. You p i ck dep. Avail. Sept 1st, $300 dep. 910-3696. StateandFederalTaxCredits p ossible o r plac e ref. req. No smoking, 541-568-4882 o rders b y c all i n g "WELCOME HOME" CCBr178 092 pets ok. 541-786-3047 541-523-547 8 or 541-856-3595, Haines. '(I'j d d ~ dj'j )lj)Lx d 5 BDRM, 3 bath house in C8II Elgin, $850. No pets. TACO TUESDAYS (541) 963-7476 534-4545, 91 0-4546. Tacos — $1.50 Golf 1/2 pnce after 2 PM Certified Tree Care GREEN TREE AVAILABLE 9-5-2012. 3 Planting Pruning Removal www.quailndqeqreens.corn b drm, possibly 4, 2 APARTMENTS M. Curtiss PN-7077A THOMAS ORCHARDS 2310 East Q Avenue bath, ­ newly redo­ CCB¹ 183649 ICimberly, Oregon crated, Ig yard, play La Grande, OR. 97B50 541 -786-8463 house, $750/month, tmana er@ slcommumaes.c YOU PICK $200 de p. Cal l = 541-963-263 3 or ) ii'L L.LL'll=;=. Free Stone Income Restnctions Ap­ canning peaches 541-91 0-6777. l ly Sunbnght P Z L ife S y s t e m , 2 at ouse , Professionally Managed 5 Lonng Elberta ZEAL FOR LIFE in Union. $900/month. by B Fi. th* 17th ~ All InOne,All NaturalAdvanced No pets, no smoking. GSL Properties Suncrest Peaches WellnessFormula! V a I I ey Re a I t Located Behind La Nectannes FeelGoodant! HaveMoreEnergy! 541-963-41 74. Grande Santa Rosa Plumbs Town Center wwwpjp.zurvita.biz or call ESTATE. VERY NICE 3 READY PICKED b drm, 2 bath, w/ t i p 541-805-0502 Free Stone o ut, d is h w a s h e r , canning peaches Blazeking wood stove, NEW 6-PLEX, all utilites Sunbnght new ice maker fridge, paid, $2100. Northeast Lonng Elberta A/C, w a s h er/dryer. P ro p . Mgt . Nectannes Not for r e nt. $ 7984 (541 ) 910-03 54. Sa nta R osa Plum s OBO. 541-786-2414 or Gravenstine Apples 541-786-0624 STUDIO, A L L ut i l ities p a id , $ 3 2 5 . BRING CONTAINERS 541-91 0-0354. N o rt h­ FEMALE, LOOKING for Open 7 days a week roommates to s h are east Prop. Mgt. nice 3 bdrm, 3 bath in 8 a.m. — 6 .m.only 541-934-2870 La Grande. $325 ea.,

gk~.LU', L'LL't'll", ~ L t-'

605 - Market Basket

M.A.S. Co.

VILLEY REILTY i020iw.)st streetsuite 2 LaGrande,OR REAL ESTATEANDPROPERTY MANAGEMENT

541-963-4174 www.Valleyrealty.net

DANFORTHCONSTRUCTION Over 30 yern serving Union County Composition - Metal - Rat Roofs Continuous Gutters

963-0144(Oflice) or Cell 786-4440 CCB¹3202

Visit us on Facebook

for updates

• 0 •

Sept. 1st. $900 mo, c l e aning CaII de p. 503-347-1 076.

first, last &

• 0 •

www.La rande Rentals.corn

i nclude u t i l it ies a n d wifi. 541-805-0972.

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BB —THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday /

/

DISPLAY ADS: •

2 days prior to publication date

Baker City Hera Id: 541-523-3673ewww.bakerci tyhera Id.corn • cl assifiedsO bakercityheraId.corn • Fax:541-523-6426 The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.corn • classifiedsOlagrandeobserver.corn • Fax: 541-963-3674 752 - Houses for Rent Union Co.

752 - Houses for 755 - Rent, Miscel­ Rent Union Co. laneous FOR RENT: Single family SECLUDED COUNTRY DRC'S PROPERTY

760 - Commercial Rentals

795 -Mobile Home 825-Houses for Sale Spaces $79,900 DUPLEX rent­ 1200 PLUS sq. ft. pro­ 12X35 STORAGE unit. T RAILE R S PA CE fessional office space, $100 mo AVAILIABLE in Union, ed for $9840 per year 4 o f f ices, r e c e ption 541-963-41 25. W /s/g . $ 20 0 . gross. Priced to sell at 780 - Storage Units

only. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 living in Summerville, Management, Inc. 541-663-1066 story, living room, fam­ 1 bdrm upstairs, pas­ ily room, fenced yd for ture 8i barn avail, extra 112 Depot, La Grande Irg a re a , small pet, dbl car ga­ cost. Pets on approval. conference/break area, Taking a p p l i c at ions 'LG 8i SM Storage Units handicap accessible. rage w/ alley access, on corner lot. 2816 N now. $ 6 5 0 / m o nt h, in La Grande 8i Union Price negotiable per 2nd St. $1200/mo. No u tilit ie s i nc l u d e d . length of lease. North­ first, plus last. No pet 541-805-8904. 'Commerical Units east Property Manage­ dep. w/ a s mall pet. Downtown ment (541)910-0354. Call for ap pt . 753 - Wallowa 760 Commercial 541-805-1 969. 1400 SQ. ft. office space County Rentals Rentals w/parking. $450/mo. 2034 Auburn Avenue. If you' ve never placed a 1304 ADAMS AVE. HOME F O R r e n t , 4 Baker City Classified ad, you' re in Located in Historic West bdrm, 2 bath, carport, 541-785-3515 the minonty! Try it once J acobson Bldg. 9 0 0 stg shed, maintained and see how quickly you s q. f t . s tor e f r o n t , ya rd, in W a )Iowa. $ 550/mo. W/s/g i n ­ APPROX. 1300 sq. ft. get results. 541-886-4305. cluded. 541-962-7828 commercial business downtown, pnme loca­

B es F e d s

(541)562-5411

J

820 - Houses For Sale Baker Co.

off Pocahontas

805 - Real Estate

(541 ) 398-1 602 BEARCO BUSINESS Park 3 6 0 0-1200 sq. 7X11 U N IT, $ 30 m o ft. units available. For dep $25 m or e i nf o c al l (541 ) 910-3696. 541-963-7711. LG. A PLUS RENTALS OFFICE SPACE, approx has storage units 1300sq ft, r e ception available. a nd waiting room. 3 5x12 $30 per mo. offices, restrooms, all 8x8 $25-$35 per mo. utilities paid . $1300 8x10 $30 per mo. month, $1200 deposit. 'plus deposit' 541-91 0-3696. 1433 Madison Ave., or 402 Elm St. La Grande. OFFICE SUITE for lease, Ca(I 541-403-1 524 700 sq. ft., all utilities provided, 1502 N Pine. Good location, lots of parking. Available July 1st. 541-963-3450

Kittens (MLF) LonghairedTabbys

Freddy (M) 10mos,Heeler Mix, neutered

(F) 4mos,Lab

in month of August 8i enter to win a

Vegas getaway! www.quaiindgegreens.corn

by Stella Wilder

or Joe Rudi

523-8316days 528-4SD7evenings 3785 10th Street

NELSON LENDER

Capital Beneats, LLC

shed, financing avail.,

GOLF COURSE area, 3-bdrm, 2-bath, 1822

820 - Houses For Sale Baker Co. 4-BDRM, 1 bath. 1600 sq. ft. New electrical, carpeting ,

p a i n t 8i

blinds. Owner finance. 1306 4th St . B aker. $85,000 with $10,000 down. 541-379-2645

STEV ENSONSTORAGE

­

Fast,FrfendkJondFair

1-800-898-6485 541-523-6485

8312 14th

• Mini-Warehouse • Outside FencedParking • ReasonableRates For informationcall:

