Issuu on Google+

P

O

R

T

F

O

L

I

O

1


Contested Malleability

4

Vacuum-Formed Double-Curved Semi-Monocoque

28

Intangible Affects

34

Cultivation Pavilion

38

Modular Bookstand

44

Civic Refuge

46

Transience and Time

50

Amalgamated Distortions

56

The Infrastructure of Experience

72

University of Michigan Sailing Club Boathouse

82


fig. 1-3

Bad Neighbors Studio Critic: Keith Mitnick Architectural Design III, 2010 Course Description “The saying “good fences make good neighbors” suggests that the boundaries we construct enable us to interact better with one another than we would without them. But what if the spatial divisions that define normalcy (among different people, groups and institutions), have outlived the attitudes and circumstances that originally determined them? In the same way that “good fences” provide a means for avoiding others, architecture plays a significant role in controlling what we pay attention to and what we ignore. For instance, many buildings express the apparently virtuous qualities of the institutions they house, such as accessibility, transparency, and permanence, while at the same time concealing the dark and insidious values, beliefs and practices that frequently underlay these same institutions, such as greed, violence and deceit. 4

Using Marcel Duchamp’s concept of inframince as a tool, we will explore architecture’s tendency to join some programs together and keep others apart, and speculate new abutments, adjacencies, overlaps and infiltrations among them. Towards this ends we will examine the relation of doubling-effects (the way a building may engender multiple and conflicting symbols, meanings and affects at the same time), and search out discrepancies between the way buildings appear and the ways they are actually constructed. Rather than concealing the inherent contradictions, schizophrenia, duplicates, and equivocations of the people and purposes they serve, we will find ways to creatively promote and put them on display.”

1

2

CONTESTED PLANS Malliable layout shifts over time (colors denote three instances)


5


Contested Malleability

Negotiating structure through a series of physical revisions This project launched with an exercise that focuses on the concept of equivocation to generate two-way forms. I used Marcel Duchamp’s concept of ‘inframince’ to explore the potential of complex spatial and symbolic relations that generate architectural premises. I considered how architectureal notions about doubling and inversion might provide a basis for architectural form. The plan of Palais Lanckoronski in Vienna was designed by Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. I co-opted the architectural language of the Palais to study techniques of reversal. The series of plans corrupt traditional notions of beauty and symmetry by inverting solid and void. The solid mass is carved out to create interconnected cavities that upend the typical reading of the plan and force the viewer to question how they are conditioned to interpret drawings. 6


7


fig. 4 Two enemies (school/library and dorm/museum) are forced to co-inhabit one building in which they are unable to get along. fig. 5 (opposite page) As a result, they must negotiate the building through a complex set of interactions.

fig. 6

The building they inhabit has two kinds of spaces: those which are shared, and those which are not shared.

museum

library

+

+

dorm

fig. 7

The unshared private space is pushed to the sides (North and South) of the building and the shared space (in between the North and South spaces) remains in flux and is continually contested.

The contested space contains elements that both factions require to function (including: outdoor park, gallery, cafĂŠ, theatre, gym).

unshare unshared

school

4 fig. 8

unshared nshared shared

6

outdoor park p gallery cafe common mmon a area

fixed

theatre outdoor park

8

8

gym/pool rehersal hersall ch chamber h b lobbyy

7

unfixed

fixed


fig. 9 The unfixed, moveable “hinged� space also works to optimize undefined space and minimize unprogrammed space. fig. 10 (opposite) The malleable layout lets the user arrange the built environment to best serve his needs. fig. 11 (see p. 5) A malleable set of walls allow one faction to dominate a resource from the other when necessary (depending upon the time of day, the season, or decade). fig. 12 It permits the pair of enemies to negotiate the space to create a layout that responds to their ever-changing dynamic. fig. 13

The physical shifts can be sparked by an individual (ex. Opening up ones dorm room wall) or by a larger organized group to takeover a larger resource (ex: overthrow auditorium).

