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PROJECT OVERVIEW The HOME Project has been exploring homelessness and its particular nature in the Northern Rivers. Over the past three years Northern Rivers Performing Arts (NORPA) has partnered with Southern Cross University (SCU) and The Winsome Hotel / Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc to run a series of creative activities led by Julian Louis, Dr Rebecca Coyle and Dr Grayson Cooke.

The Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc is a voluntary run organisation that has been providing free lunches to those in need for over 20 years. They also manage the Winsome café which is open to the public, provide low cost accommodation to marginalised men and offer space for a range of creative, social and service opportunities to the community.

In 2011 SCU students asked people what home and belonging meant to them as well as “If a statue was made in your honour, what would it look like and where would it be placed?” An exhibition of the answers in photos and videos was held at the Next Art Gallery at Southern Cross University, Lismore.

For the third stage of The HOME Project, NORPA artists have been running creative workshops in music, sound design, visual art, writing and hospitality with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc community. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering and creative development showing.

The history of The Winsome Hotel was explored in 2012, with people sharing stories of The Winsome as a pub, as a historical structure and as a music venue as well as stories of its current role as the home of the Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc. These stories were showcased in a multimedia performance evening with the Bridge Street Choir.

Tonight’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr Rebecca Coyle, whose creativity and commitment to community was the catalyst for The HOME project.

PROJECT OVERVIEW The HOME Project has been exploring homelessness and its particular nature in the Northern Rivers. Over the past three years Northern Rivers Performing Arts (NORPA) has partnered with Southern Cross University (SCU) and The Winsome Hotel / Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc to run a series of creative activities led by Julian Louis, Dr Rebecca Coyle and Dr Grayson Cooke.

The Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc is a voluntary run organisation that has been providing free lunches to those in need for over 20 years. They also manage the Winsome café which is open to the public, provide low cost accommodation to marginalised men and offer space for a range of creative, social and service opportunities to the community.

In 2011 SCU students asked people what home and belonging meant to them as well as “If a statue was made in your honour, what would it look like and where would it be placed?” An exhibition of the answers in photos and videos was held at the Next Art Gallery at Southern Cross University, Lismore.

For the third stage of The HOME Project, NORPA artists have been running creative workshops in music, sound design, visual art, writing and hospitality with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc community. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering and creative development showing.

The history of The Winsome Hotel was explored in 2012, with people sharing stories of The Winsome as a pub, as a historical structure and as a music venue as well as stories of its current role as the home of the Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc. These stories were showcased in a multimedia performance evening with the Bridge Street Choir.

Tonight’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr Rebecca Coyle, whose creativity and commitment to community was the catalyst for The HOME project.

PROJECT OVERVIEW The HOME Project has been exploring homelessness and its particular nature in the Northern Rivers. Over the past three years Northern Rivers Performing Arts (NORPA) has partnered with Southern Cross University (SCU) and The Winsome Hotel / Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc to run a series of creative activities led by Julian Louis, Dr Rebecca Coyle and Dr Grayson Cooke.

The Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc is a voluntary run organisation that has been providing free lunches to those in need for over 20 years. They also manage the Winsome café which is open to the public, provide low cost accommodation to marginalised men and offer space for a range of creative, social and service opportunities to the community.

In 2011 SCU students asked people what home and belonging meant to them as well as “If a statue was made in your honour, what would it look like and where would it be placed?” An exhibition of the answers in photos and videos was held at the Next Art Gallery at Southern Cross University, Lismore.

For the third stage of The HOME Project, NORPA artists have been running creative workshops in music, sound design, visual art, writing and hospitality with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc community. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering and creative development showing.

The history of The Winsome Hotel was explored in 2012, with people sharing stories of The Winsome as a pub, as a historical structure and as a music venue as well as stories of its current role as the home of the Lismore Soup Kitchen Inc. These stories were showcased in a multimedia performance evening with the Bridge Street Choir.

Tonight’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr Rebecca Coyle, whose creativity and commitment to community was the catalyst for The HOME project.


CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT SHOWING “Indeed, whilst hospitality might be thought of as fulfilling the most basic needs, true hospitality is a rare and precious commodity when a person has no means of acquiring food, drink or shelter.” Jim Hearn, High Season

CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT SHOWING “Indeed, whilst hospitality might be thought of as fulfilling the most basic needs, true hospitality is a rare and precious commodity when a person has no means of acquiring food, drink or shelter.” Jim Hearn, High Season

CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT SHOWING “Indeed, whilst hospitality might be thought of as fulfilling the most basic needs, true hospitality is a rare and precious commodity when a person has no means of acquiring food, drink or shelter.” Jim Hearn, High Season


Over the past six months NORPA has commissioned artists to run creative workshops with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen community. Artists Jamie Birrell, Karla Dickens, Jim Hearn and Peter Lehner have been exploring the themes of journey, food, hospitality and the river through their engagement with workshop participants at the Winsome. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering, with the artists testing out their creative findings in different spaces around the Winsome site and seeing how you, the audience, respond. Tonight we start under the bridge, a place identified by the Winsome patrons as a space to sleep when there is nowhere else to go. From the bridge, you’re invited to wander up through the sonic landscapes into The Winsome Hotel. Inside the bar a scene unfolds, taking you back in time to a Winsome of yesteryear, of bush rangers and vaudeville. Then let your nose, eyes and ears draw you outside, to the backyard of the Winsome where living, breathing installations await. Wander and explore the spaces created, there may be a hidden gem or two to be revealed. Then break bread with those who’ve come together for this experience over a shared meal created by your Winsome hosts.