- FREE QUOTES­

MortgageBroker/Owner Bonded

823-1688

don't do too much in their stead. FRIDAY, AUGUST (7, 20(2 but the things you' re involved in are likely to Born today, you can be charming and LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ­- You may becomequite importantbefore day'send. deligh fu tlcompany,and there arethose who wake today with an odd sensation or notion ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You are will travel simply to be by your side ­ - even that is not in sync with the way things seem certainly not looking for a fight, but if some­ perfect strangers! You know how to do the to be. You can get to the bottom of this. one is relentless and insists on a confronta­ right thing in a difficult situation, and those SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ­ - Someone tion, you can answer in kind. - Tensions around you are sure to be impressed byyour who knows how to play on your emotions TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ­ moral certainty and your ability to see may be at it again ­ - but today you can resist mount today over a misunderstanding­ through to the heart of an otherwise hazy in a way that lets you avoid a confrontation. unless youarewilling to be the first to suggest - You that you don't know the whole truth. issue. You have many talents, and you know SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ­ that you will be pulled this way and that by may not be the best one to take care of certain GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ­ - You can various involvements throughout your life­ pressing tasks, but as the only one available, serve yourself and others quite well without sacrificing either your own self-concern or time; what is important, however, is that you you' ll have to doyour best! - You' ll your natural philanthropy. choosea handful overallothersto explore CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ­ fully. want to avoid giving others orders, but on one CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Stick to the SATURDAY, AUGUST18 or two occasions you' ll have to offer a certain truth and you' ll find yourself wiggling out of LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -­Your good ideas amount of instruction. a situation that could have turned quite ugly are likely to be matched by the good ideasof AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — You'l be if it had been mismanaged. someone elsewho is new to the game. surprised to discover that something you oDIIORSF o dq u pl » t n Hdb W t g t h I go Perhaps youand heshould join forces. havetried to keep underwraps forquitesome COPYRIGHT 2tll2 UNITED FEATURESYNDICATE INC - It's a good time is actually widely known. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ­ DISTRIBUIED BY UNIVERSALUCLICK FORUFS l llOWd tSt K Qty IA O all0aMtl255 67l4 time for you to dole out responsibilities to PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — You may those who havebeen learning from you ­- but think that you' re just having some idle fun,

I' ll pay cashfor your trust deed, real estate contract or mortgage. - NO FEES« Call today!

MINI STORAGE • Secure • Keypad Entry • Auto-Lock Gate • Security Lighting • Fenced Area (6-foot barb) NEW 11x25 units for oBig Boy Toys"

PAY FOR 18

Come meet Freddy and his friendsf. Del's Feed Store • 10 AM - 3 PM Saturday, August 18

CASH FOR YOUR TRUST DEED!

Michael R. Nelson

ANCHOR

770 - Vacation Rent­ als

Jamie

3 BR,2 BA house, in Sun­ ny Hills. Bamboo floonng, professional landscaping, pnvate court yard. High e fficiency f u rnace a n d central air, 2 gas fireplac­ es, new low-E casement windows. 40 year roof in 2005. $172,000. 541-962­ 7696.

FOR SALE by owner: 14 miles f r o m t ow n . 402 2 N D , 2 b d r m , 1 Hunters Paradise. 14 bath, Ig fenced lot 8i acres on secluded val­ garage. May f inance l ey p r o p e rt y s ur ­ $143,000. See info on rounded by mountains. s ign , t he n c al l 1 bdrm country home, 541-663-8683. 2 bdrm, 2 bath mobile home, 2 shops, (30x48 and 24x24) on genera­ BEAUTIFUL 4 bdrm, 3 bath home i n I s land tors. 3/4th ready for City. Very large garage solar. Some equip. in­ cluded. $18 0 , 000, w/ office, sits on large lot, plus irngation well. owner will carry con­ t ract. 3 4 71 7 D e n ny Newly r e m o d e l ed, must see! Creek Rd, Baker City. 541-755-7060. Call be­ Contact 541-963-5315. tween 6-9 AM or after 5PM BEAUTIFUL HOME IN COVE. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, FSBO: LARGE lot w/gar­ nice yard, w/2 car ga­ den spot 8i well. Older rage. Close to 2 acre double wide w/built on corner lot. Option for a ddition . Se p e r a t e l ease. $225 , 0 0 0 . shop/garage building. 541-786-0660. F enced b a c k y a r d w/access from the al­ ley. See at 2195 19th CAMAS COURT, 3 br, 2ba, MH, new carpet St., Baker City. Call 8i paint, A/C, fenced 541-524-1063. Asking $40,000. yard, carport, storage

41296 Chico Rd, Baker City

front. Northeast Prop­ ST O R A G E u ni t s , erty M g t. 2 12x24, $40/mo, 1808 541-91 0-03 54. 3rd St, L a G r a nde,

www.bestfriendsofbaker.org or www.petfinder.corn

J

Cap Realty, 541-963-0511.

e Security Fenced e Coded Entry e Lighted for your protection e 4 different size units e Lots of RV storage

tion. Attractive store­

Save a life: Adopt (541) 519-73S7

over $20,000 less than County's real market value. Out of area own- I er wants this property sold! 1163747 6 J Century 21 Eagle

ONE BLOCK from Safe­ way, trailer/RV spaces. W ater, s e w er , g a r ­ bage. $200. Jeri, man­ ager. 541-962-6246 LG

825 - Houses for Sale Union Co.

$49,900, 541-805-9358.

s q. ft . c u s to m b u i l t with views. $239,900 HOME 8e Shop For Sale OBO. 541-403-4020. By Owner In Cove 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, plus of­ NEW HOME being built. fice. 1614 sq. ft. Built 3-bdrm,2-bath, vaulted in 1994. View intenor great room, fireplace, 8i extenor pictures: Google www.truiia.corn c usto m cab in e t s . 541-523-5729. CCB ¹ Address: 1506 Jasper 32951 St. Reduced pnce at $219,000. Can view by 825 - Houses for appt. only. 541-910-4114 Sale Union Co.

EAGLE CAPWilderness, 5 acres w/ cabin site, looking down at Main Eagle Creek. DEQ 8i IN C O M E w ater . $7 5, 00 0 . G REA T RENTAL PROP. FOR HOUSE FOR SALE BY 541-786-5333. SALE. Large 4-5 bdrm OWNER. $1 6 0 ,000. 3004 N 3rd St. LG. 2.5 PEACE 8e QUIET on 4 home ­ r ents f o r acres. Trees, seasonal $900/mo. Small 1 bdrms, 1 bath, Ig cor­ salmon creek. 2000 bdrm home — rents for ner lot, spacious front 8i back yards. Recent 3-bdrm, 2 bath custom $400/mo. Large 70 ft. entire remodel done. home. 3 bay shop with shop — rents for?. All bonus room upstairs. 5 on 1 c orn e r lot . Call for more info 8i m i. o u t of Bak e r . $205,000. details: 541-786-1938, 541-786-0426, 541-910-8410. Please $365,000. leave msg. 541-51 9-501 1 541-91 0-81 1 2.

CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS

38 Young beef 39 Just a bit 41 Bargain hunter's event 43 USN rank

1 Nada 6 Port in a storm 11 Tabloid staffer 13 Boat basin 14 Flour holder 15 Ms.

44 "Me and

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47 Filbert 49 One, in

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(2 wds.)

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13 17

18

20

22

21 25

23 26

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33 39

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A G L D P S O M E G A

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5 Mortar troughs 6 Mocking laughs 7 Argon, in the lab 8 Strong point

16

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F A Y E F L EW

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8-17-12 © 2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS

6

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1 Gridiron ref, slangily 2 Figures of speech 3 Beam above the door 4 NY neighbor

29 Apple seed 31 Wahine's welcome 32 Item to dunk

4

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27 DiShed Out

3

B AS S A L I T P E ST E R S R E UTA V E E C A D R E B OW K OP E N J UT E MA T 0 I LE D BR R E B BS L S T A T U E S R A CA VS RA Y

48 Throat-clearing sounds

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23 Ms. Basinger 24 Ayla's creator Jean­ 25 Messy person

1

Answer to Previous Puzzle

36 40

41 45

46

53 55

CongeStiOn

12 Cord of firewood 13 Whale or mouSe 16 Hit dead­ center 22 Prickly pear 24 Wanted-poster word 26 Apron part 28 Rock's — Leppard 30 Like some fog 32 Professor's goal 33 Springtime celebration 34 Knight's glove 36 Cocktail party nibble

42

49 52

37

9 Begrudged 10 Kind of

37 Poet-novelist — Wylie 38 Sells from a stand 40 GOP rivals 42 Siskel's old partner

• Always ride andstopwherethe driver canseeyou.

• Make eye contact.If youcan't see them, theycan't seeyou,

• It takes a split second for aclriver to make osuddenturn or lonechange, so

alwaysbealert. I •

44 M, to EinStein

45 IS, in Segovia 51 BART's city 53 Harmful ray

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• I•

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD —9B

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday /

/

DISPLAY ADS: •

2 days prior to publication date

Baker City Hera Id: 541-523-3673ewww.bakerci tyhera Id.corn • cl assifiedsO bakercityheraId.corn • Fax:541-523-6426 The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.corn • classifiedsOlagrandeobserver.corn • Fax: 541-963-3674 825 - Houses for 825 - Houses for 855 - Lots & Prop­ Sale Union Co. Sale Union Co. erty Union Co. NEWLY REMODELED, VERY NICE 3 bdrm, 2

855 - Lots & Prop­ erty Union Co.

