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OR DE R D TO ! AY

Discovering Teas Around the World From the cool, rainy climate of Northern Ireland to the benign sunshine of Tasmania, Camellia sinensis is now cultivated in more than 65 countries around the globe. Jane Pettigrew’s exploration of tea farming and manufacture reveals the care and dedication of all those who nurture this remarkable plant to offer us an infinite choice of wonderful teas.

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Table of

contents 6 Editor’s Letter

8 Contributing Writers

10 Tea-Steeping Guide

Thoughts on this special issue

An introduction of the authors

Tips to ensure successful infusions



TEA FARE & SETTINGS 13 English Cottage Tea

47 A Bonnie Scottish Tea

A cosy blue-and-white teatime

Favourites from the Highlands

25 Luck o’ the Irish Afternoon Tea

59 A Royal Celebration

Ode to the Emerald Isle

Afternoon tea fit for a queen

37 Downton Abbey Teatime

69 How-To

Inspired by the popular television series

Step-by-step guides

TEA EXPERIENCES & TRADITIONS 73 A Visit to the Real

103 A Taste of Yorkshire

Beautiful Highclere Castle

Afternoon tea in England’s largest county

79 Thés Dansants

109 Howick Hall

A British tea-dance revival

The home of the real Earl Grey

81 Tea in the Cotswolds

113 Teatime in Ireland

English tradition in picturesque towns

Twists on tradition

87 The National Trust,

119 Afternoon Tea

Five of England’s stately homes

Trains, buses, boats, and more

99 Taking Tea with Wedgwood

125 A Purr-fect Teatime

Teawares, tea, and tearooms

Cat café in London

Downton Abbey

Guardian of British Tea

128 Recipe Index Directory of featured foods

on the Move



129 Resources Essential information


British ea EDITORIAL EDITOR Lorna Reeves ASSOCIATE EDITOR Britt E. Stafford SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rhonda Lee Lother EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Katherine Cloninger CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPHY

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I have been very fortunate to have traveled to England on three separate occasions thus far in my life, though the first two visits were long before my interest in drinking tea or in having afternoon tea truly developed. It wasn’t really until my most recent trip that I was able to appreciate fully the rich tea traditions of the UK—from lovely formal afternoon teas at The Goring Hotel, St. Ermin’s Hotel, and The Rubens (pictured at left), the latter located directly across the street from one of the entrances to Buckingham Palace, to an ultra-casual teatime of fresh-baked fare and perfectly prepared tea at the charmingly eclectic Brew Babu in the 10th-century town of Oundle. While there certainly are plenty of tea histories and traditions, as well as marvelous venues for any style of afternoon tea possible in London, my day trip outside the capital city showed me that there are so many tea treasures still to be experienced. I trust the myriad of articles in this special issue will serve as a travel guide for your next trip to the UK—or at least will have you dreaming of one—and that our British-themed menus, tea pairings, and table settings will inspire you to plan a jolly good teatime without even needing a passport. May all your tea dreams come true!

Lorna Reeves, Editor


Contributing Writers Cindy-Lou Dale Cindy-Lou is a nonfiction writer and photographer who works with numerous publications around the world. Her childhood roots are buried deep in a small farming community in Southern Africa. Following university (in South Africa, the USA, and Belgium), her work has taken her around the world. She has lived in 15 countries, but now she has chosen to slow down her semi-nomadic life and lives in South East England. Here, Cindy-Lou claims, she needs to look no further than her garden gate for inspiration, as just beyond is a handsome church that has been standing there, adding a touch of nobility and grandeur to the landscape, for more than a thousand years. “Here it is just an anonymous country church, treasured by a few ageing parishioners . . . and me,” she says. Cindy-Lou regularly travels on assignment to far-flung destinations, gathering information and experiences and taking photographs used in her articles. In this instance, she took a 35-minute train journey to London to visit Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium.

Barbara Gulley Barbara Gulley and her daughter, Rachel, operate Barb’s Tea Service (barbsteaservice.com), a Michigan, USA–based tea-education business. Barbara has a BA in Political Science and an MBA, and she taught marketing and management at Central Michigan University. She is a trained Tea Etiquette Consultant, as recognized by The Protocol School of Washington. She is married to her husband, Chris, and has three children, Rachel, Rob, and Matt. In addition to working in her tea business, Barbara Gulley enjoys traveling and has visited and had tea in Italy, France, and England—the latter included a tour of Highclere Castle. ©Karri Brantley Photography

Jane Pettigrew An international tea expert, Jane Pettigrew is recipient of the British Empire Medal for Services to Tea Production and Tea History in 2016. A former tearoom owner, Jane is a contributing editor for TeaTime magazine and a much-sought-after consultant to tea businesses and hotels, a conference speaker, and an award-winning tea educator. She currently serves as the course director at the new UK Tea Academy. Her articles and essays on various tea-related subjects have appeared in newspapers and magazines both in the United Kingdom and overseas. Jane appears regularly on television and radio to discuss the various aspects of tea and tea history. Her newest book, Jane Pettigrew’s World of Tea, was published in 2018 by 83 Press (83press.com/jane) and is an educational resource tool for those who are passionate about tea and want to learn about the leaf and the more than 60 countries where it grows. Although her travels take her around the globe, she resides in London.

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Tea-steeping Guide The quality of the tea served at a tea party is as important as the food and the décor. To be sure your infusion is successful every time, here are some basic guidelines to follow.

Always use the best water possible. If the water

Use the highest-quality tea you can afford,

tastes good, so will your tea. If that is not the

whether loose leaf or prepackaged in bags or

case, then bottled spring water is a nice alterna-

sachets. Remember that these better teas can

tive. Heat the water on the stove top or in an

often be steeped more than once. When using

electric kettle to the desired temperature.

loose-leaf tea, generally use 1 teaspoon of dry

A microwave oven is not recommended.

leaf per 8 ounces of water, and use an infuser basket. For a stronger infusion, add another teaspoonful or two of dry tea leaf.

Heating the water to the correct temperature is arguably one of the most important factors in making a great pot of tea. Pouring boiling water

As soon as the water reaches the correct temper-

on green, white, and oolong tea leaves can result

ature for the type of tea, pour it over the leaves

in a very unpleasant brew. In general, use 170°-

or tea bag in the teapot, and cover the pot with

to -195° water for these delicate tea types, and

a lid. Set a timer—usually 1 to 2 minutes for

always refer to the tea purveyor’s packaging for

whites and oolongs; 2 to 3 minutes for greens;

specific instructions. Reserve boiling (212°) water

and 3 to 5 minutes for blacks, pu-erhs, and

for black and pu-erh teas, as well as herbal and

herbals. (Steeping tea longer than recommended

fruit tisanes.

can yield a bitter infusion.) When the timer goes off, remove the infuser basket or the tea bags from the teapot.

If the teapot you plan to use is delicate, warm it with hot tap water first to avert possible cracking. Discard this water before adding the tea leaves

For best flavor, serve the tea as soon as possible.

or tea bags.

Keep the beverage warm atop a lighted warmer or under your favorite tea cozy if necessary.

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TEA FA R E & SETTINGS Inspired by traditional foods of England, Ireland, and Scotland, delectable treats, accompanied by expert tea pairings, are presented on beautiful wares for a proper afternoon tea.


English Coage

TEA

A table set with fresh owers and blue-and-white china, tea sandwiches, scones, a few simple sweets, and a nice pot of tea are all you need for a cosy English cottage-style tea. teatimemagazine.com

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Apple, Cheddar, and Chutney Tea Sandwiches Tarragon Butter and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches Ham and Spinach on Rye Tea Sandwiches James Joyce’s Black Tea Blend

Golden Raisin and Orange Scones Charles Dickens’s Black Tea Blend

Egg Custard Tartlets Toffee-Walnut Cookies Chocolate-Iced Loaf Cake with Raspberry Filling William Shakespeare’s Black Tea Blend

Tea Pairings by Simpson & Vail 800-282-8327 • svtea.com


Apple, Cheddar, and Chutney Tea Sandwiches

Tarragon Butter and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches

Ham and Spinach on Rye Tea Sandwiches

Makes 12

Makes 12

Makes 12

3 teaspoons Major Grey’s chutney* 6 slices firm wheat bread 1 large green apple 6 slices Cheddar cheese Spread chutney onto each bread slice. • Using a mandoline, cut very thin slices of apple from whole apple. (Cut out and discard core and seeds from slices, if necessary.) • Place a cheese slice on each of 3 bread slices. Cover cheese with apple slices, overlapping as necessary. Cover apple layer with another cheese slice, and top with remaining bread slices, chutney side down. • Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from sandwiches, creating 3-inch squares. (Discard crusts.) Cut sandwiches diagonally into quarters, creating 4 triangles. •

*Several companies make Major Grey’s chutney, a relish made with mangos, raisins, onions, vinegar, and spices. Look for jars of this condiment in the pickle section or the British foods section of most grocery stores.

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1 (14-inch) English cucumber ½ cup salted butter, softened 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh tarragon ½ teaspoon fresh lemon zest ¼ teaspoon salt 1⁄8 teaspoon ground black pepper 6 slices firm white sandwich bread Cut cucumber into 3 (3-inch) lengths, and cut in half lengthwise. Thinly slice lengthwise on a mandoline, and lay on paper towels. • In a small bowl, combine butter, tarragon, lemon zest, salt, and pepper, stirring to blend. Spread onto each bread slice. Place 4 to 5 cucumber slices on each of 3 bread slices, layering and shingling cucumber slices. Top with remaining 3 bread slices, butter side down. • Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from sandwiches, creating 3-inch squares. (Discard crusts.) Cut sandwiches diagonally into quarters, creating 4 triangles. •

1½ teaspoons mayonnaise 6 slices seedless rye bread 1⁄3 cup baby spinach leaves 1 (7.5-ounce) package ham slices 1½ teaspoons English mustard* Spread mayonnaise onto 3 bread slices. Top each with spinach and ham. Spread mustard onto remaining 3 bread slices. Place mustard side down on top of ham. • Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from sandwiches, creating 3-inch squares. (Discard crusts.) Cut sandwiches diagonally into quarters, creating 4 triangles. •

*We used Colman’s of Norwich Original English Mustard. MAKE-AHEAD TIP FOR ALL TEA SANDWICHES: Sandwiches can be made an hour in advance, covered with damp paper towels, placed in a covered container, and refrigerated until serving time.