Over the past six months NORPA has commissioned artists to run creative workshops with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen community. Artists Jamie Birrell, Karla Dickens, Jim Hearn and Peter Lehner have been exploring the themes of journey, food, hospitality and the river through their engagement with workshop participants at the Winsome. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering, with the artists testing out their creative findings in different spaces around the Winsome site and seeing how you, the audience, respond. Tonight we start under the bridge, a place identified by the Winsome patrons as a space to sleep when there is nowhere else to go. From the bridge, you’re invited to wander up through the sonic landscapes into The Winsome Hotel. Inside the bar a scene unfolds, taking you back in time to a Winsome of yesteryear, of bush rangers and vaudeville. Then let your nose, eyes and ears draw you outside, to the backyard of the Winsome where living, breathing installations await. Wander and explore the spaces created, there may be a hidden gem or two to be revealed. Then break bread with those who’ve come together for this experience over a shared meal created by your Winsome hosts.

Over the past six months NORPA has commissioned artists to run creative workshops with members of The Winsome Hotel and Lismore Soup Kitchen community. Artists Jamie Birrell, Karla Dickens, Jim Hearn and Peter Lehner have been exploring the themes of journey, food, hospitality and the river through their engagement with workshop participants at the Winsome. These workshops are culminating in tonight’s gathering, with the artists testing out their creative findings in different spaces around the Winsome site and seeing how you, the audience, respond. Tonight we start under the bridge, a place identified by the Winsome patrons as a space to sleep when there is nowhere else to go. From the bridge, you’re invited to wander up through the sonic landscapes into The Winsome Hotel. Inside the bar a scene unfolds, taking you back in time to a Winsome of yesteryear, of bush rangers and vaudeville. Then let your nose, eyes and ears draw you outside, to the backyard of the Winsome where living, breathing installations await. Wander and explore the spaces created, there may be a hidden gem or two to be revealed. Then break bread with those who’ve come together for this experience over a shared meal created by your Winsome hosts.

Tonight marks the end of the three-year HOME Project. It is not an official “show” as such but rather an elemental experiment with ideas that are being tested. And most importantly it is a celebration of the Winsome community. Tonight the Winsome patrons are your hosts, sharing the gifts of food, shelter and community with you. The HOME Project in 2013 has been led by Director Bronwyn Purvis and Creative Producer Bethwynn Hackett as part of NORPA’s Generator program. NORPA Generator supports the making of experiential, event based theatre in the Northern Rivers. Each project brings into collaboration local and national artists to respond to and create work inspired by local stories and the people that live here. Jim Hearn has taken on an additional role as a participant observer of the project for Southern Cross University. He has been studying the third phase of The HOME Project and it’s creative engagement model. As part of this research Jim is keen to hear how you found tonight’s experience. Please fill in the feedback card in your program, drop it off in the feedback box or return to NORPA at a later date. Results of this research will be published in 2014 by Southern Cross University.

Tonight marks the end of the three-year HOME Project. It is not an official “show” as such but rather an elemental experiment with ideas that are being tested. And most importantly it is a celebration of the Winsome community. Tonight the Winsome patrons are your hosts, sharing the gifts of food, shelter and community with you. The HOME Project in 2013 has been led by Director Bronwyn Purvis and Creative Producer Bethwynn Hackett as part of NORPA’s Generator program. NORPA Generator supports the making of experiential, event based theatre in the Northern Rivers. Each project brings into collaboration local and national artists to respond to and create work inspired by local stories and the people that live here. Jim Hearn has taken on an additional role as a participant observer of the project for Southern Cross University. He has been studying the third phase of The HOME Project and it’s creative engagement model. As part of this research Jim is keen to hear how you found tonight’s experience. Please fill in the feedback card in your program, drop it off in the feedback box or return to NORPA at a later date. Results of this research will be published in 2014 by Southern Cross University.

Tonight marks the end of the three-year HOME Project. It is not an official “show” as such but rather an elemental experiment with ideas that are being tested. And most importantly it is a celebration of the Winsome community. Tonight the Winsome patrons are your hosts, sharing the gifts of food, shelter and community with you. The HOME Project in 2013 has been led by Director Bronwyn Purvis and Creative Producer Bethwynn Hackett as part of NORPA’s Generator program. NORPA Generator supports the making of experiential, event based theatre in the Northern Rivers. Each project brings into collaboration local and national artists to respond to and create work inspired by local stories and the people that live here. Jim Hearn has taken on an additional role as a participant observer of the project for Southern Cross University. He has been studying the third phase of The HOME Project and it’s creative engagement model. As part of this research Jim is keen to hear how you found tonight’s experience. Please fill in the feedback card in your program, drop it off in the feedback box or return to NORPA at a later date. Results of this research will be published in 2014 by Southern Cross University.


JIM HEARN: WRITER, CHEF AND PARTICIPANT OBSERVER

“I’m not educated but my school room has been the world.” Dougie, The Winsome

JIM HEARN: WRITER, CHEF AND PARTICIPANT OBSERVER

“I’m not educated but my school room has been the world.” Dougie, The Winsome

JIM HEARN: WRITER, CHEF AND PARTICIPANT OBSERVER

“I’m not educated but my school room has been the world.” Dougie, The Winsome


So I’m standing in front of a six-burner stove at the Winsome Hotel in Lismore. After leaving Rae’s on Wategos as head chef and writing High Season: a memoir of heroin and hospitality, as Chopper might say, I’ve really landed on my… knees. Not that anyone here cares how I’m feeling about cooking again. The Winsome Hotel is currently operating as a homeless shelter. It’s a neat idea, strip the kegs, beer taps, and pokies out of an underperforming hotel and turn it into a space to provision hospitality to the homeless. It was hard to say no to participating in such a great initiative. The thing about the Winsome that I immediately responded to is that it represents a civic response to homelessness. It’s not being funded by a church or a religious order, which is not to say religious institutions don’t do a great deal of good work for the homeless, but I didn’t want to participate in a charity. The men at the Winsome don’t need charity; they need a place a sleep, access to a kitchen, a

