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CORN TALK June/July 2018

A publication for North Dakota corn producers

Photo by Katherine Plessner

CALENDAR OF EVENTS JULY 10, 2018 NDCGA MEETING ND CORN OFFICE FARGO, N.D.

JULY 14, 2018 AG ADVENTURE DAY RED RIVER ZOO FARGO, N.D.

AUGUST 14, 2018 CORN CLASSIC GOLF MAPLE RIVER GOLF CLUB MAPLETON, N.D.

JULY 11, 2018 NDCUC MEETING ND CORN OFFICE FARGO, N.D.

JULY 16-19, 2018 NCGA CORN CONGRESS WASHINGTON, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 11-13, 2018 BIG IRON FARM SHOW RED RIVER VALLEY FAIRGROUNDS WEST FARGO, N.D.


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

06 10 12

BIODEGRADABLE FILMS: ADDING VALUE TO CORN BYPRODUCTS

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YIELD RESPONSE TO PHOSPHORUS SUPPLIED WITH DISTILLERS GRAINS

RED MEAT EXPORTS A TEAM EFFORT THAT BENEFITS U.S. AG

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ND CORN CLASSIC TO BE HELD AUGUST 14

NDCUC PARTICIPATES IN ETHANOL PROMOTION

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CONNECTING WITH OUR NEIGHBORS TO THE NORTH

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NDCGA HOLDS ELECTIONS, DIRECTORS RETIRE

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NDCUC WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS

NDCUC PRESENTS AT AG IN THE CLASSROOM EVENTS

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NDCGA WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

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NDCGA PRESIDENT'S LETTER

Randy Melvin President North Dakota Corn Growers Association

Greetings to all of our North Dakota Corn Growers Association (NDCGA) members. I'm Randy Melvin from Alice, North Dakota. I represent District 2 which encompasses Steele, Trail and Cass counties, and was recently elected to serve as the president of NDCGA. First, I’d like to share a little about myself. I farm with my wife Kristi, parents Jerry and Hattie, and brother, Jon. Kristi and I have three children. We raise corn, soybeans, edible beans and wheat in the Buffalo and Alice, North Dakota area. I believe there is great value in not only serving on the NDCGA board, but also working closely with our partners at the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA). As a partner with NCGA, NDCGA has an opportunity to have board members apply for appointments to participate in the NCGA Action Teams. The NCGA Action Teams work on various subjects affecting corn farmers in the U.S. and provide guidance to the NCGA Corn Board for setting policy. The last few years I have served on the NCGA Risk Management Action Team (RMAT) and recently completed my first year as Vice Chair of the RMAT team. The RMAT team works on policy in three main areas: taxes affecting farmers and farm businesses, crop insurance and the commodity programs of the farm bill. In the past year all of these topics have been hot issues and we have spent much of the year analyzing these topics. Our current focus has been on the debate of the 2018 Farm Bill. NCGA has been one of the lead farm organizations for advising Congress on public policy. As a result, we have been

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org

working closely with the House and Senate Ag committees to help inform them on the priorities of NCGA as well as NDCGA. We have also been honored to be a sounding board for several farm bill proposals. In these discussions we rely on our grower member surveys to guide us. The number one area of consensus from growers is the need to strongly advocate for maintaining the current crop insurance program without cuts. North Dakota’s ethanol industry has been another great partner of NDCGA. Our state ethanol industry has a $623 million annual economic impact and uses 180 million bushels of corn each year. The NDCGA has partnered with the North Dakota Ethanol Producers Association to host tours of Red Trail Energy in Richardton and Tharaldson Ethanol in Casselton. We have invited our elected officials to these tours to discuss the value that the corn and ethanol industries have to North Dakota agriculture. The ethanol industry has brought $0.30 per bushel back to the corn producer, resulting in an additional $40/acre to our bottom line using the state trend line corn yield of 135 bushels per acre. Trade is another issue NDCGA has been working on which includes the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the current Chinese trade talks. Although NAFTA is of great importance to corn and ethanol producers in North Dakota and the U.S., the Chinese trade talks are important to North Dakota farmers as well. We are cognizant of the impact this will have to agriculture and realize the opportunity exists for additional agricultural export possibilities. Our trade deficit with China has grown from $83 billion in 2000 to $376 billion in 2017, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This deficit is over six times the current value of the U.S. corn crop, reaffirming the importance of finding middle ground when renegotiating trade deals with other countries. I look forward to working with our fellow NDCGA board members on various public policy issues affecting our farming operations. Please contact me or any of our board members if you have any ideas or priorities that we ought to be considering. May you and yours have a great growing season.

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A NOTE FROM THE CHAIRMAN Terry Wehlander Chairman North Dakota Corn Utilization Council

Greetings. My name is Terry Wehlander, and as of April 1, I am the chairman of the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (Council). I am a 5th generation farmer in Sargent County, North Dakota, where I grow corn and soybeans with my uncle and cousin using vertical-till and no-till with cover crops wherever possible. I have great memories of watching my grandfather farm and knew from a young age that I would one day farm the land he farmed. I was elected to the Council in 2015 and previously served as the secretary/ treasurer. I am also on the Advisory Board for Sargent County Extension, the Hall Township Board and was recently on the Sargent County Crop Improvement Board. I currently have a demonstration plot for North Dakota State University’s (NDSU) Department of Soil Health. I became involved with the salinity project because I needed help. I attended one of Dr. Abbey Wick’s Café Talks in my area. I asked Abbey what I could do to manage salinity on my farm, and she was kind enough to come take a look to see exactly what I was talking about. Salinity had become such an issue for me that I would have been happy to see anything growing, including weeds! From that moment on I have become an advocate for cover crops and less tillage as a way to control salts. I was very proud when this demonstration plot was named the Roger Wehlander Memorial Site after my grandfather - this site was homesteaded by the first generation of Wehlanders. During my time on the Council I have been able to see firsthand the efforts made by many people on the corn

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producer’s behalf. Last winter I attended a trade mission to Mexico with the U.S. Grains Council (USGC), which inspired me to become more involved with the organization. On this trade mission we met with buyers of number 2 yellow corn and dried distiller’s grains. It was great to see the buyers of our product face to face and to tell them about the high quality of North Dakota corn and our farmers. I am looking forward to being a delegate to the USGC and to make necessary connections with buyers of our corn. Research will always be a priority for the Council. I have direct knowledge of the great work that NDSU is doing in the areas of soil health and have seen a direct improvement in my fields regarding salinity. Salinity and the management of erosion are critical issues for our farmers and I encourage all producers to attend a Café Talk and ask questions. We have the resources at NDSU, but it is up to each one of us to reach out and ask for help. The Council continues to work on finding new uses for corn. We are funding projects in the NDSU Mechanical Engineering Department to research polymers and replacements to petroleum based chemicals that will one day create a new use for corn. Through research and our membership in the North Dakota Livestock Alliance we hope to see our livestock numbers rise. We know that North Dakota can produce enough high quality feed to meet the growing demand for meat around the world. One of my favorite moments on the Council was when I attended Agriculture Adventure Day at the Red River Zoo last summer. I was amazed at how many parents and kids couldn’t identify the crops that were growing. It was a great chance for the community to celebrate agriculture and for consumers to talk with a farmer first hand. I am planning on attending Agriculture Adventure Day at the Zoo again on July 14. I am very proud of the work that the Council continues to do on behalf of the corn industry and am happy to serve as the new chairman. I look forward to working diligently on your behalf. Feel free to contact our office if you ever have a question where your checkoff dollars are being utilized.