Golden Raisin and Orange Scones Makes 11

2 cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup granulated sugar 2½ teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon fresh orange zest ½ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces ½ cup golden raisins 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon cold heavy whipping cream, divided ½ teaspoon vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, orange zest, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add raisins, stirring to blend. • In a liquid-measuring cup, combine 1 cup cream and vanilla extract, stirring to blend. Add to flour mixture, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough out to a 1-inch thickness. Using a 21⁄4-inch round cutter, cut 11 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. Brush tops of scones with remaining 1 tablespoon cream. • Bake until edges of scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, 18 to 20 minutes. •

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS: Devon Cream Orange Marmalade

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Egg Custard Tartlets Makes 12

1½ (14.1-ounce) packages refrigerated pie dough (3 sheets) 1 large egg 3 large egg yolks 2 tablespoons castor sugar 1 tablespoon honey ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 1⁄8 teaspoon salt 11⁄3 cups heavy whipping cream Garnish: sliced strawberries Preheat oven to 450°. • On a lightly floured surface, unroll pie dough. Using a 4½-inch round cutter, cut 12 rounds from pie dough (4 from each sheet). Press into 12 (33⁄4-inch) tartlet pans, trimming edges as necessary. Prick bottoms with a fork, and place prepared tartlet pans on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze for 15 minutes. • Bake until light golden brown, approximately 7 minutes. Let cool completely. • Reduce oven temperature to 350°. • In a medium bowl, combine egg, egg yolks, sugar, honey, vanilla extract, nutmeg, and salt, whisking to blend. • In a small saucepan, scald cream until very hot but not boiling. Gradually add hot cream to egg mixture, whisking to incorporate. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a liquid-measuring cup. Divide custard mixture among cooled tartlet shells. • Bake until custard is set, 10 to 11 minutes. Let cool completely before removing from tartlet pans. • Garnish each tartlet with a strawberry slice, if desired. • Serve cold or at room temperature. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Tartlet shells can be baked a day in advance and stored at room temperature in an airtight container. Custard mixture can be made a day in advance, placed in a covered container, and refrigerated until needed.

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Toffee-Walnut Cookies Makes 60

1 cup salted butter, softened 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract 3 large eggs 3½ cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons cream of tartar ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 (8-ounce) package English toffee bits ½ cup finely chopped toasted walnuts Preheat oven to 350°. Line several rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. • In a large mixing bowl, combine butter and sugars. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, approximately 5 minutes. Add vanilla extract, beating to blend. Add eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition. • In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, salt, and baking powder, whisking well. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating to incorporate. Add toffee bits and walnuts, stirring to blend. • Using a levered 2-teaspoon scoop, drop cookie dough 2 inches apart onto prepared baking sheets. • Bake until cookies are light golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to wire racks, and let cool completely. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Tŏee-Walnut Cookies can be baked in advance and stored in an airtight container at room temperature for a few days or in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Let thaw before serving.

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Preheat oven to 325°. Spray a 9x5-inch loaf pan with baking spray with flour. • In a large mixing bowl, combine butter and sugar. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, approximately 3 minutes. Add eggs, one at time, beating after each addition. Add vanilla extract, beating well. • In a medium bowl, combine flour, cocoa, baking powder, salt, and baking soda, whisking well. Add half of flour mixture to egg mixture, beating until incorporated. • In a small bowl, combine milk and sour cream, stirring to blend. Add to batter, beating until combined. Add remaining flour mixture, beating until blended. Spread batter into prepared pan. Tap pan on countertop to level and reduce air bubbles. • Bake until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean, 60 to 65 minutes. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes. • Using a long serrated knife, trim top of cake level with pan. Invert cake onto a wire rack, and let cool completely. • Cut cake in half lengthwise (with bottom being on the top). Spread raspberry preserves between the 2 cake halves, and spread Semisweet Chocolate Glaze on top of cake. • Garnish with raspberries, if desired. • Store cake in a covered container in the refrigerator. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Cake can be baked a week in advance, wrapped tightly in plastic, and stored in the freezer. Let thaw completely before ¿lling and glazing.

Semisweet Chocolate Glaze

Chocolate-Iced Loaf Cake with Raspberry Filling Makes 10 servings

½ cup salted butter, softened 1½ cups granulated sugar 3 large eggs 2¼ teaspoons vanilla extract 1¼ cups all-purpose flour 2⁄3 cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder

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Makes ½ cup

½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup whole milk ¼ cup sour cream ½ cup red raspberry preserves with seeds 1 recipe Semisweet Chocolate Glaze (recipe follows) Garnish: red raspberries

1 (4-ounce) bar semisweet baking chocolate 3 tablespoons heavy whipping cream In a medium microwave-proof bowl, combine chocolate and cream. Heat on high in the microwave at 30-second intervals, stirring until completely melted and smooth. •


“ Tea! Bless ordinary everyday afternoon tea!” —AGATHA CHRISTIE


Luck o the Irish

Afternoon Tea Assemble a table bedecked with traditional Irish hues and inspired fare for a craic (fun) teatime. teatimemagazine.com

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Potato-Leek Quiches Cucumber–Blue Cheese Canapés Luck o’ the Irish Pea Soup Celtic Cottage Tea

Irish Soda Scones with Honey Cream Connemara Morning Tea

Peppermint-Filled Shortbread Shamrocks Lemon-Thyme Curd Cakes Buttermilk Tartlets Lemon Meringue Rooibos

Tea Pairings by Trail Lodge Tea 314-680-3015 • traillodgetea.com


Cut potatoes in half and place in a medium saucepan. Fill pan halfway with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, and cook until potatoes are tender, approximately 10 minutes. Drain potatoes, and let cool. • Preheat oven to 450°. Lightly spray 8 (4-inch) removable-bottom tartlet pans with cooking spray. • Unroll pie dough sheets on a lightly floured surface. Using a 4½-inch round cutter, cut 8 circles from dough, discarding scraps. Press dough rounds into prepared tartlet pans, trimming excess dough as necessary. Using the large end of a chopstick, press dough into indentations in sides of tartlet pans. (See Tartlet Crust Howtos on page 69.) To prevent puffing during baking, prick bottoms of pie dough lightly with a fork. • Place tartlet pans on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze for 15 minutes. • Bake until very light golden brown, approximately 7 minutes. Let cool completely before filling. • Reduce oven to 350°. • In a small sauté pan, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add leeks, reducing heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally until tender, 7 to 10 minutes. Let cool before roughly chopping. • Peel cooked potatoes, discarding skins. Dice potatoes, reserving 1⁄2 cup and discarding excess. • Layer reserved potatoes, cheese, and leeks in prepared tartlet shells. • In a medium liquid-measuring cup, combine egg, cream, salt, and pepper, whisking well. Divide egg mixture evenly among tartlet pans. Sprinkle quiches with parsley. • Bake until mixture is set, approximately 13 minutes. Let cool slightly before removing from tartlet pans. • Serve warm or at room temperature. •

Potato-Leek Quiches Makes 8

4 baby honey gold potatoes 1 (14.1-ounce) package refrigerated pie dough (2 sheets) 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened 1 cup sliced leeks, white part only

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½ cup shredded Irish Cheddar cheese 1 egg 3⁄4 cup heavy whipping cream ¼ teaspoon salt 1⁄8 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Quiches can be baked a day in advance and stored in a covered container in the refrigerator. Reheat on a rimmed baking sheet in a 350° oven for 6 to 8 minutes.


Cucumber–Blue Cheese Canapés Makes 12

6 slices very thin wheat bread, frozen ¼ cup mayonnaise ¼ cup crumbled blue cheese 1⁄8 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 (6-inch) section English cucumber Garnish: 12 leaves parsley Using a 1¾-inch round cutter, cut 12 shapes from frozen bread slices, discarding scraps. To prevent drying out, cover bread rounds with damp paper towels, or place in a resealable plastic bag, and let thaw at room temperature. • In a small bowl, combine mayonnaise, blue cheese, and pepper, stirring well. • Using a mandoline or a sharp paring knife, cut 36 slices from cucumber section. • Spread a layer of blue cheese mixture onto bread rounds. Top each canapé with 3 cucumber slices, overlapping slightly to cover bread round. • Garnish each with a parsley leaf, if desired. Serve immediately. •

Luck o’ the Irish Pea Soup Makes 1½ quarts (6 to 8 servings)

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil ¼ cup sliced shallots 4 cups unsalted chicken broth 2 (13-ounce) bags frozen baby sweet green peas ¼ cup heavy whipping cream 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper Garnish: fresh pea greens* In a medium stockpot, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add shal•

lots, cooking until translucent, 5 to 7 minutes. Add chicken broth and peas and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 to 25 minutes. Add cream, stirring to combine. Remove from heat and let cool for 20 minutes. • Add salt and pepper. Using an immersion blender, purée soup until smooth. • Garnish individual servings with pea greens, if desired. *Micro pea greens are available from Gourmet Sweet Botanicals, 800-931-7530, gourmetsweetbotanicals.com. teatimemagazine.com

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Irish Soda Scones Makes 18

2 cups white whole-wheat flour 1 cup rye flour 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 tablespoon baking powder ¾ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces ½ cup dried currants 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons whole buttermilk Preheat oven to 400°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, combine flours, sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add currants, stirring to combine. Add buttermilk, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more buttermilk, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a 1-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch fluted square cutter, cut 18 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. • Bake until edges are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 13 minutes. • Serve warm. •