12

10

INDIVIDUAL MOVE parked car

13

ORGANIZED GROUP MOVE basketball game

9


10

11


Site Analysis To understand the context of my building, I gathered images of the Chicago skyline in different contexts (during winter, at night, during foggy weather, etc.) and combined them to create one continuous skyline that shows how the view evolves through the seasons and passing years. I started to investigate how the intersections of these site conditions affect the area. The different streets in the conceptual site model create a diagrammatic city grid that illustrates how different combinations interact to create specific environments. Morning St., Noon St., Evening St., and Night St. run perpendicularly to Fall St., Winter St., Spring St., and Summer St. (see p.14-15). On Summer St., all of the windows are open whereas on Winter St. they are all closed. On Morning St., traffic is dense (it is rush hour) whereas on Night St. it is a ghost town (everyone is in bed). At the intersection of Summer St. and Evening St., it is crowded (the weather is temperate and enjoyable) whereas at the intersection of Winter St. and Night St., it is empty (the weather is cold and dark). 12

N


13


fig 14

CONCEPTUAL SITE MODEL

fig 15

INTERSECTIONS OF SEASONS AND TIMES OF DAY as days and seasons change, pedestrian density and traffic patterns adjust accordingly

fig 16

NOON ST: empty, at destination

fig 17

SUMMER ST: crowded, warm

fig 18

MORNING ST: crowded, rush hour

fig 19

INTERSECTION OF SUMMER ST AND NOON ST: windows open

14

15

14

16

17


18

19

15


16 1 6


fig. 16 (opposite)

SITE ELEVATION Michigan Avenue, Chicago

17

fig. 17 and 18 DETAIL MODEL Theatre hinges back and forth in response to ever-changing dynamic 18

17


MUSEUM

LIBRARY LIBRAR RY

DORMITORY

SCHOO OL SCHOOL

MUSEUM

LIBRARY

DORMITORY DORM R ITORY

SCHOOL SC S CHOOL

19

20

18

21


fig. 19 & 20 (opposite)

fig. 21

fig. 22 & 23 22

23

ADJUSTING PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION (TWO INSTANCES) VIEWING DECK Outdoor park forces enemies to interact

DETAIL MODEL: FLOOR 12 Cafe hinges depending on negotiations between factions

19


Mechanisms and Devices fig 24 FLOOR 0 (PLAN) EXCAVATING ENTRY- The square footage of the lobby, where everybody congregates when moving in and out of the building, dramatically adjusts, always giving one faction considerably more space than the other.

26

fig 25 FLOOR 1 (SECTION) GYM- the gym doesn’t physically shift; who occupies it does. The gym switches users depending on who most requires excercise. fig 26 FLOOR 3 AND 4 (SECTION) OSCILLATING CORRIDOR- Only one faction can access the sound proof music room at a time, the corridor’s location tangibly announcing who has been keeping up with their practice. fig 27 FLOOR 7 (SECTION) OUTDOOR PARK- The hinged theatre above is constantly changing location. It always gets in the way of balls and kites on the playground.

27

fig 28 FLOOR 8 (PLAN) ORBITING THEATRE- The theatre can be used as one large hall or two smaller ones depending on how big an audience is and the enemies’ ability to coordinate. fig 29 FLOOR 12 (PLAN) SWIVELING CAFE- The basketball court painted on the ground is half covered by the cafe. Until the rivals cooperate and the cafe can be shared, a full basketball game regrettably will never be played. fig 30 FLOOR 14 (SECTION) OVERTURNING STAIR- The stair either opens into the gallery or the library. It can act as a seat for a wary museum-goer or a perfect base to study. WARNING: Be sure not to be present when it overturns.

20

24

25

28


Perspectives and Views

29

30

fig. 31 : 8 A.M.: LEFT WALL SHIFTS, EXPANDING SCHOOL’S DOMAIN WHILE SCHOOL IS IN SESSION. THE WINDOW FRAMES CHICAGO’S SKYLINE.

fig. 32: 7 P.M.: RIGHT WALL SLIDES TO ENLARGE THE DORM ROOM IN EVENING. THE WINDOW FRAMES LAKE MICHIGAN, AND BLOCKS THE BUSY SKYLINE.

21


0 Lobby / Lobby Excavating Claw 1. School/Library Lobby 3. Office 5. Rear Egress 7. Storage

1 School / Dormitory Gymnasium 1. School/Library Lobby 3. Office 5. Rear Egress 7. Storage

1.Swimming Pool 2. Basketball 1/2 Court 4./5. Bleachers 6. Locker Rooms

7. Locker Rooms

DOWN N

3.

9.

UP

7.

7. 5. UP

5.

2. 2.

UP

4. 1.

6. 8.

6.

1. 4.

UP

8.

