Page 1

Our Efforts Transformed Iowa Into a No-Kill Society. Your Support keeps it That Way. Sin ce 1926, An imal R es cu e L eag u e h as taken action to pr omote an imal welfar e, th e h u man an imal bon d, an d pr ev en t ov er popu lation . T h r ou gh th eir r ich appr oach to h elp both an imals an d people, th ey ’v e gr own in s ize an d n u mber of cau s es . F u n din g for th es e cau s es come mos tly fr om pr iv ate don or s , an d s ome comes fr om g r an ts . AR L ’s pr og r ams addr es s is s u es th at lan d an imals in s h elter s in or der to tr y to pr ev en t it. In itiativ es in clu de beh av ior cou n s elin g , cr u elty in ter v en tion , an d h u man e edu cation . AR L ’s commitmen t to edu catin g th e pu blic on h u man e activ ity , cou pled with th eir con cer n for pet ov er popu lation led to th is campaig n abou t s pay /n eu ter pr actices an d acces s ibility .

CatSnip CatSnip provides those on a financial assistance program to have their cat spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and micro chipped at no cost to them. PetSmart Charities granted ARL the funds for the CatSnip program for zip codes 50312, 50315 and 50317 in Des Moines. CatSnip surgeries, which take place every Tuesday and Wednesday in 2011, can be scheduled through the main shelter. Donations from participants are encouraged since the CatSnip program is relatively new and still needs to expand into other zip codes. For more information and surgery dates, visit our events calendar page.

The Purr Project


The Purr Project is a bit more specific than the CatSnip program. This initiative spays/neuters farm or barn cats in the Des Moines area, who would otherwise not receive the surgery. The Purr Project is not intended for indoor cats with owners; but rather the outdoor cat population who receive food, water and shelter for the livelihood of the cat. Though the program is not free, it is a greatly reduced rate. Surgeries also take place Tuesdays and Wednesdays. For scheduling, contact Dr. Braas at lbraas@arliowa.org or (515) 473-9117.

PitStop PitStop provides free spay/neuter surgeries and vaccinations (heartworm test, rabies, distemper) to owners of pit bull terriers in Des Moines who would otherwise not have the finances to get these for their dog. Although services are free, donations are encouraged, and go back directly to the PitStop program. Appointments are scheduled as funding is available. To be added to the list of those in need of this service, contact Gloria Shipman at gshipman@arl-iowa.org or (515) 473-9118.

The Daily Fix The Daily Fix is for other licensed shelters to be able to bring their animals to us for these and other veterinary services in order to make an animal available for adoption through their respective adoption programs. To receive these services, shelters must be licensed and in good standing with the State of Iowa. This program is for dogs and cats and runs Monday through Wednesday by appointment only. To schedule an appointment contact Dr. Braas at lbraas@arl-iowa.org or (515) 473-9117.

Donate Today This is an issue that needs constant support and attention from the community. Given that all of these programs are in their beginning stages, funding is spread thin. Help ARL keep pet population down. Keep our pet population down in Iowa, so we can hold on to our proud title as a no-kill community.


Tom Colvin, Executive Director Tom Colvin has been the ARL executive director since 1996. He joined ARL in 1993 as shelter director. Before making his way to ARL, Colvin was the executive director of the Cedar Bend Humane Society in Waterloo, IA, for 12 years. Since 1981, Colvin has held the president post of the Iowa Federation of Humane Societies. He also held a master of wildlife rehabilitation license. For the past 35 years, Colvin has served as the director of animal shelters. His advancements for animal welfare include training local prison inmates to provide temporary care and rehabilitation for abused and neglected horses and dogs; satellite adoption centers around the city; a barn buddy program for farm animals; special cat adoption programs; and a Black Dog Club for those who adopt black dogs, which tend to be most overlooked, from shelters. Colvin serves on numerous committees and boards related to animal issues in Iowa. He also actively lobbies for animal welfare legislation. He believes that helping hundreds of shelter dogs and cats is important but working to protect animals through strong humane laws brings lifelong change and prevention of future overcrowding in shelters. 

