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pop Living in the reel world

• friday • may 7 • 2010

also inside: Heston plays small role in lost treasure • Church discusses sophomore release • ‘Titus Andronicus’ premiers Thursday • Point of Grace member dishes it out • Norman photographer’s work on display at the Depot


page two

pop

friday, may 7, 2010

pop

Heston plays small role in lost treasure By Mary Anne Hempe

Mary Anne Hempe

Forgotten Video Editor-in-Chief: Aaron Wright Phone: 366-3533 Fax: 366-3516 E-mail all press releases and all other inquiries to: pop@normantranscript.com Weekly deadline: 5 p.m. Monday All faxed or mailed information submitted must be typed. All letters to the editor must include address and phone number.

pop is published each Friday by

The Norman Transcript, P.O. Box 1058, Norman, OK 73070. To advertise in this section, call 366-3554. COVER ART: The MooreNorman Technology center’s second annual Red Carpet Film Festival is 7 p.m. May 15 at the Nancy O’Brain Center, 1801 Stubbeman Ave. (cover photo provided)

By Hollywood logic, Charlton Heston should have turned down “The Wreck of the Mary Deare” (1959). After all, he had just finished filming “Ben Hur,” and word was that the handsome, 36year-old actor would soon be a major star. The role he was offered in this minor little sea drama wasn’t even the lead. But Heston didn’t care about the size of the part. He was far more interested in the opportunity to work with the movie’s star and one of his heroes, the legendary Gary Cooper. Our story opens in the English Channel during a storm, when The Sea Witch, a salvage vessel, spots what looks like a derelict ship floundering in the vicious ocean currents. She’s the Mary Deare, out of Hong Kong, and she appears to be abandoned. Only one life boat remains, and smoke is billowing from somewhere below. She’s riding low as well, so she’s probably taking on water. Worse, the Mary Deare is heading straight for The Minquiers, a notoriously rocky outcropping off

Forgotten Video the Jersey Shore, where she’ll surely crash and sink. Everything of value on board would go down with her, which means no profit for The Sea Witch. With minutes ticking away, Captain John Sands (Heston) volunteers to board the floating wreck to see if there’s anything worthy of salvaging. At first, it appears that the Mary Deare is indeed a ghost ship. A cargo list reveals she was carrying tea, kapok — and most interesting — airplane engines, which would prove to bring a tidy profit indeed. Sands sets off to verify the engines are on board, but finds much more than he bargained for in the form of Gideon Patch (Cooper), a filthy, wild-looking guy who claims he’s the captain. Gideon tells Sands the former captain is dead, that crew members blew a hole in the side of the ship in an effort to sink it, and then hit him over the head and left him alone on the Mary Deare, hoping he’d go down

Films playing at Warren Theatre NEW RELEASES: • Iron Man 2: Robert Downey Jr. returns as the cocky billionaire Tony Stark. Now that the world knows of his secret identity as Iron Man, Stark faces pressure to share the secret of his technology. PG-13. NOW SHOWING: • Clash of the Titans 3D: “Incredible Hulk” director Louis Leterrier remakes the 1981 adventure about the quests Perseus carries out for the gods in order to win the imprisoned princess Andromeda. PG-13. • Date Night: Steve Carell and Tina Fey star in this comedy about a couple that is mistaken for a pair of thieves that a number of people want out of the picture. PG-13.