So I’m standing in front of a six-burner stove at the Winsome Hotel in Lismore. After leaving Rae’s on Wategos as head chef and writing High Season: a memoir of heroin and hospitality, as Chopper might say, I’ve really landed on my… knees. Not that anyone here cares how I’m feeling about cooking again. The Winsome Hotel is currently operating as a homeless shelter. It’s a neat idea, strip the kegs, beer taps, and pokies out of an underperforming hotel and turn it into a space to provision hospitality to the homeless. It was hard to say no to participating in such a great initiative. The thing about the Winsome that I immediately responded to is that it represents a civic response to homelessness. It’s not being funded by a church or a religious order, which is not to say religious institutions don’t do a great deal of good work for the homeless, but I didn’t want to participate in a charity. The men at the Winsome don’t need charity; they need a place a sleep, access to a kitchen, a

So I’m standing in front of a six-burner stove at the Winsome Hotel in Lismore. After leaving Rae’s on Wategos as head chef and writing High Season: a memoir of heroin and hospitality, as Chopper might say, I’ve really landed on my… knees. Not that anyone here cares how I’m feeling about cooking again. The Winsome Hotel is currently operating as a homeless shelter. It’s a neat idea, strip the kegs, beer taps, and pokies out of an underperforming hotel and turn it into a space to provision hospitality to the homeless. It was hard to say no to participating in such a great initiative. The thing about the Winsome that I immediately responded to is that it represents a civic response to homelessness. It’s not being funded by a church or a religious order, which is not to say religious institutions don’t do a great deal of good work for the homeless, but I didn’t want to participate in a charity. The men at the Winsome don’t need charity; they need a place a sleep, access to a kitchen, a

bathroom, and a place to relax. Those things underscore what hospitality means, and the Winsome is a unique civic response to people who find themselves without a place to call home. Besides, for me, it’s a one-night stand. How bad can it be? In my twenties, I spent time on the street, days and weeks without a place to call home. What becomes apparent very quickly when you don’t have a roof over your head is that your body continues to function in the same way it did when you had a place to call home. Having a body can be a real drag. It requires things that can be difficult to care about if you have too much going on in your mind. Something I’ve noticed about the crew at the Winsome, particularly the new arrivals, is that there’s a split between the mind with all its plans, ideas, conflicts, voices, and dreams, and the body with all its rudimentary, functionary needs. It’s like… everything would be so easy if I didn’t have to meet my body’s needs.

bathroom, and a place to relax. Those things underscore what hospitality means, and the Winsome is a unique civic response to people who find themselves without a place to call home. Besides, for me, it’s a one-night stand. How bad can it be? In my twenties, I spent time on the street, days and weeks without a place to call home. What becomes apparent very quickly when you don’t have a roof over your head is that your body continues to function in the same way it did when you had a place to call home. Having a body can be a real drag. It requires things that can be difficult to care about if you have too much going on in your mind. Something I’ve noticed about the crew at the Winsome, particularly the new arrivals, is that there’s a split between the mind with all its plans, ideas, conflicts, voices, and dreams, and the body with all its rudimentary, functionary needs. It’s like… everything would be so easy if I didn’t have to meet my body’s needs.

bathroom, and a place to relax. Those things underscore what hospitality means, and the Winsome is a unique civic response to people who find themselves without a place to call home. Besides, for me, it’s a one-night stand. How bad can it be? In my twenties, I spent time on the street, days and weeks without a place to call home. What becomes apparent very quickly when you don’t have a roof over your head is that your body continues to function in the same way it did when you had a place to call home. Having a body can be a real drag. It requires things that can be difficult to care about if you have too much going on in your mind. Something I’ve noticed about the crew at the Winsome, particularly the new arrivals, is that there’s a split between the mind with all its plans, ideas, conflicts, voices, and dreams, and the body with all its rudimentary, functionary needs. It’s like… everything would be so easy if I didn’t have to meet my body’s needs.

The residents who have been at the Winsome for a while discover that their minds and the bodies rejoin. Most of the men are super relaxed. And this is a shelter for men: 18 of them in 18 separate rooms. Four of them have agreed to help me cook tonight for what has become dinner for 150 pax. No one else has spent time in a commercial kitchen, which, in a general sense probably means they have a higher IQ than me, but which also means, I’ve got to run this gig with a bunch of cowboys. They all look good standing around in striped aprons sharpening knives, but that ain’t gonna cut it when the dinner bell sounds. As I keep telling them… “Two words, boys” “Yes, Chef?” they yell. They’re learning; it’s not all bad, but it’s not exactly fine dining either. Where the fuck is Scotty when I need someone to yell at? By Jim Hearn

The residents who have been at the Winsome for a while discover that their minds and the bodies rejoin. Most of the men are super relaxed. And this is a shelter for men: 18 of them in 18 separate rooms. Four of them have agreed to help me cook tonight for what has become dinner for 150 pax. No one else has spent time in a commercial kitchen, which, in a general sense probably means they have a higher IQ than me, but which also means, I’ve got to run this gig with a bunch of cowboys. They all look good standing around in striped aprons sharpening knives, but that ain’t gonna cut it when the dinner bell sounds. As I keep telling them… “Two words, boys” “Yes, Chef?” they yell. They’re learning; it’s not all bad, but it’s not exactly fine dining either. Where the fuck is Scotty when I need someone to yell at? By Jim Hearn

The residents who have been at the Winsome for a while discover that their minds and the bodies rejoin. Most of the men are super relaxed. And this is a shelter for men: 18 of them in 18 separate rooms. Four of them have agreed to help me cook tonight for what has become dinner for 150 pax. No one else has spent time in a commercial kitchen, which, in a general sense probably means they have a higher IQ than me, but which also means, I’ve got to run this gig with a bunch of cowboys. They all look good standing around in striped aprons sharpening knives, but that ain’t gonna cut it when the dinner bell sounds. As I keep telling them… “Two words, boys” “Yes, Chef?” they yell. They’re learning; it’s not all bad, but it’s not exactly fine dining either. Where the fuck is Scotty when I need someone to yell at? By Jim Hearn