 
 



Emily
Beckmann
 Children’s
Cancer
Connection
 1221
Center
Street
–
Suite
12
 Des
Moines,
IA
50309
 Phone:
(515)
243‐6239,
ext.
1102
 E‐mail:
Emily@childrenscancerconnection.com
 
 March
2,
2011
 
 Gerald
Storch
 Toys
“R”
Us,
Inc.
 One
Geoffrey
Way
 Wayne,
NJ
07470
 
 Dear
Mr.
Storch:
 
 I
can
still
remember
as
a
child
the
sheer
excitement
and
reward
of
getting
a
new
toy.
From
 seeing
it
on
the
shelf,
to
bringing
it
home
and
tearing
it
out
of
its
package;
and
finally
 playing
with
it.

Without
a
doubt,
Toys
“R”
Us
has
always
been
the
destination
for
children
 who
have
just
learned
to
potty‐train,
gotten
an
‘A’
on
their
big
spelling
test
or
made
the
 winning
goal
in
soccer.
 
 Every
child
deserves
the
rush
and
reward
of
a
new
toy
from
time
to
time.
Here
at
Children’s
 Cancer
Connection
we
have
made
it
our
mission
to
enhance
the
quality
of
life
for
children
 and
families
affected
by
childhood
cancer.
We
do
this
by
providing
programs
for
education,
 recreation
and
support.

 
 
 One
of
our
hospital
programs
is
the
“poke
box.”
When
an
oncology
patient
at
Blank
 Children’s
Hospital
receives
a
“poke”
or
other
painful
procedure,
they
are
welcome
to
 choose
a
toy
from
the
“poke
box”
provided
by
Children's
Cancer
Connection.

These
toys
can
 help
make
the
procedure
less
daunting,
and
help
children
focus
more
on
the
toy
and
less
on
 the
pending
procedure.
 
 With
your
history
of
giving
to
children
in
times
of
need,
we
would
love
to
build
a
 partnership
with
your
company
through
product
donation
for
our
“poke
box.”
Your
 assistance
would
bring
tremendous
joy
to
some
of
the
most
deserving
children.
We
look
 forward
to
having
a
conversation
about
this
partnership
with
you
soon.
You
can
reach
me
at
 (515)
243‐6239,
ext.
1102.
 
 Sincerely,
 
 
 
 Emily
Beckmann
 Director
of
Marketing
and
Communication
 
 
 Encl:
agency
brochure



 



FOR
IMMEDIATE
RELEASE
 
 Children’s
Cancer
Connection
 1221
Center
Street,
Suite
12
 Des
Moines,
IA
50309
 Emily@childrenscancerconnection.com
 www.childrenscancerconnection.org
 
 Children’s
Cancer
Connection
Hosting
Benefit
Fashion
Show

 
 Des
Moines,
Iowa
(March
23,
2011)
–
As
spring
approaches,
the
people
of
Des
 Moines
are
ready
to
put
away
their
snow
boots.
To
cure
that
winter
cabin
fever
with
 a
purpose,
you
can
attend
Couture
for
a
Cause.
Children’s
Cancer
Connection
is
 hosting
this
event
Saturday,
April
2
at
Hoyt
Sherman
Place.

 
 This
event,
sponsored
by
Blank
Children’s
Hospital,
will
be
emceed
by
First
Lady
 Chris
Branstad.
The
models
for
the
program
are
the
women
of
Children’s
Cancer
 Connection.
 
 “Couture
for
a
Cause
is
a
great
way
Children’s
Cancer
Connection
to
interact
with
the
 Des
Moines
community
through
building
a
relationship
with
the
small
businesses
 who
are
participating
in
the
event,”
Emily
Beckmann,
Director
of
Marketing
and
 Communication.
 
 Retailers
showcasing
their
clothing
at
the
show
include:
C’est
Bon,
Worn,
Bargain
 Basket,
Dorthea’s
Closet
and
Plato’s
Closet.
In
addition
to
the
fashion
show,
the
 event
will
also
have
live
music
and
a
champagne
brunch.
Tickets
are
$50
per
person.
 You
may
order
tickets
through
March
25
by
calling
our
office.
All
of
the
proceeds
 from
the
tickets
will
benefit
the
programs
and
services
of
Children’s
Cancer
 Connection.
 