• Death at a Funeral: The Chris Rock-produced film follows a family trying to respectfully bury the family patriarch despite the bitter family drama. R. • Furry Vengeance: Woodland animals protest the development of their homes in the Oregon wilderness, starring Brednan Fraser. PG. • How to Train Your Dragon 3D: A young Viking who grows up in a society that hunts dragons happens to become the owner of one, finding out that there’s more to the creature than he thought he knew. PG. • Kick-Ass: Dave Lizewski wasn’t bitten by a spider. He can’t fly or disappear. But he wants to be a superhero. His comicbook-

inspired attempts to fight crime lead others to follow his idea and take on a superhero persona. R. • Nightmare on Elm StreetThis 2010 remake of the 1980s follows horror icon Freddy Krueger as he stalks victims in their sleep, resulting in their real life deaths. R. • Oceans: Pierce Brosnan narrates this documentary about the vanishing wonders of the subaquatic world. G. • The Back-up Plan: Jennifer Lopez stars in this comedy-oferrors as Zoe, a single woman, who is tired of waiting for the right man in order to become a mother. On the day she opts for artificial insemination, she meets Stan, a guy who could be the one she’s waiting for. PG-13.

with it. Sands tries to get Patch to return with him to The Sea Witch, but the weather makes it impossible for them to leave the Mary Deare. The Sea Witch crew is forced to leave Sands with the deranged Patch, who seems to be getting crazier every minute. As the captain of this ship, Sands must now obey his orders – which include heading straight into The Minkies. The mystery of what’s behind Patch’s determination to ditch his ship, along with what happened to those mysterious airplane engines, plays out very well in this lost little treasure of a movie. Cooper had undergone a not-so-successful facelift the previous year, and looks tired and sad throughout, just like his character. He was suffering from cancer as well, and production had to be stopped several times to allow him to rest. Always an athletic guy, Cooper managed to perform all his own underwater stunts in the film. You can find “The Wreck of the Mary Deare” at Hastings in the classics section. Check it out. forgottenvideo@hotmail.com.

Films playing at Robinson Crossing • Avatar: A band of humans are pitted against a distant planet’s indigenous population. PG-13. • Diary of the Wimpy Kid: This film follows middle school student Greg Heffley throughout the course of one academic year as he tries to survive being a preteen. PG. • Remember Me: Living with a strained father relationship following a family tragedy,Tyler’s view on life is turned around after meeting the spirited Ally. PG-13. • Repo Men: In this futuristic tale, a repo man named Remy has prolonged his life by replacing faulty organs with artificial ones. When he fails to keep up on the payments, his former partner tries to track him down and take back the organs. R. • She’s Out of My League: He’s a slightly-less-than-average guy in a dead-end job. She’s beautiful and successful. Kirk doesn’t know what Molly sees in him, but he’s determined to keep the romance rolling. R.

Films playing at Hollywood Spotlight NEW RELEASES: • Iron Man 2: Robert Downey Jr. returns as the cocky billionaire Tony Stark. Now that the world knows of his secret identity as Iron Man, Stark faces pressure to share the secret of his technology. PG13. NOW PLAYING: • Clash of the Titans 3D: “Incredible Hulk” director Louis Leterrier remakes the 1981 adventure about the quests Perseus carries out for the gods in order to win the imprisoned princess Andromeda. PG-13. • Date Night: Steve Carell and Tina Fey star in the comedy about a couple that is mistaken for a pair of thieves that a number of people want out of the picture. PG-13. • Death at a Funeral: This Chris

Rock-produced film follows a family trying to respectfully bury the family patriarch despite the bitter family drama. R. • Furry Vengeance: Woodland animals protest the development of their homes in the Oregon wilderness, starring Brendan Fraser. PG. • How to Train Your Dragon 3D: A young Viking who grows up in a society that hunts dragons happens to become the owner of one, finding out that there’s more to the creature than he thought he knew. PG. • Kick-Ass: Dave Lizewski wasn’t bitten by a spider. He can’t fly or disappear. But he wants to be a superhero. His comicbookinspired attempts to fight crime lead others to follow his idea and

take on a superhero persona. R. • Nightmare on Elm Street: This 2010 remake of the 1980s follows horror icon Freddy Krueger as he stalks victims in their sleep, resulting in their real life deaths. R. • The Back-up Plan: Jennifer Lopez stars in this comedy-oferrors as Zoe, a single woman, who is tired of waiting for the right man in order to become a mother. On the day she opts for artificial insemination, she meets Stan, a guy that could be the one she’s waiting for. PG-13. • The Losers- Members of an elite U.S. Special Forces unit are sent into the Bolivin jungle on a search and destroy mission. When they find themselves the target of a betrayal, they make plans to get even. PG-13.