PETER LEHNER AND THE BRIDGE STREET CHOIR

“The soup kitchen has helped me I have made so many friends In the Lismore community I have the courage to speak up” Rachel Saywer, The Bridge Street Choir

PETER LEHNER AND THE BRIDGE STREET CHOIR

“The soup kitchen has helped me I have made so many friends In the Lismore community I have the courage to speak up” Rachel Saywer, The Bridge Street Choir

PETER LEHNER AND THE BRIDGE STREET CHOIR

“The soup kitchen has helped me I have made so many friends In the Lismore community I have the courage to speak up” Rachel Saywer, The Bridge Street Choir


The Bridge Street Choir is a living, breathing, spirited tool for self expression and self-empowerment. Musical involvement is a very important form of therapy that lifts people out of depression and provides an easy pathway out of social isolation. One of the most important values of our choir is ‘inclusiveness’. Anyone is welcome. We don’t tell people to go away because they can’t sing. The choir is a place where they can learn how to sing, and more importantly, it’s a place for community, fun, self-expression and fraternity. Our choir has regular meetings and discussions so that everyone takes part in the decisions that shape the choir’s artistic direction. It is important for us that the impetus for all the choir’s activities comes from the participant’s own hopes and dreams rather than from the director or other external forces. We have enjoyed developing a repertoire for tonight’s showing around the themes of River, Home, Journey and Hospitality, and creating theatrical moments to be performed alongside the songs.

through creating music, performance and passionate expression, that truly opens people’s hearts. By Peter Lehner The Bridge Street Choir members performing tonight are: Ray, Richard, Laurie, Rachel, Rachel, Margaret, Moppy, Helen, Leanne, Braiden, Oshia, Jenny, Carol, Carol, Dawn, Col, Andy, Shaz, Millie,Trevor, Dave, Zac, Donna, Martina, Wild and Angela. The Bridge Street Choir director is Peter Lehner. He has travelled Australia to work with homeless, disadvantaged and indigenous communities. Awards include: Universal Peace Federation award, Australia Day Award and SMH “Sydney’s Top 100 Influential People”. Peter helps the tone deaf hear, the mute sing, the mind allow and the heart shine! He has inspired many to trust their voice and sing loudly without inhibition.

Our mission: to connect with, inspire, and empower those who are living or working in homeless or disadvantaged communities,

The Bridge Street Choir is a living, breathing, spirited tool for self expression and self-empowerment. Musical involvement is a very important form of therapy that lifts people out of depression and provides an easy pathway out of social isolation. One of the most important values of our choir is ‘inclusiveness’. Anyone is welcome. We don’t tell people to go away because they can’t sing. The choir is a place where they can learn how to sing, and more importantly, it’s a place for community, fun, self-expression and fraternity. Our choir has regular meetings and discussions so that everyone takes part in the decisions that shape the choir’s artistic direction. It is important for us that the impetus for all the choir’s activities comes from the participant’s own hopes and dreams rather than from the director or other external forces. We have enjoyed developing a repertoire for tonight’s showing around the themes of River, Home, Journey and Hospitality, and creating theatrical moments to be performed alongside the songs.

through creating music, performance and passionate expression, that truly opens people’s hearts. By Peter Lehner The Bridge Street Choir members performing tonight are: Ray, Richard, Laurie, Rachel, Rachel, Margaret, Moppy, Helen, Leanne, Braiden, Oshia, Jenny, Carol, Carol, Dawn, Col, Andy, Shaz, Millie,Trevor, Dave, Zac, Donna, Martina, Wild and Angela. The Bridge Street Choir director is Peter Lehner. He has travelled Australia to work with homeless, disadvantaged and indigenous communities. Awards include: Universal Peace Federation award, Australia Day Award and SMH “Sydney’s Top 100 Influential People”. Peter helps the tone deaf hear, the mute sing, the mind allow and the heart shine! He has inspired many to trust their voice and sing loudly without inhibition.

Our mission: to connect with, inspire, and empower those who are living or working in homeless or disadvantaged communities,

The Bridge Street Choir is a living, breathing, spirited tool for self expression and self-empowerment. Musical involvement is a very important form of therapy that lifts people out of depression and provides an easy pathway out of social isolation. One of the most important values of our choir is ‘inclusiveness’. Anyone is welcome. We don’t tell people to go away because they can’t sing. The choir is a place where they can learn how to sing, and more importantly, it’s a place for community, fun, self-expression and fraternity. Our choir has regular meetings and discussions so that everyone takes part in the decisions that shape the choir’s artistic direction. It is important for us that the impetus for all the choir’s activities comes from the participant’s own hopes and dreams rather than from the director or other external forces. We have enjoyed developing a repertoire for tonight’s showing around the themes of River, Home, Journey and Hospitality, and creating theatrical moments to be performed alongside the songs. Our mission: to connect with, inspire, and empower those who are living or working in homeless or disadvantaged communities,

through creating music, performance and passionate expression, that truly opens people’s hearts. By Peter Lehner The Bridge Street Choir members performing tonight are: Ray, Richard, Laurie, Rachel, Rachel, Margaret, Moppy, Helen, Leanne, Braiden, Oshia, Jenny, Carol, Carol, Dawn, Col, Andy, Shaz, Millie,Trevor, Dave, Zac, Donna, Martina, Wild and Angela. The Bridge Street Choir director is Peter Lehner. He has travelled Australia to work with homeless, disadvantaged and indigenous communities. Awards include: Universal Peace Federation award, Australia Day Award and SMH “Sydney’s Top 100 Influential People”. Peter helps the tone deaf hear, the mute sing, the mind allow and the heart shine! He has inspired many to trust their voice and sing loudly without inhibition.