DOWN N

DOWN

2 School / Dormitory Gymnasium

3 School / Dormitory Oscillating Corridor

4 School / Dormitory Oscillating Corridor

1. Dorm rooms 3. Classrooms

1. Dorm Rooms 2. Classrooms 3. Music Room 5. Corridor 7. Contested common space

1. Dorm Rooms 2. Classrooms 3. Music Rooms 5. Corridor 7. Contested common space

DOWN

UP

2.

1.

3.

5.

4.

3. 5.

2.

22

1.

4.


7 School / Dormitory Theatre 1. Dorm rooms 3. Theatre 4. Outdoor Park (below)

2. Classrooms

8 Library / Museum Theatre

10 Library / Museum Sky Tunnel

2. Offices 1. Offices 3. Theatre 4. Lounge 5. Lounge 6. Contested common space

1. Gallery 3. Ramp/tunnel 4. Contested common area 5. Stacks

2. Study Area

DOWN

UP

2. 6.

2.

5.

2. 5.

3.

4.

4.

3.

3.

4.

1. 1.

1. DOWN

DOWN

DOWN

14 Library / Museum Overturning Stair

12 Library / Museum Swiveling Cafe 1. Gallery 3. Cafe 5. Kitchen 7. Stacks

2.

2. Study Area 6. Kitchen

1. Gallery 3. Overturning Stair 4. Stacks

2.

7.

16 Library / Museum Outdoor Viewing Deck 2. Study Area

4.

1. Gallery 3. Overturning Stair (below) 4. Stacks

2.

2. Study Area

4.

6.

3.

3.

3.

5.

1.

1.

1.

UP

DOWN

23


Floor or 16 o 1

Floor orr 15 o

Floorr 14 Floor

Floor loor oor 1 13

Floor loor 12 2

1 Floor 11

Floor oor orr 10 0

or 9 o Floor

Floor loor oor 8

loor oor or 7 Floor

loor or 6 Floor

Flo 5 Floor

Floor 4

Floorr 3

Floor loor oo 2

Floor 1

Ground round dF Floor loo loor

24

fig 1-4 NORTH SECTION 90’


Floor 16

Floor 15

Floor 14

Floor 13

Floor 12

Floor 11

Floor 10

Floor 9

Floor 8

Floor 7

Floor 6

Floor 5

Floor 4

Floor 3

Floor 2

Floor 1

Ground Floor

fig 5-8 EAST SECTION 75’

25


Outdoor Park

Overturning Stair

Overturning Stair

Swiveling Cafe

Swiveling Cafe

Sky Tunnel T

T Tunnel

Orbiting Theatre

Orbiting Theatre

Outdoor Park

Gym

Gym

Oscillating Corridor

Oscillating Corridor

Shared Program y

26


Mary and Jack is excited to Jenny perform watch a Star Wars in a class play marathon in the theatre in the theatre, with his roommate Mary is a pirate James and their and Jenny is a friends down the hall shark. Jenny’s as soon as they all Mom is going to finish dinner. be late.

Marcus knew he Sitting on the overturning stair, wouldn’t finish his Julia sighed in solace, she paper before his 12 couldn’t believe she made it a.m. deadline. He to the presentation given by closed his eyes. Since her all time favorite sculptor, he had been sitting in Fernand Hernandez. The early the library, it had morning traffic was horrendous! snowed six inches.

Chris

Matt was sure

sick of doing loved

other chicken.

people’s He forgot

dishes. He that the

only got this cafeteria

job to buy didn’t

a new ipod. open

Frau Matina counted the “Could the sun take any longer to set?” Only students’ heads in a hurry, she then could Ashley go out to the the park knew that soon the playground and get phone service to call her Mother back would be overtaken by the in Memphis. enemy.

He Frank thought that he would go Kristine finally for a bike ride before he had his learned to tie her own afternoon nap. He pondered the shoes! As her notion in front of his building babysitter walked her for a second. Scanning Michigan into preschool, Avenue, he decided: “not today, Kristine pictured maybe on Sunday, when the the look on her best street is vacant of frantic, friend Paloma’s face. distracted tourists.

until

considered 3 p.m.

quitting. though.