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


Connecting Kids

with Agriculture

SATURDAY, JULY 14th

Free Admission

10AM-5PM

For Kids

redriverzoo.org

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

4255 23rd Ave South | Fargo

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BIODEGRADABLE FILMS: ADDING VALUE TO CORN BYPRODUCTS Submitted by Dr. Senay Simsek, NDSU Department of Plant Science Corn bran and dried distillers grains (DDGs) are being produced in large quantities as byproducts of corn and ethanol processing. Corn bran and DDGs are composed of cellulose, protein, starch, phenolic acids, lipid, ash, and arabinoxylan (AX). These fractions of the corn bran and DDGs, especially the AX can be utilized for various value added food and industrial applications, such as food packaging materials. Food packing must be aesthetically pleasing and mechanically appropriate for storing the food for which it is specified. Some of the required qualities include protecting food from oxidation, microbial spoilage, physical damage, and also increasing shelf life. Synthetic food packaging materials are popular due to their barrier properties. However, use of synthetic packaging materials has resulted in ecological problems, since they may not biodegradable or recyclable. With increased research focused on biodegradable food packaging, it is becoming clear that plant-based food packaging is one option for food packaging. It would be beneficial to incorporate biopolymeric materials into the food packaging sector because they can be used and thrown away without detriment to the environment. Carbohydrates including AX could be utilized as the basis for films that have high mechanical strengths and pliability when combined with the appropriate plasticizers. It has also been demonstrated that AX films have the same barrier and mechanical properties as starch and protein films. Someday it would be ecologically advantageous to replace synthetic food packaging with AX packaging due to the ecological advantages This project began by extracting AX from corn bran and DDGs using a method that was developed for commercial upscale, and is highly effective for AX extraction and purification. Then, AX was used as the basis of films that had a wide range of functional properties. To increase the flexibility of these films, they were plasticized with glycerol or sorbitol. The chemical, physical, mechanical, and biodegradability characteristics were also determined for all films, which provides a comprehensive materials profile for

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each type of film. These materials profiles can be used to match a food with proper packaging. Many different film materials were made by using two types of AX (corn bran and DDGs), two types of plasticizers (glycerol and sorbitol), and three levels of each of the plasticizers (100 g/kg, 250 g/kg, and 500 g/kg). Films produced from corn bran AX are light in color and transparent, which could be suitable for food packaging where visibility of the food is desired. The chemical characteristics of the AX and intermolecular interactions that took place during the curing process influenced the mechanical strengths of the AX films. In general, the films lost mechanical strength but gained flexibility when there was a higher degree of intermolecular interaction during curing. This was demonstrated by increased puncture resistance but decreased tensile strength and tear resistance at increased levels of plasticization. In addition, increased disorder in the films resulted in increased biodegradability, which is highly favorable in some applications. The interactions of the films with water were influenced by the hydrophilicity of the plasticizers and AX polymers. With this in mind, it is possible to choose an AX material that will be appropriate for numerous applications that would involve varying levels of interaction with water. All materials produced from the corn bran AX and DDGs AX have different characteristics that could be used for packaging food. This is greatly beneficial because it allows for numerous options for packaging food by changing the formula of the material only slightly. This creates opportunity in the milling, ethanol, and food packaging industries by recycling the byproducts of the milling and ethanol industries for use in food packaging. An increased level of sustainability is created by connecting these industries through this value-added food packaging. This research presented characteristics of AX films that had previously been left unexplored including the biodegradability and surface topography. Overall, this research furthered the knowledge basis for films made out of AX from corn bran and DDGs. The result of this is numerous possibilities for these biodegradable materials in the future.

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


DISHIN' UP DIALOGUE WITH COMMONGROUND Submitted by Val Wagner, CommonGround North Dakota Coordinator CommonGround North Dakota brought opportunities to two communities to ask questions regarding food, farming and fuel, as well as connecting with farmers that represented different aspects of North Dakota agriculture. The events were held at Coteau des Prairie Lodge in Havana, N.D., and Gourmet Chef in Minot, N.D. CommonGround North Dakota volunteers Polly WyrickUlrich, Joey Tigges and Christie Jaeger were involved in bringing home the CommonGround message, answering questions and providing insight and their experiences with North Dakota agriculture.

Katie Heger led the event in Havana, sharing her tips and tricks in the kitchen, as well as creating some quick and easy meals that are not only budget-friendly, but make meal times easy during this busy season. She led the group in some discussions around agriculture trivia, showcased some of the crops grown in North Dakota and gave North Dakota statistics on many of the crops that were used during the day. CommonGround North Dakota coordinator Val Wagner led the Minot event, kicking the day off with a snapshot of CommonGround for new volunteers and wrapping up with tips and tricks as well as giving them the tools to be successful at continuing the conversations with others around them that were started that evening. Conversations were lively and engaging, with questions coming up regarding local foods, food preservation, having conversations about tough topics and creating their own similar events at home. Everyone left with not only recipes in hand, but also feeling empowered about their choices at the grocery store, connected more closely to their food choices and with resources at their fingertips to make informed decisions at the market. Weather has wreaked havoc with scheduling spring events for CommonGround North Dakota engagement, with blizzards, ice and more, making it difficult to plan. As the weather improves, so does the outlook for more opportunities! Plans are underway for a variety of events to be led by volunteers across the state…stay tuned for more information!

CommonGround North Dakota volunteer Katie Heger leads a food event at the Coteau des Prairie Lodge in Havana, N.D.

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

If you’re interested in learning more about CommonGround North Dakota, or if you’d like to check out what’s happening with the organization around the state, be sure to like our Facebook page (CommonGround North Dakota) and keep up to date on where you can find us next!

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Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018

Prosper, ND

New Promise+ Rewards • 2019 corn and soybeans • Exciting Tech demos

NDCGA Board of Directors

District 1: Andrew Mauch, Mooreton District 1: Andrew Braaten, Barney District 2: Randy Melvin, Buffalo (President) District 2: Tim Kozojed, Hillsboro District 3: Andrew Torkelson, Grafton District 3: Paul Thomas, Velva (Vice President) District 4: Robert Hanson, Wimbledon (Secretary) District 4: Ryan Wanzek, Jamestown District 5: Justin Halvorson, Sheldon District 5: Kyle Speich, Milnor District 6: Drew Courtney, Oakes District 6: Bart Schott, Kulm District 7: Anthony Mock, Kintyre District 7: Clark Price, Hensler Director-at-large: Kevin Skunes, Arthur Director-at-large: Larry Hoffmann, Wheatland

NDCGA Industry Directors Tom Cook: Cargill, Wahpeton

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North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org


TRANSFERRING YOUR FARM ASSETS TO YOUR SUCCESSORS Kyle Barlow Attorney Fredrikson & Byron, P.A.