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS: Honey Cream (recipe follows)

Honey Cream Makes 1½ cups

1 cup cold heavy whipping cream 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons honey In a medium mixing bowl, combine cream, confectioners’ sugar, and vanilla extract. Beat at high speed with a mixer until thickened. Add honey, beating just until incorporated. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate until needed. •

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Peppermint-Filled Shortbread Shamrocks Makes approximately 24

½ cup unsalted butter, softened 1⁄3 cup plus 3 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar, divided ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup all-purpose flour ¼ teaspoon salt 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened ¼ teaspoon peppermint extract Green food coloring In a medium bowl, combine butter and 1⁄3 cup confectioners’ sugar. Beat at medium speed with a mixer until light and creamy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add vanilla, beating until combined. Add flour and salt, in 2 batches, beating well after each addition. • Shape dough into a disk, wrap with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. • Preheat oven to 325°. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. • On a lightly floured surface, roll cold dough to a 1⁄8-inch thickness. Using a 1¾-inch shamrock-shaped cutter, cut as many cookies as possible from dough. Place cookies 1 inch apart on prepared baking sheets.* • Bake until cookie edges are lightly browned, 8 to 12 minutes. Let cool on baking sheets for 5 minutes. Remove to wire racks, and let cool completely. • Match up pairs of cookies, bottom sides together. • In a small bowl, combine cream cheese, remaining 3 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar, and peppermint extract. Beat at medium speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add enough food coloring to achieve desired color. • Transfer frosting to a piping bag fitted with a medium round tip (Wilton #12). Working with a pair of cookies at a time, pipe icing onto the bottom side of a cookie, following the contours of the shamrock shape, and top with the other cookie. Lightly press together. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to a day until needed. •

*If shamrock design of cookie cutter is not symmetrical, we recommend flipping over every other cookie on baking sheets before baking. This will ensure designs line up when cookies are later paired for sandwiching. teatimemagazine.com

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Lemon-Thyme Curd Cakes Makes 8

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1¼ cups granulated sugar 6 large eggs, room temperature ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon lemon extract 1½ cups all-purpose flour 1½ tablespoons minced fresh thyme 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 recipe Lemon-Curd Whipped Topping (recipe follows) Garnish: 8 sprigs thyme Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a 13x9inch pan with cooking spray. Line pan with parchment paper, and spray with cooking spray. • In a large mixing bowl, combine butter and sugar. Beat at mediumhigh speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add extracts, stirring to combine. • In a medium bowl, combine flour, thyme, lemon zest, and salt, whisking well. Add flour mixture to butter mixture in thirds, beating just until combined after each addition. Spread batter into prepared pan, and smooth with an offset spatula. Tap pan firmly on counter to settle batter and reduce air bubbles. • Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 16 to 22 minutes. Let cool completely in pan. • Wrap cake pan tightly with plastic wrap, and let sit overnight at room temperature. • Flip cake out onto a cutting surface, and place right side up. Using a 2¼inch round cutter, cut 8 rounds from cake. • Using a serrated knife, gently cut each cake round in half horizontally to create 2 rounds. • Place Lemon-Curd Whipped Topping in a piping bag fitted with a large open-star tip (Wilton #1M). •

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Pipe topping onto cut side of bottom rounds. Top each with a remaining cake round, and pipe a rosette of topping on each. • Garnish each stack with a thyme sprig, if desired.

Lemon-Curd Whipped Topping Makes approximately 3 cups

1½ cups cold heavy whipping cream ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ½ cup prepared lemon curd In a medium mixing bowl, combine cream and vanilla. Beat at high speed with a mixer until thickened. Add lemon curd, beating until combined. Use immediately. •

Buttermilk Tartlets Makes 12

1 cup rolled oats ½ cup whole-wheat flour 1 cup plus 1½ tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided ¼ cup firmly packed light brown sugar ¾ teaspoon coarse salt, divided ¾ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces ¼ cup heavy whipping cream ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar ½ cup whole buttermilk 2 large eggs, lightly beaten ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon fresh lemon zest 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg Garnish: confectioners’ sugar and fresh strawberry slices Lightly spray 12 (4x2-inch) removablebottom tartlet pans with cooking spray. • In the work bowl of a food processor, pulse oats until fine, but not a •

powder, approximately 30 seconds. • Add whole-wheat flour, 1 cup allpurpose flour, brown sugar, and ½ teaspoon salt, pulsing to combine. Add cold butter, pulsing until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. • Add cream, pulsing just until dough forms a ball. Wrap dough tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until firm, approximately 1 hour. • Divide dough into 12 equal pieces. On a lightly floured surface and using a rolling pin, roll each dough portion to a 1⁄8-inch-thick rectangle. Press dough rectangles into the bottom and sides of prepared tartlet pans, trimming excess dough as necessary. Using the large end of a chopstick, press dough into indentations in sides of tartlet pans. (See Tartlet Crust Howtos on page 69.) • Place tartlet pans on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze for 30 minutes. • Preheat oven to 350°. • Using a fork, prick the bottom and sides of dough in tartlet pans. • Bake until crust is lightly golden just around the edges, approximately 8 minutes. Let cool. • Reduce oven temperature to 325°. • In a large bowl, combine granulated sugar and remaining 1½ tablespoons flour, stirring well. Add buttermilk and eggs, stirring until combined. Add melted butter, vanilla extract, lemon zest, lemon juice, cinnamon, nutmeg, and remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, stirring well. Divide mixture evenly among prepared tartlet pans. • Bake until filling is lightly golden around edges and almost set, 16 to 20 minutes. • Let tartlets cool in pans on baking sheet for 10 minutes. Carefully remove tartlets from pans, and let cool completely on a wire rack. Place tartlets in a single layer in a covered container, and refrigerate until cold, approximately 1 hour and up to a day. • Just before serving, garnish with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar and fresh strawberry slices, if desired.


Downton Abbey

TEATIME

With the much-anticipated ďŹ lm coming this fall, serve fellow Downton Abbey fans this menu, inspired by season one, episode two of the PBS television series. teatimemagazine.com

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Cucumber Tea Sandwiches Salmon Mousse Tea Sandwiches Imperial Yunnan China Black Tea

Currant Scones Darjeeling Ambootia Estate Premium Organic Black Tea

Lemon Madeleines Chocolate Biscuit Cake Victoria Sponge Cake Rose Congou Black Tea

Tea Pairings by Simpson & Vail 800-282-8327 • svtea.com


Salmon Mousse Tea Sandwiches Makes 16

1½ tablespoons cold water ½ teaspoon unflavored gelatin 2 ounces smoked Atlantic salmon, coarsely chopped ½ cup sour cream 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish 1 teaspoon heavy whipping cream 1⁄8 teaspoon kosher salt 12 slices very thin white sandwich bread Place 11⁄2 tablespoons cold water in a small saucepan. Sprinkle gelatin over water, and let soften for 5 minutes. Warm over low heat, stirring gently until gelatin dissolves. Let cool slightly. • In the work bowl of a food processor, combine salmon, sour cream, horseradish, cream, and salt, processing until mixture is smooth. With the motor running on low, add gelatin mixture to salmon mixture, processing until incorporated. Transfer mixture to a covered container, and refrigerate until firm, at least 4 hours or overnight. • Spread 1½ tablespoons salmon mousse onto 1 bread slice. Top with another bread slice. Spread another 1½ tablespoons salmon mousse on top. Top with a third bread slice. Repeat for remaining bread slices to make a total of 4 triple-stack sandwiches. • Using a bread knife, trim crusts from all sides of sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 4 triangles. •

Cucumber Tea Sandwiches Makes 8

3 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 teaspoon heavy whipping cream 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest 1 teaspoon minced fresh dill ¼ teaspoon salt 4 slices white sandwich bread, frozen 1 (6-inch) section English cucumber In a medium bowl, combine cream cheese and cream. Beat at mediumhigh speed with a mixer until creamy. Add lemon zest, dill, and salt, beating at low speed to incorporate. Transfer cream cheese mixture to a piping bag fitted with a small open-star tip (Wilton #21). • Using a 1¾-inch square cutter, cut 4 squares from each frozen bread slice. (Place squares in a resealable plastic bag, or cover with damp paper towels to let thaw and prevent drying out while working.) • Using a mandoline* on a very thin setting, cut 32 paper-thin cucumber •

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slices. Lay cucumber slices on paper towels, and blot dry. • Pipe cream cheese mixture onto 8 bread squares, beginning with perimeters and then filling in centers. Lay 4 cucumber slices atop cream cheese layer on each bread square, letting cucumber slices hang over edge of bread. Top with another bread square. • Serve immediately, or cover sandwiches with damp paper towels for up to an hour until ready to serve. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Cream-cheese mixture can be made a day in advance, placed in an airtight container, and refrigerated until serving time. Let come to room temperature before using. Bread squares can be cut a day in advance and stored at room temperature in a resealable plastic bag.

*We used a Kyocera mandoline, which is available at surlatable.com. You can also use a small, sharp paring knife to cut cucumber as thinly as possible.

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Salmon Mousse can be made a day in advance and refrigerated overnight. Sandwiches can be made earlier in the day. (Trim crusts, but do not cut into triangles until ready to serve.) Cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time. KITCHEN TIP: To create even layers of sandwich ¿lling in a triple stack sandwich, measure ¿lling before spreading onto bread slices.