27


WALL FEATURING SIX DOUBLE-CURVED MOLD TYPES

fig. 1-3 fig. 1

TOP ELEVATION

fig. 1

BOTTOM ELEVATION FRONT ELEVATION

fig. 3 fig. 4 (opposite)

Vacuum-Formed Double-Curved Semi-Monocoque

A modular parametric wall system researching material and structural efficiency

MOLD TYPES: Original 1

1

Flip 1 Original 2

Studio Critics: Wes Mcgee, Dave Pigram Robotic Fabrications in Architecture/ Advanced Computational Geometry, 2010

2

Flip 2 Original 3 Flip 3

Collaboration with Ning Wang This research project examines how a double curve can maximize load distribution to create structural resilience in a modular wall system. The study investigates whether a system of double-curved surfaces can create a stronger wall than one made of single-curved surfaces. One of the goals was to use vacuum-formed modularized components that maintain maximum material efficiency. The wall system is modeled on three double curve types that streamlined the form generation process. We used these curves to fabricate plywood molds for vacuum form plastic panels. Using three 28

3

molds instead of customizing a mold for each unique panel drastically simplified a complicated design. To customize each vacuum-formed modularized component, we cut each of the three different plastic form types into unique shapes depending on their placement in the wall system. The panel averaging system and trimming procedure was generated using the Rhinoceros scripting plug-in Monkey. It allowed us to create a complex parametric design that increases strength while maintaining material efficiency.

VACUUM-FORMED DOUBLE-CURVED PROTOTYPE


fig. 5

DESIGN PHASE

fig. 6

CUT PATH SIMULATION IN MONKEY (RHINOSCRIPT EDITOR) Preparation for physical cutting done by robot

fig. 7 & 8

fig. 9 & 10

5

6

30

MOLD FABRICATION PHASE: Material: MDF VACUUM FORMING PHASE

7

9

8

10


fig. 11 & 12 CUTTING PHASE Surface consists of part saddle shape, “egg” shape. flat surface, and single curved surface fig. 13 & 14 fig. 15

11

13

12

14

15

Seven-axis robot cutting scripted geometry in plastic PROTOTYPE Double-curved wall system

31


fig. 16

The geometry of each mold is generated through averaging the curvature of the target surface

fig. 17

THREE MOLDS TO VACUUM-FORM PLASTIC WITH Generated from target surface Material: plywood

fig. 18

Plastic with mold (after vacuum-forming)

fig. 19

PETG vacuum-forms gather, await customization on CNC Router

fig. 20 fig. 21 (opposite)

PETG panel cut using 3-Axis CNC Router VACUUM-FORMED DOUBLE-CURVED PROTOTYPE 18

19

16

32

17

20


fig. 1

SURFACE DUPLICATE ROTATED, THEN FLIPPED

fig. 2

PAVILION GENERATED FROM A PAIR OF BINARY MESH FROMS

fig. 2 (opposite)

FLOWER BEDS IN FULL BLOOM

Cultivation Pavilion

Using Rhinoceros, with the paneling tools plugas well as Grasshopper to develop a surface model that aggregates a three-dimensional part into a parametric system. Studio Critic: Glenn Wilcox Generative Design Computing, 2009 This pavilion is generated from a binary surface form. A set of rules parametrically regulate the formal and functional properties of a single structural lattice. The pavilion consists of two identical meshes rotated and folded over to create a space within. The two figures form a pair of bridges: one that burrows into the ground and one that rises above it. Holes in the parametric structure allow views in and out of the structure, framing specific moments and letting light in. The pavilion provides visitors with a break from the sun without blocking out light completely. The openings in the pavilion’s surface that make contact with the earth act as flower beds. The pavilion creates filtered light, making it a prime 34 34

environment to experiment with shade-dwelling plants that wouldn’t survive in the sunny setting. The flowers depend on visitors for cultivation.

1

The pavilion acts as an agency for guests to interact with nature.

2


fig. 4

WITHIN PAVILION 3D printed model detail

fig. 5

LARGER APERTURES SERVE AS FLOWER BEDS 3D printed model detail

fig. 6

VISITOR TENDING FLOWER GARDEN West elevation

fig. 7

BINARY MAKEUP Two identical parametric surfaces (one rotated and flipped) produce pavilion

fig. 8 (opposite)

4

6

3D PRINTED MODEL AND SITE Pavilion material: plastic, Site material: chipboard

5

36

7


37 3 7


VISITORS INTERACT WITH PAVILION

fig. 9 fig. 10

COMPACT GEOMETRY CREATES STRUCTURE

fig. 11

LARGER APERTURES BECOME THE FLOWER BEDS

fig. 12 (opposite) IN SEASON Flowers in full bloom within the openings of the surface form 9

10

38

11


fig. 1

THE DESIGN

fig. 2

THE 2x6” PRIOR TO PROCESSING

fig. 3

BOOKSTAND

fig. 4 (opposite)

DETAIL

Modular Bookstand

A bookstand made of a single two-by-six without adhesives or fasteners Studio Critc: Lars Gräbner Construction I, 2009 The exercise was to create a bookstand that is high enough to read from while standing out of a single 2” x 6” board. The goal of the design and construction was to generate as little waste as possible and forgo the use of adhesives or fasteners.