 Children’s
Cancer
Connection
is
a
nonprofit
organization
run
by
a
small
staff
in
Des
 Moines.
The
majority
of
efforts
come
from
the
support
of
volunteers.
We
channel
 our
efforts
toward
enhancing
quality
of
life
for
children
and
families
affected
by
 childhood
cancer.
Around
300
children
attend
our
annual
summer
camp
programs.
 In
addition
to
the
summer
camp,
there
are
hospital‐based
programs
and
support
 services.

 
 
 
 
 Contact:
Emily
Beckmann
 (515)
243‐6239,
ext.
1102
 #
#
#
 
 



SUMMER
CAMP
FOR
ALL
 :30
SECONDS
 SFX:


CHILDREN
LAUGHING,
PLAYING
KICKBALL


FEMALE
V/O:


IMAGINE
THESE
CHILDREN
PLAYING
AT
SUMMER
CAMP.


SFX:


SPLASHING
AND
LAUGHING
IN
A
POOL


FEMALE
V/O:


NOW
IMAGINE
A
CHILD
WITH
CANCER.


SFX:
 FEMALE
V/O:


HEART
MONITOR
BEEPING
 YOU
WOULDN’T
GUESS
THAT
THESE
CHILDREN
PLAYING
AT
CAMP
 WOULD
BE
AFFECTED
BY
CANCER—BUT
THEY
ARE.
WITH
THE
HELP
OF
 DONORS
LIKE
YOU,
CHILDREN’S
CANCER
CONNECTION
MAKES
IT
 POSSIBLE
FOR
CHILDREN
WITH
CANCER
TO
EXPERIENCE
SUMMER
 CAMP.
WITH
THIS
ENHANCEMENT
OF
THEIR
QUALITY
OF
LIFE,
FOR
A
 FEW
WEEKS
EACH
SUMMER
CAMP
HEART
CONNECTION
PROVIDES
A
 HAVEN
FROM
THE
BURDENS
OF
CANCER
FOR
THEM.
GO
TO
 CHILDRENSCANCERCONNECTION‐DOT‐ORG
NOW
TO
SEE
HOW
YOUR
 DONATION
MAKES
LIFE
MORE
ENJOYABLE
FOR
THESE
CHILDREN.



 



VOLUNTEER
FOR
CAMP
 :15
SECONDS
 ANNCR:
 CHILDHOOD
CANCER
IS
A
HEART
WRENCHING
FACT
OF
REALITY.
A
 GREAT
WAY
TO
ENHANCE
THE
QUALITY
OF
THESE
CHILDREN’S
LIVES
 ALL
WHILE
SEEING
THE
BENEFITS
DIRECTLY
IN
YOUR
COMMUNITY
IS
 VOLUNTEERING
FOR
CHILDREN’S
CANCER
CONNECTION.
TO
FIND
OUT
 HOW
YOU
CAN
SPEND
TIME
IN
THE
FRESH
OUTDOORS
OR
CREATE
FUN
 MEMORIES
DOING
ARTS
AND
CRAFTS
WITH
THESE
REMARKABLE
 CHILDREN
VISIT
CHILDRENSCANCERCONNECTION‐DOT‐ORG.




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Children’s Cancer Connection: We Promise Transparency with your Donation Since 1988, Children’s Cancer Connection has used funds, granted by donors like you, to enhance the quality of life of those affected by childhood cancer. Through their unique approach to enhancing the quality of life rather than finding a cure, donating provides more tangible results. There are three main initiatives that thrive off of these donations. One initiative includes the camps and recreation. Another initiative is the support. Lastly, are the hospital-based programs. Children’s Cancer Connection is a relatively small organization, but this ensures you know where your money is going.

Camps and Recreation Camp Heart Connection Oncology Camp and Camp Heart Connection Sibling Camp, combined, host approximately 300 campers. A scholarship for one camper is $300. No child is turned away due to inability to pay. Camper scholarships grant these children the opportunity to escape their cancer-ridden life. In addition to these two main camps, 50 children attend the Mid-Year Reunion at $125 per child and 23 families attend family camp, which costs $3,750 per session. It is CCC’s mission to relieve some stress involved for each member of the family of a child with cancer. These camps are an effective vehicle for doing so.