Statistics tell us that one-third of farmers today are over the age of 65. There are many reasons why farmers do not retire. Two main reasons why many delay retirement are the income tax bill and concern about an income stream. However, careful planning can successfully transfer the farm to the successor without the giant tax bill. Every farming operation is made up of two parts: (1) the operations which include the crops raised and the machinery used to produce the crops; and, (2) the land on which the crops are raised. In order to continue the farm, the next generation needs all of the machinery and land, while the retiring farmer needs an income stream from the farm assets. A sale of the machinery and land may not be possible because the next generation cannot afford to buy it all, and/or the sale will result in a large tax liability to the retiring farmer. Income Tax Problems The machinery is typically fully depreciated by the retiring farmer, so the proceeds from its sale will be taxed at ordinary income tax rates. In addition, the retiring farmer no longer has expenses to offset the income earned from selling crops. This often means a retiring farmer is in the top income tax bracket (37 percent federally in 2018) in the year of their retirement. To address this, the retiring farmer could consider a gift of crops to charity or family, and leasing rather than selling the machinery to the successor farmer. Gift Crops If the retiring farmer makes charitable gifts each year, he

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org

may consider making gifts of crops instead of cash. Once transferred to the charity, the charity can sell the crops tax free. At the same time, the retiring farmer does not report income from the sale, and he gets an income tax deduction for the value of the gift of the crops. Another option is to gift crops to a family member in a lower income tax bracket. In 2018, a farmer can give away up to $15,000 ($30,000 if the retiring farmer is married) to each recipient (this includes children, grandchildren, and even children-in-law) without using any of his estate/gift tax exemption. After completing the gift, the recipient can sell the crops and they will pay income on the sale at their lower income tax rate. Machinery Lease Instead of a sale, the retiring farmer could consider leasing the machinery to the next generation over a period of years with an option to purchase it at the end of the lease. For income tax purpose this is treated as a sale of the machinery, but will spread the income over several years so it is not all taxed in one year. In addition to the income tax savings, this will help provide the retiring farmer with an income stream for the lease term. Stream of Retirement Income A sale of this land during the farmer’s lifetime is usually impossible because a large capital gain is triggered by the sale. This capital gain vanishes if the land passes to the next generation at the death of the retiring farmer. Therefore, the best option is usually for the retiring farmer to keep the land and cash lease it to the next generation. This will also provide the retiring farmer with the income stream they need. It is possible for a farmer to successfully retire with a sufficient income stream and without paying a large income tax bill. However, in order to do this they need to put a plan in place that will help accomplish their goals. Kyle Barlow is an attorney with Fredrikson & Byron, P.A., in Fargo, North Dakota, who focuses on estate and succession planning. If you would like to speak Kyle regarding a transition plan for your farm you can contact him at 701.237.8213 or kbarlow@fredlaw.com.

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RED MEAT EXPORTS A TEAM EFFORT THAT BENEFITS U.S. AG Submitted by the U.S. Meat Export Federation Exporting beef, pork and lamb produced in the United States and keeping the nation’s agriculture economy firing is a team effort that includes efforts of North Dakota corn producers.

to 23 percent. Pork export value averaged $54.81 per head slaughtered, up four percent from a year ago.

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), which receives funding from nine different agriculture sectors – including state corn checkoff associations – promotes U.S. red meat and works on trade access issues in more than 90 countries. Its mission, “to increase the value and profitability of the U.S. beef, pork and lamb industries by enhancing demand for their products in export markets through a dynamic partnership of all stakeholders,” can be simplified this way: "USMEF’s goal is to put U.S. meat on the world’s table.” For corn producers, there’s value in putting more meat on the world’s table: a study commissioned by USMEF revealed that U.S. red meat exports add 45 cents to the value of each bushel of corn grown by U.S. farmers. Before we describe some of the efforts being undertaken on behalf of North Dakota corn producers and the U.S. ag community in key international markets, let’s look at U.S. red meat export numbers from the first quarter of 2018. U.S. beef exports were nine percent ahead of the 2017 pace in volume (318,073 metric tons) and jumped 19 percent in value ($1.92 billion). Exports accounted for 13.2 percent of total first-quarter beef production and 10.7 percent for muscle cuts, up from 12.4 percent and 9.8 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value averaged $315.67 per head of fed slaughter, up 18 percent year-over-year. First-quarter exports of U.S. pork were slightly ahead of last year’s record volume pace and climbed significantly higher in value. For the January-March quarter, volume increased one percent year-over-year to 636,297 mt, while value was up eight percent to $1.7 billion. Exports accounted for 26.6 percent of total first-quarter pork production, down slightly from a year ago, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported edged slightly upward

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Efforts to Grow U.S. Red Meat Exports in 2018 Japan USMEF has used North Dakota Corn checkoff dollars to help grow demand for U.S. beef and pork in Japan, where meat-centric festivals, unique concept restaurants, and the trend of “instagenic” red meat menus where diners can post their meals to social media platforms like Instagram are fueling the Japanese consumer’s appetite for beef and pork. Western-style cooking methods and culinary techniques such as grilling are becoming increasingly popular in Japan, where consumers have traditionally embraced thinly-sliced beef and pork. But now USMEF is focusing on moving larger volumes of U.S. red meat in Japan by demonstrating the superior eating quality and proper cooking techniques for thick-cut U.S. product at the retail level. Supermarket customers are being encouraged to purchase more thick-cut items, and the response has been very positive. To increase U.S. beef retail sales in Japan, USMEF introduced a new merchandising idea at a seminar for foodservice buyers and restaurant owners. The “pound steak” campaign was followed by a “My Pound Steak” Instagram event for consumers. “The catchphrase ‘pound steak’ is all about U.S. beef thick-cut steak, which is something we are really trying to establish as a consumer food trend in Japan,” said Takemichi Yamashoji, USMEF-Japan director. “Typically, steaks in Japan are six to eight ounces. Our idea is to convince foodservice operators and restaurants to serve steaks that are 15 to 16 ounces, which is equal to one pound – thus the ‘pound steak’ campaign, a way to enjoy the taste and quality of U.S. beef as thick-cut steak.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


South Korea In South Korea, USMEF is taking aim at the country’s increased interest in convenient, affordable high-quality dining options. Capitalizing on USMEF training and its relationships with food truck operators in Korea, a new dining concept that is really taking off among young Koreans, leading convenience store chains CU, GS25, and 7-Eleven teamed up with Chef Lee Food Truck to launch a U.S. beef steak lunch box. Pairing U.S. cube steak with a unique steak sauce recipe, fried rice, mashed potatoes and precooked broccoli, nearly 7,000 U.S. beef lunch boxes are sold per day, accounting for 12 metric tons of U.S. beef every month. Promoting thick-cut and dry-aged steaks while offering new ideas for preparing U.S. beef, USMEF partnered with E-mart, the largest grocery chain in South Korea, to conduct a series of educational sessions for retail meat department managers. E-mart plans to further expand steak offerings in 2018 and turned to USMEF for help educating its staff.