+

=

This bookstand uses a standardized module that is stacked to create a sturdy shaft on which a book can be read. The modular design makes the bookstand easy to fabricate and the modules quickly can be stacked and unstacked in order to customize the bookstand to reach a specific height. The notched modular system creates a stable structure that can withstand use by many eager readers. 1

40

2

3


Civic Refuge

An urban shelter for a downtown garden Studio Critic: Karl Daubmann Generative Design Computing, 2010 This project used generative computing to design a garden structure for a new garden planted in the heart of Shenzhen, China The design employs parametric controls to manipulate the constraints and context of the site. The resulting shape of the garden creeps out into the urban square, reaching the plaza’s corners drawing passersby in. The final form is derived from a series of arcs designating different sections of the urban garden. Six areas identified in the original plan are further defined by lofting the arcs over to create a tent-like structure. The 3D forms of the original plan combined with this sweeping organizational technique control the horizontal section and create a series of interacting pavilions. The structure provides shelter for the shade-loving plants and humans. 42

1


fig. 1 (opposite)

EXISITING SITE PLAN

fig. 2

MANIPULATED SITE PLAN

fig. 3

MANIPULATED PLAN BECOMES 3D FORM

fig. 4

PLAZA ELEVATION

2

3

4

43


OVERLAIN LOGIC OF PLAN’S VARIATION Successive instances

fig. 5

fig. 6-22

CONTROLLED FORM’S PARAMETRIC EVOLUTION Civic pavillion provides shelter for shade -loving plants

5

4

44

10

15


First row, fig. 1 & 2 of second row

fig. 3, 4, 5 of second row & third row

6

7

8

9

11

12

13

14

16

17

18

19

PLAN MANIPULATIONS Assignment 1: Sketching the Plan FORM TRANSLATION Assignment 2: From Flat to Form

45


fig. 1 fig. 2 (opposite)

Transience and Time

A space for two transients and one watch repairman generated by windswept water Studio Critic: Ellen Donnelly Architectural Design I, 2009 The building at the core of this project is inspired by the properties of water when exposed to wind. It consists of three parts. The first is the long, narrow arch that acts as a passage to the neighboring living space and doubles as a watch repair shop and integrates vertical storage of watch parts. The second part is the cube. Using the aesthetic properties of water when exposed to wind the cube derives its form from wave action and bubbling and serves as a resting place for weary travelers. The third part is the entry sequence: a pod. The transients plug into the structure through a pod that opens up and lets them into the space, similar to the way a raindrop falls into water and disperses. There is a small door that connects the transient’s space to the watch repairman’s shop; they rarely interact. 46

1

DECENT FROM POD INTO TRANSIENT’S QUARTERS Section model & interior perspective TRANSIENTS’ MOST TEMPESTUOUS ENCLAVE Model interior (Material: basswood)


3

48

4

fig. 3

POD PLUGGED INTO ROOF STRUCTURE (top view) Model detail (Material: basswood)

fig. 4

POD ABSENT, REVEALING 2ND FLOOR BENEATH (top view) Model detail (Material: basswood)


ROOF STRUCTURE

SURROUNDING FLOOR SYSTEMS

ROOF STRUCTURE WITH POD PLUGGED IN

OUTER FACADE

ROOF STRUCTURE WITH POD PLUGGED IN AND OPENED

BRIDGE TO NEIGHBORING SHELTER

49


5

6

7

50

fig. 5

THE POD DESCENDS

fig. 6

SITE WHERE POD PLUGS IN

fig. 7

VIEW WITHIN TRANSIENT’S QUARTERS TO LAUNCH PAD


fig. 8

8

20’ NORTH SECTION Pod plugs into building, opens, letting travelers out, and then leaves again when they are ready to move forward


fig. 1

DISTORTED SECTIONS

fig. 2

ANDREAS GURSKY’S CAIRO (DIPTYCH)