page three

pop

friday, may 7, 2010

King’s love is for quintessential American music By Doug Hill pop reviewer

Jason King Band “Blue Skies & Black Shoes” Hip-Rox Music

Jason King is what the U.S. of A. is all about. Born in the Philippines of Japanese-Spanish heritage in 1973 he came to L.A. at age 7 and now fronts a rock-blues band. King’s love is all hot and bothered for the quintessentially American music. This is King’s first album, with its

11 original compositions. He’s assembled a terrific gang of seven playing drums, bass, keys, lap steel guitar, saxophones and blues harp. King provides smooth baritone lead vocals and plays rhythm/ lead guitars. “Learn to Take it Slow” is a lady-loving instruction manual and

indeed the majority of his lyrics have been inspired by the fair sex. “Broken” could be a Branson anthem with sentimental country underpinnings and “…Bruised but not broken” is a message of hope. “Mean and Nasty” has sexy sax passages that sound like a lascivious alley cat. It’s a cruel woman blues

Church discusses sophomore release ‘Carolina’ By Andrew W. Griffin Pop writer

OKLAHOMA CITY — It’s been a year since the release of Eric Church’s second studio release, “Carolina,” and as Church describes it, it’s been a whirlwind of touring, positive press and attention in rock and country music circles. Church was a little late to the phone interview on the day pop talked to the 32-yearold North Carolina native. But he had a good reason. “This was a rare day off,” said Church. “I’m doing a songwriting session. Working a little bit for the next record.” Church said it is a little too early to explain what direction the next album will take. “I don’t know what the next record will be yet,” he said. “It takes me a while to put it together. I write all my songs. I expect the record to be out at the beginning of next year.” And if “Carolina” is any indication of coming attractions, it definitely will be worth the wait. As this reviewer noted here in pop last year, “Carolina” is a solid, diverse and engaging country music album. He already hit the Top 10 last year with “Love Your Love the Most” and is riding high again with “Hell On the Heart.” Asked about the latter song and its pop-influenced beat and sound, Church acknowledges that “it’s unlike anything I’ve ever done.” “I like changing up,” Church said. “The first time I heard it, it was addictive. Kind of cool.

photo provided

If you heard it, I don’t know what you’d say. There’s pop, rock and country in it. I like that. It shows a lot of the influences I have. And it blows by in like 2 minutes and 40 seconds.” And as for that aforementioned chart topper, Church sounds pleased when he replies, “It’s good to get over that — Eric Church hurdle.” Asked about the title track, Church said “Carolina” is “one of my favorite songs I ever did,” which led to that being the album title. “You don’t have to be from North Carolina to get that song,” Church said. “It’s about

“I don’t know what the

next record will be yet. It

takes me a while to put it together. I write all my

songs. I expect the record

to be out at the beginning of next year.”

wherever home is. It started out as a melancholy, lonely kind of song. It’s about where I’m from and when I’m there my soul is at rest.” This leads Church to note that while “Carolina” was the key song on the album, he said he doesn’t have “that song yet” that will be the key track for the next album. Church channels his inner outlaw on the hard-hitting honky-tonker “Lotta Boot Left to Fill,” the song that calls out poseur popcountry artists and people in country music who put style over substance. “It’s like with the first record, “Sinners Like Me,” with songs like “Two Pink Lines” or “Lightning” … I like to write about stuff that’s real. I’ve always been honest about that.” Church continues, “I think, putting (‘Lotta Boot’) out there allows us to have success we’ve had. And we’ve had a lot of success, outperforming people who’ve had more success. Songs like that really help shape a career and it’s not even a No. 1 song.” Writing from a guy’s perspective inspired the hard-hitting “Ain’t Killed Me Yet,” Church said. “I have a male fan base. I’m a guy and it’s an in-your-face type track,” he said. “It’s the opening song in our set.” Asked about what folks can expect at an Eric Church show, he said: “There’s beers in the air, crowd surfing, a fight or two … it’s pretty rowdy. You’ll be covered in sweat. We attack the crowd and I shake my fist a lot.” Church concludes, noting confidently that he and his band have refused to change or alter their sound. “We kept doing what we do. We’ve had success because of that. We were the only country band to play Lollapalooza and I thought we rocked harder than the rock bands. I know we’re out there on the fringes, but we like to bring people into country. Some think it’s not a cool (form of music). It is cool,” Church said. reddirtreporter@gmail.com