Currant Scones Makes 16

1⁄3 cup dried currants 2 cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup granulated sugar 2½ teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces ½ cup plus 4 tablespoons cold heavy whipping cream, divided ½ teaspoon vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • Place currants in a small bowl, and cover with very hot water. Let stand for 5 minutes. Drain well, discarding liquid. • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add currants, stirring to incorporate. • In a small bowl, combine ½ cup plus 3 tablespoons cream and vanilla extract, stirring to blend. Add to flour mixture, stirring to combine. Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms. (If dough seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until dough is uniformly moist.) • Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and gently knead 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ¾-inch thickness. Using a 1¾-inch scalloped-edge cutter, cut shapes from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. Brush tops of scones with remaining 1 tablespoon cream. • Bake until edges of scones are golden and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 16 minutes. Serve warm. •

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS: Clotted Cream Orange Marmalade teatimemagazine.com

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Lemon Madeleines Makes 40

½ cup all-purpose flour ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1⁄8 teaspoon salt 1 large egg 6 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon lemon extract 2 teaspoons fresh lemon zest ¼ cup butter, melted and cooled 1½ cups confectioners’ sugar ¼ cup fresh lemon juice Preheat oven to 350°. • Spray 2 (20-well) mini madeleine pans with nonstick baking spray with flour. • In a small bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. • In a large bowl, combine egg, sugar, lemon extract, and lemon zest. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, approximately 5 minutes. Gradually add flour mixture, beating at medium speed until incorporated. Slowly add melted butter, beating at low speed until incorporated. Let batter stand for 5 minutes. • Drop 1 teaspoon batter into each well of prepared pan, smoothing with tip of finger to create a level surface. • Bake until edges of madeleines are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, 8 to 9 minutes. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes. Transfer madeleines to a wire rack. Let cool completely. • In a bowl, combine confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice, whisking until smooth and creamy. Pour glaze over madeleines, letting excess drip off. Let glaze dry on cookies until surface no longer feels wet, approximately 2 hours. Store in an airtight container at room temperature until served. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Cookies can be baked a week in advance and frozen, unglazed, in an airtight container. Let thaw completely before glazing.

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Chocolate Biscuit Cake Makes 12 servings

1⁄4 (10.6-ounce) package Englishstyle rich tea biscuits (cookies) 1 (11.5-ounce) package milk chocolate morsels 2⁄3 up heavy whipping cream 1 tablespoon butter 1 recipe Milk Chocolate Ganache (recipe follows) Line a (6x3½-inch) mini loaf pan with plastic wrap. Set aside. • Break cookies into somewhat equal pieces, approximately 1 to 2 inches in size. Set aside. • Place chocolate morsels in a heatproof bowl. Set aside. • In a medium saucepan, combine cream and butter; heat to a very hot temperature, but do not let mixture boil. Pour over milk chocolate morsels. Let sit for 1 minute. Stir until morsels have melted and mixture is smooth and creamy. • Pour enough melted chocolate into prepared loaf pan to cover bottom of pan. Lay broken cookies in a single layer over ganache, covering surface of ganache. Continue layering chocolate and cookies in this manner until pan is full. • Refrigerate in pan until chocolate is hard, approximately 4 hours. • Remove cake from pan, and place on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet, top side down. Remove plastic wrap. Pour Milk Chocolate Ganache over cake, letting it drip down sides. Using an offset spatula, smooth ganache over all sides of cake. • Refrigerate, uncovered, for at least 8 hours or overnight before serving. • Using a sharp knife, cut into 1⁄4-inch slices by pressing down rather than sawing. •

Milk Chocolate Ganache Makes ¾ cup

2⁄3 cup milk chocolate morsels 1⁄3 cup heavy whipping cream

Place milk chocolate morsels in a heatproof bowl. • In a small saucepan, heat cream until very hot but not boiling. Pour •

over milk chocolate morsels. Stir until morsels melt and mixture is smooth and creamy. Use immediately.

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Victoria Sponge Cake Makes 12 servings

²⁄³ cup plus 3 tablespoons self-rising soft-wheat flour ½ cup castor or superfine sugar ½ cup butter, softened 2 large eggs 13⁄4 teaspoons vanilla extract, divided 1 cup cold heavy whipping cream ¼ cup plus 1⁄3 cup confectioners’ sugar, divided 3⁄4 cup hulled and chopped strawberries ¼ cup seedless strawberry jam Garnish: 1 strawberry, cut into a fan Preheat oven to 325°. Spray 2 (8-inch) round cake pans with nonstick baking spray with flour. Line each pan with parchment paper. Spray parchment paper. • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, butter, eggs, and 1¼ teaspoons vanilla •

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extract. Beat at high speed with a mixer until ingredients are well incorporated, approximately 5 minutes. Divide batter evenly between prepared pans, smoothing evenly. • Bake until edges of layers are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 15 minutes. • Let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Invert layers onto wire racks, bottom sides up. Remove parchment paper, and let cakes cool completely. • In a large bowl, combine cream, 1⁄4 cup confectioners’ sugar, and remaining 1⁄2 teaspoon vanilla extract. Beat at high speed with a mixer until stiff peaks form. Add chopped strawberries, stirring well. • Place 1 cake layer on a cake plate, bottom side down. Tuck strips of wax paper under cake layer to protect cake plate when sifting confectioners’ sugar. • Stir jam until smooth, and spread

over first cake layer. Carefully spoon strawberry–whipped cream mixture over jam, spreading into an even layer. Place second cake layer over whipped cream, bottom side up. • Lay a decorative stencil or doily over cake. Sift remaining 1⁄3 cup confectioners’ sugar over stencil, making sure all cutout areas are filled in evenly. Very carefully lift stencil up and off cake. Carefully remove wax paper strips from around cake base. • Garnish top of cake with a fanned strawberry, if desired. Serve immediately. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Cake layers can be baked a day in advance and wrapped in plastic wrap. Whipped cream can be made earlier in the day and refrigerated until needed. Add strawberries just before using. Cake can be assembled up to an hour before serving and refrigerated until needed.


“One is not given many chances in life, and if you miss them, they may not necessarily be repeated. ” —VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM


A Bonnie

SCOTTISH TEA Invite guests to enjoy these teatime favourites from the Highlands of Scotland, where the word scone rhymes with gone, and shortbread is considered the crown jewel of Scottish baking. teatimemagazine.com

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Steak & Onion Bridies Scotch Egg Canapés Smoked Trout Tea Sandwiches Scottish Breakfast

Oat & Wheat Scones Earl Grey

Raspberry-Oat Tartlets with Whiskey-Honey Cream Lemon-Vanilla Shortbread Dundee Cake Victorian Afternoon

Tea Pairings by Mark T. Wendell Tea Company 978-635-9200 • marktwendell.com


Steak & Onion Bridies Makes 16

1 tablespoon olive oil ½ pound ground sirloin ½ cup finely chopped yellow onion 1 (10½-ounce) can beef consommé ½ cup very small diced russet potato 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 1 teaspoon ground mustard ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 2 (17.3-ounce) packages frozen puff pastry (4 sheets), thawed 1 large egg 1 tablespoon water Garnish: fresh thyme leaves Preheat oven to 400°. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. • In a medium sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Add sirloin and onion; cook, stirring frequently, until sirloin is browned and onion is tender. Add consommé, potato, thyme, mustard, and pepper. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cover, and cook, stirring frequently, until potato is tender and mixture is heated through, 5 to 7 minutes. Uncover, and cook until liquid is gone. Remove from heat, and let mixture cool to room temperature. • On a lightly floured surface, unroll puff pastry sheets. Using a rolling pin, roll each sheet to a ¼-inch thickness. Using a 4-inch round cutter, cut 16 rounds from sheets. Place approximately 1 tablespoon sirloin mixture in the center of each pastry round. • In a small bowl, combine egg and 1 tablespoon water, whisking to blend. Using a pastry brush, coat edges of pastry rounds with egg wash. Fold pastry rounds in half to encase sirloin mixture, and crimp edges with a fork. Place bridies on prepared baking sheets. Brush pastries with remaining egg wash. • Garnish bridies with thyme leaves, if desired. • Bake until bridies are golden brown, approximately 15 minutes. Serve warm. •

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MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Filling can be made a day in advance, stored in an airtight container, and refrigerated until needed. Bring to room temperature before ¿lling bridies.

Scotch Egg Canapés Makes 8

3 slices firm white sandwich bread, frozen 8 ounces ground pork breakfast sausage ½ cup all-purpose flour 2 large eggs, beaten ½ cup fine bread crumbs 1 cup vegetable oil 3 slices medium Cheddar cheese 3 medium hard-cooked eggs, peeled ¼ cup prepared piccalilli* Preheat oven to 350°. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. • Using a 1¾-inch round cutter, cut 8 rounds from frozen bread slices. Place on a prepared baking sheet. • Bake until bread slices are crisp and light golden brown, 7 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely. • Line a rimmed baking sheet with waxed paper. • Divide sausage into 8 golf-ball-size balls. Press flat onto prepared baking sheet. Place in freezer for 10 to 15 minutes. • Remove sausage patties from freezer, and dredge in flour, beaten egg, and bread crumbs to coat. • In a medium sauté pan, heat oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Fry sausage patties until crumb coating is light golden brown, approximately 1 minute per side. Drain on paper towels, and place on prepared baking sheet. • Bake until interiors of sausage patties are cooked, 5 to 7 minutes. • Using a 1¾-inch round cutter, cut each sausage patty to neaten edges, discarding scraps. Using the same cutter, cut 8 rounds from cheese slices, discarding scraps. • Using an egg slicer, slice boiled eggs •

horizontally into thin slices. • Spread piccalilli onto toasted bread rounds. Top each with a sausage patty, a cheese round, and an egg slice. Serve immediately. *Piccalilli is a flavorful relish made from pickled vegetables, such as cucumber, onion, and cauliflower. We used Heinz Piccalilli Pickle. Look for jars of this condiment in the pickle section or the British foods section of most grocery stores.

