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FIVE YEARS FIVE

FARMS 1


“The biggest barrier to recruiting young farmers is making the land affordable. We need many tools in that tool box, and the tool NEFA has developed is both needed and powerful.� John Piotti President & CEO, American Farmland Trust

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Dear Agricultural Center LLC members and farmers: In the five years since NEFA launched, we’ve secured 1,550 acres of land, of which over 900 acres are tillable, wooded and ancillary, in the densest part of the country, creating five agricultural centers, with two more underway. Your investments, supported by fifty investors, range from $2,500 to $3,000,000. Your contributions of time, money, and counsel make possible the hard work of 25 new and expanding farmers, providing much-needed security and equity while adding to our northeast farm legacy. The results are clear: our agricultural centers have benefited their local communities by keeping old farmland active, creating new jobs, and ensuring local food is more accessible and affordable. And more is coming soon. With new Ag Centers already underway in both the Finger Lakes Region of New York and Unity, Maine, we’ll soon see even more historic farmland kept in production for the next generation of farmers. There’s additional farmer housing in the planning as well -- the next biggest hurdle to new farmers after land access and a crucial step to helping our farmers grow their businesses. We’ll also be expanding our Agroecology project to revitalize wetlands and wooded areas where farmers can’t grow, fortifying these sensitive habitats with native species and benefiting pollinators, animal life, and the ecosystem as a whole. Through the development of our new capital Fund and nonprofit arms, we will provide new options for investors and expand our social activism efforts. Through education, outreach, and partnerships with food justice organizations, we will create a food system that is more accessible for all, no matter race, gender, or income. The future of NEFA is brighter than ever. I hope you enjoy the stories of our farms and the diverse group of farmers that follow, a celebration of all we have accomplished together. This is what your investments have made possible.

Thank you! — Bob and the NEFA Team

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Northeast Farm Access Has a Unique Way to Get New Farmers Onto Old Lands In the Spring of 2013, NEFA set out to establish a new model to keep important farms active through a sound financial instrument. Taking the best from successful community land trusts and the affordable housing movements, NEFA’s new model offers protection for both farmers, through 30-year renewable leases on prime farmland, and for the sociallyconscious investor, by providing both financial and non-financial returns. We did this for the land’s health and beauty, for fair and affordable food access, and for the farmers who grow our food. Thanks to our fifty investors, funds from conservation land trusts, and federal awards, NEFA now has: • 5 new agricultural centers in New York & New Hampshire, with a sixth center now forming in Maine • 700 acres converted from conventional to organic production • 1,000 acres protected forever through conservation easements • 25 independent farm businesses of different scales, models, and means • 40 full-time and eighty seasonal jobs • Provided abundant access to fresh food and good jobs in both urban and rural regions, while integrating young farmer families into the local community • Thousands of tons of fresh, local food produced each year the right way

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Farm Succession for the Next Generation As older farmers prepare to retire without successors in place, your investment ensures this land remains accessible for the next generation. But money alone can’t secure our centers’ land without the strategic long-term protection of our partner organizations. These land trusts include the American Farmland Trust, Columbia Land Conservancy, Maine Farmland Trust, the Monadnock Conservancy, Orange County Land Trust, Rondout-Esopus Land Trust, and the Scenic Hudson Land Trust. Nor could our farmers feel secure in growing their business without a legal framework between their farms and the land, created by our team of attorneys, financial planners, and land consultants. Working along with Jacob Meyer and Randall Carmell, the Attorneys at Lavelle & Finn, PC and Orr & Reno, PC have played major roles in making this possible. Farm Credit East has provided independent accounting for each Ag Center and for NEFA since the start. By taking this holistic approach —legal, financial, equitable— NEFA’s model is broader in scope than other organizations’. Through farmer training and business advice, partnerships with local municipalities, and access to experts in creative infrastructure rehabilitation, our Center’s farmers are in the best position to succeed. Our form of land tenure is comprehensive: • New farm businesses obtain both land security and build equity • Multiple farm operations are empowered to work the land collaboratively • We break the cycle of farm resale that results from short-term leases, thereby protecting farmers’ investment in expensive infrastructure on our land • Our model positively impacts communities at a social, environmental, and economic level, where jobs are scarce and populations shrink

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ADAMS ROAD JEFFERSON ROAD TAFT ROAD

MOU

Northeast Agroecology 3.4 acres

MOUNTAIN VIEW ROAD

IN

6a

VIEW

ROA

WASHINGTON ROAD

PARK SIDE DRIVE

LINCOLN ROAD

D

MOUN

VIEW

ROAD

0

MOUNTAIN VIEW ROAD

Brewery 1 acre

1a

Unleased 7.2 acres

TAIN

Camphill Village 15 acres

Ag Structures Complex Boundary

0 1Unleased acre

3b

Deep Roots Farm 10.1 acres

CE NT

FARM

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Deep Roots Farm

HI

3c 0.55 acres

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COLUMBIA CO. ROUTE 7A

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3a

Borough Mushrooms 4.5 acres

Camp Farm 20.4 acres

6c

Deep Roots Farm 9.35 acres

1b

Camphill Village 5 acres MAGNETIC NORTH

NT

0

200

Northeast Agroecology 6.9 acres

HIL

SCALE IN FEET 1" = 100'

100

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100

tructu res Boun Comple x dary

Camp Farm 6.2 acres

6b

CE

PLAN VIEW 200

Tiny Hearts Farm 21.3 acres

W

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TRUE NORTH HORIZONTAL DATUM NAD 83 STATE PLANE COORDINATES NEW YORK EAST ZONE VERTICAL DATUM NAVD 88

Northeast Agroecology 8.5 acres

5

PUMP HOUSE

TRUE NORTH

4b

PUMP HOUSE

PUMP HOUSE

W

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Ag Stru

ctures

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Compl

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ndary

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7

A

COLUMBIA CO. ROUTE 7A

CTY

.

ROU

TE

Leasehold Plan

Copake Agricultural Center Copake, NY

7A

Legend

6

Camphill Village Farm (1)

20 acres

NE Agroecology (6)

18.8 acres

Borough Mushrooms (2)

4.5 acres

Unleased (0)

9.2 acres

Deep Roots Farm (3)

20 acres

Ag. Structures Complex

Camp Farm (4)

26.6 acres

Farmstead Complex

Tiny Hearts Farm (5)

21.3 acres

Farm Lanes

Structures (existing & proposed)

Wells

W



Scale: 1" = 100'-0" Prepared by: Walter Cudnohufsky Associates, Inc. October 23, 2018


Copake Agricultural Center

“I don’t know about the farming yet, but it’s great that young people are moving into town.”

a Copake Center Neighbor

LAND

INFRASTRUCTURE

PRODUCTION

110

0

12

0

Acres Tillable

Acres Pasture

Acres Woodland

Acres Ancillary

2

2

5

3

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

5

15

330

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

Irrigation Systems

2

Easements

4.3

Fencing & Roads (miles)

660K $1.4M

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

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ABOUT COPAKE AGRICULTURAL CENTER NESTLED IN THE WESTERN FOOTHILLS OF THE BERKSHIRE MOUNTAINS, the Copake Agricultural Center is NEFA’s pioneer multi-farmer agricultural project. Formed in 2014, it is our first showplace of diversified, sustainable agriculture, and the proof of concept that NEFA is good for farmers, reinvigorates the soil, and re-energizes the community. Copake Agricultural Center initially purchased two farms, the Belt Farm and the Town Center Farm (known as the Flats, locally), leasing to three farm families who relocated their farm operations from Massachusetts, Maine, and Westchester County, respectively. In December of 2017, NEFA sold the Belt Farm after placing it into conservation, converting the land to certified organic, and renovating its buildings. The new owner is a like-minded farm-investor who has several young farmers working the land. Farmers at NEFA’s Copake Center celebrated five years on the land as of March 2019. The project has proven our model: create a secure place for farms to establish themselves, and watch them take off. Each of our inaugural farms has grown and evolved to best meet their specific business needs — sometimes in ways we could not have even imagined. TRANSITIONS Sparrow Arc Farm has moved up the road into a larger farm, with a lease-to-purchase option. Next year, MX Morningstar Farm is buying a property nearby. As farms grow in different directions, the land they worked and transitioned to organic has opened up opportunities for new farmers to come in. We are thrilled to share that despite the transitions of some of our initial farms, the Center remains 90% leased for 2019: Deep Roots Farm, Langdonhurst Farm, and Camphill Copake will lease the land and much of the infrastructure formerly used by MX Morningstar Farm. Tiny Hearts Farm is expanding not only with a new baby, but also in cultivated land, growing from 12 to 22-acres.