915- Boats & Motors

ROSE RIDGE 2 Subdivi­ 1973 STARCRAFT 16' T ri-level, 3 b d rm , 3 A luminum boat w i t h bath, w/ tip out, dish­ 81X113, 1818 Z Ave. sion, Cove, OR. City: bath. Dining area, Ig. w asher, Bl a z e k i n g Utilities available, $39k Sewer/VVater available. 40hp Mariner outboard l iving r o o m w / f i r e ­ wood stove, new ice OBO. 541-963-2668 Regular price: 1 acre motor. Package also m aker f r i d ge , a / c , includes trailer & Eagle place, Ig. great room, m/I $69,900-$74,900. N EW P RICE! F L A G double ca r g a r age, washer & dryer. $7984 We also provide property I.D fishfinder. All for LOTS for sale near n ew deck, 2 b d r m OBO. 5 4 1-786-2414 management. C heck $2500. 541-523-6918. Greenwood school. rental u n it , o n .83 or 541-421-3410. out our rental link on Baker City 110x83, plus dnveway a cres. 1006 21st St . our w ebs i t e 111x20. 1706 V Ave, Ca II 541-963-5996 845 -Mobile Homes www.ranchnhome.co 925 - Motor Homes $34,000. 541-786-0426; m or call Union Co. SEE ALL RMLS 541-428-21 1 2. LISTINGS AT: LAST 2 lots available in 25 FT MOTORHOM E 55+ park, M o u ntain One of the nic­ www.valleyrealty.net Generator and roof Park Estates. Double A/C. Baker wide o nly . e s t t h i n g s Ranch-N-Home Realty, 541-51$2900. 9-4962 o r 541-91 0-351 3 or craigslist — East OR­ 541-786-5648. about classified In c. 541-963-5450. RV' s-7/2 9/1 2

Nalley­

ads is their lovv cost. Another is 1975 CONCORD Single t h e q uick Wide M a n u factured You can enloy extra vaca­ home. 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 results. Try a tion money by exchang­ b ath, 1 0 0 x 10 0 lo t ad i ng idle i t e m s i n y o u r (fenced). $25,000. 495 c lassified home for cash ... with an N . B e n son , U n i o n . today! ad in classified. 541-562-5036. Classifieds get results. 541-9634174

855 - Lots & Prop­ erty Union Co.

by Stella Wilder SATURDAY, AUGUST (8, 20(2 involved in something that you may not fully learn much from you. Born today, you are never one to submit understand. Observers, too, may bemisinter­ ARIES (March 21-April 19) ­- Once you yourself willingly to any kind of busywork; preting what they see. position yourself correctly you can do almost you will avoid that kind of daily activity at all SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Aconflict anything and have almost anything ­- but you costs, saving yourself for those things that that seems to flare today is really not worth a have to know what you want. really capture your interest and get your great deal of thought or attention. You have TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ­ - You may blood pumping. Except for one or two brief muchbiggerfish to fry. find it difficult to send messages via conven­ episodes characterized by bad decision-mak­ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ­ - You tional means today, but you can surely think ing on your part, your life is very likely to may have trouble shaking the disconcerting outside the box and come upwith a solution. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ­- Others may progress according to plan — yourplan,in feeling that someone onyour team isn't really fact, and one that you will have begun formu­ giving it his or her all. be surprised to learn you' vehad your eye on lating at a remarkably early age. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Youcan them for quite some time, and that you know SUNDAY, AUGUST19 make faew keychangesthatarenotindividu­ how to do what they are unwilling to ox LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You may not ally significant but that work together to have CANCER (June 21-July 22) ­- You' reeager want to reveal everything that you know, or a major overall impact. to begin a project that will allow you to - but going AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) —Are you explore your creativity and apply your par­ everything that you are doing ­ undercover may betoo dangerous. ready to do what is necessary to eliminate a ticular talents in an exciting new way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You'll have negative influenceandpromote ideas that can fEDIlURS F«dt 4 q u pl » t n Hdb w a g t h I gC to keep your eye on the clock if you want to benefit those around youf COPYRIGHT2tll2 UNIIED FEATURESYNDICATE INC finish up your work in time to engage in a PISCES (Feb.19-March 20) ­- You' ll find a DISIRIBUIED BYUNIVERSALUCLICKFORUFS lllOWd t St K » Q t yIAOall0a Btltl255 67l4 little social fun. way to get through to someonewho hasbeen You' re LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ­ refusing to listen to reason. He or she can SUNDAY, AUGUST 19,20(2 ways. You cansteer clear. have to judge the value of certain assigned Born today, you have a particular point of LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ­- The schedule tasks with great care today. Some things are viewthat helps to determinewhatyouw(lido you have built for yourself may not hold up worth doing, but others ... not so much! in any given situation ­ - and how ­-and you when things begin to acceleratebeyond your ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Othersare aren't easily swayedwhen you make up your influence or control. waiting for you to make a decision that will mind about something. You are ahard work- SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) —Take care affect them directly over the next several er, and when you apply yourself to some- thatyou're not actuallystallingwhen, in fact, days. thing, you are determined to stick it out and you should be picking up the pace.You may TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You can go the distance; only when you find that the be ruled by certain unknown fears. keep certain fears at bay as you attempt ends do not justify the means­- or vice versa SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -­You something for a second or third time that you — will you stop short and change direction, cannot be in the lead and go placesthat 0th- failed at before. You are positive yet realistic, and able to set ers are not going to want to follow You must GEMINI (May zl June 20)-A ­ change of your sights on lofty goals while remaining keep their needssquarely in mind. heart is likely today. Thosearound you may firmly rooted in what is practical. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ­- You express surprise when you do what seemsto MONDAY, AUGUST 20 can take things to the next level, but you' ll beoutofcharacter. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)-­Your reasons for want to know for sure that a new partner is CANCER(June 21-July 22)-­You' ll want sticking to the game plan are many and completelyon board. to mount your own investigation into events sound ­-but you may still be tempted to AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -­You were that others cannot adequately explain. Steer explore other avenues. better off resigning from a certain project clear of anything overtly threatening. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Youare in than spinning your wheels simply because no mood to be caught, once again, by a situ- there's nothing better to do. COPYRIGHT 2tll2 UNIIED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC ation that makes life uncomfortable in many PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ­ - You will D»~i~~ED~~~wE~s~iUcUcKFo~UFs lllOWd e St K »

1001 - Baker County Legal Notices meet at

t h e D i s t r ict

1001 - Baker County Legal Notices

1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices w ork on A u gust 2 8 IN THE CIRCUIT a nd w o ul d l i k e t h e COURT OF THE w ork to start by m i d STATE OF OREGON September. FOR THE COUNTY The Contract is sublect OF UNION