Smoked Trout Tea Sandwiches Makes 6

1 (8-ounce) package lemon pepper and garlic smoked trout fillet ½ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon creamy prepared horseradish 1 tablespoon finely snipped fresh dill 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest 1⁄8 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 slices large firm whole-grain white sandwich bread 6 thin horizontal slices English cucumber* Remove and discard skin from trout. Rinse excess spice from trout, and pat dry. Flake trout into a medium bowl. Add mayonnaise, horseradish, dill, lemon zest, and pepper, stirring to combine. Spread mixture onto 2 bread slices, topping with remaining 2 bread slices. Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 3 rectangles. • Remove top bread slices from each tea sandwich. Place a cucumber slice on each tea sandwich, and trim to fit. Replace top bread slices. Serve immediately, •

*For even slices, use a mandoline. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Sandwiches can be made an hour ahead, covered with damp paper towels, placed in an airtight container, and refrigerated until serving time.


Oat & Wheat Scones Makes 12

1 cup whole-wheat flour ½ cup all-purpose flour ½ cup quick-cooking oats 1⁄3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces ½ cup plus 3 tablespoons cold heavy whipping cream, divided 1 large egg Preheat oven to 400°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, combine flours, oats, brown sugar, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. • In a liquid-measuring cup, combine ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons cream and egg, whisking to blend. Add to flour mixture, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ¾-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch square cutter, cut 12 scones from dough. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. Brush tops of scones with remaining 1 tablespoon cream. • Bake until edges of scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 12 minutes. Serve warm. •

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS: Clotted Cream Red Currant Jam

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completely before removing from tartlet pans. • In a medium bowl, beat cream at high speed with a mixer until soft peaks form. Slowly add sour cream, whiskey, and 1 tablespoon honey, beating until incorporated. • Divide cream mixture among tartlet crusts. Top with raspberries. Drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon honey. Top with reserved granola crumbs. *We used Dewar’s White Label Scotch whiskey.

Lemon-Vanilla Shortbread Makes 8 wedges

½ cup salted butter, softened ½ cup confectioners’ sugar 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest ½ teaspoon lemon extract ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup all-purpose flour 1⁄8 teaspoon salt Preheat oven to 325°. Lightly spray an 8-inch shortbread pan* with nonstick cooking spray. • In a large mixing bowl, beat butter with a mixer at high speed until creamy. Add confectioners’ sugar, lemon zest, and extracts, beating to blend. Add flour and salt, beating until incorporated. • Firmly press dough into prepared pan. Prick dough with a fork. • Bake until shortbread is light golden brown, approximately 35 minutes. Let shortbread cool in pan for 10 minutes. Turn out shortbread onto a cutting board. Cut into wedges to serve. •

Raspberry-Oat Tartlets with Whiskey-Honey Cream Makes 6

1½ cups oat and honey granola cereal ¼ cup granulated sugar 4 tablespoons salted butter, melted 1 cup heavy whipping cream ½ cup sour cream 1 tablespoon Scotch whiskey 2 tablespoons honey, divided Fresh raspberries

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Preheat oven to 350°. In the work bowl of a food processor, combine granola and sugar, and pulse until finely chopped. Reserve 1 tablespoon granola crumbs for topping. • In a medium bowl, combine granola crumb mixture and melted butter, stirring to blend. Divide mixture among 6 (4-inch) tartlet pans with removable bottoms. Press mixture firmly into bottoms and up sides of tartlet pans. Place tartlet pans on a rimmed baking sheet. Place in freezer for 15 minutes. • Bake for 10 minutes. Let crusts cool • •

*We used an 8-inch hexagonal Scottish thistle ceramic shortbread pan from Brown Bag Designs, shortbreadpan.com. Shortbread can also be baked in an 8-inch round cake pan.


Dundee Cake Makes approximately 16 servings

1 cup very hot water 1 cup golden raisins 1 cup salted butter, softened ¾ cup granulated sugar 4 large eggs 2 large egg yolks 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 12⁄3 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon fresh orange zest 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground allspice 1 cup dried chopped pineapple ½ cup dried chopped dates Garnish: confectioners’ sugar Preheat oven to 325°. Spray an 8-inch springform pan with baking spray with flour. • In a small bowl, pour 1 cup hot water over raisins, and let sit for 15 minutes. Drain well. • In a large bowl, combine butter and sugar. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and creamy, 4 to 5 minutes. Add eggs and then egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla extract, beating to combine. • In a medium bowl, combine flour, orange zest, baking powder, salt, and allspice, whisking well. Add to butter mixture, beating at low speed until incorporated. Add raisins, pineapple, and dates, beating at low speed until just combined. • Spread batter into prepared pan, smoothing top with an offset spatula. Tap pan on counter to level and settle batter. • Bake until cake is golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 60 to 75 minutes. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes. Remove sides of pan, and let cool completely on a wire rack. Slide cake off bottom of springform pan onto a cake plate before serving. • Garnish with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar, if desired. •

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A Royal

CELEBRATION The birthday of the British monarch, whoever he or she may be, is traditionally celebrated in June. Commemorate the occasion with a tea party that will give your guests the royal treatment. teatimemagazine.com

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Coronation Chicken Salad Sandwiches Watercress and Egg Salad Tea Sandwiches Dilled Salmon Mousse CanapĂŠs Royal English Breakfast

Cream Scones Royal Palace Tea

Lemon Linzer Cookies with Ginger Preserves Mini Cherry Bakewell Tartlets Strawberry-Lemon Battenberg Cakes Victorian London Fog

Tea Pairings by Harney & Sons 800-832-8463 • harney.com


Coronation Chicken Salad Sandwiches Makes 24

1 tablespoon salted butter 1 cup chopped yellow onion 6 tablespoons Major Grey’s chutney* ¼ cup tomato purée ¼ cup water 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons curry powder 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 bay leaf ½ cup mayonnaise 3 cups finely chopped roast chicken ½ cup chopped toasted slivered almonds 3 tablespoons finely chopped dried apricots 2 tablespoons finely chopped green onion (green tops only) 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 2 tablespoons dried currants 12 slices potato bread In a large sauté pan, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion, and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender and translucent, 5 to 7 minutes. Add chutney, tomato puree, water, vinegar, curry powder, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thick (like ketchup), 8 to 10 minutes. Pour sauce into a large bowl, and let cool completely. • Remove bay leaf from sauce, and discard. Add mayonnaise to cooled sauce, stirring to combine. Add chicken, almonds, apricots, green onion, parsley, and currants, stirring to blend. • Spread a thick layer of chicken salad onto a bread slice. Top with another bread slice. Repeat with remaining chicken salad and bread slices. • Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from sandwiches, creating squares. (Discard crusts.) Cut sandwiches diagonally into quarters, creating 4 triangles.

*Several companies make Major Grey’s chutney, a relish made with mangos, raisins, onions, vinegar, and spices. Look for jars of this condiment in the pickle section or the British foods section of most grocery stores. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Chicken salad can be made a day in advance. Sandwiches can be made earlier in the day, covered with damp paper towels, placed in an airtight container, and refrigerated until serving time.

Watercress and Egg Salad Tea Sandwiches Makes 12

6 hard-cooked eggs, peeled ¾ cup finely chopped watercress ½ cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons stone-ground mustard ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 8 slices firm white sandwich bread Garnish: additional watercress

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In a medium bowl, chop eggs into small pieces, using a pastry blender. Add watercress, mayonnaise, mustard, salt, and pepper, stirring to blend. • Spread a thick layer of egg salad onto a bread slice. Top with another bread slice. Repeat with remaining bread slices and egg salad. Wrap sandwiches lightly in plastic wrap, and freeze just until firm to make sandwiches easier to cut. • Using a 1¾-inch fluted round cutter, cut 3 round tea sandwiches from each frozen whole sandwich. Cover tea sandwiches with damp paper towels, and let thaw completely at room temperature, approximately 45 minutes. • Garnish with additional watercress, if desired. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Egg salad can be made a day in advance, placed in an airtight container, and refrigerated until needed.

Dilled Salmon Mousse Canapés Makes 12

1½ tablespoons water ½ teaspoon unflavored gelatin 1 (4-ounce) package thinly sliced smoked salmon ½ cup sour cream 1 tablespoon snipped fresh dill 11⁄2 teaspoons fresh lemon zest 1 teaspoon heavy whipping cream 1⁄8 teaspoon salt 6 slices very thin whole-wheat bread Garnish: dill sprigs In a small saucepan, heat water to a simmer. Remove from heat, and add gelatin, stirring to blend. Let cool. • In the work bowl of a food processor, pulse smoked salmon, cooled gelatin mixture, sour cream, dill, lemon zest, cream, and salt until combined. Transfer salmon mousse to an airtight container, and refrigerate until cold and firm, approximately 6 hours. • Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • Using a serrated bread knife, trim crusts from bread, discarding crusts. Cut bread into 2½x1-inch rectangles. Place bread rectangles on prepared baking sheet. • Bake until firm and crisp, 7 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely. • Place cold salmon mousse in a piping bag fitted with a large openstar tip (Wilton #1M). Pipe mousse in a scrolled shell pattern onto each toasted bread rectangle. • Garnish each canapé with a dill sprig, if desired. Serve immediately. •

MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Salmon mousse can be made a day in advance and refrigerated until needed. Bread rectangles can be made a day in advance and stored in an airtight container at room temperature. KITCHEN TIP: To retain freshness, soak fresh dill sprigs in iced water for 15 minutes before garnishing.