“Being given a chance to purchase this farm would not have been possible without the opportunity to lease land and build our business in Copake. Our time here has been well spent building a loving and close-knit community, creating a business and farmstead from scratch, and most importantly, growing good food. We look forward to using the following year to expand on those things for the benefit of all.” With love and appreciation, Max and Maria, MX Morningstar Farm

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BOROUGH MUSHROOMS

Johnathan Sadlowe

Borough Mushrooms will soon purvey locally grown specialty mushrooms to restaurants, grocery stores and greenmarket customers in the greater New York City area. Owner Jonathan Sadlow recently purchased a greenhouse from a former Copake farmer and converted it into a mushroom growhouse. After extensive renovations, production will begin this Spring on their mushroom crop of shiitake, maitake, and oyster varieties.

CAMPHILL COPAKE

Travius Sims

Tavius Sims has led an initiative to farm hemp at the Ag Center for medicinal CBD oil. Camphill has hired Kyle Woehrle to be the lead grower for 2019. Camphill may raise some food crops as well.

LANGDONHURST FARMS

John Langdon

John Langdon, our neighbor and predecessor at the farm, is leasing 7 acres to also raise a crop of hemp for CBD oil.

THE INSTITUTE OF AFROFUTURIST ECOLOGY Jasmine Burems

+ King Aswad

The Institute of Afrofuturist Ecology is a land-based eco justice organization serving at the nexus of Black Culture, Land and Technology. Founded by regenerative farmers, healers, artists, technologists and academics, it is a millennial think tank, cross pollinating a diversity of practitioners to dramatically improve the lives and livelihood of disenfranchised black families by supporting them to become self-sustaining. Our mission is to advance economic and racial justice, to solve environmental problems and to create better opportunities and outcomes for a more just and sustainable future.

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DEEP ROOTS FARM

Scott & Stormie O’Rourke

Deep Roots Farm NY’s mission is to provide their local community with fresh, organic produce, as well as pickles fermented without preservatives or additives. Scott and Stormie O’Rourke began farming in North Salem, NY, but soon discovered they needed more land to scale up and meet the growing demand, which they found at Copake. “We are extremely grateful for such a wonderful opportunity to farm in such a gorgeous area, on such well-maintained farmland. Already having a fenced in property with a well on certified organic land allows us to focus on other tasks that directly add value to our business, saving us a lot of upfront time and costs.” —Scott O’Rourke

MX MORNINGSTAR FARM

Max Morningstar

Max Morningstar came to the Copake Agricultural Center from Siena Farms in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where he managed 60 acres of organic vegetables and a 700+ person CSA for eight years. The opportunity to create his own business drew Max to the Center, where he obtained a 30-year lease on 72 acres to grow a variety of organic vegetables. After meeting his wife Maria at a farmers market that first season, the farm restructured to focus on wholesale and restaurant customers, such as the Berkshire Co-op Market and the Copake General Store. They are currently under contract to purchase a farm in nearby Claverack and plan to relocate in 2019. “We are really sorry to see Max and Maria leave, but are excited to have been a big step helping them acquire another local farm that will be managed organically.” —Bob Bernstein, NEFA Director

TINY HEARTS FARM

Luke Franco & Jenny Elliot

In 2014, Jenny Elliot and Luke Franco of Tiny Hearts Farm moved their farm to Copake. Now, like the Center’s other farmers, they have a secure, 30-year lease to work 25 acres, where they rent a house and barn that overlook their fields. On May 5th, 2017, Tiny Hearts opened a studio and showroom in nearby Hillsdale, where they offer classes, full-service wedding design, their CSA pickup of weekly bouquets, and seasonal retail offerings. Tiny Hearts is leasing an additional 12 acres, doubling the size of their flower farm at the Center.

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LEGEND

16 Acres Upland Fields

NEFA Owned (Zangrillo A & Durma) Land Under Contract (Zangrillo B)

Blooming Hill Farm

Contorino Propertty Nicotra Property Contract B

Battiato Property

Blooming Hill Farm

600 acres County Owned

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Chester Agricultural Center “If it wasn’t for NEFA, we wouldn’t be farming right now. The model they’ve devised made land and infrastructure accessible in a way that it wouldn’t otherwise be, considering our proximity to New York City. And by bringing together a community-minded group of farmers, NEFA set us up for a successful, cooperative business in a field that sees fewer farmers every year.”

Shayna Lewis Dirty Boots Farm

LAND

165 Tillable Acres

Pasture Acres

Ancillary Acres

Woodland Acres

Easements

INFRASTRUCTURE

0

6

4

0

5

PRODUCTION

0

5

3

2

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

Irrigation Systems

Fencing & Roads (miles)

5

18

465

930K

$3M

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

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ABOUT CHESTER AGRICULTURAL CENTER SITUATED ON MORE THAN 270 ACRES OF ORANGE COUNTY’S FAMOUSLY FERTILE BLACK DIRT, the Chester Agricultural Center conserved and transitioned their farmland to organic management practices. NEFA is proud to have facilitated the formation of the Center in the fall 2014 in partnership with the Ralph E. Ogden Foundation, Orange County Land Trust, and eight local investors. Along with returning these farms to healthy growing practices, Chester Agricultural Center promotes greater awareness of the challenges and opportunities in the current farm-labor economy among farmers, workers, social investors, and the community. NEFA expanded our standard land lease, in consultation with the farmers, to promote these values. Chester has a rich agricultural history. In the late 19th-century, newly arrived farmers from Italy turned this former-glacial lake into prime muck soil, or “black dirt”, by digging a system of ditches to drain the water and create a readily available source of irrigation. The descendants of these families have since retired from farming, but remain an active part of the community, offering advice on the unique challenges— and incredible benefits—of farming this nutrition-dense soil. They, like the community at large, are thrilled to see farming return to their former land. Although the soil’s structure makes it unsuitable for construction, which alleviates development pressure, black dirt soil creates specific conservation and environmental-management issues for agriculture. The wetlands and ditches require watermanagement infrastructure to protect crops from floods and droughts, and farmers need to control the high weed pressure to produce viable yields. Currently, most black dirt farmers elsewhere in the country rely heavily on herbicides. By supporting farming research and facilitating communication among farmers to share best-practices, the Chester Agricultural Center has demonstrated the viability of returning organic practices to such land. NEFA partnered with the Scenic Hudson Land Trust to gain approvals for the first ever conservation easement on black dirt. Now funded, this easement should close in 2019, ensuring organic practices will continue for decades to come.