Office (address above) in Baker City, OR at 8:30 a.m. Request for Bid pack­ to the applicable provi­ ages are available at t he Distnct Office. I f s ion s of O RS In the Matter of the Es­ you have any q ues­ 2 79C.800 t hr o u g h tate of M u i r B u rten­ tions o r c o m m e n t s, ORS 279C.870, and shaw Snow III, the Oregon Prevailing p lease c o n t act t h e D ISTRICT office a t Wage Law. Deceased. 541-523-7121 x 111 or C ontract D o c u m e n t s email may be examined at No. 12-07-8402 Nicole.sullivan©or.nac t he f o l l ow in g l o c a ­ tions: Notice to Interested Per­ dnet.net. This prolect is funded City of Baker City, Ore­ sons in part by funds from g on City H a ll, 1 6 55 F irst S t r e et , B a k e r Notice is h e reby given the Oregon Lottery. City, Oregon that the undersigned Legal No. 00026711 Anderson Perry & Asso­ has been a p pointed 930 - Recreational Published: August 15, ciates, Inc., 1901 N. Fir personal representa­ Vehicles S treet, L a G r a n d e, tive. All persons hav­ 17, 20, 22, 2012 Oregon ing claims against the 2003 ARCTIC Fox Model estate are required to 25N 5th wheel. Super THE CITY of Baker City, Anderson Perry & Asso­ c iates, I nc., 2 1 4 E . p resent t h e m ,w i t h s lide, r e a r k i t c h e n , Oregon, in v ites bids B irch S t reet, W a l l a vouchers attached, to for the construction of AM/FM CD player. Is the undersigned per­ the Scenic Vista Res­ Walla, Washington in excellent condition, sonal representative at ervoir Improvements Copies of the Contract used very little. Tires 1306 Adams Avenue, - 2012. The work con­ D ocuments may b e a re nearly n e w , 3 obtained at the office La Grande, OR 97850, years old . F a ntastic sists of constructing a within four months af­ 70,000-g a II on g la s s of Anderson Perry & f a m i I y t ra i I e r, n o n t er the d at e o f f i r s t Associates, Inc., 1901 fused to steel bolted smoking. Will consider N. Fir Street, P.O. Box publication of this no­ reservoir, including the hitch w i t h s e l l of 1107, La Grande, Ore­ tice, or the claims may reservoir f o u ndation trailer, asking $11,000. g on 9 7 8 5 0 , upo n be barred. and piping within and OR. C ove , non-refundable pay­ All persons whose rights beneath the reservoir. 509-540-0034. ment of $50.00 per pa­ may be affected by The City of Baker City the proceedings may per set. Alternatively, will complete the site 970 - Autos For Sale obtain additional infor­ earthwork and excava­ the Contractor may re­ m ation from t h e r e ­ quest a paper copy of t ion s o t h e si t e is 2007 F O R D Ra n g e r ready for the Contrac­ the Bidder's P acket cords of the court, the Pickup. 24,554 miles, and a CD containing a personal representa­ tor to install the foun­ $10,000. 963-2728. pnntable pdf version of tive, or the lawyers for dation, piping beneath t he Co ntract D o c u­ the personal represen­ the reservoir, and the ments and Drawings tative. n ew r e s ervoir. T h e for $20.00. Only a Bid­ Dated and first published City will make all final der's Packet obtained on 3rd August, 2012. piping connections to f rom t h e En g i n e e r the new reservoir. The shall be used for bid­ Charles H. Gillis p roJect is l o cated i n d ing purposes. T h e Personal Representative southwest Baker City Contractor shall pro­ on an existing City res vide his/her mailing ad­ P ublish: August 3, 1 0 , ervoir site. There will dress, telephone and 17, 2012. be no pre-bid tour, but 1001 - Baker County bidders are e n c our­ f ax n u m b e rs , a n d Leqa I no. 26470 Legal Notices e-mail address when a ged to v isit th e s i t e plans are requested. NOTICE OF PROPOSED INVITATION TO BID and become familiar The Contractor shall Clear Creek with the tight confine­ RULEMAKING also identify him/her­ Restoration Project ment of th e s ite and HEARING self as a p r ime con­ Oregon University Sys­ t he l i m ite d w o r k i ng tractor, subcontractor, Request for Engineenng a rea. A site v i sit c a n tem, Eastern Oregon supplier, etc., as appli­ Bids for a final design be arranged by calling University. Administra­ cable. The C o ntract including stream bank Michelle Owen, Public tive R u le s C h a p t er D ocuments w i l l b e and channel restora­ W orks D i r e ctor, a t Number: 579. Rules available after August 1-541-524-2031. tion, as well construc­ Coordinator: T e r esa 10, 2012. tion oversight. Prolect Sealed bids for the de­ Carson-Mastrude, Contact Brad D. Baird, 541-962-3773. bids will be r eceived scnbed prolect will be P.E., with A n derson Oregon University Sys­ received by M i chelle from qualified vendors Perry & A s s o ciates, by the Eagle Valley Owen, Public Works tem, Eastern Oregon Inc., at 541-963-8309 Soil and Water Conser­ Director, or her author­ U niversity, On e U n i ­ with any questions. v ation D i s t r i ct , u n t i l ized representative, of versityty B lvd., In low 4:00 p m T h u r sday, the City of Baker City, Hall 202A, La Grande, September 6th 2012 Oregon, at City Hall, Lega I No. 00026798 OR 97850. at the District Office, 1655 First Street / P.O. P ublished: August 1 7 , 2012 located at 3990 Mid­ Box 650, Baker City, RULE CAPTION Oregon 97814, u ntil way Drive, Baker City, Modify Parking and Ve­ O R. P r o posals r e ­ 2:00 p.m., local time, hicular Traffic Regula­ ceived will be opened August 23, 2012. Bids tions at Eastern Ore­ o n S e ptember 6 t h will be publicly opened gon University. and read aloud at the 2012. same location, t i m e, A mandatory pre-bid Heanng Date: 9-18-12 s ite visit of t h e w o r k and date that bids are Time: 2:00 PM = = tllf= = ~ = area will be conducted due. The time for sub­ Location: Eastern Ore­ on Fnday August 24th s tantial c o m p l e t i o n = IIEIINIt gon University — Inlow shall be 60 calendar 2012. All prospective Hall 201 -La Grande, bidders interested in days. The City antici­ OR 97850 il PION IIICII t he sit e v i si t s h o u ld p ates aw arding t h e Heanngs Officer: Staff

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Get oncourseto beawell-prepared —andendorsed—motorcycle rider with a skills andsafety coursefromTEAMOREGON.There's never been a better time because the laws for riders are changing. Thepenalty for riding without an endorsement has riow doubled. Arid over the next

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TAKETIN K COURSE.GET KNOORSKQ.

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10B — THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

PUBLISHED BY THE LAGRANDE OBSERVER & THE BAKER CITY HERALD - SERVING WALLOWA, UNION & BAKER COUNTIES

D EADLINES : LINE ADS:

Monday: noon Friday Wednesday: noon Tuesday Friday: no o n Thursday /

/

DISPLAY ADS:

2 days prior to publication date

Baker City Hera Id: 541-523-3673ewww.bakerci tyhera Id.corn • cl assifiedsO bakercityheraId.corn • Fax:541-523-6426 The Observer: 541-963-3161e www.la randeobserver.corn • classifiedsOlagrandeobserver.corn • Fax: 541-963-3674 1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices

1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices

Auxiliary aids for persons 08-15-2012, 2:37 p.m. w ith

d i s a b ilities a r e

available upon request. NOTICE OF PROPOSED

RULEMAKING RULEMAKING ACTION Oregon University Sys­

1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices

1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices

of new rule numbers with the Administra­ tive Rules Unit pnor to filing.

Statuatory Authority: ORS 351.070 AMEND: 549-070-0005 University. Administra­ Other Authority: 351.070 Parking and Vehicular tive Rules Chapter Traffic Regulations Number: 579. Statutes Implemented: 351.070 RENUMBER: Secure ap­ Rules Coordinator: p rova I of n e w r u l e Teresa Carson-Mas­ RULE SUMMARY numbers with the ad­ trude, (541)962-3773 ministrative Rules Unit Oregon University Sys­ Parking and Vehicular Traffic Regulations at tem, Eastern Oregon pnor to filing. Eastern Oregon Uni­ AMEND AND RENUM­ University, One Uni­ versity. BER: Secure approval versity Blvd., Inlow of new rule numbers Hall 202A, La Grande, Last Day and Time for with th e A d m i n istra­ OR 97850. tive Rules Unit pnor to public comment: 09-18-2012 filing. RULE CAPTION Statuatory Authority: Division 70-Amend Park­ Teresa Carson-Mastrude ORS 351.070 ing and Vehicular Traf­ tcarson©eou.edu fic Regulations 08-15-2012 Other Aut hority: ORS 351.070 Statutes Implemented: RULEMAKING ACTION STATEMENT OF NEED 351.070 AND FISCAL IMPACT AMEND: 579-070-0005 Oregon University Sys­ RULE SUMMARY Parking and Vehicular tem, Eastern Oregon University. Administra­ Parking and V e h icular Traffic Regulation Traffic Regulations RENUMBER: Secure ap­ tive Rules Chapter Number: 579. Last Day and Time for proval of new rule p ubli c co m m e n t : numbers with the ad­ RULE CAPTION 09-18-2012, 5:00 p.m. ministrative Rules Unit Division 70-Amend Park­ pnor to filing. Teresa Carson-Mastrude AMEND AND RENUM­ ing and Vehicular Traf­ BERR: Secure approval fic Regulations. tcarson©eou.edu tem, Eastern Oregon

1010 - Union Co. Legal Notices

b. Pro)ected reporting, recordkeeping and

In the Matter of: 579-070-0005 Statuatory Authonty: ORS 351.070 Other Authonty: 351.070 Stats Implemented: 351.070

other administrative activities required for compliance, including

costs of professional services: N/A c. Equipment, sup­ plies, labor and in­ creased administration required for compli­

Need for the Rule(s): To modify/update Parking and Vehicular Traffic Regulations ance: N/A Documents ReliedUpon, How were small busi­ and where they are nesses involved in the available: None development of this Fiscal and Economic Im­ rule: If not, why?: pact: None None

for

Administrative Rule Advi­ Statement of Cost of sory Committee con­ Compliance: sulted?: Yes 1. Impact on state agencies, units of local Last Day and Time for government and the public comment: public (ORS 09-18-2012 183.335(2)(B)(E)): Teresa Carson-Mastrude None tcarson©eou.edu 2. Cost of compliance 08-15-2012 effect on small busi­ ness (ORS 183.336): Publish: August 17, 2012 a. Estimate the num­ Legal no. 26821 ber of small business and types of busi­ nesses and industries Step into the world of classi­ with small businesses fied advertising, where you' ll find lust about anything you sublect to the rule: may be looking for! None