Cream Scones Makes 12

2 cups all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 2½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon cold heavy whipping cream Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add 1 cup cream, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a 1-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch fluted round cutter, cut 12 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. • Brush tops of scones with remaining 1 tablespoon cream. • Bake until edges of scones are golden brown, approximately 20 minutes. • Serve warm. •

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS: Clotted Cream Lemon Curd Orange Marmalade

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“Good memories are our second chance at happiness.” Lemon Linzer Cookies with Ginger Preserves Makes 32

3 cups all-purpose flour 1½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup salted butter, softened 1 cup granulated sugar 1 large egg ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon lemon extract 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest ¾ cup ginger preserves* Preheat oven to 350°. Line several rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. • In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. • In a large mixing bowl, combine butter and sugar. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and fluffy, approximately 5 minutes. Add egg, vanilla extract, lemon extract, and lemon zest, beating until incorporated. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating until dough comes together. • Place half of dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper or waxed paper. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ¼-inch thickness. Transfer dough and parchment paper to another rimmed baking sheet, and freeze for 15 minutes. Repeat with remaining half of dough. • Remove dough from freezer, and remove parchment paper from dough. Using a 2-inch fluted round cutter, cut 32 rounds from chilled dough. Place rounds 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets. • Using a 2-inch fluted round cutter fitted with a diamond-shaped linzer cutter†, cut 32 rounds from chilled dough, and remove and discard centers. Place rounds 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets. • Bake until edges of cookies are very

light golden brown, approximately 10 minutes. Transfer cookies to wire racks, and let cool completely. Store in an airtight container with layers separated by waxed paper. • Just before serving, spread a scant 1 teaspoon ginger preserves onto each whole cookie. Top with a cutout cookie. *We used Mackays Ginger Preserves. †

We used a Wilton round linzer cookie– cutter set.

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Mini Cherry Bakewell Tartlets Makes 36

4 tablespoons salted butter 2 large eggs ¼ cup granulated sugar 6 tablespoons almond flour ¼ cup cherry preserves 36 mini (1.75-inch) shortbread tartlet shells* Sliced almonds In a small saucepan, heat butter over low heat until browned and fragrant. Remove from heat, and let cool slightly. • In a medium bowl, combine eggs and sugar, whisking well. Add browned butter, whisking to blend. Add almond flour, folding to incorporate. • Place tartlet shells on a rimmed baking sheet. Place ¼ teaspoon cherry preserves in each tartlet shell. Fill each shell with almond mixture. Arrange sliced almonds on top of filling in a flower pattern. • Bake until filling is firm, 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely. Store tartlets in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a day. •

*We used Clearbrook Farms Mini Bite-size Sweet Tart Shells.

—QUEEN ELIZABETH II

Strawberry-Lemon Battenberg Cake Makes 8 to 10 slices

½ cup plus 2 tablespoons salted butter, softened ½ cup castor sugar or extra-fine granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 cup self-rising flour 1 teaspoon lemon extract Yellow food-coloring paste or liquid 1 teaspoon strawberry extract Pink food-coloring paste or liquid 1⁄3 cup apricot jam 1 (24-ounce) box white vanilla fondant* Preheat oven to 350°. Spray an 8-inch square cake pan with cooking spray. Line pan with parchment paper, and spray again. • Using a piece of aluminum foil approximately 8 inches long, make a foil divider for pan by folding foil in half, and then fold in half again. Referring to Photo 1 on page 70, stand foil rectangle in the center of pan to create a divider. Spray divider with cooking spray. • Place another piece of parchment paper (approximately 12x8 inches) over foil divider in prepared pan, folding as needed to fit (Photo 2). Spray parchment paper again. • In a medium mixing bowl, combine butter and sugar. Beat at high speed with a mixer until light and creamy, approximately 3 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition. Add flour, folding to combine. • Divide batter into 2 equal portions. To one portion of batter, add lemon extract and enough yellow food paste to reach desired shade of yellow, stirring to blend. Spread batter into one side of prepared pan, smoothing top and creating a level surface. • To remaining portion of batter, add strawberry extract and enough pink food paste to reach desired shade of pink, stirring to blend. Spread batter •


into one side of prepared pan, smoothing top and creating a level surface (Photo 3). Tap pan on countertop to reduce air bubbles. • Bake until a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, 23 to 25 minutes. Let cakes cool in pan for 10 minutes. Turn out cakes onto wire racks, and let cool completely. • Place cakes on a cutting surface. (If either cake has a domed top, cut level, using a long serrated bread knife.) Cut each cake lengthwise into 2 equal sections. Trim sections to measure 11⁄8 inches in width. Wrap each section securely in plastic wrap, and let stand for 6 to 8 hours to make cake easier to work with. • In a small saucepan, melt apricot jam over low heat, stirring to loosen. Using a pastry brush, coat tops of both yellow cake sections with melted jam (Photo 4). Stack a pink section on top of each yellow section. Flip one stack so that yellow section is on top. Brush long side of one stack with melted jam (Photo 5). Press sides together. (Jam will serve as the glue.) Trim ends of cake stacks evenly (Photo 6). • Knead and roll out fondant to a 12x10-inch rectangle, according to package directions. Brush top of cake stack with melted jam. Place cake stack, jam side down, in center of fondant sheet (Photo 7). Brush top and remaining sides of cake stack with jam. • Wrap cake with fondant, pressing and smoothing fondant so that it adheres to cake (Photo 8). Turn cake over. Using kitchen shears, trim long edge of fondant, letting ends overlap slightly. Press seam in place using fingers. Gently roll cake over so seam is on bottom. Fold and tuck in ends of fondant to keep cake moist. • Using a straight edge such as a plastic ruler, press down on fondant every ½ inch or so to create a diamond pattern (Photo 9). • Place cake on cutting board, and wrap securely in plastic wrap, making

sure plastic is in contact with fondant to prevent it from drying out. • Just before serving, unwrap cake. Using a long, serrated knife, trim ends, and cut cake into ¾-inch slices, using a gentle sawing motion.

*We used Wilton Decorator-Preferred Fondant. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Battenberg Cake can be made a day in advance, wrapped securely in plastic wrap, and stored at room temperature. teatimemagazine.com

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How-To

Let these step-by-step photos serve as your visual guide while you create these impressive and delicious teatime treats.

TARTLET CRUST Egg Custard Tartlets, page 21 Potato-Leek Quiches, page 29 Buttermilk Tartlets, page 35

2

1 Press dough shapes into tartlet pans.

Using a cutter, cut shapes from dough.

4

3 Trim excess dough.

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Using the wide end of a chopstick, push dough into indentations of pan.


BATTENBURG CAKE Battenburg Cake, page 67

1 Using a piece of foil approximately 8 inches long, make a foil divider for pan by folding foil in half, and then fold in half again. Stand foil rectangle in the center of pan to create a divider. Spray divider with cooking spray.

4 Using a pastry brush, coat tops of both yellow cake sections with melted jam. Stack a pink section on top of each yellow section.

7 Brush top of cake stack with melted jam. Place cake stack, jam side down, in center of fondant sheet.

2 Place another piece of parchment paper (approximately 12x8 inches) over foil divider in prepared pan, folding as needed to ďŹ t. Spray parchment paper again.

3 Spread yellow batter into one side of prepared pan and pink batter into other side, smoothing top and creating a level surface.

6

5 Flip one stack so that yellow section is on top. Brush long side of one stack with melted jam.

Press sides together. (Jam will serve as the glue.) Trim ends of cake stacks evenly.

9

8 Brush top and remaining sides of cake stack with jam. Wrap cake with fondant, pressing and smoothing fondant so that it adheres to cake.

Using a straight edge such as a plastic ruler, press down on fondant every ½ inch or so to create a diamond pattern. teatimemagazine.com

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TEA EXPERIENCES & TRADITIONS Discover the history of beloved tea customs while exploring a fascinating assortment of tearooms and venues in regions such as Yorkshire, London, and the Cotswolds.


A VISIT TO THE REAL

Downton Abbey Lady Carnarvon talks about life at Highclere Castle, the impact of the popular period drama, and where she likes to have tea.

Text by Barbara Gulley All Photography ©Highclere Castle Photograph by Different Perspecitves Limited

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Saloon (Above) Physically and socially, the gothic-style Saloon is the heart of Highclere Castle. The leather wall coverings of this impressive space date to the 17th century and are ornately embellished with golden scrolls and polychrome botanicals.

cup of tea and Downton Abbey make a perfect pairing whether you enjoy your tea milk-in-first or milk-in-last (the former practice historically tied to the downstairs staff; the latter, to the upper class). No matter which side of the manor you identify with, Downton Abbey fans are united in their devotion to the show, whether it be the fictional story, the reallife characters who inspired it, or a combination. Downton Abbey aired on PBS’s Masterpiece from 2011 until 2016, and for the first two months of those years, many Americans welcomed the members of the aristocratic Crawley family and their downstairs staff into their homes every Sunday night. In turn, the Carnarvons have been opening the doors to their country estate, Highclere Castle (the blue-blood clan and residence, respectively, that inspired Downton Abbey), to the public for years. Fans of the patrician lifestyle get a glimpse of what it’s like to reside in a home that contains not only the grand furnishings passed down from generation to generation but also the stories of ancestors ripe for the retelling.

