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SHIKA&BODANI&•&LUIS&CASTANO&•&NORA&MUMBA&•&VINH&NGUYEN& LUXURY&MARKETING:&FALL&2012&


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TABLE OF CONTENTS THE STORY LUXURY SALES FLOOR THEME: LUX AIRLINES CRITERIA FOR BRANDS LUXURY AND PREMIUM SYNERGY NORA’S BRANDS FURNITURE BY CH RSTIAN LIAIGRE FABRICS BY PIERRE FREY LIGH TING AND CENTERPIECES BY SAINT -LO UIS PORCELAIN DINNERW ARE BY BERNARDAUD CRYSTAL GLASSW ARE BY M OSER

VINH’S BRANDS M EN’S SH O ES BY JOH N LOBB M EN’S W ATCH ES BY BLANCPAIN BALLPO INT, RO LLERBALL, AND FO UNTAIN PENS BY M O NTBLANC LEATH ER DESK GO O DS

(STATIONERY, NOTEBOOKS, PORTFOLIOS, ETC)

BY SM YTH SON

M EN’S LEATH ER BAGS BY H ERM ES

LUIS’S BRANDS W O M EN’S JEW ELRY BY TIFFANY & CO . CH OCOLATES BY LA M AISO N DU CH O CO LAT W O M EN’S H EELS BY M ANO LO BLAH NIK CH ILDREN’S CLOTH ING BY GUCCI M AKE-UP BY GUERLAIN

SHIKA’S BRANDS W O M ENSW EAR CLO TH ING BY CH ANEL W O M EN’S H ANDBAGS BY M ULBERRY ALCO H O L BY M O ËT & CO M PANY W O M ENSW EAR CLO TH ING BY LO RO PIANA SUITCASES BY RIM OW A

APPENDIX SOURCES USED !

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1 ! THE STORY LUXURY SALES FLOOR THEME: LUX AIRLINES Holiday season is a time to reconnect, relax, and unwind. This season there will be plenty of travel to our nostalgic hometowns to visit friends and family or even just going on a much-needed vacation abroad to treat yourself and your family. Despite these joys of the holiday season, traveling is generally thought to be the worst part of the experience and can place a damper on the festivities. Therefore, in order to break into the luxury segment of the retail market, we propose creating a space that would play on the fantasies of the "perfect travel experience." What exactly is the perfect traveling experience? Our answer is a luxury private luxury jet with all of the amenities to suit desires of a "perfect" trip for the holidays. We propose the luxury sales floor of the department store should be at the topmost level of the store with sweeping views of the city as it would be the closest to the sky and give customers a breathtaking view. We believe this symbolizes the idea of being in a separate world of luxury further emphasized by the distance between upper premium already available in your store and our proposed luxury brands that would inhabit the top luxury floor. In terms of the interior, we propose the floor appear to be in actual cabin of the luxury private jet. This will be similar to the thematic windows at luxury retailers Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman. However it will be a more free flowing, immersive space with mock set ups featuring various brands and products where the customer will feel more like they are in an experiential moment rather than in a transaction. This will make luxury customers feel at ease and encourage them to purchase. Our private jet space will also initiate upper premium customers into the luxury segment by educating them about the brands (via brand ambassadors as hostesses) and push sales into the luxury segment for the store.

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2 ! CRITERIA FOR BRANDS We have identified five key aspects necessary in order for a brand to carry the title of “luxury” appropriately. They include: •

Rarity

Superlative craftsmanship

Both artistic and functional

The ability to evolve as a brand

International brand recognition or potential

Brand dream or universe

In terms of rarity, we believe that a brand must have some sort of significant rarity in its production processes, materials, knowledge, distribution methods, etc. in order to maintain its value. Luxury brands are often sought as a social stratifier; therefore it ceases to be desirable without some aspect of rarity. This aspect creates a demand that could potentially prove itself to be very profitable if our department store is known and trusted to be one of the few locations at which a client may purchase genuine luxury articles that would see to it that they achieve this level of differentiation amongst their peers. Within the same vein is the idea that a luxury brand’s items should not be easily accessible to the general market. The difference between “masstige” and prestige is one of the factors that differentiate a true luxury article from its premium counterpart. Our goal is to increase the department store’s own reputation through its association with such highly coveted products. Superlative craftsmanship is self-explanatory; however, it is not the same as technical perfection. Craftsmanship is the quality of the design and work that is put into the product. While this may not be perfect, it is unique and inimitable. Our desired luxury brands should ideally maintain their

