Page 58

Our faces are a canvas for us to experiment on, blending color and lines. Makeup can be artistry; a way of expression, a way to change our presentation or simply for fun. However, the concept of using makeup to create a nomakeup look is a contradictory, and yet, an idea on the rise among young people. One would think that no-makeup would mean that no makeup products were involved. Yet, as brands such as Glossier and Milk grow in popularity, so does the trend of appearing fresh faced and natural while still wearing multiple products. Makeup has been a part of human culture for eons. It can be first traced back over 12,000 years ago to the ancient Egyptians. Using oils and minerals such as copper and malachite, they adorned their eyes and skin, much like

Models: Leilani Potgieter and Diana Steelman

60

people today still do. Perhaps the most iconic look of the Egyptians featured thick black lines done on both eyelids, connected with a line that then extended outwards, completed with Kohl. Kohl was made by combining the mineral galena and soot onto a wet palette, which then created a paste that could then be brushed onto the lids. A few millennia later, the ancient Chinese and Japanese would use henna to dye the hair and make designs on the skin—similar to what cultures in India and Northern Africa would use, and in some areas, continue to use today. Makeup was worn more primarily by the noble classes of ancient China. Both men and women focused much of their look on their eyebrows, which went through several trends through history; going from sharp arches to more curved brows. Meanwhile, in ancient India, much

Youth  

Northeastern University's Fashion Magazine, The Avenue - Youth Issue

Youth  

Northeastern University's Fashion Magazine, The Avenue - Youth Issue

Advertisement