China Since the market reopened in mid-2017, exports of U.S. beef to China have grown steadily. Through March of this year, exports to China had reached 1,616 mt, more than half the volume exported in 2017. USMEF continues to re-introduce U.S. beef to the market with seminars, cutting demonstrations, and roadshows bringing buyers and suppliers together. Highlighting the difference in quality and consistency between U.S. beef and its competitors, USMEF seminars showcase U.S. products and demonstrate applicable uses for a variety of U.S. beef cuts. While development of this market will require a heavy time investment, USMEF is committed to building a strong presence for U.S. beef in China. USMEF recently conducted training sessions in Guangzhou, the largest city in southern China, to help educate importers and hotel, restaurant and institutional (HRI) clients about the quality and availability of U.S. beef. Mexico Over the course of several years, USMEF has focused on teaching consumers in Mexico how to cook high-quality U.S. beef and pork. Traditional Mexican cuisine calls for stewing, a result of the availability of lower-quality beef in the market. Mexican cooks also tend to overcook pork – and USMEF is working with the country’s foodservice sector to educate chefs on new ways to prepare U.S. pork that brings out its distinctive flavor. Partnering with Weber, USMEF brought the grill experience the major metropolitan areas of Mexico City, Monterrey and Guadalajara. Hands-on workshops led by Weber grill masters taught U.S. beef and pork buyers and end users the proper techniques for grilling a variety of U.S. cuts.

The U.S. Meat Export Federation partnered with a grocery chain in South Korea to conduct educational sessions for retail meat department managers.

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

For the first time ever, USMEF also organized a U.S. beef and pork cutting and cooking seminar in Puebla, the fourth-largest metropolitan area in Mexico and one that is well-known for its culinary traditions. The seminar focused on product education and was attended by distributors and staff from foodservice companies and processing facilities.

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NDCUC PARTICIPATES IN VALLEY CITY ETHANOL PROMOTION On May 11, the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (NDCUC), along with the North Dakota Ethanol Council and Petro Serve USA, participated in the grand opening celebration of the Valley City Petro Serve USA location. To celebrate the grand opening, consumers were able to save 15 cents per gallon of E15 during the month of May. The grand opening ceremony included a news conference, E15 deals and food and beverage specials. Jason Strand, North Dakota farmer and owner of E85 Racing, had his ethanolpowered racecar on location and visited with consumers on the benefits of ethanol. News conference speakers included Valley City Mayor Dave Carlsrud; Former Governor Jack Dalrymple; Kent

Satrang, CEO of Petro Serve USA; Kevin Skunes, president of the National Corn Growers Association; Jeff Zueger, CEO of Midwest Ag Energy Group and chairman of the North Dakota Ethanol Council; Dale Ihry, NDCUC executive director, and Ron Lamberty, senior vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol. “We are committed to offering our customers choices at the pump,” said Kent Satrang, CEO of Petro Serve USA. “Ethanol blends are the perfect partnership between North Dakota’s corn fields and oil fields. E15 provides a very costeffective option for our customers, and we are proud to be CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

Jason Strand of E85 Racing had his ethanol powered racecar at the Petro Serve USA grand opening in Valley City to talk with consumers about the benefits of using ethanol.

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Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

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offering it at the new Valley City location.” Satrang noted that during the E15 promotion during the month of May, sales of E15 increased 282 percent, with ethanol mid-grade sales up 250 percent. Dale Ihry, NDCUC executive director, said, “We were happy to work with the Ethanol Council and Petro Serve on this promotion to encourage the use of mid-level ethanol blends like E15. E15 has undergone more testing than any other automotive fuel, so we know it’s a safe option for vehicles 2001 and newer. Our goal at the Corn Council is to create markets for corn grown in North Dakota, and ethanol is a huge market opportunity for us.” (Right) Speakers at the new conference during the Petro Serve USA grand opening included (from left) Kevin Skunes, National Corn Growers Association president; Former Governor Jack Dalrymple; Kent Satrang, CEO of Petro Serve USA; Valley City Mayor Dave Carlsrud; Jeff Zueger, Midwest Ag Energy Group CEO and North Dakota Ethanol Council chairman; Dale Ihry, NDCUC executive director; and Ron Lamberty, senior vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol.

Mike Clemens, North Dakota Corn Growers Association board member, was one of many consumers stopping by the Petro Serve USA grand opening to fuel his vehicle with ethanol.

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

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NDCGA HOLDS ELECTIONS, DIRECTORS RETIRE The North Dakota Corn Growers Association (NDCGA) elected officers to lead the organization and welcomed two new board directors, with terms starting July 1, 2018. The newly elected officers of the NDCGA are President Randy Melvin from Buffalo, Vice President Paul Thomas, Velva, and Secretary/Treasurer Rob Hanson from Wimbeldon. Officers are elected to serve a one-year term by fellow board members. New board members elected at the NDCGA Annual Meeting include Andrew Mauch, Mooreton, and Drew Courtney from Oakes. Mauch will represent District 1,

replacing Carson Klosterman from Wyndmere, who terms out after serving two four-year terms. Courtney will replace Chris Erlandson, Oakes, as the District 6 director. Erlandson served two four-year terms. At-large directors Mike Clemens, Wimbledon, and Jeff Enger, Marion will retire from the NDCGA board, effective June 30, 2018. Vern Anderson, Carrington, Gary Geske, Enderlin, and Ray Kotchian, Fargo, served the NDCGA board as non-voting industry directors. Their term ends June 30, 2018.

NDCGA directors with terms ending June 30, 2018: (Back): Ray Kotchian, Chris Erlandson, Carson Klosterman and Gary Geske. (Front): Jeff Enger and Mike Clemens. Not pictured is Vern Anderson.

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North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org


NDCUC PRESENTS AT AG IN THE CLASSROOM EVENTS

Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity members from North Dakota State University helped at the Living Ag Classroom event in Fargo.

The North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (NDCUC) participated in four Ag in the Classroom events this winter, presenting information about corn to nearly 3,800 elementary students in the state. The four events included the Winter Ag and Construction Expo in Jamestown, KFYR Agri-International Show in Bismarck, Living Ag Classroom in Fargo and Harvest North Dakota in Lisbon. When teaching the students about corn, NDCUC focuses on three types of corn grown in North Dakota: popcorn, sweet corn and field corn, and the four uses of corn: food, feed, fuel and fiber. Students learn more about corn by

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

playing a game using the spin wheel. Other commodity groups and agricultural organizations also present at the Ag in the Classroom events, so students are able to learn about a variety of North Dakota crops and livestock. Members of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity from North Dakota State University led the presentations to the elementary students at the Living Ag Classroom event in Fargo. With over 2,300 students from the Fargo area attending this event, the NDCUC is thankful for the help from the fraternity members.