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3 ! craftsmanship through the use of a more human element than focusing entirely on automated production that modern day advances would certainly allow. Be it through design or inspection, the time that an expert artisan places into each piece through the incorporation of the human touch ads a greater feeling of care and attention that many commercial products that are currently in the market lack, thereby giving them an added air of desirability. Next, the brand must produce products that are simultaneously artistic and functional. A beautiful piece of luggage that cannot be used for travel purposes is rather useless from a functional standpoint, thereby limiting it solely to the realm of the arts. We would also like to note that brands which make it a point to continually innovate not only their products but also strive to modernize through a patronage to the use of contemporary arts are likely to generate the greatest demand, and therefore the great profit margins for both the brand and the department store. Therefore, the brands we have chosen were done so with the idea that they should be capable of evolving over time so as not to outdate themselves, thereby outdating our stock. In addition, a brand must have the international recognition or potential to be recognized within a global market. This may or may not be from its emblem or logo, but from its style or signature products and techniques. Lastly, the most important aspect in choosing a luxury brand is that it must have a proper brand universe that works with the private jet luxury floor. A brand’s universe must embody the luxury distance principle. Entrance into the luxury brand’s universe must elevate the consumer to a new level of intrinsic and psychological consumption.

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4 ! LUXURY AND PREMIUM SYNERGY As an upper premium department store, the store already curates to those with luxurious tastes. What we offer with this perfect luxury travel experience thematic luxury sales floor is a opportunity for those with already discerning tastes and premium palates or those to enhance their tastes and step beyond premium into the world of luxury they did not know existed before. Those who have a taste for luxury are not necessarily the same as those who have luxurious tastes. The former implies an acquisition of knowledge about the intricacies of the products they wish to purchase. They are the ones who will avoid counterfeits and not only understand, but seek higher pricing points due to awareness of the superior craftsmanship, culture, and tradition that each luxury piece carries. They are beauty seekers, creativity moguls, rarity curators, and security aficionados. They are those who understand that a high price and the goal of achieving the ultimate product perfection that often characterize premium goods do not evoke the same emotions as those product who’s stories, both good and bad, are interwoven in their seam to create something truly spectacular. This is a difference that can be taught. The sales associates in charge of taking care of our clientele shall also don the responsibility of educating premium seekers about the products and properly inviting them into the world of luxury. By doing so, our department store stands to increase not only the range of products that it sells, but the average spend per consumer.

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5 ! NORA’S BRANDS If a suit is what makes a man, what makes a home? In our case, what would give our private jet all of the trimmings in order to become a one of a kind, the palate of any true luxury connoisseur? We would like to dress the showroom with well crafted furniture upon which one lays down to sleep, eat, or relax; fabrics that tell tales of the past, speak of the present, and whisper of the future; crystals that light the pathways and brighten a room, flatware upon which to enjoy a savory delight, and glasses within which one may twirl their drink of choice. To do so, we look at five very distinct artists and houses from France. "French products are considered by many to be the finest in the world. It is a reputation earned over centuries, based on a commitment to quality, style and integrity." Their discreet authenticity, as Kapferer would call it, would attract those who seek products for their own sake with an understanding of its value within one's lifestyle. Due to the infrequent purchasing patterns that make up the nature of the demand curve for each of the above sectors, each piece should be backed by a brand that understands the value of its traditions, upholds the highest quality and craftsmanship, and maintain its soul all the while evolving to keep pace with the flow into modernity and art's ever-changing face. Each should be stylish and highly coveted brands without falling into the volatile waters that make up the fashion industry. FURNITURE BY CH RSTIAN LIAIGRE

Paying homage to the idea that a luxury brand need not be old is interior designer Christian Liaigre. It has been a mere 27 years since Liaigre opened his first design studio in 1985, and only 25 years since his first showroom debut at Rue de Carenne in Paris. With mastery in design and a passion for the arts Liaigre is known for having created some of the most sophisticated interior projects for exceedingly prominent individuals and businesses alike, thereby fostering is