with down and dirty Hammond B3 intro and merciless guitar solo. The title track is a Muscle Shoals tribute about all King needs to be able to hit the road. The young man doesn’t stray from blues traditions. He brings bright personality and fresh enthusiasm to the venerable genre.

‘Titus Andronicus’ premiers Thursday pop staff Reduxion Theatre presents Tickets cost the to the show opening are $15 for night of adults and “Titus $12 for stuAndronidents and cus” 8 p.m. seniors. May 13 at Tickets can the City be purArts chased at Center, 651-3191. 3000 General Pershing Blvd. in Oklahoma City. The performance chronicles a Roman general who returns home after 10 years of war. A “Feast of Saturnine” gala will follow the opening night performance. Deep Fork Grill will cater. The show will continue through May 29, showing on Thursday, Friday and Saturday only.Tickets cost to the show are $15 for adults and $12 for students and seniors.Tickets can be purchased at 651-3191. This is the final production of the Reduxion Theatre’s second residential season in Oklahoma City.

FYI


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pop

friday, may 7, 2010

On the cover Film festival gives students chance for real-world environment By Aaron Wright pop editor

The Moore-Norman Technology Center’s second annual Red Carpet Film Festival stemmed from a desire to give their students a real-world environment. “We wanted something for our students for a big, final project,” said Chris Kalinsky, Digital Video Production instructor at the technology center. “We also know that in the real-world graphic design, video and Web people work in the same office.” To give them the feel of authenticity, a panel of judges was put together to select the final six films for the project. Graphic design students then consulted with the final filmmakers to design movie posters and DVD cases. Each film director was presented with various design takes on their film by student designers. The directors selected their top choices and the designers went to work preparing the pieces for the festival. Other career majors also stepped in to assist the filmmakers. The cosmetology department got involved providing makeup

photo provided

“Discovering Dylan” is one of the films to be shown at The Moore-Norman Technology Center’s second annual Red Carpet Film Festival.

and hair services for the actors and actresses. Auto classes painted the elevator doors for one film and carpentry classes built sets for two movies. The completed fruit of the students’ labor can be seen at the film festival at 7 p.m. May 15 at the Nancy O’Brian Center, 1801 Stubbeman Ave. A pre-show showcasing work of other first and second year film students starts at 6:30 p.m. The show will run about two hours, said Kalinsky. The show is free, but VIP party tickets are available for $5. The party will follow the festival. Refreshments will be served, including chocolate delicacies and DVD and movie posters will be sold. Kalinsky said because Sony is sponsoring the event, $1,000 in Sony merchandise will be given away as door prizes at the VIP party. Playing off an Oscar theme, student filmmakers and other VIPs will enter the performing arts center by walking down a red carpet. They also will be chauffeured there by a limousine. We want to “bring Hollywood to Oklahoma,” said Amy Smith, another Digital Video Production instructor at MNTC. She is hoping students’ exposure to Oscar-winning film editor Richard Chew will help them realize that digital video production is a viable career and obtainable goal. Chew, who won an Academy Award for his work as co-editor of “Star Wars,” also has been nominated for an Oscar for his work on “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Chew will attend the festival and VIP party. He also will work with students throughout the day before hosting a community forum at 7 p.m. May 14 at Journey Church, 2801 Journey Parkway. Gauging of the success of last year’s show, which garnered a crowd of 350 with only word-of-mouth promotion, organizers say they hope to fill the 1,200 seat theater this year. If the event continues to grow, Zalinsky said they have toyed with the idea of expanding the program statewide, perhaps creating the only film festival aimed at students.