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DIG INN FARM

Larry Tse

Dig Inn Farm, a flagship venture of the farm-to-table restaurant chain of the same name, grows on 17 acres of the former Battiato Farm, producing vegetables for their restaurants in NYC. Dig Inn, which is in its third year of operation, employs five seasonal farmhands, training their workers in organic practices and tractor-use. Dig Inn is also creating an incubator program on this site to help their employees start farms of their own.

DIRTY BOOTS

Shayna Lewis & Matt Hunger

Dirty Boots Farm, one of the initial farmers at the Chester Agricultural Center, will be moving their operation to NEFA’s Arrowhead Agricultural Center for the 2019 growing season. They’re appreciative of their time at Chester, but fell in love with a house in Ulster County, which is, fortunately, just down the road from NEFA’s Kerhonkson site.

SUN SPROUT FARM

Simon Ziegler

Sun Sprout Farm, Chester Agricultural Center’s largest operation on 30+ acres of land, grows a wide variety of seasonal vegetables, fruits, cut flowers and plantstarts for their customers in New York City, New York State, northern New Jersey and southwestern Connecticut. Hiring both apprentices and local farmworkers, Sun Sprout brings a decade of expertise to their year-round grow operation, becoming a fixture in the local food community and a favorite at the Park Slope farmers market.

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Esopus Agricultural Center O L D C H A M B E R S FA R M “The impact of NEFA on our community is multifaceted and profound: farmers have found new stability, investors have a local option, neighbors are enjoying the resulting abundance at local farmers markets, and the agricultural centers have become vibrant hubs of community activities and events. It’s truly inspiring to see benefits of collaboration and synergy in action!”

Maria Reidelbach Author, Artist, Rondout Valley Growers’ Association Board Member, Esopus Agricultural Center investor

LAND

138 Tillable Acres

Pasture Acres

Woodland Acres

Ancillary Acres

Easements

INFRASTRUCTURE

1

2

5

2

2.5

PRODUCTION

2

60

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

3

17

420

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

14

Irrigation Systems

1

Fencing & Roads (miles)

840K $1.8M

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

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ABOUT ESOPUS AGRICULTURAL CENTER INITIALLY FUNDED BY 10 SOCIAL IMPACT INVESTORS, THE ESOPUS AGRICULTURAL CENTER, LLC closed on the historic 214-acre Old Chambers Farm in the Town of Ulster in August 2016. The Chambers Farm acquisition was the third such NEFA effort in the Hudson Valley in as many years. Located along the Esopus Creek and situated within one of the city’s residential neighborhoods, the Center has revitalized both the farmland and its properties, adapting an abandoned farmhouse into an office with a kitchen and meeting space for the Center’s farmers and members. Following a major investment in the Spring of 2018, extensive infrastructure upgrades were completed to improve roads, power lines, and water systems from both the Town and Esopus Creek. Thanks the vision, technical assistance, and funding from the Scenic Hudson Land Trust, a conservation easement is expected to close in mid 2019, permanently enmeshing farmland within the city limits and as part of the community, which offers school visits.

“As someone born and raised on a farm, I understand how important local farms are to our county’s economy. It’s exciting to see new investment and creative new farm business models taking root here, and I’m thrilled to welcome Northeast Farm Access to Ulster County. To ensure local farming continues to thrive, we need projects like the Esopus Agricultural Center. Through NEFA’s efforts, experienced farmers can grow or expand sustainable farm businesses, which in turn will contribute to our communities by adding jobs, providing access to healthy food, and protecting our County’s natural and scenic resources.”

Mike Hein

Former Ulster County Executive Set among a diversity of natural habitats and intensive human development, Old Chambers Farm is a vast, flat expanse of organically certified prime Unadilla, Scio, Raynham and Tioga soils. Tracts of woodland separate the farm from the city, creating a peri-urban environment that is distinct but indelibly connected. Neighbors include a senior housing complex, shopping center, golf course, and single-family homes — even the Thruway, making easy access to markets near and far. The adjacent natural habitats include the Esopus Creek, old growth forest, wetlands, and the Bear Cat Kill. We plan to add native-plant insectary strips to ensure pollinators thrive, as part of NEFA’s larger Agroecology Program. TRANSITIONS Four experienced farmer-lessees, each attracted by the stability of 30-year leases and the great soils, were on the land by September 2016. As of the 2018 growing season, two of those have expanded, and one new farm has joined.

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ALEWIFE FARM

Tyler Dennis

Tyler Dennis joined Esopus Agricultural Center in December 2016 after starting Alewife Farm in 2014 to produce a diverse range of vegetable and some herbs. He sells through a mix of restaurants, specialty wholesale accounts, and two farmers’ markets in Manhattan. Tyler’s started his farming career as a WWOOFer on a diversified organic olive orchard in France. He spent two years apprenticing at Stone Barns where he wanted to start a farm. He hoped to create a farm business in the Hudson Valley and never to have to get a “real job”. Now, leasing 48 acres, Tyler and his crew have raised five greenhouses, wash-pack and cooling facilities, and he created an operation admired and appreciated by all.

EVER-GROWING FARM

Nfamara Badjie, Dawn Hoyte, & Moustapha Diedhou

In 2015, Nfamara Badjie, his wife Dawn Hoyte, and his cousin Mustapha Diedhou started Ever-Growing Farm to bring a lifetime of hand-cultivated, sustainable farming experience from the Gambia in West Africa to the Hudson Valley. Situated beneath a mountain ridge, the farm utilizes hard clay dams to maintain the marshy flats required for their water-intensive rice crop, making them a unique addition to the project.

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Ten-percent of every dollar earned at EGFF goes to their sister farm in Nfamara’s village Sitta, Gambia, to offset the devastating impact of climate change on the subsistence farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa.


FARMSTOCK NEW YORK

Sarah & Nicholas Marnell Michelle & Ashton Zabul

Corporate-dropouts turned first generation farmers, Farmstock Family Farm’s owneroperators moved back to the land after an “a-ha!” moment while attending a Farm Aid concert years ago. Fast forward, on three acres they’ve implemented responsible, sustainable practices, while promoting access to locally grown, high quality, nutritious produce using no-tractor, no-till and organic growing methods. At Farmstock they like food to be simple. As a trusted partner for local communities and restaurants, Farmstock has big ambitions: every table should be able to have the freshest, healthiest ingredients.And they won’t stop until they get there.

SEED SONG FARM & CENTER

Creek Iverson

Creek Iversen, who transitioned from teacher to farmer about ten years ago, now leases about 40 acres to grow 40 kinds of vegetables at the Esopus Agricultural Center. His farm also grows berries, flowers, and harvests forest products, and he offers a pick-your-own opportunity to encourage farm visits and get the community out into nature. The farm’s non-profit arm, Seed Song Farm Center, holds many on-farm education opportunities and events, which Creek says enables him to “get community support for things that are not profitable, such as sponsoring meals for the underprivileged.” These events include visits from the local schools, both visual arts and music events, shared-meals, and advocacy for a more sustainable life.

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Livestock Fence along Road Frontage Ex. Drive

New Entry Drive (phase 1)

ROUTE 209

LIVESTOCK PASTURE: EAST

Barn

Goat Dairy ROUTE 209

4 Cars

Proposed Greenhouse (approx 30 x 96)

Equip Barn Transformer Pad

Barn Livestock Barn & Storage

Farmer Field Access & Parking: Gravel (4,550 SF)

EVENT SITE: OVERLOOK

Livestoc

k Fence

Farmer Housing

Proposed Farm Enterprise Location

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

Proposed Farm Stay Cabins

Consider Dedicated Well for Barn? (Septic field?)