Support Services Support services are vital to the work of CCC. Those facing the diagnosis of childhood cancer and its effects are in dire need of support and networking resources. CCC provides more than 90 resource kits per year. These resource kits help families learn about what is to come and provides opportunities to network with others in similar situations. Family resource kits cost $5,000 per kit. Support groups are also an integral facet of CCC’s support services. Club HOPE (for parents), The Survivorship Connection, The Lending Library and Adopt a Family are all support groups that satisfy a different need. Each support group requires about $500 a year to function.


Hospital-Based Programs Hospital-based programs start the journey with families affected by childhood cancer. From the treatment binder CCC provides to the “end of treatment parties,” there are numerous resources for families. Other hospital-based programs steal the children from boredom and anxiety while at the hospital. Arts & Crafts can occupy the children between tests. “The Poke Box,” is a program that gives a child a stuffed animal as a reward for enduring a surgical procedure, or some other difficult feat. Beads for Bravery, which costs $1,000 a year, is another program that recognizes overcoming obstacles for children in the hospital. For example, a remission bead or a CT scan bead could be granted to a child after these procedures.

Donate Today Donating to an organization on the grassroots level means much more likelihood of making your dollar count. As always, donating your money locally results in benefits for your community. Camp Heart Connection takes place at Y Camp in Boone, Iowa. The support services reach 450 families across Iowa, and even some surrounding states. Beads for Bravery, the Poke Box and Arts & Crafts keep patients entertained at Blank Children’s Hospital. Your money doesn’t go to research, but it guarantees a happier, more fulfilling life for a child with cancer. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



MEMORANDUM
 
 
 DATE:

 April
27,
2011
 
 TO:
 
 Emily
Beckmann,
Children’s
Cancer
Connection
 
 FROM:
 Nora
Harding
 
 SUBJECT:
 Tips
to
Enhance
Children’s
Cancer
Connection’s
Social
Media
Presence
 
 Children’s
Cancer
Connection
should
be
commended
for
their
effort
in
the
world
of
 social
media.
You
have
your
name
in
most
social
media
outlets
(Facebook,
Twitter,
 Blog,
YouTube),
however
they
could
all
use
a
little
fine‐tuning.
In
addition
to
 tweaking
your
existing
accounts
,
you
could
also
place
your
organization
on
a
few
 other
social
media
pathways.
 
 Creating,
maintaining
and
updating
your
social
media
websites
are
full‐time
 commitments.
Though
time
consuming,
this
is
paramount
to
having
a
pertinent
 presence.
Given
that
your
organization
is
relatively
small,
it
might
be
too
much
to
 expect
that
a
paid
employee
would
be
in
charge
of
this
task.
This
would
be
a
 fantastic
opportunity
to
create
a
position
or
two
for
prospective
interns.
First
and
 foremost,
college
students
are
extremely
eager
to
land
an
internship.
Secondly,
they
 are
also
stereotypically
the
most
informed
group
on
social
media
and
current
 technologies.
Thus,
social
media
interns
would
run
this
part
of
your
organization.
 
 The
best
stories
and
news
tips
for
the
media
are
time‐sensitive
events.
Another
 newsworthy
story
would
be
a
feature
story
on
how
someone
was
touched
by
CCC.
 Or
even
more
interestingly,
a
story
about
someone
touched
by
CCC
doing
something
 significant
in
the
community.
Advances
and
achievements
within
CCC
may
also
be
 newsworthy,
but
only
to
the
audience
that
already
knows
the
organization.

 
 All
of
the
aforementioned
tips
require
a
planned
course
of
action.
I
have
specific
 suggestions
for
enhancing
CCC’s
social
media
presence.
To
have
an
effective
social
 media
campaign,
especially
with
a
lesser‐known
organization,
an
obvious
selling
 point
is
imperative.
One
small
thing
you
could
do
to
improve
this
on
all
of
your
 Internet
outlets
is
a
tweak
to
your
logo.
To
better
convey
your
purpose
and
the
 “selling
point”
of
the
organization,
you
could
add
a
tag
line
under
the
logo.
For
 example,
“The
Entire
Family.
The
Entire
Journey.”,
is
already
used
on
a
lot
of
your
 publications,
but
not
on
the
logo.