photo provided

“I am Pandaman” is one of the films to be shown at The Moore-Norman Technology Center’s second annual Red Carpet Film Festival. “We’d like to open it up to more people,” Smith said. For now, though, the instructors said they don’t want to get ahead of themselves. Their first goal is to help their students stay engaged with filmmaking. So far, this project seems to be working, said Smith. There is a zing of excitement throughout the year as students prepare for the film festival. “It keeps them interested, interested in school, interested in learning,” she said.

FYI Films titles are as follows: “The Upstairs Window” “Discovering Dylan” “I Am Pandaman” “The Misfits” “The 5th Floor” “Closed for Business”


page five

pop

friday, may 7, 2010

Point of Grace member dishes on country direction, cookbook By Andrew W. Griffin pop writer

OKLAHOMA CITY – As Norman native and founding member of award-winning Christian vocal group Point of Grace Denise Masters Jones talks to pop about the group’s new CD and cookbook a dog can be heard barking in the back. “Sooner! Don’t do that,” she says to the playful puppy, adding, “He’s such a mess sometimes.” Sooner, and his canine pal Boomer may live with Jones and her family in Tennessee, but their names are evident of the love of her hometown. “Norman was such a good place for me to grow up,” Jones said, adding, “We’re huge Sooner fans.” Jones, along with Point of Grace members Leigh Cappillino and Shelley Breen, are busy promoting their new, countryinfluenced album “No Changin’ Us,” on the Word Records label, as well as a new cookbook, “Cooking With Grace: A Cookbook From Point of Grace.” The album, the first to feature PoG as a trio — Norman native Heather Floyd Payne left to devote more time to her growing family — maintains those sweet harmonies, thoughtful lyrics and professional sound (produced by Nathan Chapman, who produced Taylor Swift’s “Fearless” album). Going country, as it were, was a “natural progression for us,” Jones said. “On our past record, ‘How

Andrew W. Griffin reddirtreporter@gmail.com

photo provided

Christian vocal group Point of Grace recently released a CD and a cookbook. You Live,’ is a step into that (country) direction. It’s where we’re at musically. I grew up on country and Southern gospel and it’s common for me to switch back and forth from country to a Christian station.” She said that influence, and the fact that Payne, who has a more dynamic pop-oriented voice, left after the birth of her fourth child, made the gravitation to country natural, while still embracing their Christian music foundation. And Jones said the fans agree. One song, “Love and Laundry,” was a song the group thought

might be a little “cheesy,” but decided to record it after it was warmly received at a concert they gave during a women’s conference. “Sometimes in the Christian music world, you sometimes feel like you’re stuck on a higher pedestal,” Jones said. “We’ve really worked hard to relate to people. We love people. We love to sing and we love God. That’s what we’ve made our career about.” Listening to the first track, “He Holds Everything,” there is a definite pop-country Martina McBride feel to it. The carefree,

bluegrass vibe on “Wildflower” is dynamite, while another bluegrass-inspired song, “Hometown,” speaks just about that. “Norman will always be my hometown,” Jones said. And with that in mind, Jones hopes to bring the ladies to Central Oklahoma sometime soon. “Our dream is to come back to our hometowns and do a concert,” Jones said. “I would love for us to come back to Norman and perform at the Sooner Theater.” Jones said Point of Grace would enjoy being here during the Fourth of July. Details are not firm but they are trying to work it out, she said. As for the new cookbook, Jones said they got the idea last fall when their assistant came back from Africa, having worked with The Raining Season, a Christianbased organization that provides services for orphaned children and needy families on that continent. “We, as Point of Grace, love food. We’re always checking out the best restaurant to go to,” Jones said. Jones said her favorite dish is barbecue brisket, particularly brisket that uses Ponca Citybased Head Country barbecue sauce.