Improved Farm Lane with Parking Area (3- 4 cars max)

9 20 TE

EVENT SITE: POND

U O R

Lane Farm Commons A -West 1.1 Acre Shared Farm Sheds (3-16 x 20 units)

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

LIVESTOCK PASTURE: EAST

Livestock Fence (Typical)

Pond

Well Location Well

House

4 Cars 2-3 Cars

Shed & Cooler H.T. North Position 2

H.T. South Position 3

H.T. South Position 2

Hydrant & Electric

5 Cars

Shed

Livestock Fence (Typical)

DEER FENCED ZONE

Long Season Farm Greenhouses(30 x 96) GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

Farmer Access & Parking: Gravel (5,385 SF)

Farmer Field Access & Parking: Gravel (20,900 SF)

DEER FENCED ZONE

Irrigation Main Line (typical)

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

Livestock Fence (Typical)

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

3 Cars

EVENT SITE: RONDOUT

RONDOUT

CREEK

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

Approx. Field Shed Location (15 x 30 )

DEER FENCED ZONE

LIVESTOCK PASTURE: EAST

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

H.T. South Position 1

Treadlight Farm Greenhouses Moveable High Tunnels (30 x 96)

GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

Livestock Fence (Typical)

Farm Commons B -West 2.1 Acres

Native Vegetated Buffer

Hydrant & Electric H.T. North Position 6 Cars1

Livestock Fence (Typical)

Work Yard & Parking: Gravel (7,570 SF)

Native Vegetated Buffer

H.T. North Position 3

LIVESTOCK PASTURE: WEST

Livestock Barn (30 x 48)

Dirty Boots Greenhouse (30 x 36)

Gravel Pad (2,700 SF)

Livestock Fence at Edge of Woods Uphill from Existing Cow Lane Proposed Guest Lodge Site

LIVESTOCK PASTURE: WEST

Shared Coolers & Wash and Pack

Sunset

Livestock Fence (Typical)

l)

Proposed Agro-ecology Parcel

Livestock Fence (Typical)

Future Barn Location

Proposed Farmer Support Building

Sugar Cabin

(Typica

Pond

FARMSTEAD COMPLEX 9.09 ACRES

Hudson Valley Seed Company Greenhouses(30 x 96) GATE LOCATION: Deer Fence

Irrigation Pump Station

Irrigation Main Line (typical)

RONDOUT CREE K

Irrigation Field Connect(approx)

K

OUT

Irrigation Main Line (typical)

ROND

CREE

PLAN VIEW 200

100

50

0

100

SCALE IN FEET 1" = 200'

SOURCE DATA NOTES: 1) Property Boundary Data is derived from survey plans completed by Brooks and Brooks. 2) Ortho Aerial Imagery is from NYS GIS and utilizes current imagery available 3) Contour Data is from NYS GIS and is shown at a 2' contour interval.

SITE TOPOGRAPHY AND GIS AERIAL IMAGERY: ARROWHEAD FARM Kerhonskon, NY PROJECT NORTH SCALE: 1"=200'-0" Prepared by: alter Cudnohufsky Associates Inc. February 25, 2019

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200

400


Arrowhead Farm

Agricultural Center

“Living in the Hudson Valley is a dream of ours. The land and views are absolutely beautiful. The environment and atmosphere is quite different from the city life we are accustomed to. It allows us to be still, present and focused on the land.” Kurt Frederick & LaAsia Pugh-Miller Grazing Pastures Farm

LAND

120 Tillable Acres

Pasture Acres

Woodland Acres

Ancillary Acres

Easements

INFRASTRUCTURE

3

4

4

2

7

PRODUCTION

55

0

10

1

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

Irrigation Systems

Fencing & Roads (miles)

8

20

360

720K

$3M

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

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ABOUT ARROWHEAD FARM AGRICULTURAL CENTER NEFA ESTABLISHED ARROWHEAD FARM AGRICULTURAL CENTER, LLC (AFAC) IN 2018 TO purchase the old Arrowhead Farm in the Rondout Valley on Route 209 in Kerhonkson, New York. This third-generation family farm is a tremendous addition to NEFA’s efforts to expand access to mid-scale organic agriculture in a central, popular area of the Hudson Valley where development is booming. HISTORY Farmed by the Davis family since 1911, Arrowhead Farm operated primarily as a 200 cow dairy farm, filling its four silos with corn, soy, hay, and grains. Arrowhead includes some of the Rondout Valley’s finest agricultural land. The farm’s 271 acres sit in the center of the valley, between the Catskill Mountains and the Shawangunk Ridge, and runs 1.4 miles along the Rondout Creek. The farm’s rolling hills and sweeping vistas make the Davis Farm one of the most scenic and vital farms in Ulster County. But it has also made development pressure on the farm intense. “My family and I have received numerous offers to sell the farm for development, including plans to develop the property with hundreds of homes and commercial retail space along Route 209,” said Peter Davis. In June 2008, the Open Space Institute and the Ulster County Farmland Protection Board announced the permanent protection of the farm. Thanks to the funds from the conservation easement, the Davis’s were able to preserve their family farm and heritage forever. AFAC is completing its second year of transitioning Arrowhead to organic management practices. It has brought in nine farmerlessees experienced in raising flowers, seeds, vegetables, goat cheese, cows, sheep, chickens and maple syrup. More than 90 acres of Unadilla silt loam run along the Rondout Creek, with 100 acres of property on higher ground in pasture and sugar bush production. There are many water sources, including a stretch of the Roundout Creek adjacent to tillable land, a drilled well at the farmstead complex, two ponds, and additional springs. AFAC is affiliated with the Rondout-Esopus Land Conservancy and nearby farms. TRANSITIONS Farmer Peter Davis has been collaborating with AFAC for two years and plans to leave in 2019 to join his family, currently farming in Tennessee. AFAC has one new business and five expanding businesses, three retail businesses, two wholesale businesses, and two CSAs. Currently, we have five farmer/lessees that support the work of 12 year-round farmers aided by 20 three-season farmworkers.

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ACORN HILL FARM

Joyce Henion & Aleah Rose

When Acorn Hill Farm, a family-owned goat micro-creamery, outgrew their small farm’s dairy facilities, they found few affordable farms available to accommodate their growth. Three years into the search they discovered Arrowhead Farm, which provided the best opportunity to grow their operation. Acorn Hill Farm specialty goat products include cheeses, fudge, and soaps from organically managed dairy goats. The farm will offer cheese-making classes at their new creamery.

GRAZING PASTURES FARM

Kurt Frederick & LaAsia Pugh-Miller

Grazing Pastures Farm will raise high-quality, organic pastured laying hens, grassfed cattle, and Katahdin sheep through an intensive rotational grazing system. Kurt and LaAsia’s priority is to bring communities together through healthier, safer food, using regenerative land management practices. They strive to make food easily accessible all year-round and to educate consumers on where and how their food is raised.

HUDSON SOIL COMPANY

Eileen Banyra

Eileen Banyra founded the Hudson Soil Company to distribute her organically produced compost locally, ensuring an integrated food and agricultural system throughout the region. Eileen’s method recycles local resources by salvaging organic material destined for the landfill, transforming it into high quality, nutrition-dense compost. This practice reduces the negative environmental impact of incorrectly disposing organic material, all while building healthy plants and more resilient communities.

HUDSON VALLEY SEED CO.

Ken Greene & Doug Muller

Ken Greene and partner Doug Muller co-founded HVSC in 2008 to preserve heirloom seed varieties in a novel way. The idea began when Ken added seeds to the Gardiner Public Library’s catalog so patrons could “check them out,” grow them, and then “return” saved seed at the end of the season. After four years of running the program at the library, Ken and Doug decided to turn the library into a mission-driven, homestead-based small business, now on 15 acres of land.