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6 ! international image. His architecture and designs are "far from fashion and trends but synonym to timelessness, calm beauty and subtle luxury. He believes comfort does not lie in trivial affluence but in delicacy and rareness". With this in mind Liaigre seeks a conglomerate of materials from numerous countries. In line with the company's rich culture of handcrafting excellence, these rare materials are molded to near perfection. In so doing, his work becomes impregnated not only by the distinct flavorings of each region, telling the story of its travels, but by the soul of the artisan who has put his or her heart into creating each piece. The idea is to create rooms featuring some of Liaigre's pieces as part of potential scene so as to allow clients to envision themselves within the space. While Liaigre is known to have a number of product lines, we'd like to focus on his furniture (beds, chairs, sofas, side tables, office desk, entertainment stands, etc) for this particular exhibit. Due to the sheer size of these products and the potential warehouse costs that one would incur from storing too many pieces, not to mention a potential tarnishing of the brand by holding excessive quantities, it would be best that clients be made to order their pieces through one of our sales representatives. Our department store would benefit by being one of the few retailers within the US to carry Liaigre's work, thereby coveting the attention of interior design enthusiasts and his more general patrons alike. FABRICS BY PIERRE FREY

First founded in 1935, Pierre Frey was originally a French fabric and furnishing house. Over the years, it has expanded its product range to include home accessories and furniture collections as well. While "Thirty per cent of its production is sold in France,"‌ the remaining works have drawn the attention of a truly global market with inflows of demand to its subsidiaries in the United States, Britain, Italy, Germany, Switzerland and Dubai. Sixty showrooms in 37 countries boast the company's expansive collection of over 7,000 fabrics. With "tremendous appeal as artwork" as well as through functional products, "Pierre Frey has built a big reputation on its ability to replicate or !

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7 ! evoke the spirit of the richly elaborate tones and textures of antique surfaces and oil paintings, of chateaux and history" while eliminating any "stuffiness" that would hinder the products from success within the modern market. In addition to these rather adventurous pieces, the company recently expanded even further with the acquisition of Indian fabric and cotton brand Barquenie and silk brand Fadini Borghi. Both companies built upon Pierre's core competencies in the fabric creation while further increasing its prestige and desirability by adding royalty, both past and present, to its list of patrons. We would like to present Pierre's works as both parts of some of the mock rooms as well as individually in the form of freestanding art pieces that could be used to make orders for particular styles. Our department store may also look into a possible collaboration with the designer to create pieces (carpets, curtains, chairs) to be sold exclusively at our location. It is our belief that, given the culturally diverse nature of NYC and its myriad of ethnically diverse tourists, Pierre's pieces would draw in demand from not only those with a creativity streak, but those in search of timeless beauty. Again, quantities shall be limited to a few hundred yards of perhaps a dozen or so of the company's most recent pieces. Access to the remainder of the collection shall be on an order basis. LIGH TING AND CENTERPIECES BY SAINT-LO UIS

Making its grand debut in 1586, Saint-Louis is arguably one of the oldest glassworks companies in the world. With patrons including figures such as the King of Nepal in 1893, Empress Eugenie, Napoleon III, Queen Victoria, and Oscar Wilde, the company has received its share of fame shedding light on the lives of some of the world's most influential people. Throughout its rather rich history, Saint-Louis has had generations to pass down its knowledge from one expert to another, all while maintaining a competitive advantage through the addition of "advances authorized by chemical and mechanical processes". Such technological improvements in conjunction to the company's own love affair with the arts, Saint-Louis has adopted a number of !

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8 ! ways to revitalize its image through its precise cuts, elaborate engravings and gold ornaments, geometric motifs and shapes and more. Always a leader within its segment, Saint-Louis "has made countless technological contributions to the art of crystal making" including the discovery of crystal opaline in 1844, acid engravings, and a method through which 24 karat gold may be applied to finished crystal. Saint-Louis is known to take extensive care of its production capacities and distribution methods. The brand is currently available at its factory, as well as through high end department stores, and select Hermes boutiques worldwide. With this in mind we may only be able to sell the pieces on a to-order basis based on the limited quantities arranged by the company itself. Its rarity would certainly play into our gain. Crystal chandeliers and suspensions may hang over elegantly prepared dining layouts. Wall sconces may be used as part of our own decor to light any hallway regions that we may display. In addition, small decorative pieces such as ashtrays for men or centerpieces and vases for offices, kitchens, and living areas may also be on display within sets as well as within cabinetry dedicated to Saint-Louis' works. PORCELAIN DINNERW ARE BY BERNARDAUD