“I love Head Country. It’s not available here in Nashville. I have to order it online,” she said, adding that she also loves “greasy bundles,” a not-so-heart-healthy dish involving bacon and gravy and strawberry pretzel salad. Asked about her time growing up in Norman, Jones said she had great music teachers and noted Patti Drennen, who taught her music during her junior high and high school years. Back to the new album, Jones was asked about the final song on the album, a powerful song that showcases their Christian faith, a track called “Come To Jesus.” “We wrestled with how to best end the record,” Jones said. “With a sweet special song? This one is more on the powerful side, but to us that’s what is most important.” While they’re still deciding what song to promote as a single on Christian and country radio, Jones said they are really proud of “No Changin’ Us.” She said they are very relaxed at concerts these days, noting that acoustic instrumentation is far more common in their shows. “We’re having a great time with it. We’re lovin’ what we’re doing,” she said, adding, “Something I get to do this long is a special thing.” Jones said “No Changin’ Us” and their new cookbook are available at most Christian bookstores and at Amazon.com. For more information, visit to www.pointofgrace.net.


ROBOTMAN & MONTY® by Jim Meddick

Norman photographer displays work through May at Depot By Debra Levy Martinelli Special for pop

An exhibition of Norman photographer Mark Williams’ work will be on display through May 31 at The Performing Arts Studio in the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave. A reception for the artist will be 6 to 10 p.m. May 14 in conjunction with the Second Friday Circuit of Art.There is no admission charge for the exhibition or reception. Williams said his choice of subject comes from intuition with a heavy reliance on natural light. “Seeing and being aware of my surroundings allows me to show an obvious subject from a not-so-obvious point of view,” he said.“I look for the unusual in the usual, the uncommon in the common, and then try to present in a visually pleasing way.”

If you go An exhibition of Norman photographer Mark Williams’ work will be on display through May 31 at The Performing Arts Studio in the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave.

He said he also seeks bold colors, unusual textures and high-contrast situations where crisp linear features dominate and subject clarity is important. “There are wonderful photographs waiting to be

MICHAEL D MONROE (405) 360 9500 1100 Rambling Oaks Dr. Norman, OK 73072 MichaelMonroe@AllState.com

© 2007 Allstate Insurance Company.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid PG 12:50 2:50 4:50 7:20 9:15 She’s Out of My League R 12:35 2:55 5:05 7:10 9:35 Percy Jackson & The Olympians PG 1:00 7:00 Remember Me PG13 4:05 9:20

Repo Men R 12:30 2:45 5:00 7:15 9:30 Avatar in 2-D PG13 12:45 4:00 8:00 The Book of Eli R 12:40 7:05 The Crazies R 3:00 4:55 9:25

$6.75 Bargain Matinees - All Shows Before 6PM $7.50 Student Admission With Valid I.D. • $3 Surcharge applies to all 3-D Tickets

IRON MAN 2 • (PG13) 12:00 12:30 1:20 1:50 2:20 3:45 4:15 4:45 5:15 6:45 7:15 7:45 8:15 9:15 9:40 10:10 10:40

found every day,” he said. “With a little vision, imagination, luck and improvisation, I will try to uncover more ways to find them.” PAS gallery exhibitions are made possible in part by grants from the Norman Arts Council, Oklahoma Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts. For more information on PAS and its programs, visit www.thepas.org or call 3079320.