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Reflecting on Northeast Farm Access after five years... “It is essential to have a deep and sustained love of the land. When graduating from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design in 1963, we were asked to pen a statement on what is crucial to achieve great landscape architecture and design. My answer has not wavered in the past fifty six years. Without respect for, interest in, and the willingness to be in awe of the land, we will be lost! Agriculture may be our most expansive connection with the land and of course is central to our very survival. To be done well, farmers as well must possess ‘A Love of the Land.’ Following Mark Twain who famously said, “Buy land they are not making it anymore,” NEFA is doing just that. It is a thrill for our firm to be involved in this courageous work, the insuring of self-sustaining agriculture through small scale working farm enterprises. In our experience planning for NEFA, we see the genius happening at multiple levels. There is the continual sharpening of the concept, care in the assigning of land and soils and buildings to particular agricultural uses, the provision of efficient infrastructure and services that allow agricultural enterprises to operate efficiently side by side. To have an assured diversified outpouring of farm products from each of the NEFA agricultural centers is epic. The fact that NEFA requires organic agricultural practices is important. The fact that it fosters investment and hosts young but proven agricultural enterprises is another component of raising the agricultural bar. There exists an absolute necessity for changing the way we currently do agriculture in North America and beyond. The fact that NEFA’s working farm preservation is in perpetuity is a gift beyond measure. The fact that it embraces then builds on the best of historic agricultural traditions and less damaging agricultural practices is another model of a thankfully growing movement.” —Walter Cudnohufsky Landscape Architect Land and Community Planner Walter Cudnohufsky Associates Inc.

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LONG SEASON FARM

Erin Enouen & Sam Zurofsky

When Long Season Farm found themselves selling out of produce at their local markets, they struggled to find the prime farmland needed to grow their business. “During our year-long search for additional farmland, we were not finding much we could afford,” says Erin. Arrowhead, only one mile from their home farm, matched all the needs they had outlined for expansion, including security for a growing business and some of the best soils available. The farm grows a diversified crop of organiccertified vegetables year round.

TREADLIGHT FARM

Irene Berkowitz & Matt Dell

Treadlight Farm is a specialty cut-flower farm in Kerhonkson, NY. Matt and Irene began their farm in 2015 on two acres in Bovina, NY. This year, they’re relocating their farm to Arrowhead and expanding to twelve acres. With great care for the land and its soil, they specialize in surprising and unique florals that are underrepresented in the conventional floral trade. They provide fresh flowers to the New York City region through farmer’s markets, florists and floral designers, grocery stores, and at weddings and events.

THREE SISTERS FARM

Roberto Rodriguez

Roberto Rodriguez has 20 years of experience growing organically-produced fruits and vegetables. At the Arrowhead site, he will be growing a variety of fruits, vegetables, and herbs, while offering pick-your-own strawberries for visitors. Robert will also help with special planting projects and assist with NEFA’s agroecological project.

ROOTS, SHOOTS & FLOWERS FARM

Kyle Woehrle

Kyle Woehrle will be growing specialty herbs and vegetables on three acres of land at Arrowhead. Roots, Shoots and Flowers Farm produce will be available for sale in New York City.

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TREE JUICE

Ryan Annets & Jake Fairburn

Hilltop Bottom Farm works 200 acres of land to produce hay and to pasture their animals, from which they produce raw milk, meat, and eggs for their on-farm market. With a focus on sustainability, they hope to keep the farm in their family for generations to come. They will also produce vegetables this year. Ryan plans to bring in sap from smaller sugar bush areas nearby their Arrowhead site to add to the bounty they boil at the farm.

35


 

FULL PROPERTY CONCEPT PLAN 

SIMPLE STRUCTURE AT POND: CABIN, TENT PLATFORM OR GAZEBO

NORTH HAY FIELD: CONSERVED. CONVERT TO ORGANIC/BIODYNAMIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTION w/ LIVESTOCK IN ROTATION

RETREAT CABINS IN SUGARBUSH

POLE BARN RELOCATED: ADD SMALL LIVESTOCK, CABIN, PARKING

HOMESTEAD: KITCHEN & DRYING ROOM ADDITION, CLUSTER 1-2 ARTIST CABINS E

TISAN

PROPERTY OF INTEREST

SUGAR HOUSE MAINTAIN NEIGHBOR'S ACCESS & ADD SCREENING FROM FARM OPERATIONS HOUSING: ALTERNATIVE LOCATION; CLUSTER OR DUPLEX

RELOCATED POLE BARN

MIDDLE HAY FIELD: CONSERVED. CONVERT TO ORGANIC/BIODYNAMIC, w/COMMUNITY GARDEN, BARN & GREENHOUS(ES)

CARRIAGE HOUSE: STUDIO(S) & FARM STORAGE

HOUSING: CONVERT PORTION OF BARN TO RESIDENCES BARN: COWS, HAY STORAGE, COMMUNAL KITCHEN & MEETING SPACE

SOUTH HAY FIELD: NOT CONSERVED. PASTURE AND VIEWS, FOR HUMANS TOO!

(2) PRIVATE PARCELS with 12.6 ACRES of CONSERVATION EASEMENT or DEED RESTRICTION

LEGEND BLDG: FARM USE BLDG: ARTIST USE BLDG: HOUSING CONSERVED LAND PROPERTY LINE

36


Monadnock Agricultural Center

“We are thrilled to be living our dream, farming the land in our neighborhood. Because of our strong land lease, we were able to buy equipment and lease a great barn.” Jenn & Karl Comeau Hilltop Bottom Farm

LAND

INFRASTRUCTURE

PRODUCTION

30

50

75

5

2

Tillable Acres

Pasture Acres

Woodland Acres

Ancillary Acres

Easements

2

4

1

0

0.5

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

Irrigation Systems

Fencing & Roads (miles)

2

4

90

180K

$1.2M

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

37


 

HOMESTEAD: KITCHEN & DRYING ROOM ADDITION; CLUSTER 1-2 CABINS

CONCEPT PLAN: FARMSTEAD DETAIL 

NE

POLE BARN RELOCATED: ADD SMALL LIVESTOCK, CABIN, PARKING

TISA

HOUSING: ALTERNATIVE LOCATION; CLUSTER OR DUPLEX

Chickens Pigs

SUGAR HOUSE

POLE BARN

PROPERTY OF INTEREST LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT SHED CARRIAGE BARN: STUDIO(S) & FARM STORAGE BARN: COWS; HAY STORAGE; COMMUNAL KITCHEN & MEETING SPACE HOUSING: CONVERT PORTION OF BARN TO RESIDENCES