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CORN YIELD RESPONSE TO PHOSPHORUS SUPPLIED WITH DISTILLERS GRAINS Submitted by Jasper Teboh and Szilvia Yuja, NDSU Carrington Research and Education Center, and Joel Ransom, NDSU Department of Plant Science Condensed distillers solubles (CDS, or syrup), and wet distillers grains (WDG) are co-products from corn ethanol production. Even though they are used primarily as feed for livestock, some farmers in close proximity to ethanol plants, or who are able to acquire distillers grains at relatively low cost, have wondered whether crops would respond similar to commonly used inorganic fertilizers on their fields. Despite some drawbacks to their application (lack of appropriate application equipment, transport cost, storage) the appeal that nutrients removed from soil by previous years’ corn crops can be recycled back to the field has been appealing to some farmers, who recently expressed interest in studies to assess the phosphorus (P) fertilizer value of distillers grains. The objectives of the study were: 1. To demonstrate that like triple super phosphate (TSP), distillers grains can supply P to enhance corn yields 2. To determine the amount of distillers grains that can significantly increase yields Corn studies were conducted at Carrington from 2015 to 2017, and at Fairmount in 2015, to assess yield performance of corn when distillers grains were applied as CDS and WDG, and compared to granular P fertilizer (triple super phosphate or TSP) at 40, 80, and 120 pounds per acre. These treatments included a control (0 pounds of added P). All treatments were surface applied and incorporated in soil. From the lab analysis of CDS and WDG in 2015, we determined the amount needed to supply P at 40N fertilizer (urea) was applied up to nonlimiting rates to the control and TSP treated plots, and some added only to the low P treatments of WDG and CDS to bring the nitrogen (N) levels to adequate levels. All other nutrients such as sulfur (S) and potassium (K) were added if necessary to avoid deficiency in plots that received low or no addition of the nutrients from distillers grains. Table 1 shows the amount of N, P, K, S supplied when either WDG or CDS were applied at 40 pounds P rates.

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Table 1. Amount of nutrients supplied by WDG at 40 lbs. P WDG Year of analysis

WDG

P

N

T/ac

S

Lbs/a

2015

2.10

52

36

15

2016

2.60

94

33

16

2017

1.21

63

28

10

2018

3.28

112

27

17

N

K

S

CDS

40

P

1000 gal/ac

CDS

K

Lbs/a

2015

0.36

44

33

12

2016

0.28

47

28

13

2017

0.30

61

27

7

2018

0.27

32

31.0

15

40

From the results, yields at Fairmount did not respond to either P rates or sources. For the three-year study at Carrington, yield differences were only significant between sources of P, if P had a significant effect on yields. That means when P fertilization had no significant impact, sources of P did not have an effect. This was likely because all other nutrients supplied with distillers grains (S, N, K, etc.) were supplied in adequate amounts. Yields were increased significantly by application of P in two of the three years at Carrington in 2015 and 2016 (Fig. 1). In 2015 CDS improved grain yields significantly with the application of CDS and WDG. CDS improved yields by 17 bushels more than TSP, probably due to availability of all essential nutrients supplied with CDS, even though soil test levels for other nutrients were at sufficient levels besides N. In 2016, yields from WDG were significantly greater compared to CDS and TSP. Yields were probably lower for CDS than WDG because only half the rate of N that was applied with TSP (187 pounds N) and with WDG (187 pounds N at 40 and 80

CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


If means are shown with letters, they were statistically different. Means followed by same letters in each year are not statistically different (p<0.1) * CDS received only half of total N rates applied to other treatments

pounds P, and 280 pounds N at 120 pounds P rates for WDG), compared to 46, 93, and 139 pounds N applied at P rates of 40, 80, and 120 pounds, respectively. Meanwhile, in 2017 yields were not statistically different following P addition even though numerical differences showed higher yields for WDG and CDS compared to TSP and the control (Fig. 2). In 2017 P fertilization improved yields by 16 bushels when P was applied and averaged across sources. Even though yields have been shown to improve with distillers grains application, an economic use of distillers grains as sources of fertilizers are recommended only for farmers who do not have all the associated costs if they are to be used as sources of nutrients. Cost of transportation, application cost, availability of equipment, and storage, are some of the associated costs. Nevertheless, distillers grains provide an alternative source of nutrients for crops in North Dakota and beyond. Farmers, and ethanol producers who have excess CDS and are willing to provide to farmers at no charge, have called with interest to know if distillers grains can be an important source of nutrients to crops. This research proves the answer is yes.

If means are shown with letters, they were statistically different. Means followed by same letters in each year are not statistically different (p<0.1) * CDS received only half of total N rates applied to other treatments

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

17


ND CORN CLASSIC TO BE HELD AUGUST 14

NEWSLETTER SPONSORS EXECUTIVE LEVEL DEKALB Tharaldson Ethanol

The 16th annual ND Corn Classic golf tournament will be held August 14 at the Maple River Golf Club in Mapleton, N.D. This event is a great opportunity for networking, marketing and fun! Golfer registration and sponsorship opportunities are available now. Teams of four golfers can register by completing the registration form at www.ndcorn.org, or the registration form included in this issue on page 20. The form on our website can process credit card transactions. Registration fees include green fees, cart, lunch and steak supper. The prices for golfing are as follows: • Golf: $125/person

PRINCIPAL LEVEL Corteva Agriscience Dyna-Gro Seed Legend Seeds, Inc. Peterson Farms Seed Proseed CORE LEVEL AgCountry Farm Credit Cargill

Thank you! 18

• Steak supper only with no golf: $20/person Single golfers will be assigned to teams that register three or fewer players. All golfers will receive two mulligans and one putt in the putting contest, sponsored by the First State Bank of North Dakota. Sponsorships are also available for the event. Sponsors can register by completing the sponsorship form on our website. Sponsorship options are as follows: • Hole Sponsor: $250 (recognition on hole green and event program) • Lunch Sponsor: $500 (recognition on banner, website and event program) • Supper Sponsor: $1,000 (recognition on banner, website, radio advertising, and event program) • Tournament Sponsor: $5,000 (recognition on banner, website, radio advertising, event program and golfer registration forms, plus one free golf team) Contact Katelyn at katelyn@ndcorn.org or (701) 566-9322 with any questions. We look forward to hosting another successful and fun event!

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org


CONNECTING WITH OUR NEIGHBORS TO THE NORTH On June 11, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (NDCUC) staff and the North Dakota Soybean Council staff traveled to Carman, Manitoba, to meet with staff from the Manitoba Corn Growers Association (MCGA) and Manitoba Pulse and Soybean Growers Association. The meeting was held to gain an understanding of each organization and to identify potential opportunities for collaboration. MCGA is the oldest commodity organization in Manitoba, which incorporated in 1981. They represent over 1,300 producers and have a 12 member board of directors.

Staff from the N.D. Corn Utilization Council and N.D. Soybean Council traveled to Manitoba to identify future collaboration opportunities with the Manitoba Corn Growers Association and Manitoba Pulse and Soybean Growers Association.