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12B —THE OBSERVER rr BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

COFFEE BREAK

Crush on teacher troubles

NEWS OF THE WEIRD

student headed for college

Police look for thieves who took 500 canaries

DEAR ABBY: I'm a male who haspadu­ ated from high school and is about to start college in another state. I'm ready for a new challenge. Theonly thing holding me back is a romantic attraction I have toward one of my high school teachers. He and I arebest friends, but I love him more than as afriend. I have bought him many meals and gifts since hetaught me, and I have found every opportunity available

looking for two people they say stolemore than 500 canaries from the home of an 87-year­ old Florida man. Police say the men entered Manuel Sanchez's home on May 27 and took the birds. The next day, they sold the birds to at least three petshops. The canaries are valued at $30 each, which means the thefts were worth about

a tattoo? If someoneelse also got one in aplace that doesn't show, would they havetold you after you told everyone you didn't like tattoos? You can't hide this from your husband forever, so don't try. If he reactsbadly, remind him that the buttock with the flower belongs

to be with him. I'm not sure if he's

aware of my feelings, although I wonder whether I unconsciously make myself obvious. Regard­ less, we have apeat relationship. It kills me inside to know I cannever bewith him. I have never told anyonehow I feel, and I know if I ever told him, it would destroy every­ thing we have. I can't forget about him. He's on my mind constantly. Having to leavehim soon is killing me. Do you haveany advice for me? — DREADING IT IN LOUISIANA DEAR DREADING IT: Yes. Goaway to college andopenyourselftonew experiences and relationships. Correspond with this special person, and whenyou return for school breaks, continue the friendship. Your feelings mayor may not be reciprocated, but it is important that youletsometime— years— elapsebefore trying to pursueanything closer with him. If you don't wait, it could be damaging to his career. DEAR ABBY: Last Saturday, two days before my 75th birthday, I did something very uncharacteristic of me. I went to a tattoo parlor

25 miles awayandhad a flower put on my right buttock. I don't intend to tell anyone. It was my

birthday present to myself. This was not aspur-of-the-moment impulse. I have told my husbandmany times that if I

to YOU and that at 75, you' re abig girl who didn't needanyoneelse'sconsent. Now it's time to give yourself another birthday present: Refuse to listen to your husban's DEAR verbal abuse,andyou' ll

ABBY

bemu ch happier.

DEAR ABBY: What are you supposed to dowhenyou are sitting in a salon having your hair cut and styled, and the next appointment shows upearly and engages your stylist in nonstop conversation? My wife says this happensoften in beauty parlors and I should suck it up. I wanted the stylist's full attention so I could get agood haircut. She's not cheap. Am I right? What would you do? — PERPLEXED IN CALIFORNIA DEAR PERPLEXED: For the stylist to carry on an ongoing conversation with the next customer wasunprofessional. If it happened to me, I would take my stylist aside andexplain my feelings. For the next customer to monopolize the styl­

ist's attention wasrude. Theperson should have beenasked tositsomewhereandmakehim-or herself comfortable until you were finished. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, alsoknown asJeannePhillips,andwas founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbbycom or PO. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

For an excellent guide to becoming abetter conversationalist and amore sociable person, He just laughed it off. No one in our family order "How to Be Popular." Sendyour name has one, and in thepast, I have beencritical of andmailingaddress,pluscheckormoney them. But this one does not show. order for $7 iU.S. funds) to: DearAbby, Popu­ Now I have to find away to tell my husband. larity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, He has anexplosivetemperthatgoeson and IL 61054-0447. iShipping andhandling are on, and henever drops anissue — ever. I need included in the price.) advice, and soon. Help me, will you? COPYRIGHT 2012 UNIVERSAL — SITIlNG ON A SECRET UCLICK DEAR SITTING ON A SECRET: How do 1130 Walnut, KansasCity, MO 64106; 816­ you know you are the first in your family to get 581-7500 made it to 75, I might celebrate it with a tattoo.

Police on Wednesday asked the public for help in identify­ ing the suspects. Authorities sayimages ofthe suspects sell­ ing the birds were captured by videosurveillance cameras. Police were able to recover about 150 birds.

MIAMI iAPl — Police are

robber entered Elmer's Restau­ rant late Monday wearing a greenhooded sweatshirt,gloves and a beanie atop a shoulder­ length blond wig that was pulledpartly acrosshisface. A bartendertried to bat away the can of insect repellent when the robber brandished it, but theemployee gotadirect spray to the face. The Roseburg News-Review reports the robber grabbed money froma cash box behind the bar and fled. The amount of the take wasn't disclosed.

Man fires insect

repellent in robbery ROSEBURG iAPl — Police in Roseburg say a man who robbed a restaurant was armed with a can of bug spray. Sgt. Aaron Dunbar says the

$15,000 in all.

Teen slealisguiltvfor TroutlialemariiuanaPrank PORTLAND iAPl — A

nian he regrets the incident, but didn't intend to cause any harm. He thinks prosecutors blew it out of proportion when they charged him with drug felonies The felony charges were dis­ missed in return for the guilty plea to the misdemeanor in Multnomah County

man who thought it would be funny to give a cupcake secretly laced with marijuana to his friend's 51-year-old mother in Troutdale pleaded no contest Thursday to misdemeanor harassment. Nineteen-year-old Ethan AllenLehmann toldThe Orego­

Circuit Court. Lehman has completed 40 hours of community service, apologized to his friend' s

mother and paid $175 for her out-of-pocket costs in Janu­ ary for a trip to an emergency room. She awoke in a panic aftereating the potcupcake and going to bed.

Next wave in rescues: Remote-control 'lifeguards' WESTERLY, R.I. iAPl­ Think of a lifeguard and you might conjure up images of sunburned teenagers work­ ing a summer job. A new and relatively inexpensive lifesaving device could change that. Meet EMILY, a remote-con­ trolled lifeguard. It looks like a buoy, but it's a small watercraft fitted with a flotation device. It can go up to 22 mph and can get to people more quickly, and in some cases more safely, than any human. It's being used by a handful of communities. Last month, it

was used in its first rescue. "In the day and age of shrink­ ing budgets and the availability of personnel, this is just another thing we can use," said Joshua Williams, chief of the Depoe Bay Fire District in Oregon, which performed the rescue with it July 15. "It's proven itself by saving a father and a son. It's really all the proof that we need." EMILY stands for Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard. It's a little over 4 feet long, weighs 25 pounds and costs

dronalix, a Green Valley, Ariz., company established in 2009. If a swimmer is struggling, alif eguard or anyone else can put battery-powered EMILY in the water and, with a remote control, send it through even rough waves to help. Some loca­ tions attach an emergency radio so they can instruct panicked swimmers on what to do. EMILY can't bring swimmers back to shore, but it can keep them safe until rescuers get there,orbe attached to arope so rescuers can pull EMILY and about $10,000. It's made by Hy­ anyone holding on back in.

Air France: Outa as'? As assen ersto itc in PARIS iAPl — An emer­ gency layover in Syria's capital was bad enough. Then passengers on Air France Flight 562 were asked to open their wallets to check if they had enough cash to pay for more fuel.

The plane, heading from Paris to Lebanon's capital, diverted amid tensions near the Beirut airport on Wednesday. Low on fuel, it instead landed in Damascus, the capital of neighboring Syria, where a civil war is raging.

w EATHER AT A GLANGE BA K E R

An Air France spokesman explained Friday that the crew inquired about passen­ ger cash only as a "precau­ tionary measure" because of the "very unusual circum­ stances." Sanctions against Syria complicated payment for

extra fuel. He said Air France found a way to pay for the fill-up without tapping customer pockets — and apologized for the inconvenience. The airline had never resorted to such a request before, he sard.

C O U NTY FO R ECA ST

The plane took off for an overnight layover in Cyprus then landed safely in Beirut on Thursday. Lebanon is a volatile mix of pro- and anti-Syrian factions, and a seriesof hostage-takings has raised worries about Lebanon being

dragged deeper into Syria's unrest. Mobs supporting Syrian President Bashar Assad blocked the main airport highway in Beirut on Wednesday, before Lebanese military units moved in.