Our travelers can feast on sumptuous delights upon dinnerware by Bernardaud. Set up in 1863, Bernadaud has roots in the Limoges region, known to be the silicon valley of the French porcelain industry. Having survived two world wars and their accompanying economic crises which left several competitors knocking on the doors of the poorhouse, Bernardaud has masterfully blended its expertise in creating beautiful yet functional pieces with effective marketing strategies. Though, should be follow Kapferer's teachings, going into television marketing was a dubious decision, Bernardaud's commitment to both its past and its present through technology and art has without a doubt been a huge factor in its success. "Every artisan – from the modeler to the colorist, finisher or transfer decorator - draws, shapes, enamels, assembles, decorates or inspects by hand. The !

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9 ! quality of a piece of porcelain can be expressed as the sum of time required for its manufacture and for successive drying and firing operations�. "Traditional or contemporary, the Bernardaud collections elegantly modernize the art of entertaining." In addition to setting our mock tables with Bernardaud's pieces, we would also suggest cabinetry be provided to display his work by set. Demand comes from porcelain lovers, of course, but also those who have a soft spot for the arts, those aspiring to be within a higher social group, as well as collectors. CRYSTAL GLASSW ARE BY M OSER

Created by Ludwig Moser and sons, this line hails from Karlsba, Bohemia, an area that is presently known as the Czech Republic. "Moser's innovative techniques in cutting, engraving and coloring quickly won the line great acclaim at many prestigious international art exhibitions. With a focus on high quality, glass masters to this day create pieces by hand and are passed through several layers of inspection. Those that fail are immediately tossed. Such protocol has allowed the company to successfully target European aristocracy drawn to the attractive waters found in several prominent spa towns in order to "become the proud possession of royalty, heads of state and wellknown personalities throughout the world, an esteemed reputation that has held fast and continues to grow now in the 21st century." Moser glassworks has added to its lines through the use of top artists in order to remain relevant through wars, trials and tribulations while simultaneously combining traditional values with modern day demands. Moser's pieces shall be displayed much in the same way as Bernardaud with some gracing our tables while others line our shelves in complete sets featuring goblets, red and white whine glasses, champagne flutes, and martini glasses. Should our department store wish to utilize Moser's work, it would be important to note that the company has recently faced issues with counterfeit products filling their markets. Our department store's positive reputation would aid in ensuring our !

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10 ! consumers that this is the real deal, thereby generating greater trust and loyalty to the company as a whole. Demand exists not only by those who enjoy the consumption of alcoholic beverages, but by those whom would understand the fantastic craftsmanship of the pieces as well as those who aspire to the imagined lifestyle and positive influence that owning such products especially with which to entertain, would be on one's self image and one's reflected self image.

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11 ! SOURCES USED By Nora: • http://www.departures.com/articles/crystal-persuasion • http://www.saint-louis.com/en/collections/timeless/cerdagne.html • http://sarabrajovic.com/2011/07/interview-from-new-york-pierre-frey/ • http://blog.decoratorsbest.com/showrooms/a-look-inside-pierre-freys-history/ • http://www.camilleriparismode.com/fileadmin/user_upload/pdf/Flair_November_2010_Pie rre_Frey_article.pdf • http://www.arabnews.com/node/407001 • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moser_(glass_company) • http://www.antiquecolouredglass.info/History%20of%20Moser%20Glass.htm • http://www.moser-glass.com/en/pages/hand-production-of-moser-crystal/ • http://www.moser-glass.com/en/pages/development-of-new-products-studio-moser/ • http://www.elledecor.com/shopping/furniture/christian-liaigre-showrooms • http://www.thamesandhudson.com/Maison_Christian_Liaigre/9780500511626 • http://www.thestudio.co.nz/site/studiooftable/files/Info%20Folders/Bernardaud_Info_Page. pdf

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