Manitoba planted almost 400,000 acres of grain corn and nearly 90,000 acres of silage corn in 2017. Grain corn averaged 134 bushels an acre, up from the 10 year average of 115 bushels an acre. Most corn is grown in southern Manitoba, but has been planted up to 300 miles north of the border. The livestock industry uses 68 percent of the corn grown in Manitoba with over half of that utilized in swine production. 21 percent of the corn grown is used in ethanol production. The sole ethanol plant is owned by Husky Energy in Minnedosa. Research projects were a central focus of the meeting. Manitoba has been investing in developing short season, cold tolerant and disease resistant hybrids. This research is being conducted at the University of Ottawa. This project also includes the establishment of a Goss’s Wilt screening nursery where hybrids can be challenged with the disease and tested for resistance. Screening methods can also be standardized for the disease. Goss’s Wilt has been

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

identified in Manitoba and this research will identify and characterize the bacterial populations causing Goss’s Wilt on corn in Manitoba. MCGA has invested in on-farm research projects. Plot scale research can help sort out an answer among many potentially conflicting options because there can be many replicates. The goal is that by using commercial sized equipment they will get a more complete answer on an issue and be one step closer to agronomic recommendations and implementation. Other projects discussed included nitrogen timing trials and on-farm strip tillage with fertilizer trials. Many of the issues that we face in North Dakota are also prevalent in Manitoba, such as Goss’s Wilt, short growing season, crop rotations getting shorter, glyphosate tolerant weeds and northern corn rootworm prevalence. The similarities in land, water and temperature make the MCGA an ideal partner for the NDCUC. A future meeting between the two organizations will take place in the fall of 2018. We look forward to collaborating with our neighbors to the north.

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16th annual th

ND NDCorn CornClassic Classic 16 annual

Maple River Golf Club Maple River Golf Club• •August August14, 14, 2018 2018 Golfer GolferRegistration Registration Form Form

Registration:11 amam • Shotgun pm Registration:11 • ShotgunStart: Start:Noon Noon •• Supper: Supper: 55pm Name:Name:

Additional Golfers: Additional Golfers:

Company: Company:

Name: _______________________________ _______________________________ Name:

Address: Address:

Name: _______________________________ _______________________________ Name:

City, State & Zip:

City, State & Zip: Email:

Name: _______________________________

Name: _______________________________

Email:

Singles will be assigned to teams

Singles will be to teams that register 3 orassigned fewer players. that register 3 or fewer players.

Phone:

Phone:

Registration Fee

Registration Fee Registration fee includes green fees, cart, lunch and steak supper

Each golfer receives 2 mulligans and 1 putt in the putting contest, sponsored by First State Bank of ND Registration fee includes green fees, cart, lunch and steak supper

Each golfer receives 2 mulligans and 1 putt in the putting contest, sponsored by First State Bank of ND Golf: $125/golfer steak supper (no golf): $20/person Golf:Ribeye $125/golfer

Ribeye steak supper (no golf): $20/person

Total:

Please remit payment with this registration form. This form will serve as your invoice.

Total:

Please remit payment with this registration form. This form will serve as your invoice.

Payment Information

Return this form along with payment Payment Information or credit card information to:

Make checks payable to NDCGA

Credit Card Type: ___________________________________

Make checks payable to NDCGA

Name on Card: _____________________________________

Credit Card Type: ___________________________________

Credit Card #: ______________________________________

Name Expiration on Card: Date: _____________________________________ _________________ CVN: ______________ Credit This Cardform #: ______________________________________ and credit card processing are available on our website: www.ndcorn.org/corngrowers

Expiration Date: _________________ CVN: ______________

Return this form along with payment NDCGA or credit card information to:S. 4852 Rocking Horse Circle Fargo, ND 58104

NDCGA For more information, please contact Katelyn 4852 RockingorHorse Circle S. at 701-566-9322 katelyn@ndcorn.org. Fargo, ND 58104 For more information, please contact Katelyn at 701-566-9322 or katelyn@ndcorn.org.

This form and credit card processing are available on our website: www.ndcorn.org/corngrowers

20

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org


NDCUC WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS Tysen Rosenau farms near Carrington with his father, Dan. They grow corn, soybeans and wheat. Rosenau and his wife have one son. He looks forward to serve as an advocate for the corn and ethanol industries. Rosenau will represent the corn producers of District 4, which includes Barnes, Griggs, Eddy, Foster and Stutsman counties. Rosenau replaces Dave Swanson from New Rockford, who served the allowable limit of two, four year terms.

Tysen Rosenau

William Wagner

On April 1, the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (NDCUC) welcomed two new members, Tysen Rosenau and William Wagner. Members represent the districts in which they reside by influencing how checkoff dollars are expended.

NDSU SOIL HEALTH

BUS TOUR

July 25-26, 2018

District 3 will be represented by William Wagner of Neche. Wagner grows corn, soybeans, wheat, pinto beans and alfalfa and raises cattle with his parents and wife. Wagner and his wife have one son. Wagner looks forward to helping promote North Dakota corn use and build corn markets in his new role on the NDCUC. Wagner replaces Paul Belzer from Cando, who represented corn producers in District 3 for two, four-year terms. District 3 consists of 18 counties in northern North Dakota.

To register and for hotel information, visit the NDSU Soil Health webpage: ndsu.edu/soil health - under the “Events” tab. Hotel accomodations are reserved and paid on your own

TOPICS COVERED: • Fertility • Soil health • Interseeding cover crops

Valley City, ND

• Full season cover crops for grazing • Salinity

Register Online • Cost $20

• Weed management

NORTH DAKOTA

DEPARTMENT of HEALTH

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

21


FOUR NDCGA BOARD DIRECTORS RETIRE to follow their cropping base history, which opened the door to grow corn. I could see the opportunity for massive growth in growing corn and wanted to be a part of it. There was an opening in my district and I was voted in. What has surprised you about being on the NDCGA board?

Carson Klosterman

Jeff: I've been surprised at how much agriculture has had to defend itself, which has become an important part of the mission of the Corn Growers Association. A pleasant surprise has been the numbers of young farmers who have come back to our local communities.

Chris Erlandson

Chris: I'm most surprised by the impact that the organization has on the development of policy on a state and national level. Before my time on this board, I was completely unaware that farm bill type legislation was not just dreamed up in some unknown back room, but in fact legislative leadership seeks out input, opinions, and ideas from farmer leaders within organizations like the Corn Growers Association. Even more impressive is the respect and trust that national leaders have expressed about the Corn Growers organization during meetings. Jeff Enger

What have been some top achievements or your best memories of being on the NDCGA board?

Mike Clemens

Jeff: One of the events I most enjoyed was ACE Fly-ins in Washington, D.C. I attended for seven years and enjoyed the visits to Capitol Hill telling our story. It was also my pleasure to spend time at Bismarck during the legislative sessions and see the work done on our behalf.