O RE G O N F O R E C A S T

HOT 51

RATE THE DAY: 6

9 6/55

93/ 53

90/ 51

87/ 47

Saturday's weather

REGIONAL TEMPS Thursday'shigh/Friday's low Baker County: 88/42 Union County: 90/45 Wall owa County: 86/48

Mostly clear

Partly cloudy Slight chance of Sunny and hot Slight chance of and hot hunderstorms ghunderstorms

f

U NION CO U N T Y FO R E C A S T

':+.:I,

, ~

"

PRECIPITATION La Grande

95/60

24 hours ending 4 a.m.: 0.00 Month to date/Normal: 0.00/0.45 Year to date/Normal: 9.66/1 0.47

93/58

9 1/ 55

86/ 55

! W~. Across the region

Baker City 24 hours ending 4 a.m.: 0.00 Month to date/Normal: 0.00/0.36 Year to date/Normal: 6.06/6.72

Enterprise 24 hours ending 4 a.m.: 0.00 Month to date/Normal: 0.00/0.44 Year to date/Normal: 9.51/11.17 State's wettest: trace at Brookings

Mostly clear

W ALLOW A 51

Sunset: 7:53 p.m. Sunrise: 5:59 a.m. Mostly clear

MOON PHASE

'

"

"

"

"

"

C O U N T Y FO R E C A S T 90/53

88/ 49

88/ 48

83/ 46

Hi T he Dalles 100 Joseph na Corvallis 99 Newport 61 Portland 10 0

Lo 62 na 57 50 65

Pr~ 0 na 0 0 0

Meacham 8 1 Pendleton 9 1 Redmo n d 92 Pasco 94 Walla Walla 9 0 Baker City 8 8 Ontar i o 96

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Hottest Thursday

New Full

Last

New

Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 8 Sept. 15

• 0 •

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Temperatures indicate previous day' s high and overnight Iow to 4 a.m.

36 54 51 52 66 42 66

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Across the nation

SUN

First

Partly cloudy Slight chance of Sunny and hot Slight chance of and hot thund e r storms

Weather History

Nation: 121 in Death Valley, Calif. Oregon: 104 in Medford

On A u gust 18 in 1909, Bagdad, Calif.,lo­ cated in San Bernardino County, reported no precipitation starting on the date and Coldest today Nation: 32 in IIV. YeIIowstone, IVIont. endIng May 6, 1912, for a total of 993 consecutive days. Pregon: 36 in IVIeacham

• 0 •

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85 66

76 58

0

0

s

82 47 0 s 88 77 0 s 98 78 0 pc L as Vegas 103 83 0 p c LosAngeles 7 7 6 9 0 pc Mia m i 89 77 0 pc New York City 85 7 1 0 pc P hoenix 99 7 6 0.17 t Sal t Lake City 97 7 1 0 pc S a n Francisco 70 5 5 0 pc Sea t tl e 94 62 0 s Was h ington, DC 91 72 0 pc

• 0 •


Friday, August 17, 2012 The Observer & Baker City Herald

BaKerCounty

Bow hunters

advisedle gehigher selugin

welareas By Jayson Jacoby Baker City Herald

Jim Ward photo

Any bow hunter would be thrilled at the opportunity to encounter a bull elk of this magnitude.

• Good spring and summer forage has left deer and elk in exceptional condition, biologist says from forage. The hot, dry weather will make it harder for hunters to Crackle could take pop out of the quietly stalk elk and deer. opening weekend of bow season in The hot, dry weather also Northeast Oregon. means deer and elk will not be Still, hunters have many reasons active in the daytime, said Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to beoptimisticforthebow season fordeer and elk overall. Biologist Eddie Miguez, manager Forestsare expected to be noisy of the Elkhorn Wildlife Area. when bow season begins Aug. 25 Miguez advises bow hunters to due to the extensive hot, dry weath­ look for deer and elk in areas with er the region is experiencing, condi­ heavy forest cover, where they tions that have sapped moisture are staying in the daytime to beat By Dick Mason

The Observer

III-fitting bow can

wreak havoc with one's neck and shoulders A compound bow not properly fit for your arm length can lead to injuries. Ron Babcock, the co-owner of Alpine Archery in La Grande, with his wife, Michelle, wants hunters to be aware of this as the Aug. 25 opening of bow season for deer and elk nears. Babcocksaid thatw hen people use compound bows not fit for the length of their arms, they run the risk of hurting their neck and

shoulders. People with ill-fitting bows are often those who pur­ chased them secondhand and not at an archery shop. Babcock advises people who were not fitted for their com­ pound bow to go to an archery shop and make sure they have a proper fit. Babcock said places where one can have their bow properly fit in La Grande include Alpine Archery, the sporting goods section at Thatcher's Ace Hardware and Ben's Archery. — Dick Mason

the heat. This is particularly true of elk. Elk have a harder time dealing with heat because of their thicker hides. The problems presented by hot and arid weather should diminish significantly as the season, which runs through Sept. 23, progresses. This will increase hunters' odds off success. The deer and elk hunters will be harvesting should be in exceptional condition because they have had plenty of good forage in the spring and summer, Miguez said. Vegeta­ tion became available earlier than normal in the spring and still re­ mains abundant, which is unusual for mid-August. Miguez said that he has not re­ ceived any elk damage complaints from farmers and ranchers this summer. Normally by this time of year ranchers and farmers have started reporting elk coming on their land and eating their irrigated crops. The absence of complaints indi­ cates that elk have plenty to eat at higher elevations and are not com­ ing down to lower sites in search of food at farms and ranches. Miguez worries that this could change quickly if the hot, arid weather continues. SeeArchers / Fbge 5C

Archers have leg up on rifle hunters when

itcomes to tags Bowhunters in Oregon are more likely to have hunted deer and elk the year before than their counterparts who use firearms. This is the belief of Phil Gil­ lette of La Grande, a member of the Oregon Hunters Asso­ ciation, who is the manager of the sporting goods section of La Grande Ace Hardware. He explained that bowhunt­ ers are able to get general season tags every year to hunt where they want. Rifle hunters, by contrast, face frustration because all hunts are controlled, limiting the number of tags available for each unit. This means rifle hunters may have to wait years before getting a tag for the unit they want. Some may not hunt at all in the interim. Bowhunters, by contrast, are more likely to hunt every year because it is easier to get tags to hunt wherever they want. — Dick Mason

Hunters: Leave note about where you are going By Don lier The Observer

It's every person's worst nightmare. Alone, in the woods, lost, with wolves howling in the distance, darkness coming and dropping temperatures making hypothermia a possibility. While hunters in Northeast Oregon can count on the sherifFs search and rescue teams to do everything in their power to find a lostperson,therearea few steps that can be taken to prevent getting lost or help out searchers when it does happen. "Know what your limits are, be aware of what's around you and your ability," said Mike Hansen, Wallowa County Sheriff Search and Rescue. "Hunters will get really fo­ cused on game and next thing they know it's dark and they get lost." Knowing where you' re going,

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bringing a map and compass — and knowing how to use them — and a GPS device can help prevent getting lost. But if it does happen, thereare a few stepsexpertsrecom­ mend taking if you find yourself lost in the woods. "Tell someone where you' re going. It often doesn't happen," said J.B. Brock, Search and Rescue coordina­ tor for the Union County Sheriff. "Be detailed. It gives us a place to start and expedites finding some­ one." Before you go, leave a note with as many details about where you are going and when you plan to returnso that a friend or loved one knows to call when you don' t come back. Being as specific as you can on where you will be helps to narrow the search area for rescuers. "Leaving a note on a dashboard, or filling out a permit if using a

trailhead helps," Hansen said. "Also you can leave someone with an impression of the boots you' ll be wearing if you' re worried about getting lost." To make a boot impression, Han­ sen recommends taking a piece of aluminum foil and stepping onto it with the boot on the carpet. When someone realizes he is lost, it is recommended that he stops moving, sit down and try to calm himself. Once the lost person is calm, he should start to think rationally and come up with a plan to re-orient himself. The worst thing he can do is to panic and continue to move and get further lost. Depending on the person' s experience level, the weather and the situation determines what they should do from there. It may be best just to stay there, or it might help to climb up in elevation in SeeSearch/ Fbge6C

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File photo

Bringinga map and compass, and knowing how touse them, can help prevent getting lost.