 
 The
CCC
Twitter
account
doesn’t
need
too
much
work.
In
fact,
pretty
much
all
of
 your
tweets
are
very
pertinent
and
informational,
which
is
exemplary
use
of
a
non‐ profit
Twitter
account.
However,
you
could
make
use
of
it
a
bit
more.
Incorporating
 pictures
could
be
a
way
to
engage
followers.
Also,
you
are
tweeting
almost
everyday,



but
you
should
be
tweeting
everyday.
So
many
organizations
tweet
several
times
a
 day,
so
you
should
be
trying
to
tweet
at
least
once.

 
 Your
Facebook
page
is
also
relatively
well
run.
I
saw
a
“Donate
Now”
tab
on
the
St.
 Jude
Children’s
Research
Hospital
Facebook
page.
They
may
be
a
much
larger
 organization,
but
there’s
no
reason
why
CCC
couldn’t
make
use
of
that
tab.
If
you
 want
to
beef
up
your
fans
on
Facebook
(or
followers
on
Twitter),
give
people
a
 reason
to
“like”
your
page
or
follow
you.
For
example,
you
could
give
away
one
of
 your
new
reusable
bags
to
the
first
100
people
who
“like”
the
page
or
follow
you.

 
 Your
YouTube
page
could
use
some
work.
There
are
only
five
videos
on
it
now.
If
 people
go
to
your
YouTube
page
and
see
that
you
only
have
five
videos,
they
may
 not
even
bother
watching,
or
they
could
watch
all
of
the
videos
watched
in
a
matter
 of
minutes.
Given
that
it
looks
like
you
don’t
upload
that
often,
they
may
not
ever
 think
of
coming
back
because
they
wouldn’t
expect
anything
new
to
be
posted.
You
 should
try
to
upload
videos
on
a
regular
basis.
Ideas
for
videos
are:

Testimonials
 from
donors,
volunteers,
participants,
families,
etc.,
documentation
of
activities
such
 as
Arts
&
Crafts,
Beads
for
Bravery,
a
child
receiving
a
toy
from
the
“Poke
Box”,
what
 it’s
like
to
volunteer
for
specific
initiatives
such
as
the
gift
wrap
center
at
the
mall
 during
the
holidays
and
so
forth.
Once
you’ve
built
up
your
YouTube
page,
you
could
 also
add
some
of
the
videos
to
your
Facebook
video
tab
and
direct
the
viewers
back
 to
your
YouTube
page
as
cross
promotion.
 
 CCC
has
a
blog,
but
it’s
not
promoted
well
enough.
Try
to
promote
your
blog
in
all
of
 your
publications.
Both
conventional
paper
publications
and
Internet
outlets
should
 be
mentioning
the
blog.
Also,
the
blog
should
be
updated
far
more
often.
People
like
 to
view
blogs
habitually.
If
your
blog
isn’t
updated
enough,
people
will
just
write
it
 off
and
stop
visiting,
period.
The
sky
is
the
limit
with
the
blog.
With
things
like
 Facebook
and
Twitter,
people
want
concise
information.
Blogs
are
accepted
as
more
 subjective
outlets,
so
use
it
as
such.
Let
the
intern
use
their
creativity
here.
An
intern
 should
love
this
kind
of
freedom,
but
still
use
enough
discretion
to
only
post
things
 that
are
relevant
to
the
organization.
A
side
note
on
the
blog
from
the
homepage:
 Have
the
link
to
the
blog
open
in
a
new
page,
not
the
existing
one.
 
 I
also
have
a
few
suggestions
for
you
that
you
aren’t
doing
now
(or
if
you
are
it
isn’t
 promoted
enough
that
I’m
aware
of).
You
may
have
pictures
on
most
of
your
social
 media
outlets,
but
you
should
also
create
a
Flick’r
account.
If
people
want
to
look
at
 just
photos,
you
need
to
make
it
easy
for
them.
Flick’r
would
be
a
consistent
place
 that
all
photos
could
be
found.
All
other
photos
would
only
be
used
as
needed
in
 other
outlets.
You
should
also
create
an
RSS
Feed
on
the
“Social
Media
Connection”
 part
of
the
website.
The
RSS
Feed
could
filter
into
all
CCC
news
or
volunteer
and
 donor
news
only.
One
last
thing
that
would
engage
your
audience
is
Foursquare.
 Specifically,
you
could
create
check‐in
rewards
for
CCC
events
or
when
someone
 checks
in
for
volunteering.
 
 



Nora Harding Portfolio  

Writing pieces for in-class clients by Nora Harding

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