fig. 3

NEGATIVE/POSITIVE STUDY

Amalgamated Distortions

How seemingly random combinations and intersections create and distort space

2

Studio Critic: Ellen Donnelly Architectural Design I, 2009 My models and drawings examine spatial confusion through shifting lines and seemingly jumbled groups of volumes. After researching Andreas Gursky and studying his image Cairo (Diptych), I produced three drawings analyzing movement, perspective and negative space. In my subsequent models and drawings I explored how the chaos of Gursky’s image could be brought to life spatially. In my final model I carried lines through space to connect the negative and positive, produce movement, and question perspective. In my first drawings I explored the shifting confusion and chaotic shapes of the space Gursky photographed. Through my preliminary work, I began to understand a fabric created by the image’s inhabitants. Diagramming how the space 52

is inhabited and how Gursky manipulated shape and shade to make his image compelling, I considered how angles and perspective were used in Gursky’s work to create negative/ positive and tangible/intangible space. Through documenting the space as if I were a pedestrian in the scene, (through elevation), and modeling and drawing angles from viewpoints that distort perspective, I analyzed how seemingly random combinations and intersections create and distort space. Shapes (people, cars) combine to create a new space in an already existing space (Cairo). The shifting social environment and confusion of the two photographed scenes of the diptych create a mysterious, unexplained phenomenon leaving the viewer wondering what sort of system he is studying, what produces its chaos.

After cutting 96 layers of museum board I stacked them to create a 6”x4”x8” box. In the box, I carved out seemingly random shapes. These spaces penetrated one another to create a complex amalgamation of negative space within the confines of the museum board. After pouring Rockite into a cast of the negative space of the museum board model, I create a negative of the inner space of my stacked model. The negative space, now formed in Rockite, is as tangible as the unique space create by figures and vehicles in Gursky’s Cairo (Diptych).

3


53


fig. 4 fig. 5 (opposite)

4

54

SECTIONS IN OBLIQUE AXONOMETRIC PERCEIVED PERSPECTIVE: STUDY MODEL


fig. 7, 8 and 9 fig. 10 fig. 11 (opposite)

7

8

9

10

56

PERCEIVED PERSPECTIVE: STUDY MODELS DISTORTED VIEWPOINTS: DRAWING STACKED MUSEUM BOARD MODEL


11


UNDERNEATH (WITHIN) INTERCHANGES

fig. 1 and 2

PLAN VIEW

fig. 3 and 4 fig. 5, 6 and 7 (opposite)

REPURPOSING INTERCHANGES (SKETCHES)

The Infrastructure of Experience Repurposing unnecessary highway interchanges as headquarters for Ninja Warrior Competition

1

2

3

4

5

6

Studio Critic: Jennifer Harmon, 2010 Architectural Design II Obliterating highways and re-appropriating them into the structure of new buildings forces Detroit to stop using cars and seek other modes of transportation. We were to design a Ninja Warrior Athletic Center and production headquarters for the obstacle course-based reality TV show based in Japan. Noticing that highways surround the site of our building, Downtown Detroit’s Grand Circus Park, I became interested in what would happen if they were removed from the city and replaced by reliable public transportation which Detroit currently has very little of. I began my research mapping Detroit’s various transportation routes through history (horse car, bus, people mover, etc.) and how they 58

interact with our proposed site. I considered how if these diverse modes of transportation were available currently, many more Detroiters would be able to access the entertainment provided by the Ninja Warrior Center instead of just Metro suburbanites who can afford cars and who come into the city only for entertainment and then leave again (as exampled in neighboring Ford Field and Comerica Park). As seen in the mapping, approximately half of the buildings and lots where buildings have been torn down in this area of Detroit have been re-appropriated into parking lots. There is more parking than building. What if the highways were obliterated and recycled into new buildings and these buildings replaced

parking lots in the area? What if Detroiters’ bus system wasn’t cut back again and residents could actually access their resources downtown instead of being isolated in their neighborhoods? Can Ninja Warrior act as an example of how a community can be brought together again to reinvigorate a city center through re-appropriating dated city resources?


fig. 7

DETROIT’S HISTORIC TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

fig. 8

SITE PLAN

fig. 9 (opposite) MAP Detroit’s present-day parking lots (gray) and public transport routes available through history (various linetypes)

N

Woodward Light Rail 2011 Parking Present Park Present People Mover Present Highway Present Detroit Bus Present Windsor Bus Present Tour De Troit Bike Path 2006 Formula One World Championship Circuit 1982 Electric Street Car Lines 1897 Horse Car Lines 1897 7