The good news for archery hunters in Baker County is that the deer and elk populations are relatively robust. The bad news is you' ll have to go find them. Which is not to imply that big bucks and bulls ever routinely stroll into camp and wait pa­ tiently while you fumble around nocking an arrow. But unless the weather changes dramatically before the month-long season starts on Aug. 25, bowhunters might have to do a little more digging, so to speak, to find a target. With hot and dry conditions predominating since mid-July, hunters would do well to choose eitheroftw ostrategies,said Brian Ratliff, a wildlife biologist at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Baker City office. 'You can either go high, and follow the animals there, or look for a cool, wet area such as a north slope," Ratliff said. "The animals are going to be tied to water, and they' re not going to be out in the open much during the day if it stays hot." While counting upland game birds earlier this month, Ratliff noticed that even chukars, which aren't much affected by heat, were seeking the shelter of sagebrush by around 8 a.m. These conditions aren' t exactly unprecedented, of course — except for the last few days, the general archery season always is confined to summer. And savvy ior, sometimes, lucky) hunters can turn the weather to their advantage. With water scarce, a hunter who sets up a stand near a reliable water source hasdecent odds of getting a shot. In a more damp year, animals tend tobe scattered and, thus, more difficult to find. As for the animals them­ selves, elk arefaring abitbetter than mule deer, Ratliff said. "I'm not worried about them at all, "he said."There are no big changes from last year." He reminds archers that the bag limit is any elk in the Pine Creek, South Sumpter and Lookout Mountain units, but archers can shoot bulls only in the Keating and North Sumpter unit, as well as in the adjacent Desolation unit. M ule deer numbers, and in particular buck populations, have been declining over the past few years. In response, ODFW cut the number of rifle season tags from 1,800 to 1,700 in 2011, and then down to 1,600 for this year. One bright spot, though, is the increasing population of white­ tail deer, especially along the western edge of Baker Valley and in the Pine Valley in eastern Baker County. aWe'restarting to seem ore harvest of white-tails," Ratliff said. Compared with mule deer, white-tails are homebodies­ some bucks spend most of their lives in an area no more than a square mile. However, much of the best white-tail habitat is private property, so as always hunters shouldnever go ontoprivate land without permission.

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2C — THE OBSERVER tk BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

HUNTING 2012

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Hunter Paustian of La Grande took this buck deer with a bow in August of 2010.The buck was in the John Day area and had an approximate Boone and Crockett score of 170. '.IIit lc,

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Garritt Ritter shot this forked horn mule deer buck in the foothills between Cove and Union. Garritt participated in the Youth Mentor Program and was able to take his first buck at age 9 with his grandparents' tag. I

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD — 3C

HUNTING 201 2

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Ryan Steward of La Grande displays a 6x7 buck taken at Trout Creeks in October 2011. The buck scored 195 5/8.

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Joey VanLeuven of lmbler took this bull moose in Alaska in 2010.

Until some genius designs a freezer that's powered by solar panels and so light you can haul it around in a backpack, early season hunters will continue to face a challenge. How to keep big chunks of fresh meat cool when the temperature is in the 80s or 90s. We are, of course, accus­ tomed to thinking of meat as something that must be kept refrigerated, almost constantly, lestitbreed bacteria which play unpleas­ anttricks on ourdigestive systems. (And make our steaks taste funky besides.) But in reality, a modicum of common sense will pay largedividends for hunters who perish the thought of wasting a single morsel of venison, said Del Woodcock of Baker County Custom Meats. The best advice, he said, is also the simplest: don' t dawdle. Once the animal is down, get right to work with the field dressing. Removing the innards and propping open the chest cavity will allow the residual heat to dissipate. Woodcock thinks a relatively common problem among hunters — though perhaps not a surprising one — is that they head out into the woods without truly

"Once the animal is down, If you have ice avail­ able, make sure it's in a get right to work on the

field dressing." And then, when the arrow or the bullet flies true, the hunter isn't fully prepared for what typically is the hardest part ofthetrip­ caring for the meat. Once you' ve gutted and skinned the animal, it' s vitalto hang thecarcass, which allows air to circu­ lateand speed the cooling process, and protectitfrom flies.

ered the animal, meat can be temporarily cooled in water, but only if you have ample plastic bags (use at leasttwo for each piece)to keep the meat dry.

sealedbag — don'tjust toss meat into an ice-filled cooler. If you' ve already butch­

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will handle the latter task. Although daytime temperatures during the ar­ chery season can exceed 80 degrees, even in the moun­ tains, temperatures at night usually dip below 50. In those conditions a skinned carcass will cool nicely overnight, Woodcock said. However, if you can't haul all the meat back to town the next day, he said it' s importanttocoverthe part that's still hanging before the day warms much. He recommends for the purpose a sleeping bag­ those thin game bags will keep the flies off but they have no insulating proper­ ties. Although it might be tempting to cool meat by immersing it in a stream, Woodcock advises hunt­ ers to keep meat as dry as

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Jonel Ricker shot this bull elk in Saskatchewan, Canada.

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4C — THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

HUNTING 2012

ODFWhuntforecast lookspromising The Oregon Department of Fish and Game has released the following hunting fore­ cast for the 2012 seasons. BAKER DISTRICT: Sumpter, Keating, Pine Creek, Lookout Mountain wildlife management units DEER Over-winter survival was better than average due to the light winter. Buck ratios arestillator above manage­ m ent objec tives.Overalldeer numbers are still down Rom the hard winter of 2010. The body condition of animals should be excellent with the above average spring and early summer rains. ELK Elk herds in Baker County came out of the winter in good shape with large healthy calves. Bull ratios are at or near management objective for all units. Calf ra­ tiosareaverage throughout the units, with the high being in the Sumpter Unit. For the best chance at tagging an elk, get as far away Rom roads as possible, perhaps by hunt­ ing inone ofthecooperative Travel Management Areas.

UNION DISTRICT: Starkey, Catherine Creek, East Mount Emily, portions of SledSprings,and Wenaha wildlife management units DEER Deer in Union County survived the winter reason­ ably well this year. It's likely to be a good year for hunter success. Deer appear to be in excellent physical condition due to high quality forage produced by a very wet spring. Buck ratios are up slightly in Starkey, about the same in Catherine Creek and down slightly in East Mt. Emily. Fawn survival through the winter was 77 percent or higher in the units men­ tioned above. The Catherine Creek unit continues to be well under our target population objective; East Mt. Emily and Starkey are at or above population target levels. Buck ratios 4ucks per 100 does) are 17 in the Starkey, 16 in Catherine Creek and 12 in East Mt. Emily Hunt units. 2011 hunter harvest statistics: Rifle buck/archery hunter harvest and success rates were 302 deer and 35 percent in Catherine Creek, 285 deer and 19 percent in Starkey, and 393 deer and 31 percent in Mount Emily.

Catherine Creek unit hunter success should be up due to a slightly elevated population. Prospects for the East Mount Emily unit are expected to be betterthan average due to an increase in calf survival and bull ratios. Elk in the Starkey and Catherine Creek units came through the winter in relatively good condition. Starkey is just below popula­ tion management objective and Catherine Creek is well above the objective. Bull ra­

deer populations well below m anagementobjectivelevels. We have had great spring and summer weather, with good moisture producing an abundance of forage, so deer will be entering the fall in good body condition. Hunt­ ers can expect to see fewer yearling bucks this year, but adult buck ratios have remained stable in all units. There should still be opportu­ nityforolderageclassbucks for hunters willing to spend the time and effort.

tioscbulls per 100 cows)are 9, 12, and 13 respectively for the Starkey, Catherine Creek and east side of the Mt. Em­ ily units. Thesebullratiosare either the same or up Rom the previousyear.Calfratios icalves per 100 cows) are 26, 29 and28 respectively for the Starkey, Catherine Creek and east side of the Mount Emily units. These calf ratios are all up Rom the previous year. 2011 hunter harvest sta­ tistics: Rifle/archery hunter harvest and success rate was 155 elk and 15 percent in Catherine Creek, 461 elk and 12 percent in Starkey, and 133 elk and 16 percent in Mount Emily ifirst season spike and second season any

bull). WALLOWA DISTRICT: Wenaha, Sled Springs, Chesnimnus, Snake River, Minam, Imnaha DEER Despite a relatively mild winter, deer numbers are still low in all units with this past year's fawn survival lower than the previous year. Predation on adults and fawns continues to hold

Reader scrapbook

wet but not enough to make up for thedry w interand itappearsthat we are in a drought situation this sum­ mer. Buck ratios are hovering rightaround management objective. The Murderers Creek­ Flagtail Travel Management Area begins three days prior to archery season again this year irather than three days priortorifl e season). 2011 Hunter harvest statistics: Total hunter harvest and success rate was 563 deer and 33 percent in Northside, 512 deer and 28 percent in Desolation, 521 deer and 28 percent in Mur­ derers Creek.

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Mark Penninger poses with a bull moose he took with a traditional bow in Alaska last September.