June 30, 2018 will mark the end of terms for four board members of the North Dakota Corn Growers Association (NDCGA). Carson Klosterman, Wyndmere, N.D., and Chris Erlandson, Oakes, N.D., have served the allowable limit of two, four year terms. Mike Clemens, Wimbledon, N.D., and Jeff Enger, Marion, N.D., have served as atlarge directors on the NDCGA board. We asked them a few questions to learn more about their time served.

Carson: I've enjoyed making trips to Washington, D.C. to relay issues as a member of the National Corn Growers Association action teams and NDCGA president and later seeing those issues corrected.

How did you get involved with the NDCGA?: Chris: I was approached by a retiring board member who recommended I consider running for his position because it would be a good experience for a young guy and bring a different perspective to the board. I knew very little about the organization at the time so I learned a lot and gained more experiences that I could not have found elsewhere. Mike: I was asked years ago by a seed sales representative before corn was a popular crop in much of N.D. The Freedom to Farm Act had just passed a few years earlier and farmers were figuring out that they no longer had

22

What would you say to others looking to get involved in ag organizations like the NDCGA? Carson: There is probably never a "good" time to join, so just do it! You'll meet lots of folks to call friends and have many great experiences. Mike: To anybody interested in making a difference, get involved with a grower group. This goes way beyond just waiting for rain. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make a difference in your farm, develop long lasting relationships with fellow growers and make life better on the farm for everyone.

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org


SCOUT FOR TODAY, SCOUT FOR TOMORROW Eric Nelson Technical Agronomist Monsanto Company

It is easy for all of us involved in agriculture to say “scout your fields.” In our current time it is even more important. Of course it is important to scout for any agronomic issue that can still be addressed in season, but it is also valuable so we can properly set our expectations for harvest. Realistically we could find something for which there isn’t a treatment, we could find something that was mechanically induced during one of our operations, but we may find something that we can prevent in future crop years. Most of the concerns that I have found so far this year are dependent on soil moisture and vary across the geography I travel. As the 2018 crop year began, we felt under the gun based on the calendar date. We didn’t necessarily get the crop off to an ideal start due to that fact. The symptoms are visible now, the results won’t be seen until fall. Some fields were on the dry side and seeds were not placed into adequate soil moisture for emergence. In some areas, fall tillage wasn’t an option due to excessive soil moisture, many of those fields were still wet this spring. Seedbed preparation under wet conditions is difficult. Cloddy seedbeds from tillage under wet conditions can lead to poor seed to soil contact which will also lead to uneven emergence patterns. By planting into those same wet soil conditions we can also encounter sidewall compaction. The resulting root system will be less effective at drawing water and plant nutrition into the plants leading to smaller cobs at harvest. Another agronomic concern that has been visible this year that we don’t see as frequently, fertilizer burn on corn roots and the resulting plant stand. Fertilizer burn to young corn roots is more common under dry soil conditions as the salts injure young roots. When soils are dry, this outcome is even possible with rates that are normally safe when placed with the seed. As planting season got underway, there were many corn fields yet to be fertilized with nitrogen. In

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org

cases where anhydrous ammonia is used, it is important to wait before planting. The general rule is to wait three to five days between spring anhydrous application and planting. The length of time truly required will vary based on depth of application, soil type, and soil moisture among others to prevent plant injury. Now as we talk about scouting for the future, what is on our minds? The period of most rapid plant growth accompanied by high demands for nutrients and moisture is right upon us, knee-high to tasseling. “Onion Leaf” or “Buggy Whip” plants are more common during this phase of rapid growth. Normal recovery is the usual outcome; however, some genetics are more susceptible to a greater injury and slower recovery. Throughout this period, plants will also be more susceptible to leaf rolling from moisture deficiency, root lodging (leaning, not broken) from winds, and greensnap. These can obviously reduce yield to varying levels based on incidence and severity. In terms of making changes for following crop years, disease and insect pressure should also be followed closely. Insect resistant traits have us protected against some of those most damaging to corn such as corn earworm, European corn borer, and corn rootworm. We still need to keep tabs on the populations in our fields for instances where a more protective trait will be required. If corn rootworm populations build it may be advantageous to upgrade to a CRW protected hybrid. Goss’s Bacterial Wilt is a disease that has garnered more discussion in the last year than many previous years. Goss’ Wilt requires a conducive environment for proliferation, inoculum present, and injury to plant leaves (hail is one) for infection to occur. Once the disease is present and builds to a level of greater concern, we will need to choose hybrids with an emphasis on Goss’ Wilt tolerance. In addition to yield and other agronomic characteristics. Like I stated at the beginning, it is easy to say “scout your fields” much more difficult to maintain the practice. We scout at 50 mph through the window, we scout from the seat of the sprayer, we need to scout a bit closer, earlier, and more thoroughly. Better decision making before a problem exists will help us maintain and increase production into the future.

23


NCGA HOSTS CORN UTILIZATION TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE Larry Hoffmann, North Dakota Corn Growers Association board member, and Jean Henning, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council finance and research director, attended the Corn Utilization and Technology Conference (CUTC) in St. Louis, Missouri on June 4-6. Since 1987, CUTC has brought together leading innovators in the corn industry and is hosted by the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA). The biennial conference provides a venue that allows scientific exchange and engaging discussions for researchers, farmers and other industry leaders. “CUTC provides a great opportunity for attendees to interact with key stakeholders throughout the supply chain, sharing each other’s needs, priorities and successes,” NCGA Market Development Director Jim Bauman said. “A lot of planning goes into providing high-quality sessions around the topics of production, processing and utilization. But it’s often the unplanned, free-flowing conversations, such as the discussion on the need for additional consumer outreach, which encourages many of CUTC’s attendees to return year after year.” Bauman said, “Scientific advancements in agriculture possess the ability to provide a solution to many current and projected future social issues. However, if consumer’s understanding and comfort with modern science doesn’t increase, it will slow or even prevent the implementation of new technology designed to sustainably increase the production, processing and utilization of U.S. corn.” It seems the growing communication challenge between the public and farmers is also being felt in the scientific and technical communities. Those attending CUTC’s general session concurred that there is a compelling need to develop techniques and messages that help bridge between how consumers “feel” and what they need to “know.” A theme that was heard throughout the conference is the need for us to become a demand driven industry rather than a supply push industry. We need to listen to our customers and become partners throughout the supply chain in providing the products that our customers want. Information was shared on advancements in digital

24

agriculture which will allow for a more integrated supply chain, and real time information on crop quality, markets and traceability of products. Discussions were held regarding corn becoming more differentiated and the market place rewarding quality and sustainability practices in the future. Volume and quantity will become less important than quality of the product and high quality will be rewarded. Future generations will continue to be environmentally conscious and much effort is underway in creating plantbased plastics. Corn based modified ethylene glycol (MEG), one of the monomers that goes into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, is currently being researched. Current research indicates that corn based MEG will provide efficiencies in the process without adding additional cost. Goals of finding efficiencies in processes as well as utilizing of all parts of the kernel were common themes throughout the conference. Breakout discussions were held on mycotoxins including applications of ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) for mycotoxin management. RNAi has become a new and powerful tool in managing plant diseases in recent years. The latest methods were presented in suppressing various genes that are important for Aspergillus flavus to infect the host plant or to synthesize aflatoxin after infection. Along with gene editing, advances in mycotoxin detection technology were presented. Accurate measurements will allow corn to be put to uses that are appropriate with the extent and level of contamination and facilitates efforts to prevent fungal contamination. The technologies used to measure mycotoxins and the way that those technologies are applied in control systems, continue to evolve. State of the art technologies for detecting mycotoxins are currently solving problems in the ethanol industry as well as ongoing efforts of the USDA to facilitate corn export through the Mycotoxin Testing Program. A key mission of NCGA’s CUTC is to engage and retain top talent in corn research. Attracting students into corn CONTINUED ON PAGE 25