KICK ASS (R) 12:15 3:40 6:30

FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 1:30 4:25 7:10 9:35 NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET • (R) 12:10 1:00 4:00 4:35 6:35 7:25 9:10 9:45 BACK UP PLAN (PG13) 12:25 3:55 6:50 9:25 DATE NIGHT (PG13) 1:10 4:30 7:20 9:55 DEATH AT A FUNERAL (R) CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG13) 4:20 7:05 10:00 12:20 3:50 6:40 9:20 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) THE LOSERS (PG13) 12:50 4:10 7:00 9:50 12:40 4:05 6:55 9:30


POP’S

SOCIAL CALENDAR

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

7

8

9

A Chorus Line, OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, Rupel J. Jones Theatre, 8 p.m.

A Chorus Line, OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, Rupel J. Jones Theatre, 8 p.m.

A Chorus Line, OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, Rupel J. Jones Theatre, 3 p.m.

Adam Granger, the Chouse, 6:30 p.m., $10

Mike Hosty solo, The Deli

Gene Watson, Riverwind, with Moe Bandy and T.G. Sheppard, $15-25

Circe, alternative rock, The Brewhouse, 9 p.m.

1980s party on new patio, Brothers, 563 Buchanan St.

MONDAY 10

11

2010 Senior Capstone Exhibition, Lightwell Gallery in the Fred Jones Art Center, 520 Parrington Oval

MAY

Kellie Austin, Rhinestone Cowboy, 900 S.E. 59th St. OKC Elephant Revival Crossroads Concert, Norman Music Institute, 2795b Broce Dr. 7:30 p.m., $20

14

15

Electric City, 9 p.m., $5 cover, The Brewhouse Hosty Duo, The Deli Amy Niles and Christian Pearson, Jazz, Othello’s

Canterbury Choral Society’s closing concert “The Three B’s: Baroque, Bel Canto, and Beyond,” 8 p.m., Civic Center, 201 N. Walker Ave., tickets 405-232-7464 Chocolate exhibit opens at Sam Noble Museum, 2401 Chautauqua Ave.

Second Friday Circuit of Art, 6-10 p.m., various Norman art venues Livecraft: An Evening of Interactive Improvisational Art, Form+Function Lab, 123 E. Main St., Suite 200, free, 6--9 p.m.

16 Heather Nelson Trio, 7:30 p.m., Performing Arts Studio, Santa Fe Depot, 200 S. Jones, free

WEDNESDAY 12

2010 Senior Capstone Exhibition, Lightwell Gallery in the Fred Jones Art Center, 520 Parrington Oval Songwriter Association Norman Open Mic night, 7-9 p.m., Michelangelo’s

Mama Sweet, The Deli John Calvin, Singer/Songwriter, 9 p.m.- midnight, Othello’s

TUESDAY

THURSDAY 13 Cola Cola, 9 p.m., $5 cover, The Brewhouse

Andy Frasco, Pop Rock, 9 p.m., $5 cover, The Brewhouse Somebody’s Darling, The Deli, 10:30 p.m.

Jillian Holzbauer, Singer/ Songwriter, 7-9 p.m., Othello’s Green Corn Revival, The Deli, 10:30 p.m. Titus Andronicus, 8 p.m., $15, City Arts Center Theatre, followed by “Feast of Saturine” gala

17

18

Norman photographer Mark Williams’ work, on display May 4-31, The Performing Arts Studio, 200 S. Jones Ave., 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., free

Apollyon, The Hidden Castle, 1309 SW 24th Ave.

19

The Crucible Foundry and Gallery exhibits open, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 110 E. Tonhawa Dremer 26 exhibit, Noon to 6 p.m., Dreamer Concepts Studio Foundation, 324 E. Main Ave

20

Guestroom Records Showcase, The Deli, 10:30 p.m.

Resident Funk with Fatty Lumpkin, The Deli, 10:30 p.m.

Tom Toperzer and Paul Medina exhibit, Mainsite Contemporary Art Gallery, 122 E. Main St., 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Post Arcadia, Singer/Songwriter, 7 p.m., Othello’s

Outlaw Poets, The Hidden Castle, 1309 SW 24th Ave

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pop - May 7