LEGEND BLDG: FARM USE BLDG: ARTIST USE BLDG: HOUSING CONSERVED LAND

38


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ABOUT MONADNOCK AGRICULTURAL CENTER THE MONADNOCK AGRICULTURAL CENTER, LLC WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2017 to purchase Maple Homestead Farm, the first of several potential farm acquisitions in the region. The center is NEFA’s first in New Hampshire. New housing is coming soon, with our first visitor-cottage in place and ready for the season. HISTORY Maple Homestead Farm is a piece of history nestled between Mount Monadnock and Spectacle Pond in the Town of Marlborough, New Hampshire. Established in 1770, its farmhouse remains standing to this day, having changed with the times. The town relocated Marlborough’s first schoolhouse to the farm in the early 1900’s. For more than a century after, the old farmhouse served as a carriage house, with a root cellar established below to store the farm’s potatoes. Today, the old farmhouse is now a two-bedroom apartment that houses a combined sculpture and tractor shop. The farm’s previous owner, Hank Kenney, purchased the farm in 1972 to start a 70-cow dairy operation, a business that he ran for more than two decades. Eventually Hank turned his focus to maple syrup and hay, selling to farm outlet stores and stables. Hank also kept Dutch Belted Galloway cattle for clearing pastures and breeding them for sale. Hank capitalized on the farm’s prime views of the iconic Mount Monadnock, offering a stunning wedding venue for local couples. In 1998, Maple Homestead received the highest farm honor in the state as a New Hampshire Farm of Distinction. The Monadnock Agricultural Center is building on the work that Hank Kenney completed over the years. Farming at Maple Homestead Farm will continue to focus on haymaking, maple sugaring, livestock and poultry, with some fruits and vegetables planned as well. AGROECOLOGY AT MAC Ecologist Jeffry Littleton of Moosewood Ecological LLC (MELLC) is completing an ecological inventory of the farm. Jeff’s work will align sustainable land uses and ecological components of the property with its surrounding landscape. His work with natural systems supports biological diversity and sustainable land use, through which he does educational outreach on applied ecology. TRANSITIONS At present, MAC’s farmhouses are leased out to farmers and artists, while the farm transitions to organic and biodynamic practices. Cabins and additional studios for artist residences are coming soon. Currently, we have one artist in residence, sculptor Marita Torbick. Additional housing for farmers and on-farm renters are in the planning stage. Early discussions are underway to lease land to a local nonprofit educational organization to bring hands-on learning to local kids. A conservation easement for agricultural use is already in place for a portion of the farm, and NEFA is working to expand the easement on most of the remaining 82 acres. As MAC’s first second season begins, three operations are in place to work the historic farm. They include Hilltop Bottom Farm, MHF Sugaring, and Tisané, LLC. We plan to build additional greenhouses and to restore the agricultural landscape to good health. Bridging the two farm areas are diversified farming and artist-residencies in four-season farm cabins, known as the Carriage Barn and the Farmhouse. MAC intends to research and learn from our agroecology work and share that research with the broader organic community to revitalize the area’s farmland. 40


EARTH HAVEN FARM

George Iselin

Owned and operated by George and Mary Iselin, Earth Haven farm offers a variety of different services including grass-finished beefalo meat; sheep sausage in three flavors; horse drawn weddings, hay and sleigh rides; Romney sheep, lambs, and wool; hay; maple syrup; and original oil paintings with an agricultural theme.

HILLTOP BOTTOM FARM

Karl & Jen Comeau

Hilltop Bottom Farm is a small diversified family farm that promotes health and sustainability in the community. Neighbors and local restaurants eat their naturally grown vegetables and humanely raised egg and meat products. Living on the farm are grass-fed cows, free-range chickens and heritage breed turkeys, hogs, and plants that support an array of native bees & insects.

MHF SUGARING

Karl Comeau

After the sale of the land to MAC, former owner Hank Kenney and helper Seth Tourigney kept up maple sugar production on-site, bucking up 20 cords of wood and producing over 350 gallons of syrup last year. Karl Comeau and a team from the local fire department will takeover this year. MHF has been producing maple syrup for 45 years on 5,300 taps.

ARTIST RESIDENCIES With its studio space, MAC is unique among NEFA’s agricultural centers, offering an idyllic setting for making and viewing art. We’ll be offering this space to artists whose work is thematically and materially relevant to our place in the environment, and how to preserve it for the future. Our artists and viewing spaces will be an integral part of the community we are creating at MAC. 41


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43


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Unity Agricultural Center

“Using the biodynamic farm as the foundation for learning, The Bowsprit Foundation at the Center will provide opportunities for young people to have meaningful and productive work and life experiences within a vibrant and healing social context.�

Unity Agricultural Center Mission Statement

LAND

INFRASTRUCTURE

PRODUCTION

50

100 Pasture Acres

Woodland Acres

Ancillary Acres

Easements

1

3

0

0

1

Tillable Acres

390

10

1

Farmhouses

Barns & Commons

Greenhouses

Irrigation Systems

Fencing & Roads (miles)

2

4

150

300K

$1.1M

Farm Operations

Farmers

Food Produced Annually (Tons)

Food Produced (Pounds)

Equity & Debt Capital

45


ABOUT UNITY AGRICULTURAL CENTER A VIBRANT, PRODUCTIVE FARM PROVIDING HOMES FOR MULTIPLE FARMERS AND CRAFTSPEOPLE, the Unity Agricultural Center is steeped in history and culture, community and education. These autonomous but interrelated on-farm businesses will share their work and craft with young people searching for a more substantive, engaging, and rewarding relationship with the world. Working alongside farm and craft-masters who take joy in creating, and who respect their students, the farm project aims to enrich the lives of the community’s youth through hands-on learning. The former Ellwell Farm, now owned by Maine Farmland Trust, will create such opportunities for experiential learning by sharing their work and accomplishments, meals and festive times together. Elwell Farm can be found at Mussey and Elwell Farm Road, just minutes from Unity College. The Elwell Farm consists of a mix of open fields and woodlands situated on well drained, gently rolling hills. The farm contains over 130 acres of fields and pasture that have been used to support a dairy operation for many years. The fields have also been used to produce beans, sweet corn, feed corn and potatoes. Approximately 44% of the property contains Farmland Soils of Statewide Importance, including large amounts of Adams and Dixmont series soils. The Elwell Farm contains over one mile of frontage along the Sandy Stream and has the Mussey Brook running through the center of the property. The farm also offers public access opportunities via the Snow Dusters snowmobile trail and the Waldo County Trails Coalition Hills-To-Sea Trail. As a local agricultural endeavor intent on supporting food security in our region, we will sell the majority of the food produced at local markets in Belfast. Both the Belfast Coop and Hannaford’s actively buy from local organic farms and are quite literally ‘bursting at the seams’ for three seasons of the year. Successful local organic food distributor Crown O’ Maine would see that our produce and products reach a broader customer base elsewhere in Maine, and we will be actively marketing to mid-coast restaurants during the growing season. Ellwell envisions a small on-farm store retailing a variety of products from the farm, and possibly craftwork made by our young visitors and guest faculty. TRANSITIONS Eventually, we plan to build a cluster of four to five modest, energy-efficient houses close to the heart of the farm for our farmers and partners. Land workers, visitors, and the public will utilize the existing building as a center where they can interact. The main house will contain an office, as well as offering rooms for farm stays. Seasonal farm apprentices will inhabit the smaller cottages. We will renovate the older barn as a multi-use building for, among other things, a bi-annual lecture series on agriculture and education, community dances, arts events, and our small on-farm store. We see the Ellwell Farm Center as a place for diverse cultural activities and a place to demonstrate the viability of small-scale rural economies.

46


Peter Brady &

BOWSPRIT THE BOWSPRIT FOUNDATION FOUNDATPeter Brady & Graziella Cervi A non-profit organization, Bowsprit Foundation will manage a life-skills training program at the UAC. The Foundation will offer two and three-week seasonal intensives, where between six and eight young people will be immersed in the daily farm and studio-craft schedule at the Center, working with local crafts-masters and businesses. Together students and mentors will raise fruits and vegetables, livestock for milk, cheese, eggs and meat, and sustainably harvest building timber and firewood from the woodlands at UAC. The bakery at the farm will use locally grown grains and students will have an opportunity to work in the kitchen.

BEETREE FARM

Peter Brady & Graziella Cervi

A biodynamic farm that interweaves the arts with youth mentoring, BeeTree will be led by farmer-educators Peter Brady and Graziella Cervi and will build on the family’s decades of farming and leadership experience. Their vegetables will be sold in local markets throughout the region and at a farm store on premise.