KARLA DICKENS: VISUAL ARTIST, PROJECTIONS, INSTALLATION AND BOWER BIRD

“I sold myself to the sea. I’ve been around most of the world a number of times.” Rob, The Winsome

KARLA DICKENS: VISUAL ARTIST, PROJECTIONS, INSTALLATION AND BOWER BIRD

“I sold myself to the sea. I’ve been around most of the world a number of times.” Rob, The Winsome

KARLA DICKENS: VISUAL ARTIST, PROJECTIONS, INSTALLATION AND BOWER BIRD

“I sold myself to the sea. I’ve been around most of the world a number of times.” Rob, The Winsome


I am a Wiradjuri woman, artist, mother, upheld with the power of my eagle totem and bower bird by nature. Presented with the project titled ‘Home’ I was flooded with visual images. I have always wrestled with the idea of a home on many levels. What is a Home? A roof, a river, a sky, country, belonging, memories, an abandon nest. Hope. Earlier this year my home, became a roof and four walls that were closing in. I started to collect bird cages, I embedded them in the frame of an old caravan. The cage doors were left open as freedom became attractive. In a struggle with social conformity I realised no matter what a birds flight entailed, a nest was needed. A safe resting place.

Embracing the connection of structural objects are a number of projections, one of washing on a line, one flowing with various bird images, another holding images of abandoned houses with long held memories along with one sporting faces at times set behind masks of a number of people I have had the privilege to spend time with on this journey. As bed springs swing, enjoy the warmth of our fire. By Karla Dickens

The Winesome is a safe resting place, a watering hole, a feeding bowl, a large communal nest. Avoider of white picket fences and conformity, this reclaimed pub shelters a tight knit community, woven together by support, basic essentials and a sense of belonging. The images I have chosen to work on with the community are birds (sparkling bunting) flagging the building and nests built from found materials representing the human nesting instinct.

I am a Wiradjuri woman, artist, mother, upheld with the power of my eagle totem and bower bird by nature. Presented with the project titled ‘Home’ I was flooded with visual images. I have always wrestled with the idea of a home on many levels. What is a Home? A roof, a river, a sky, country, belonging, memories, an abandon nest. Hope. Earlier this year my home, became a roof and four walls that were closing in. I started to collect bird cages, I embedded them in the frame of an old caravan. The cage doors were left open as freedom became attractive. In a struggle with social conformity I realised no matter what a birds flight entailed, a nest was needed. A safe resting place.

Embracing the connection of structural objects are a number of projections, one of washing on a line, one flowing with various bird images, another holding images of abandoned houses with long held memories along with one sporting faces at times set behind masks of a number of people I have had the privilege to spend time with on this journey. As bed springs swing, enjoy the warmth of our fire. By Karla Dickens

The Winesome is a safe resting place, a watering hole, a feeding bowl, a large communal nest. Avoider of white picket fences and conformity, this reclaimed pub shelters a tight knit community, woven together by support, basic essentials and a sense of belonging. The images I have chosen to work on with the community are birds (sparkling bunting) flagging the building and nests built from found materials representing the human nesting instinct.

I am a Wiradjuri woman, artist, mother, upheld with the power of my eagle totem and bower bird by nature. Presented with the project titled ‘Home’ I was flooded with visual images. I have always wrestled with the idea of a home on many levels. What is a Home? A roof, a river, a sky, country, belonging, memories, an abandon nest. Hope. Earlier this year my home, became a roof and four walls that were closing in. I started to collect bird cages, I embedded them in the frame of an old caravan. The cage doors were left open as freedom became attractive. In a struggle with social conformity I realised no matter what a birds flight entailed, a nest was needed. A safe resting place. The Winesome is a safe resting place, a watering hole, a feeding bowl, a large communal nest. Avoider of white picket fences and conformity, this reclaimed pub shelters a tight knit community, woven together by support, basic essentials and a sense of belonging. The images I have chosen to work on with the community are birds (sparkling bunting) flagging the building and nests built from found materials representing the human nesting instinct.

Embracing the connection of structural objects are a number of projections, one of washing on a line, one flowing with various bird images, another holding images of abandoned houses with long held memories along with one sporting faces at times set behind masks of a number of people I have had the privilege to spend time with on this journey. As bed springs swing, enjoy the warmth of our fire. By Karla Dickens


JAMIE BIRRELL: MUSICIAN AND SOUND ARTIST

“Cos property, it takes you away from God you know.” Mick, The Winsome

JAMIE BIRRELL: MUSICIAN AND SOUND ARTIST

“Cos property, it takes you away from God you know.” Mick, The Winsome

JAMIE BIRRELL: MUSICIAN AND SOUND ARTIST

“Cos property, it takes you away from God you know.” Mick, The Winsome


Aural experiences influence our beings like no other sense. I compose soundscape compositions to create an environment that is both reflective and evocative. By exploring the boundaries of electronic and natural soundscapes, I set out to capture the listener with contrasting yet complimentary sonance to bring inspiration and connection. I was fortunate enough to conduct my workshops outside in the beautiful old ‘beer garden’ of the Winsome. Twice a week for 4 weeks I would set up my array of instruments with the idea of connecting with a number of Winsome residents as well as day trippers. I created a casual atmosphere where participants could simply come, play or just listen to percussion, guitars, keyboards and other electronic instruments. I enjoyed the random nature of passersby dropping in and rocking out, then disappearing into thin air. It was these moments where magic was created between a few, but was sonically enjoyed by the many folk that utilise this wonderful space every day of the week.

hope. People need to feel connected, and I have witnessed this sense of optimism first hand during my Winsome sessions. By Jamie Birrell The Home Band musicians are: Jamie, Garrett, Gary, Tom, Gene, Uncle Trevor and other special guests. Music performance has taken Jamie on a rich and varied journey. As an instrumentalist he has supported mega bands such as Metallica, worked with esteemed producers Vanda and Young in London, and received an Aria nomination for his work with children’s music. Recently he has been composing for theatre and helping those with disabilities creatively express themselves. He is now entering the world of sound artistry and design in order to collaborate with other creative talent from different mediums.