State Dining Room

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Library

Saloon

Morning Room

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As the author of two books on the former residents of the country estate as well as of a 2017 release about entertaining there, the current Countess of Highclere, Lady Fiona Carnarvon (married to George Herbert, the 8th Earl of Carnarvon) has become the face of the real Downton Abbey. While some may find it daunting to receive so many guests each year, Lady Carnarvon considers it as part of Highclere’s history. “Highclere has welcomed visitors since 1988,” says Lady Carnarvon, “and whilst we are busier and are delighted to see more international visitors, it has been part of my life ever since I married Geordie (my husband).” The Carnarvons were also delighted to welcome Downton back to Highclere again, she says, for the filming of the Downton Abbey movie, whose eagerly anticipated release in cinemas is scheduled for September 2019. “Julian [Fellowes, the show’s creator,] and the wonderful cast and crew of Downton Abbey were so much a part of our lives for so many years, and it is very special to develop the next role with them.” Aside from the familiar characters and smart writing, what fans may have missed most of all is the silent star of the series—and now, of the movie—the country manor itself. Its alter ego, Highclere Castle, has arguably become, to many, as recognizable and iconic to England as Westminster Abbey or Buckingham Palace. Visiting this impressive estate is now an industry unto its own and a boon to the Carnarvon family. Tour groups come in droves to this Hampshire country manor to connect with the popular Edwardian series. As buses filled with Downton Abbey fans ascend the estate—and the view of the grand home is still the size of a postage stamp—guests immediately recognize the familiar landscape that spans acres. The grounds of Highclere are picturesque and dappled with gardens and follies, popular in the time of the home’s construction. But it is the manor home that, once in full view, strikes a deep emotional chord with the audience. Built in the late 17th century, it has been home to generations of the Carnarvon family. The residence has endured over the centuries, having received a major facelift in the early 19th century that gave the edifice a limestone front fans will recognize as the Downton Abbey of today. Once the multitude of buses park, visitors eagerly line up at the front entrance of Highclere as doors open to welcome them inside. Tourists enter and walk through the rooms on the ground floor with the easy comfort of visiting an old friend. Guests then make their way upstairs to get a peek at a few of the bedrooms on the first floor. Climbing the stairs, it’s easy to envision the towering Christmas tree below or to spot a number of hiding places along the hallway for convenient eavesdropping by family and staff alike.


Drawing Room

Perhaps the most recognizable room is the Library, where Downton Abbey viewers have witnessed many snappy exchanges among family and staff. It wears the patina of aged furnishings and family portraits—the red velvety couches are at once opulent and welcoming. It also ranks among Lady Carnarvon’s favorite rooms. “I love the Library,” says the current Countess of Highclere. “The proportions and decoration are both impressive and restrained. [In addition], I like my study, as it is full of photos and mementos that matter to me. I rather like climbing the stairs to the tower. The rooms are quirky, [they have] wonderful ceilings, and the views are extraordinary.” With so many lovely rooms at their disposal, the Carnarvons don’t restrict teatime to any one particular space, and they consider the occasion as well as the season. “In the winter, we may have tea in the Smoking Room, as the paintings are exceptional, and it is a good time of day to enjoy them. The original tea chest sits in the Drawing Room, but today I see that room less for tea as it works so well for cocktails, and it is a treat to share different parts of the house with our guests.” In addition, the Carnarvons take advantage of the well-manicured grounds for afternoon tea, weather permitting.

(Above) Although Highclere Castle’s original tea chest is in the Drawing Room, the Carnarvons use that room frequently for cocktails. (Below and opposite page, top) The Library is one of Lady Carnarvon’s favorite rooms, especially for afternoon tea.

Library

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State Dining Room

Library

While Downton Abbey devotees eagerly await the movie’s release, there is still plenty on the horizon for Highclere, according to Lady Carnarvon, such as Art & Architecture Week in May 2019, which will feature talks by her as well as other experts in those fields. Participants will also enjoy guided tours of the castle’s state rooms and galleried bedrooms, which were featured in the beloved television series as well as in the film, and refreshments, which are certain to include tea. The Downton Abbey movie may very well mark the finale of the captivating period drama and will undoubtedly bring a mixture of joy and tears, but its fans will find comfort in knowing its real-life alter ego will continue to be open to visitors, with plans for even more afternoon teas for years to come. Downton Abbey has endeared its audience, whether milk-in-first or milk-inlast, to a time and place rich with history, elegance, and a great deal of entertainment. ............................................................................................ To stay abreast of special events at Highclere Castle or to plan a visit, go to highclerecastle.co.uk. For more information about Lady Carnarvon’s books, personal appearances, and blog, visit ladycarnarvon.com. 77

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....

Monks Garden

(Left) George Herbert, the 8th Earl of Carnarvon, and his wife, Lady Fiona, the current Countess of Carnarvon, welcome visitors to their family home, Highclere Castle. (Above) In her book At Home at Highclere, Entertaining at the Real Downton Abbey (Rizzoli, 2017), Lady Carnarvon writes about the food, etiquette, and history of hosting at her stately home. teatimemagazine.com

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Photograph Courtesy of The Waldorf Hotel

T Thés Dansants Reveling in a British tea-dance revival Text by Jane Pettigrew

Photograph Courtesy of Jane Pettigrew

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ea and dancing have long been happy partners. When the pleasure gardens of 18th-century London lured people through their gates with music, firework displays, masquerades, and dancing, tea with bread and butter was included in the ticket price and provided welcome refreshment. When wealthy Georgians made their annual visits to spa towns such as Bath, Buxton, and Harrogate, tea was always available at evening dances held in assembly rooms and in winter gardens. Jane Austen highlighted these entertainments in many of her novels. As afternoon tea gained importance through the latter half of the 19th century, hostesses organized a variety of amusements for their tea-party guests. The Etiquette of Modern Society, published by Ward Lock in 1881, states, “Refreshments, both at ceremonious teas and At Homes are served in the dining-room, wither the guests repair during the intervals of music, dancing, recitations, or the dramatic entertainments.” In 1884, Mrs. Armstrong, another etiquette writer, told readers, “Refreshments are going on all the afternoon, and gentlemen take the ladies to the tearoom during the intervals between the dances.” When in 1912 an exotic and risqué dance called the tango arrived in London from Buenos Aires, dancing at teatime acquired an even more seductive and tantalizing nuance. The first tango Londoners saw was performed at The Gaiety Theatre in a show called The Sunshine Girl, and almost overnight, everyone was clamoring to learn


the steps and show them off on dance floors. Theatres, restaurants, and hotels quickly recognized the frenzy and rearranged tables to allow space for dancing, organized tango dance classes and clubs, and hired bands to provide the moody Latin music in tea lounges and palm courts. Going out to tea in tearooms and hotel lounges was already a fashionable part of Edwardian life, but tango teas caused quite a stir. The Daily Express reported: “Tango teas are becoming so great a craze that one wonders if Mrs. Brown of Brixton [i.e., Mrs. Average] will ever again be content to stay at home for plain drawing room tea without the accompaniment of a few tangos and a dress parade or two. Yesterday, among London’s scores of similar entertainments, came the inauguration of tango teas at the Palace Theatre.” The Waldorf Hotel in the Aldwych quickly became famous for its weekly tea dances, as The Dancing Times reported in June 1913: “The ‘Tango’ is graceful, decorous and worthy of a place in any ball-room. If you doubt me, go to one of the ‘Thés Dansants’ organized by the ‘Boston Club’ on Wednesday afternoons at The Waldorf Hotel, and you will be charmed.” The idea of dancing at teatime captured society’s attention, and American etiquette writer Emily Post told readers in 1922: “The afternoon tea with dancing is usually given to ‘bring out’ a daughter, or to present a new daughter-in-law.… After ‘receiving’ with her mother or mother-in-law for an hour or so, as soon as the crowd thins a little, the débutante or bride may be allowed to dance. The younger people, as soon as they have shaken hands with the hostess, dance. The older ones sit about, or talk to friends or take tea.” The popularity of tea dances continued through the 1920s and ’30s, but with two world wars and changing lifestyles, daily life left little time for indulgent afternoon tango teas. The Waldorf continued its tea dances until 1939, when a bomb shattered the glass roof of the Palm Court. There was no more light tripping of waltz steps or cha-cha-chas on the famous marble floor until 1982, when tea dances were reintroduced on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday afternoons. The Ritz London quickly followed suit. A scattered program of tea dances continued throughout the UK during the 1990s and into the new century. The events at the Ritz in the ’80s lasted only a year or so, and when the Waldorf changed hands in 2003, the glorious weekend tea dances, sadly, came to an end, and the doors to the magnificent Palm Court closed. But in the past five years, the bubbling delight and enthusiasm for afternoon tea and a new energetic passion for dancing have rekindled interest, and tea dancing is suddenly all the rage. A tentative revival at the Waldorf to

(Opposite page, top) Tea dances in the historic Palm Court of The Waldorf Hilton, London, occur throughout the year. (Opposite page, bottom) Jane Pettigrew enjoys dancing in the Paul Hamlyn Hall at the Royal Opera House. (Right) In January 1914, The Dancing Times informed readers: “Roland and Marion Mitford, who have been appearing at the Palace Theatre ‘Tango Teas’, and also at the Lotus Club each night are perhaps better known in Paris than they are in London.”

celebrate the hotel’s centenary in 2008 was announced online: “… and with Tango Tea we’re offering people the chance to step back in time to an age of elegance.… Guests will also be entertained with shows from professional dancers before being invited on to the dance floor themselves.” The success of that special afternoon led to regular events held through the year in the Palm Court, with live music by the Berkeley Square Society Band. These elegant tea dances capture the mood of bygone days and entice visitors from all over the world. But not all tea dances are quite so grand, and afternoon dancers at other venues are quite happy with a refreshing cup of tea and a biscuit to keep them going for two or three hours of Latin, ballroom, and sequence routines. In the wonderful glass-domed Paul Hamlyn Hall (formerly the Floral Hall) at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, a cup of tea is included in the ticket price for the monthly tea dances. And announcements on websites for an ever-burgeoning list of tea dances in parks, civic centers, market squares, town halls, dance studios, and clubs all over the country always include a promise of tea and cake or biscuits. Some events are organised to raise money for charity and some, to encourage older people to exercise. Just mention that you’ve been to a tea dance and the response is almost always an eager, “I want to go, too!” And so the number of tea dancers grows, the venues multiply, and more and more people are benefiting from the healthy combination of exercise and tea. The Dancing Times told its readers in May 1913: “What a happy innovation on such an afternoon would be the ‘tea-dance’! Men usually fight shy of the ladies’ tea-hour, but few of them can resist the pleasure of a waltz or a Boston; so try the tea-dance idea!” teatimemagazine.com

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Afternoon Tea in the

Cotswolds Text by Jane Pettigrew Photography by Nick Turner, nickturnerphoto.com; Courtesy of Cotswold Tourism Partnership, cotswolds.com

The very English tradition endures in picturesque towns and villages.