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


Student scientists can showcase their corn research in poster sessions at the Corn Utilization and Technology Conference.

research will ensure there are trained researchers, industry partners and crop specialists to work in an evolving industry. One way to engage students is through poster session competitions. The Gary Lamie Student Poster Competition and the mycotoxin poster session allow student scientists to showcase their research to a broad audience. The top three posters in both the general and mycotoxin sessions receive cash prizes. Joseph P. Polin, a graduate student from Iowa State University’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, received top honors in the Gary Lamie Student Poster Competition for his work on improving the process economics of making bio-renewable fuels and chemicals from corn stover. Polin’s research seeks to take abundant corn stover biomass and convert the lignocellulose fractions into valuable products more economically and efficiently by improving the scalability and process economics of corn stover pyrolysis systems. CUTC conducted a second poster session focused on mycotoxin research efforts. Mycotoxin contamination of corn or dried distillers grains complicates the handling of corn

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org

and can reduce limit in marketability and value. Claiming first place in the mycotoxin poster session was Weiran Li, a graduate student in the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Purdue University. Li’s research focused on identifying genes which are involved in corn immune responses to bacterial pathogens which can then be utilized to slow down the disease development of Goss’s Wilt on leaves on corn seedlings. Goss’s Wilt is a bacterial disease that can cause systemic infection and wilt of corn plants, severe leaf blighting and ultimately, reduced yields. Encouraging young researchers to consider a career in agriculture is a major focus for NCGA and their state partners. Those recognized in the poster contest show our efforts are paying off and provide another reason for optimism. Conference attendees were very impressed with the quality of research and the level of enthusiasm the students exhibited. Larry Hoffmann commented that “CUTC is a wonderful opportunity for farmers to hear from industry members and researchers on the future of corn. These are the people who will drive much needed new uses for corn in the future.”

25


NORTH DAKOTA CORN COUNCIL BOARD OF DIRECTORS District 1: Arnie Anderson, Hankinson District 2: Jason Rayner, Finley (Vice Chairman) District 3: William Wagner, Neche District 4: Tysen Rosenau, Carrington District 5: Terry Wehlander, DeLamere (Chairman) District 6: Scott German, Oakes (Secretary) District 7: Robert Ferebee, Halliday

NORTH DAKOTA CORN COUNCIL COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES Corn Council District 1 Richland - Arnie Anderson Corn Council District 2 Cass - Patrick Skunes Steele - Jason Rayner Traill - Steve Doeden Corn Council District 3 Benson - Randy Simon Burke - Bryan Ankenbauer Cavalier - Mike Muhs Divide - Derik Pulvermacher Grand Forks - Greg Amundson McHenry - Jason Schiele Mountrail - Cliff Tollefson Nelson - David Steffan Pembina - William Wagner Pierce - Nick Schmaltz Ramsey - Paul Becker Renville - Bruce Teubner Ward - Gary Neshem Corn Council District 4 Barnes - Mike Clemens Eddy - Bill Smith Foster - Tysen Rosenau Griggs - Mark Ressler

26

Corn Council District 5 Ransom - Justin Halvorson Sargent - Terry Wehlander Corn Council District 6 Dickey - Scott German LaMoure - Dennis Feiken Corn Council District 7 Adams - Jordan Christman Bowman - Tony Pierce Burleigh - Lance Hagen Dunn - Robert Ferebee Emmons - Alex Deis Golden Valley - Steve Zook Grant - Cody VandenBurg Hettinger - Darwyn Mayer Kidder - James Cusey Logan - Dennis Erbele McIntosh - Anthony Neu McKenzie - CJ Thorne McLean - Paul Anderson Mercer - Riley Schriefer Morton - Elwood Barth Oliver - Clark Price Sioux - Jarrod Becker Slope - Ryan Stroh Stark - Duane Zent Wells - Richard Lies

Funded by the North Dakota Corn Checkoff | ndcorn.org


NDCGA WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS Andrew Mauch farms near Barney with his father and brother. They grow corn, soybeans, navy beans and sugar beets. Mauch and his wife have four children. He is looking forward to serving on the NDCGA board to serve as an advocate for farmers and help those not involved in agriculture understand what farmers do, and why they do it. He will represent District 1, which contains Richland County, replacing Carson Klosterman from Wyndmere, who retires from the board after serving the allowable limit of two, fouryear terms. Andrew Mauch

Drew Courtney

The North Dakota Corn Growers Association (NDCGA) elected two new board members, with terms starting July 1, 2018. Andrew Mauch and Drew Courtney were elected to the NDCGA board during the Annual Meeting on February 13. Board members represent the districts in which they live by influencing policy that affects North Dakota corn producers.

Drew Courtney will represent District 6, which consists of LaMoure and Dickey counties. Courtney and his cousin are the fifth generation of their family to farm their land near Oakes. They grow corn, soybeans and wheat. He also raises cattle with his wife. They have two daughters. Courtney hopes to continue the positive environment for growing corn in North Dakota, and looks forward to lobbying for corn issues that he and fellow producers face. Courtney replaces Chris Erlandson, Oakes, who terms off after serving two, four-year terms.

CLEMENS APPOINTED TO FCIC BOARD North Dakota Corn Growers Association (NDCGA) board member Mike Clemens has been selected to serve as a Farm Industry board member on the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) Board of Directors. Senator John Hoeven recommended Clemens for the position. The FCIC helps facilitate a stable agriculture economy by promoting the necessary research and expertise to devise and implement crop insurance. The Board is also responsible for approving new policies and plans or any modifications to existing crop insurance plans. The FCIC

North Dakota Corn Growers Association | ndcorn.org

is managed by a Board of Directors under the general supervision of the Secretary and the Risk Management Agency (RMA) Administrator. Clemens is one of three farmers in the U.S. on the FCIC Board of Directors. Clemens started farming in 1975, and has carried crop insurance for the entirety of his farming career. He and his wife have worked their family farm for 37 years, and currently farm with their eldest daughter, her husband and their son. The family grows corn, barley, soybeans and spring wheat. Clemens has served on several agricultural boards, including the National Corn Growers Association's action team that works specifically on crop insurance. The NDCGA wishes Mike the best in his new role.

27


4852 Rocking H orse Circle S . • Fargo, N D 5810 4 ndcorn.org • (701) 566 -9322

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