VERONESI FOREST FARM

Peter Brady & Graziella Cervi

Fifteen minutes from UAC in Montville is Veronesi Farm, currently owned and forest-farmed by Peter Brady and Graziella Cervi’s family. Future plans include continuing the long-term forest stewardship legacy of Eddie Veronesi through sustainable forestry internships for Bowsprit students, as well as research and study programs for college forestry programs. UAC and Veronesi Farm are linked by the “Hills to Sea Trail,” which runs between Unity and Belfast.

HONEYBEE-LIGHTROOT SANCTUARY

Barbara Booth

Biodynamic farmer Barbara Booth is in the planning phase of bringing her vision for the Honeybee-Lightroot Sanctuary to the Center. Through landscape conservation, establishing a protected apiary, and holding educational events, the Sanctuary promises to fulfill the Center’s vision of protecting and nurturing land. 47


WOODSONG

Sunniva Brady

WoodSong is an organic goat dairy that works a herd of Saanen/Alpine/Nubian crosses to produce dairy such as chevre, yogurt, and kiefer, which are sold in a variety of flavors on the farm, along with plain, raw milk. The goats are fed on grass in the summer and hay in the winter; milking does are fed an additional diet of organic grains to support their lactation with extra protein. Born to farming parents who taught her the art of living in harmony with her fellow animals, owner-operator Sunniva Brady has been working with farm animals since she was five years old.

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AGROECOLOGY “We find the ongoing discussion about agroecology and regenerative farming very exciting and see opportunity to employ strategies and principles that could be a means for more fully realizing the larger intention of more deeply caring for the land and building a resilient stewardship based community at Arrowhead.” —Walter Cudnohufsky Associates AGROECOLOGY LINKS ECOSYSTEMS, NATIVE PLANTS AND BENEFICIAL INSECTS WITH SOCIAL SYSTEMS TO SUSTAIN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS, AND VIABLE FOOD AND FARMING COMMUNITIES. NEFA’s Agroecology efforts are led by farmers, ecologists, and social-justice advocates, to enhance agricultural ecosystems, promote food access, and experiment with mutual-association farming that lead to healthy environments. Our goal is to assess ecological and human communities and relationships that occur naturally on farms. Our vision is for sustainable agriculture that is interdependent with and integrated into local ecological, social, and economic systems. We will: • Assist local and regional farmers to implement biodiversity and organic management practices. • Conduct observational research that requires minimal change to crop plans, planting, or farm management, and study farmer and farmworker knowledge of crops and cropping systems within existing production rotations. • Disseminate the findings of all of our research within the NEFA network, locally and regionally. • Explore and develop ways of maximizing farmer-lessee control while balancing with investor-member interests. • Consider the impacts of agricultural practices on the structure and function of farm ecosystems and the structure of local food systems.

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HOW WE GOT OUR START Back in 1977, I first put together a model for affordable farmland access by establishing the Southern Massachusetts Community Land Trust. Along with land access, farmers’ next biggest need is affordable housing, which we created through the Cheshire Housing Trust. With this workable vision, and aid from the Institute for Community Economics, we expanded afield, assisting community land trusts all over the US with our proven model. Between 1990 and 2012, we continued to pair farmers with private landowners, all with community-initiatives guiding the way, growing our model, refining the process, and further cementing farms as part of our communities. After establishing Northeast Farm Access, in 2013, we set our sights on expansion, opening initiatives in mid-coast Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, before landing across the border in Copake, NY. -Bob Bernstein, NEFA Director THANK YOU NEFA would especially like to thank both Jacob Meyer and Karen Fitzpatrick. Jacob Meyer was instrumental in shaping the NEFA model by preparing and developing legal documentation for both the LLCs and leases. We’re glad that Jake is still available to work for us part-time. Throughout the last five years, Karen Fitzpatrick’s creative land planning made it possible for multiple farm businesses to equitably divide and work the land at our Agricultural Centers, a key element to making our model work. Karen has since moved onto other things and we wish her the best.

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WHO WE ARE BOB BERNSTEIN, NEFA DIRECTOR Bob Bernstein, an experienced community-based development practitioner, has been connecting individuals and groups with land, public facilities and affordable housing for 40 years. Bob has worked with multi-party initiatives, community land trusts, and individuals to develop and implement traditional and non-traditional legal and financing mechanisms for affordable land and housing. He brings this wealth of experience, perspective, and tenacity to Northeast Farm Access, LLC, a company he founded in 2013. At NEFA, Bob recruited the following highly skilled professionals to help fulfill a common vision for a company that builds reciprocal relationships between experienced farmers and socially minded investors, while promoting working farms and growing good local food. ROCIO LALANDA, DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT Rocio Lalanda is the new Director of Development at NEFA. She recently earned a Ph.D. in Geography and Environmental Science and Policy, focusing her dissertation on land conservation and, specifically, on the motivations of agricultural-land owners to protect their land in perpetuity from non-agricultural forms of development. She was born and raised in Spain, where she completed two master’s degrees in the fields of Sustainability, Corporate Responsibility and Rural Development Project Planning. KAHLIL LOZORAITIS, DIRECTOR OF ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Born on Co-op day, Kahlil possesses a long history of passion for quality food and sustainable development. He is a seasoned strategist and MBA/MA with 15-plus years of building brands with purpose, and has successfully led projects for Fortune 500 clients, nonprofits, as well as startups. An avid outdoorsman, he and his family share time between Brooklyn and the Hudson Valley. JACOB MEYER, LEGAL COUNSEL Jacob Meyer brings a background in law and policy to the challenge of identifying and encouraging professional, consumer, and charitable investment that honors sustainable agriculture as the root of social and economic health. He has 13 years’ experience in legal and public policy research, writing, and analysis, applying clarity and precision to complex legal, business and social issues. LAURA HARTZ, OUTSIDE GENERAL COUNSEL, ORR & RENO, P.A. Laura Hartz is an attorney at Orr & Reno, P.A., of Concord, New Hampshire, which has been bringing a practical approach to New England’s legal challenges for over 70 years. Admitted to the bar in New Hampshire and Maine, Laura helps businesses and non-profits meet their legal requirements and business goals. She particularly enjoys environmental and energy law, land use, and business law. Laura has consulted for environmental and agricultural organizations, including Northeast Farm Access, the Natural Resources Council of Maine, Downstream Strategies, and Organic Valley Dairy Cooperative., leading project teams, soliciting grant funding, and writing technical reports and case studies. She also received a Master’s Degree focused on Agriculture, Food, Environment from Tufts University. NANCY GASPERONI, EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & BOOKKEEPER Following many years in the software development industry Nancy has mastered the endless details of NEFA and our Ag Center’s custom acquisition, management, capital improvements and reports. On top of that, the more Bob stresses, the louder Nancy laughs. 52