60

8


fig. 9

FULL Y INTERCHANGE

fig. 10 (opposite)

HALF-CLOVER INTERCHANGE

fig. 11 (opposite)

TRUMPET INTERCHANGE

Parasitic Interchanges

The reevaluation of Detroit’s transportation n system If a person doesn’t have access to a car, traveling around Metro Detroit is difficult. Getting to Grand Circus Park, the site of the tournament, to see the Ninja Warrior competition is an obstacle because there is little access to public transport. Almost all bus routes in Detroit were cut in 2010 due to lack of funding.

tearing communities apart, it could bring them together. The highway parasitically inserts itself between two existing buildings. The course is accessible to the pedestrian. Detroiters can experience a new kind of highway that is free and open to the public, inviting locals to come together and experience a monumental sport.

Highways were constructed in Detroit in the 1950’s and 1960’s, cutting through neighborhoods. The introduction of the highways to the city transformed the community of Detroit. A highway isn’t really thought of as an experience in itself, it is a place one inhabits simply to get from point A to point B. The Ninja Warrior competition could unite Detroit while encouraging public transportation.

The building pulls its shape from the delicate form realized in highway interchanges. The building evolves the interweaving infrastructure of exit and entrance ramps to cater to the requirements of the Ninja Warrior course. Ramps puncture the building walls to mimic the highway while providing paths for observing visitors and obstacles.

The Ninja Warrior Course could do the opposite of what the highway did in Detroit. Instead of 9

62


10

11

63


fig. 12

fig. 13

SITE MODEL

fig. 14

SECTION MODEL

fig. 15 (opposite)

13

64

12

AXONOMETRIC: PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION Dark Gray- Visitor Light Gray- Ninja Green- Circulation

14

80’ NORTH VERTICAL SECTION


fig. 15 2ND FLOOR HORIZONTAL SECTION

66


SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

80’ EAST VERTICAL SECTION

80’ WEST VERTICAL SECTION

2ND FLOOR HORIZONTAL SECTION

1ST FLOOR HORIZONTAL SECTION

Mail Room Copy Room

Bath hrrooms

Weights & Cardiovascular Machines

Receptionists Gym

Core Body Strength Traaaiining i Studio

40’ NORTH VERTICAL SECTION

WEST ELEVATION

BASEMENT HORIZONTAL SECTION

67


SITE MAP

fig. 1 fig. 2 (opposite)

FIELDNOTES AND MEASUREMENTS

fig. 3 (opposite)

SITE LOOKING NORTH BASE LINE LAKE

University of Michigan Sailing Club Boathouse A second story addition to existing boathouse Collaboration with Maynard León, 2010

ESTCODE

Construction on the Boathouse will commence in Spring 2011 and will maintain the “wet” area on the first floor for boat maintenance and storage and add a “dry” second floor for classrooms, offices and a kitchen.

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

The University of Michigan’s Sailing Club has grown steadily since its inception, now counting over two-hundred members. The clubhouse/ boat storage (designed and built by members of the club in the 1970s) has grown so crowded with new nautical acquisitions that the members can barely use the space. The boathouse lacks “dry” space where sailing classes can be taught and members can gather. The club also needs an observation deck where club sailors can watch over novice sailors on the Base Line Lake.

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE

N

ESTCODE

ESTCODE ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

1

68

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

After conversing with club members, we came to the conclusion that the best option was to invest in a second story for the boathouse. We designed the space and organized the program (classrooms, observation deck, communal space) to satisfy their requests while working with a contractor to save resources and maintain a $25,000 budget.


2

3

69


fig. 4

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

fig. 5 (opposite)

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

fig. 6 (p. 86)

CURRENT SITE

fig. 7 (p. 87)

FUTURE ADDITION

OPEN SHOP AND STORAGE SPACE

BATHROOM 2

UP

4

70

BUILT-IN STORAGE

DRESSING ROOM 3

DRESSING ROOM 2

BATHROOM 1

DRESSING ROOM 1


OBSERVATION DECK

KITCHEN

STOVE COMMUNAL SPACE

STORAGE/OFFICE LOCKERS

LOCKERS

5

DOWN

WALKWAY TO PARKING

71


Cover: Ford Motor Company Engine and Fuel Plant, Dearborn, MI,


Portfolio 2011