II BAKER

ELK Elk numbers continue to increase slowly in most units. The past year'sdistrictcalf survival was low, averaging 20 calves per 100 cows. Pre­ ELK dation on elk calves contin­ Most elk populations are ues to hold calfrecruitment at orabove management ob­ at low levels. Hunters can jectives in the Grant district expecttosee fewer yearling units. ispikel bulls this fall. Calf ratios were higher at Most units have good the end of the winter than numbers of branched bulls they had been the past few and hunting success should years except in Desolation be good. The Wenaha Unit which is still experiencing reducedcalfrecruitment. population is still below m anagementobjectivelevel, Because of the higher and spike hunters can expect calf recruitment elk hunt­ low success. ing may be better than past year. However, due to the dry GRANT DISTRICT conditions, elk will be focus­ DEER ing onareas ofgood forage at Deer populations in Grant least early in the fall. County continue to be below The Murderers Creek­ management objectives. Flagtail Travel Management Grant County experienced Area begins three days prior an unusually warm and dry to archery season again this winter which led to good year irather than three days adult survival but fawn sur­ priortorifl e season). vivalwas justaverage due to 2011 Hunter harvest sta­ lack of fall green up. tistics: Rifle/archery hunter Also, more coyotes were harvest and success rate observed during spring was 507 elk and 19 percent flights than past years and in Northside, 285 elk and 12 that may have caused some percent in Desolation and lower fawn survival. The 484 elk and 18 percent in spring was fairly cool and Murderers Creek.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

OD~ offers free

bird hunts for youth The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is of­ feringseveralfree upland game bird hunts in Sep­ tember for hunters 17 and younger. The list includes events near Baker City and La Grande. Although the hunts are free, hunters need a valid

hunting license i$14.50l and upland game bird validation

i$8.50l to participate, and they must have completed a hunter education course. The Baker City hunt will be nearthe airport,and is scheduled for Sept. 8-9. For more information, call the ODFW's La Grande office at 541-963-2138. The La Grande hunt will be at the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area on Sept. 15-16. Advance registration is not required; check-in will be at 7 a.m. both days at the Wildlife Area headquarters, 59116 Pierce Road, with hunting fiom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. To registe ronlinefor the Baker City event, go to ODFW's home page at www. dfw.state. or.us. •Go tothe license sales

Bear seasoninfull swing wOLWERII!lN "~~,-,."

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General bear season opened Aug. 1. Hunting for bear early and late in the day will provide hunters the bestopportunity to observe bears during the warm days of August. Bears are beginning to

use draw bottoms as haw­ thorn berries and service berries begin toripen. Huckleberries and plums are favored by bears in the early fall. Spot and stalk hunting will likely provide the

Your Huntinl Boot h Clathiny Head u a r t ers

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ty. Starkey had 26 calves per 100 cows, according to spring ODFW aerial counts. This Continued ~om Page1C was the highest total of the The good forage deer and past 12 years, according to elk have been feasting on the ODFW. means that many are in Calfratioswere alsoup at prime condition and will the two other Union County have larger antlers. units. Catherine Creek had "There has been phe­ 29 calves per 100 cows, up nomenal horn growth," said three Rom a year ago, and Phil Gillette of La Grande, East Mt. Emily had 28 a member of the Oregon calves per 100 cows, its high­ Hunters Association who is est mark since 2008. the manager of the sporting This means that hunters will have noticeably better goods section of La Grande Ace Hardware. chances to take yearling Hunters in Union and bulls in Union County in late Wallowa counties will find summer and the fall. In Wallowa County the about the same overall num­ ber of deer and elk they did a overall elk population is up slightly to 18,000. Last year ago. The best news on the elk spring Wallowa County had 20 calves per 100 cows, down population &ont is in the Starkey Unit of Union Coun­ four from a year ago.

Reader scrapbook

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Mule deer numbers in Union and Wallow counties are down slightly, according to the spring census counts. In Union County the deer population is down slightly in the Starkey Unit and unchanged in the Catherine Creek Unit. Hunters in Union County can expect to have improved opportunity to take year­ ling bucks and an average chance to adult bucks, based on the spring population count. The mule deer population count in Wallowa County is down about 4 percent from a yearago.W allowa County had an estimated mule deer populationofabout 22,000 last spring, down about 1,000from the previous spring.

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page. • Enter the Hunter/Angler ID iODFW ID¹l, last name and Date of Birth of the youth hunter. ilf the youth hunter has never purchased an ODFW document, choose "New Customer" under the "Hunter/Angler ID¹" drop down arrow.) •Selectgreen "Registerfor a Class" tab. • Verify your customer information. • Select Youth Upland Hunt tab. • Select hunt of choice. Continue through the checkout process. It is not necessaryto bring thereceipt to the youth pheasant hunt. Pheasants will be stocked at each hunt, and quail and dove will be available at some sites. All regular bag limits will be enforced. An adult 21 or older must accompany each youth ito su­ pervise, but not hunt). Both hunter and adult must wear a hunter orange hat and vest, and eye protection. ODFW will provide equipment to those who don't have it. Although most hunts are two-day events, hunters can sign up in advance for only one day. Hunters can choose to show up on the other day and will be allowed to hunt if the event's quota isn't filled.

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD — 5C

HUNTING 2012

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6C — THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

HUNTING 2012

SEARCH

a person can do is to stay put. Hansen told about a person Continued from Page1C who was lost and she had been near a creek and then order to make out some land­ wandered ofK Search and marks to find a way out. Or it Rescue searched near the may help to go downstream creek and then moved on, and follow a water source, while she moved back to the though that does not always creek that had already been mean you' ll find civilization searched. Moving around or a road. delayedher getting rescued. Bring extra clothing, Sometimes the best thing

especially gear that isn' t made of cotton. Clothes made with material that can repel rain and keep you warm are highly recommended. Weather can change quickly in Northeast Oregon and it' s been known to snow during bow hunting season. It can also help to pack a space blanket, and be sure to pack extra water, food and

some fire-starting material. "Especially in fall it' s useful to have a fire to stay warm at night," Hansen said. Also for those who will be in the back country, there arespotdevicesthatcan communicate with satellites to alert friends and authori­ ties of your progress or your position, although they can be expensive.

It may also be useful to bring a cell phone. However, since there aren't many tow­ ers in remote areas, it may be impossible to triangulate the locationoftheperson. Wallowa County Search and Rescue typically has 20 to 40 calls annually. Accord­ ing to Hansen, there have beenfewer callsthelastfew years, and while about two­

thirds of them used to come during hunting season, now only a quarter to a third of them come during the fall. Brock says that Union County Search and Rescue receivesabout 30 missions annually, and hunting season is typically their busiest. He saidthe biggestvariant isthe weather, with colder weather bringing in more calls.

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Hunter Maddy Thomas, 12, and her trusty assistant, Morgan Thomas, 7, harvested this tom turkey in the Walla Walla Unit, in May. RayWilhelm packs into hunting camp at Chicken Peak in Idaho.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD — 9C

HUNTING 2012

Hunters need to prepare physically for challenges of hunt By Casey Kellas

good day of hunting into a

The Observer

painfully bad day.

With hunting season right around the corner, hunters of all ages are busy preparing for that first big hunt of the year. But one thing that often goes overlooked, something that is just as important as sighting in your rifle or scouting out an area, is your physical fitness level. Not being in the proper shape can turn a possibly

Pulls, strains and the like are pretty common during hunting season. But they can be easily avoidable with a little work during the months leading up to the hunt. Ron Babcock, a physical therapist at Mountain Val­ ley Therapy in La Grande, suggests working on core strength and increasing your aerobic capacity well

in advance of hunting season. "Something I would sug­ gest is, first thing in the morning do some push-ups or squats. Some arm circles. Anything to get your heart rateup and togetblood flowing in your extremities," Babcock said. Babcock also suggested spending time walking or jogging on gravel roads and uneven surfaces, anything that will prepare your body

for the terrain you will face in the field. Babcock, a hunter himself, said he shoots year round and takespart in trailshoots. He also added that Moun­ tain Valley Therapy has trainerson stafFthatcould help you get in the proper shape required to trek the

hillside And if you'renotthe gym­ going type, there are plenty of ways to get a good workout around the house that will

work specific muscles you will use on your hunt. "Chopping wood is a great core workout," Babcock said. "Anything that involves pulling. Even rolling a tire through your yard works the core. You just need a little imagination." But evenifyou have paid close attention to your fit­ ness level and think you' re in the right shape, doing something first thing on the morning of the hunt is

just as important. "Strains are most likely to happen in the cold. Some general stretches are good. Just a light warm-up," Bab­ cock said. So don't let that trophy bull get away because you spent too much time on the couch during the summer. Doing a little extra in the ofF months could pay off in a big way down the road. Literally.

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George Garoutte took this four-point buck in the Snake River unit in 2011. Hank Rodman shot this bull elk in Canada

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10C —THE OBSERVER a BAKER CITY HERALD

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012

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LA GRANDE OBSERVER_08-17-12