The soundscapes I have created for tonight bring together stories and sounds of people who are in some way connected to the Winsome. They are stories of struggle, despair and ultimately

Aural experiences influence our beings like no other sense. I compose soundscape compositions to create an environment that is both reflective and evocative. By exploring the boundaries of electronic and natural soundscapes, I set out to capture the listener with contrasting yet complimentary sonance to bring inspiration and connection. I was fortunate enough to conduct my workshops outside in the beautiful old ‘beer garden’ of the Winsome. Twice a week for 4 weeks I would set up my array of instruments with the idea of connecting with a number of Winsome residents as well as day trippers. I created a casual atmosphere where participants could simply come, play or just listen to percussion, guitars, keyboards and other electronic instruments. I enjoyed the random nature of passersby dropping in and rocking out, then disappearing into thin air. It was these moments where magic was created between a few, but was sonically enjoyed by the many folk that utilise this wonderful space every day of the week.

hope. People need to feel connected, and I have witnessed this sense of optimism first hand during my Winsome sessions. By Jamie Birrell The Home Band musicians are: Jamie, Garrett, Gary, Tom, Gene, Uncle Trevor and other special guests. Music performance has taken Jamie on a rich and varied journey. As an instrumentalist he has supported mega bands such as Metallica, worked with esteemed producers Vanda and Young in London, and received an Aria nomination for his work with children’s music. Recently he has been composing for theatre and helping those with disabilities creatively express themselves. He is now entering the world of sound artistry and design in order to collaborate with other creative talent from different mediums.

The soundscapes I have created for tonight bring together stories and sounds of people who are in some way connected to the Winsome. They are stories of struggle, despair and ultimately

Aural experiences influence our beings like no other sense. I compose soundscape compositions to create an environment that is both reflective and evocative. By exploring the boundaries of electronic and natural soundscapes, I set out to capture the listener with contrasting yet complimentary sonance to bring inspiration and connection. I was fortunate enough to conduct my workshops outside in the beautiful old ‘beer garden’ of the Winsome. Twice a week for 4 weeks I would set up my array of instruments with the idea of connecting with a number of Winsome residents as well as day trippers. I created a casual atmosphere where participants could simply come, play or just listen to percussion, guitars, keyboards and other electronic instruments. I enjoyed the random nature of passersby dropping in and rocking out, then disappearing into thin air. It was these moments where magic was created between a few, but was sonically enjoyed by the many folk that utilise this wonderful space every day of the week. The soundscapes I have created for tonight bring together stories and sounds of people who are in some way connected to the Winsome. They are stories of struggle, despair and ultimately

hope. People need to feel connected, and I have witnessed this sense of optimism first hand during my Winsome sessions. By Jamie Birrell The Home Band musicians are: Jamie, Garrett, Gary, Tom, Gene, Uncle Trevor and other special guests. Music performance has taken Jamie on a rich and varied journey. As an instrumentalist he has supported mega bands such as Metallica, worked with esteemed producers Vanda and Young in London, and received an Aria nomination for his work with children’s music. Recently he has been composing for theatre and helping those with disabilities creatively express themselves. He is now entering the world of sound artistry and design in order to collaborate with other creative talent from different mediums.


CREDITS AND THANK YOUS:

“Everybody deserves Full Belly, Not Hungry And a fluffy pillow Safe bed, warm bed And a fluffy pillow” Laurie, The Bridge Street Choir

CREDITS AND THANK YOUS:

“Everybody deserves Full Belly, Not Hungry And a fluffy pillow Safe bed, warm bed And a fluffy pillow” Laurie, The Bridge Street Choir

CREDITS AND THANK YOUS:

“Everybody deserves Full Belly, Not Hungry And a fluffy pillow Safe bed, warm bed And a fluffy pillow” Laurie, The Bridge Street Choir


CREATIVE PARTICIPANTS THANK YOU Ray Richard Laurie Rachel Rachel Margaret Moppy Helen Leanne Braiden Oshia Jenny Carol Carol Dawn Col Andy Shaz

Millie Uncle Trevor Dave Zac Donna Martina Wild Angela Julie Rachel Anonymous Donald David Anthony James Winnie Gary Andrew Rob

Dougie Mick Paul Sean Gene Big Steve Mark Bob Andrew Amanda

Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation Arts NSW Southern Cross University School of Arts & Social Sciences, Matthew Marshall, Jacqueline Hudson and all those involved in HOME Project 2011 & 2012 Meike, Margaret and the Winsome Management Committee Paul, Rob, Bob and all of the Winsome residents Sharon, Annetta, Heather and all Lismore Soup Kitchen Volunteers The Bridge Street Choir and The Home Band Aunty Hazel Rhodes for her Welcome to Country The Bay Seafood Market, Byron Bay Baz & Shaz Fruit and Veg, Byron Bay Karl Johnson and the entire NORPA team Melville House Dr Greg Clancy Amy Shaw for the brilliant program – www.truebrand.com.au

Creative Producer:

Bethwynn Hackett

Project Director:

Bronwyn Purvis

Writer/Chef:

Jim Hearn

Visual Artist:

Karla Dickens

Musician/Sound Designer:

Jamie Birrell

Choir Director:

Peter Lehner

Program Design:

Amy Shaw

Actor/ Performer

Mitch King

Lighting Design:

Rich Morrod

NORPA Artistic Director:

Julian Louis

NORPA Executive Producer: Emily Berry Southern Cross University Participant Observer:

Jim Hearn

Southern Cross University:

Dr Grayson Cooke

Creative Producer:

Bethwynn Hackett

Project Director:

Bronwyn Purvis

Writer/Chef:

Jim Hearn

Visual Artist:

Karla Dickens

Musician/Sound Designer:

Jamie Birrell

Choir Director:

Peter Lehner

Program Design:

Amy Shaw

Actor/ Performer

Mitch King

Lighting Design:

Rich Morrod

NORPA Artistic Director:

Julian Louis

CREATIVE PARTICIPANTS THANK YOU Ray Richard Laurie Rachel Rachel Margaret Moppy Helen Leanne Braiden Oshia Jenny Carol Carol Dawn Col Andy Shaz

Millie Uncle Trevor Dave Zac Donna Martina Wild Angela Julie Rachel Anonymous Donald David Anthony James Winnie Gary Andrew Rob

Dougie Mick Paul Sean Gene Big Steve Mark Bob Andrew Amanda

Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation Arts NSW Southern Cross University School of Arts & Social Sciences, Matthew Marshall, Jacqueline Hudson and all those involved in HOME Project 2011 & 2012 Meike, Margaret and the Winsome Management Committee Paul, Rob, Bob and all of the Winsome residents Sharon, Annetta, Heather and all Lismore Soup Kitchen Volunteers The Bridge Street Choir and The Home Band Aunty Hazel Rhodes for her Welcome to Country The Bay Seafood Market, Byron Bay Baz & Shaz Fruit and Veg, Byron Bay Karl Johnson and the entire NORPA team Melville House Dr Greg Clancy Amy Shaw for the brilliant program – www.truebrand.com.au

NORPA Executive Producer: Emily Berry Southern Cross University Participant Observer:

Jim Hearn

Southern Cross University:

Dr Grayson Cooke

Creative Producer:

Bethwynn Hackett

Project Director:

Bronwyn Purvis

Writer/Chef:

Jim Hearn

Visual Artist:

Karla Dickens

Musician/Sound Designer:

Jamie Birrell

Choir Director:

Peter Lehner

Program Design:

Amy Shaw

Actor/ Performer

Mitch King

Lighting Design:

Rich Morrod

NORPA Artistic Director:

Julian Louis

CREATIVE PARTICIPANTS THANK YOU Ray Richard Laurie Rachel Rachel Margaret Moppy Helen Leanne Braiden Oshia Jenny Carol Carol Dawn Col Andy Shaz

Millie Uncle Trevor Dave Zac Donna Martina Wild Angela Julie Rachel Anonymous Donald David Anthony James Winnie Gary Andrew Rob

Dougie Mick Paul Sean Gene Big Steve Mark Bob Andrew Amanda

Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation Arts NSW Southern Cross University School of Arts & Social Sciences, Matthew Marshall, Jacqueline Hudson and all those involved in HOME Project 2011 & 2012 Meike, Margaret and the Winsome Management Committee Paul, Rob, Bob and all of the Winsome residents Sharon, Annetta, Heather and all Lismore Soup Kitchen Volunteers The Bridge Street Choir and The Home Band Aunty Hazel Rhodes for her Welcome to Country The Bay Seafood Market, Byron Bay Baz & Shaz Fruit and Veg, Byron Bay Karl Johnson and the entire NORPA team Melville House Dr Greg Clancy Amy Shaw for the brilliant program – www.truebrand.com.au

NORPA Executive Producer: Emily Berry Southern Cross University Participant Observer:

Jim Hearn

Southern Cross University:

Dr Grayson Cooke


Keith plays piano: unknown tune Winsome Hotel: homeless shelter, Lismore Murray stalks the dining room intent One-dollar lunch at the Soup Kitchen Every Body Eats Vicky pulls espresso for the cashed-up No booze, plenty of cigarettes The talk is of conflicts old and new Winter blows through the door Wednesday Choir practice Participants gather Gene sits upright at a laptop doing good deeds for the Government B Flat B Minor B Major Denise joins Keith at the piano Sings Unknown Tune

Keith plays piano: unknown tune Winsome Hotel: homeless shelter, Lismore Murray stalks the dining room intent One-dollar lunch at the Soup Kitchen Every Body Eats Vicky pulls espresso for the cashed-up No booze, plenty of cigarettes The talk is of conflicts old and new Winter blows through the door Wednesday Choir practice Participants gather Gene sits upright at a laptop doing good deeds for the Government B Flat B Minor B Major Denise joins Keith at the piano Sings Unknown Tune

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Keith plays piano: unknown tune Winsome Hotel: homeless shelter, Lismore Murray stalks the dining room intent One-dollar lunch at the Soup Kitchen

Every Body Eats

Vicky pulls espresso for the cashed-up No booze, plenty of cigarettes The talk is of conflicts old and new Winter blows through the door

Wednesday Choir practice Participants gather

Gene sits upright at a laptop doing good deeds for the Government

B Flat B Minor B Major

Denise joins Keith at the piano

Sings Unknown Tune

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

UNKNOWN TUNE

UNKNOWN TUNE

UNKNOWN TUNE


Rodriguiz on repeat amongst the boys down the back Day-trippers Soupies’ Checking out the queue Spring sits around for an hour a day Bob looks down from the verandah upstairs Checking out who’s lost it, blown up, missing Fucking cold last night he says sipping on his tea Steel doors block passage upstairs to where the residents look down Eighteen months now Bob says breathing in the steam Paul’s been here three years Gold chain and a key around resident necks Downstairs Sugar Man again Murray sings along Smells from the kitchen get the Soupies’ lining up Billy’s back on the drink Fucking Soupies’, Bob says, from his Silver Majik Ship Cold Last night Sunlight On his chain

Rodriguiz on repeat amongst the boys down the back Day-trippers Soupies’ Checking out the queue Spring sits around for an hour a day Bob looks down from the verandah upstairs Checking out who’s lost it, blown up, missing Fucking cold last night he says sipping on his tea Steel doors block passage upstairs to where the residents look down Eighteen months now Bob says breathing in the steam Paul’s been here three years Gold chain and a key around resident necks Downstairs Sugar Man again Murray sings along Smells from the kitchen get the Soupies’ lining up Billy’s back on the drink Fucking Soupies’, Bob says, from his Silver Majik Ship Cold Last night Sunlight On his chain