WALTER CUDNOHUFSKY, LAND PLANNER Walter Cudnohufsky has over 50 years of experience as a landscape architect and land and community planner. His practice includes all scales, from regional planning to residential site planning. Operating within this continuum, Walter Cudnohufsky Associates (WCA) Inc. works to bridge planning and design as a seamless whole. We are a full service firm from conception to implementation. Walter has an agricultural background and a long held reverence for protecting agricultural lands. Through Walter’s work in public process he has developed strength in facilitating public input and is particularly adept at conceptualizing often complex issues. Quality design is based in the natural systems and human uses of a particular site. The crew at WCA, including Chuck Schnell and Kirsten Baringer, are acute observers who believe that planning and design is a team process that includes the client, users and the land as critical members of the team. CHARLES SCHNELL, LAND PLANNER Charles Schnell received an MA in Landscape Design from the Conway School of Landscape Design, following year-long fellowship at the Kew and Edinburgh Royal Botanical Gardens in Great Britain. His undergraduate degree in Horticulture and experience as Landscape Manager of Montgomery Place give Chuck a rich botanical knowledge complemented by his thoughtful design and restoration skills. KIRSTEN BARINGER, LAND PLANNER Kirsten Baringer joined WCA in 2005 with an M.A. in Landscape Design from the Conway School of Landscape Design, and professional experience in residential landscape design and installation. Since becoming part of the WCA team she has carried out site analysis, design, drafting and cost estimating for a variety of residential and commercial design projects. Her skill in drafting and illustrative graphics, both hand and CAD, is a valuable asset to the firm. FARM CREDIT EAST Farm Credit East consults with NEFA and the Centers for a variety of functions. Jon Jaffe acts as a farm finance advisor, helping to evaluate property purchases and vet farmer business plans. David Rifenburgh, Virgilia Teggiachi and Amanda McCarthy do account reconciliations, handle tax accounting, and provide K-1’s annually to members. MATT HUNGER, LEGAL AND COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR Matt Hunger will be splitting his time between farming at NEFA’s Arrowhead Agricultural Center with Dirty Boots Farm and writing communiques for NEFA to further their important work. MARC DELANY, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANT Marc Delany is an experienced appropriate-technology designer and builder with 35 years’ experience in community-based housing and innovative product development. Marc has particular expertise in solar, and adaptive re-use of residential and commercial properties, with a proven track record of achieving neighborhood acceptance of innovative projects. Marc has advised NEFA on various design projects, from housing and barns to gates and event facilities.

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FINANCIALS

NEFA AGRICULTURAL CENTERS ESTABLISHED Total Farmland Acres Tillable Pasture Woodland Ancillary

Chester

Esopus

NY

NY

NY

1470 673 197 554 46

110 0 12 0

165 0 3 5

138 2 60 14

Conservation Easements

10

2

2

1

Infastructure Farmhouses

10

2

0

1

Barns & Commons

26

2

6

2

Greenhouses

19

5

4

5

7

3

0

2

Fencing (miles)

7.3

2.3

0

0

Roads (miles)

13.3

2

5

2.5

Farm Operations

26

5

5

3

Farmers

84

15

18

17

1905

330

465

420

Food Production Annually (Pounds)

3,810,000

660,000

930,000

840,000

Easement

$881,000

$245,000

$900,000

$536,000

$12,735,013

$1,413,513

$3,000,000

$1,805,500

Irrigation Systems

Food Production Annually (Tons)

Equity & Liabilities 54

Copake


NEFA AGRICULTURAL CENTERS ESTABLISHED

Farmland Acres Tillable Pasture Woodland Ancillary

IN DEVELOPMENT

Monadnock

Arrowhead

Unity

NH

NY

ME

30 30 75 5

120 55 0 10

50 100 400 10

Conservation Easements

2

1

1

Infastructure Farmhouses

2

3

1

Barns & Commons

4

4

3

Greenhouses

1

4

0

Irrigation Systems

0

2

0

Fencing (miles)

0

5

0

0.5

2

1

Farm Operations

2

8

2

Farmers

4

20

4

90

360

150

180,000

720,000

300,000

$100,000

–

$175,000

$1,216,000

$3,000,000

$1,150,000

Roads (miles)

Food Production Annually (Tons) Food Production Annually (Pounds) Easement Equity & Liabilities

55


FINANCIALS EQUITY AND LIABILITIES PER AGRICULTURAL CENTER

Finances

Farmland Renewal

Chester

Equity

$877,000

$725,000

Liabilities

$539,598

$1,200,0008

Esopus

FARMLAND RENEWAL

Liabilities: $539,598 38%

Equity $877,000 62%

MONADNOCK Equity $330,000 23% Liabilities $1,111,850 77%

56

Monadnock

Arrowhead

$1,142,500

$330,000

$3,000,000

$6,074,520

$533,4868

$1,111,850

$20,0010

$3,404,953

CHESTER

Liabilities: $1,200,000 62%

Equity $725,000 38%

ARROWHEAD Liabilities $20,001 1% Equity $3,000,000 99%

Total

ESOPUS

Liabilities: $533,486 32%

Equity $1,142,500 68%

TOTAL

Liabilities: $3,404,953 36%

Equity $6,074,520 64%


VALUE OF LANDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT PER AGRICULTURAL CENTER

Finances

Farmland Renewal

Chester

Land

$577,648

$1,500,000

Buildings

$463,748 $7,000

Equipment

Esopus

Monadnock

Arrowhead

$1,181,172

$414,770

$972,000

$4,645,610

$425,000

$275,695

$764,583

$567,536

$2,496,580

$28,864

$29,855

$65,727

FARMLAND RENEWAL Equipment $7,000 1% Buildings: $463,748 44%

Land $577,648 55%

MONADNOCK Equipment $28,864 3% Buildings: $764,583 63%

CHESTER

Buildings: $435,000 22%

Buildings: $275,695 19% Land $1,500,000 78%

Equipment $29,855 2%

Land $414,770 34%

ESOPUS

Land $1,181,172 81%

ARROWHEAD

Buildings: $567,536 36%

Total

TOTAL Equipment $29,855 1%

Land $972,000 62%

Buildings: $2,496,580 35%

Land $4,645,610 64%

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MEMBERS NUMBER OF INVESTORS PER AGRICULTURAL CENTER AND INVESTMENT LEVEL AGRICULTURAL CENTERS

Equity Investment Level

Farmland Renewal

Chester

Esopus

$24,999 or less $25,000-$49,000 $50,000-$99,000 $100,000-$249,000 $250,000-$499,000 $500,000 or more

15 8 3 3 0 0 29

1 3 0 2 0 1 7

4 6 4 1 1 0 16

Total Investors per center

FARMLAND RENEWAL

1

3

1

1

6

4

3

2

20 18 8 7 1 2 56

ESOPUS

1

15

Total Investors per Investment Level

0 0 0 0 0 1 1

0 1 0 1 0 0 2

CHESTER

3

8

Monadnock Arrowhead

4

MONADNOCK

ARROWHEAD

TOTAL ALL CENTERS: 56 MEMBERS* 12 7

1

1

1

20 8 18

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*NEFA owns 416,000 units distributed among four agricultural centers (excluding Chester)


“Thankfully many of us are finding our way back to the agrarian landscape that was, not so long ago, a huge part of our human psyche and of course, our survival. But it’s not an easy journey…and the land, farmers, plants and animals need far reaching community involvement and support. We all need to be exploring new ways of farming and being agricultural communities, and I find myself compelled to rise up as a customer and patron, an advocate, an ally. NEFA is doing great work to explore unique, courageous and much needed ways to re-inhabit the farmlands that are in danger of becoming extinct. This work is challenging and so very necessary on so many levels: • economically in a society that just won’t slow down or value the land for it’s true resources; and on large farms that are no longer affordable for farmers; • socially in multi-farmer groups that have to navigate sometimes difficult but rewarding communication, understanding and collaboration; • financially in an age where more and more people with means want to invest in things that really matter to humanity, and where shared economic endeavors are not the norm; • environmentally where soil and nutrients have been depleted and tons of often dangerous “fertilizers” and practices have put so much at risk.

NEFA has taken it all on with passion, perseverance and humility. I’m so glad I get to be involved in this ground breaking work! —Catherine S., New Hampshire Investor in Farmland Renewal, Esopus, and Monadnock Agricultural Centers

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For more information: Phone: 603-209-2000 Web: nefarmaccess.com

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Profile for Northeast Farm Access

Northeast Farm Access: The First Five Years  

A look back at NEFA's first five years of preserving farmland, the farmers who work the land, and where we'll go from here.

Northeast Farm Access: The First Five Years  

A look back at NEFA's first five years of preserving farmland, the farmers who work the land, and where we'll go from here.