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Rodriguiz on repeat amongst the boys down the back Day-trippers Soupies’ Checking out the queue

Spring sits around for an hour a day Bob looks down from the verandah upstairs Checking out who’s lost it, blown up, missing

Fucking cold last night he says sipping on his tea

Steel doors block passage upstairs to where the residents look down

Eighteen months now Bob says breathing in the steam Paul’s been here three years

Gold chain and a key around resident necks

Downstairs Sugar Man again Murray sings along

Smells from the kitchen get the Soupies’ lining up Billy’s back on the drink

Fucking Soupies’, Bob says, from his Silver Majik Ship Cold Last night Sunlight On his chain

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

UPSTAIRS DOWNSTAIRS

UPSTAIRS DOWNSTAIRS

UPSTAIRS DOWNSTAIRS


Ride-on mower idle Spring has settled in The sun benevolent Before summer’s rage Upstairs smoker’s cough Night and day Feet slide and stumble Down the hall Doors open and quickly close Inner worlds contained “Taking your music, Brian?” Murray accuses “You heard Mickey’s dead?” Untrimmed beards get pulled at Brian pushes the radio to his ear Terry walks outside Sneakers freshly washed “Going for a beer at East’s Bowls.” “You don’t go to Northern Rivers?” “Easts.” Terry repeats. “Don’t go anywhere else.” Mickey kept the lawns neat The mower from going to rust “Sounds good,” Murray says Flicking his cigarette into hungry grass.

Ride-on mower idle Spring has settled in The sun benevolent Before summer’s rage Upstairs smoker’s cough Night and day Feet slide and stumble Down the hall Doors open and quickly close Inner worlds contained “Taking your music, Brian?” Murray accuses “You heard Mickey’s dead?” Untrimmed beards get pulled at Brian pushes the radio to his ear Terry walks outside Sneakers freshly washed “Going for a beer at East’s Bowls.” “You don’t go to Northern Rivers?” “Easts.” Terry repeats. “Don’t go anywhere else.” Mickey kept the lawns neat The mower from going to rust “Sounds good,” Murray says Flicking his cigarette into hungry grass.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Ride-on mower idle Spring has settled in The sun benevolent Before summer’s rage

Upstairs smoker’s cough Night and day Feet slide and stumble Down the hall

Doors open and quickly close Inner worlds contained “Taking your music, Brian?” Murray accuses “You heard Mickey’s dead?”

Untrimmed beards get pulled at Brian pushes the radio to his ear Terry walks outside Sneakers freshly washed

“Going for a beer at East’s Bowls.” “You don’t go to Northern Rivers?” “Easts.” Terry repeats. “Don’t go anywhere else.”

Mickey kept the lawns neat The mower from going to rust “Sounds good,” Murray says Flicking his cigarette into hungry grass.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

UNKEMPT

UNKEMPT

UNKEMPT


Some new faces this week Stories much the same Fate got the better of good intentions What is left of will is hope Lottery tickets, football games Plans for tomorrow Today is about something to eat A place to stay and discuss What went wrong yesterday Everyone talks about Monday’s wars Wednesday’s plans and the problem With Tuesday’s menu The soup kitchen provisions Seven days a week There’s no need to steal No one does because everyone Believes that tomorrow They’ll be someplace else

Some new faces this week Stories much the same Fate got the better of good intentions What is left of will is hope Lottery tickets, football games Plans for tomorrow Today is about something to eat A place to stay and discuss What went wrong yesterday Everyone talks about Monday’s wars Wednesday’s plans and the problem With Tuesday’s menu The soup kitchen provisions Seven days a week There’s no need to steal No one does because everyone Believes that tomorrow They’ll be someplace else

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Some new faces this week Stories much the same Fate got the better of good intentions

What is left of will is hope Lottery tickets, football games Plans for tomorrow

Today is about something to eat A place to stay and discuss What went wrong yesterday

Everyone talks about Monday’s wars Wednesday’s plans and the problem With Tuesday’s menu

The soup kitchen provisions Seven days a week There’s no need to steal

No one does because everyone Believes that tomorrow They’ll be someplace else

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

Photograph by Karla Dickens. Poem by Jim Hearn.

TOMORROW

TOMORROW

TOMORROW


FEEDBACK The Southern Cross University is publishing a paper on the Home Project and would greatly appreciate your feedback.

When completed, please return card to:

Lismore City Hall 1 Bounty Street, Lismore OR post to: PO BOX 225 Lismore NSW 2480

FEEDBACK

The Southern Cross University is publishing a paper on the Home Project and would greatly appreciate your feedback.

When completed, please return card to:

Lismore City Hall 1 Bounty Street, Lismore OR post to: PO BOX 225 Lismore NSW 2480

Lismore City Hall 1 Bounty Street, Lismore OR post to: PO BOX 225 Lismore NSW 2480

When completed, please return card to:

The Southern Cross University is publishing a paper on the Home Project and would greatly appreciate your feedback.

FEEDBACK


1. Have you been to the Winsome before?

2. What was your favourite part of the evening?

3. Did you meet any of the residents of the Winsome in person?

4. Did you listen to any of the residents recorded stories in the sound booth?

5. Write a short note or poem about your experience tonight.

1. Have you been to the Winsome before?

2. What was your favourite part of the evening?

3. Did you meet any of the residents of the Winsome in person?

4. Did you listen to any of the residents recorded stories in the sound booth?

5. Write a short note or poem about your experience tonight.

5. Write a short note or poem about your experience tonight.

4. Did you listen to any of the residents recorded stories in the sound booth?

3. Did you meet any of the residents of the Winsome in person?

2. What was your favourite part of the evening?

1. Have you been to the Winsome before?


NORPA's The Home Project