Village of Naunton


Stanton, Gloucestershire

S

et in South Central England, the Cotswolds are an expanse of gently rolling hills and meadows that cover a 787-square-mile area and stretch from Warwickshire and Worcestershire through Oxfordshire, Gloucestershire, and Wiltshire to Bath and Somerset. The name is said to refer to the “sheep enclosures in rolling hillsides” of the past. (In medieval times, Cotswold sheep were famous throughout Europe for their thick, heavy fleeces and high-quality wool.) Designated an Area of Outstanding Beauty in 1966, the gentle landscape stretches out in all directions, lyrical and welcoming. The vast acres of undulating farmland are separated only by ancient drystone walls and clumps of woodland where tall trees form dappled leafy tunnels over winding country roads. Nestling amongst the tranquil countryside, picturesque villages and small towns—made rich by the wool trade of the past— boast grand churches with tall steeples, old coaching inns where weary travelers and exhausted horses once rested, thatched cottages, and gracious manor houses with exquisite gardens and walls of yellow Jurassic limestone that gleams honey gold in the summer sun.

Northleach

The region is dotted with neighborhood tea shops and grand hotels that were once stately homes, castles, or ancient priories. And so, after wandering through the little villages or hiking the Cotswold Way footpath, head for one of the following four venues for a very English afternoon tea. teatimemagazine.com

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Photographs Courtesy of Ellenborough Park

ELLENBOROUGH PARK Southam Road Cheltenham Gloucestershire GL52 3NJ +44 1242 545454 • ellenboroughpark.com

Afternoon tea at this stunning hotel, named England’s Leading Country House Hotel at the World Travel Awards 2016, is served in the Great Hall of a house that was built in the first half of the 16th century. Many features of the Tudor building remain—family coats of arms carved into wooden fireplaces and wood paneling, carvings in the fire surrounds of those who lived here, and large family portraits that include a painting of Edward Law, Earl of Ellenborough and Governor General of India from 1842 to 1844. The original architecture, the fascinating historic details, and the warm welcome from the staff make hotel residents and those popping in for an indulgent afternoon tea feel as if they have inadvertently stepped onto the set of Downton Abbey. Traditional afternoon tea here changes according to the season and annual festive occasions. For Christmas, the savouries might include a roasted turkey and 83

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cranberry sandwich, and the cake stand will be arranged with mid-winter treats such as an orange and mascarpone mont blanc, a chestnut macaron, a coconut and pineapple snowman, and a chocolate and cherry yule log. Pastries at other times of the year have recently included such yummy indulgences as white chocolate and ginger dome with honeycomb topping, Champagne and strawberry jelly with strawberry mousse, carrot cake with orange mascarpone, raspberry and passion fruit macarons, dark chocolate mousse with salted caramel, and vanilla and white chocolate cheesecake with raspberries. The unusual list of loose-leaf teas offers a tiramisu-flavoured tea, a China green flavoured with tropical fruits, and a fruity berries infusion with floral notes and hints of liquorice, as well as favourites such as Assam, Lapsang Souchong, Earl Grey, and English Breakfast. David Williams, the hotel’s executive chef, has always focused on creating dishes that feature seasonal flavours and colours, and under the direction of recently appointed General Manager Marwan Hemchaoui, who joined the hotel in September 2018, the Ellenborough Park afternoon tea is set to become an even more delicious and special experience.


TISANES TEA ROOM Cotswold House 21 The Green, Broadway Worcestershire WR12 7AA +44 1386 853296 • tisanes-tearooms.co.uk

Tracey Sone, owner of this extremely successful traditional tearoom, started her career in tea in the 1980s when she was just a young teenager. Her first job at Teatime, a tearoom in London, was washing dishes on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Then when she left school, she graduated to running the kitchen and soon became the tearoom manager. When the shop was sold in 1989, she went to work for Whittard (the High Street tea retailer) and then ran their warehouse for seven years. But in the back of her mind was her determination to run her own tearoom, and for the past 12 years, that is exactly what she has been doing—managing Tisanes with the same energetic efficiency and concern for all her customers as she did at Teatime. Tisanes occupies a traditional 17th-century stone building at the lower end of Broadway’s attractive High Street (or broad way) where 16th-, 17th-, and 18th-century stone buildings are homes to art galleries, restaurants, pubs, and lovely shops selling gifts, high-end clothing, jewellery, and local products. Tisanes is a haven for Broadway residents and tourists alike, is always busy, and attracts constant interest from local radio stations and organizers of local events (food markets, seasonal festivities, music festivals, clubs, and societies) who know that Tracey will always deliver a thoughtful, reliable, high-quality service. Tisane’s tea menu is impressive and includes black, oolong, green, and white loose-leaf teas from around the world and a long list of blends, flavored teas, and herbal infusions. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., customers can choose sandwiches, toasted sandwiches, light lunch dishes, scones, and a tempting variety of cakes. Whenever guests call in, they are guaranteed a warm welcome; a friendly, chatty atmosphere; and a good pot of tea. And before leaving, they can buy jars of jams and jellies, pickles, chutneys, and mustards, books, and, of course, packets of tea to brew at home.

Photographs Courtesy of Tisanes Tea Room

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HUFFKINS

Photographs Courtesy of Huffkins

Locations in Burford, +44 1993 824694; Cheltenham, +44 1242 300640; Stow-on-the-Wold, +44 1451 830867; Stratford-UponAvon, +44 1789 415433; Witney, +44 1993 708155 huffkins.com

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Huff kins is to the Cotswolds what Bettys is to Yorkshire. The independent, family business owns and manages tearooms in five Cotswold towns and has a craft bakery that produces irresistible breads, cakes, scones, and savoury treats that are offered in the tearooms and also sold at their retail counters. The company dates back to 1890, when a Mr. Titcomb opened the first shop on the High Street of Burford, one of the busiest and prettiest towns in the region. In those days, the now famous breads and cakes were delivered by donkey and cart to nearby customers. The Burford tearoom today (pictured at left) is housed in two Grade II–listed buildings, one of which still contains the original bake house, and Huff kins bakers work through the night to produce enough bread for all the sandwiches served in the five shops. Essential ingredients are sourced locally wherever possible so customers are served authentic Cotswold food. The company believes it is important to “feed the eyes first,” so the retail items look really tempting. The tearoom in Witney sits at the lower end of the High Street in a Grade II–listed Victorian shop with a wrought-iron frontage typical of the period. In Stow-on-the-Wold, Huff kins occupies another Grade II–listed Cotswold stone building and overlooks the bustling market square. The Cheltenham branch, the smallest of the five tearooms, is located in a Grade II–listed Regency building dating back to the beginning of the 19th century, and the tearoom in Stratford-upon-Avon is in a charming Grade II–listed building with pretty bay windows and exposed wooden beams made from old ships’ timbers. The range of food and teas offered at all locations means visitors can always find something on the menu to suit the time of day and individual tastes. And don’t miss the famous luxury fruit cakes! They are matured for 30 days to allow the complex flavours—Cranberry & Orange, Apricot & Almond, Cherry & Pecan, Date & Walnut, or Chocolate & Orange, among other seasonal combinations—to develop, then the sides of the cakes are trimmed away to ensure that every single bite of them is packed full of deliciousness.


THE TEA SET CHIPPING NORTON 24 High Street, Chipping Norton OX7 5AD +44 1608 642233 • theteaset.co.uk

Victoria Wills set up her award-winning tea business after organizing a memorable vintage afternoon-tea party for her daughter’s 18th birthday. She already owned some pretty antique teawares but scoured local shops and markets for enough vintage china to host 65 guests. And once local friends and neighbors knew what she was looking for, they offered her their unwanted cups and saucers, hand-embroidered tablecloths, linen napkins, three-tiered cake stands, and vintage cutlery. She now owns enough tea sets for 300 people, and since 2012, the company that grew out of that family party has been creating bespoke tea events for weddings, birthdays, baby showers, christenings, and anniversaries. Clients choose the venue, the menu, and the teas, and Victoria’s team delivers everything, sets up the room, serves the guests, and clears away afterwards, creating really special, trouble-free, indulgent tea occasions. As if all that work weren’t enough, in 2016, Victoria also opened her first tearoom, The Tea Set, in the center of Chipping Norton, a busy market town at the heart of the Cotswolds and famous for its wealthy media, political, and show-business residents (including David Cameron) known as the “Chipping Norton Set”—hence the company’s name. The shop has an easy-come, easygo ambiance that suits visitors of all types with its mix of old wooden dining and side tables inside and white wrought-iron tables outside; a medley of chairs from different eras; mix-and-match teawares in an assortment of colours, styles, and patterns; gentle jazz music from the 1920s and ’30s; and very kind staff. In early 2017, Victoria opened a second vintage-style tearoom on Church Close in the nearby medieval town of Broadway.

Photographs © Cristina Colli

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ŠNational Trust Images/John Hammond


THE NATIONAL TRUST,

Guardian of

British Tea The history of tea in some of England’s stately homes Text by Jane Pettigrew

B

ritain’s National Trust is a much-loved conservation charity that protects and preserves some of the country’s finest historic houses, gardens, and countryside. As well as tracing the nation’s social and political development, many of the houses contain furniture, porcelains, silverwares, and stories that bring our tea history to life. Of the hundreds of Trust properties, five manor houses in the south of England reveal secrets and special tea moments dating from the middle of the 17th century to the elegance of Edwardian Britain. Queen Catherine drank tea at Ham House; Polesden Lacey’s Edwardian tearoom hosted international politicians and ambassadors; handpainted Chinese wallpaper at Saltram House illustrates 18th-century tea processing; Castle Drogo was built with money made by selling tea; and in the 1880s, Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales both took tea at Waddesdon Manor. All these houses are open to the public, and each has a tearoom that welcomes thirsty visitors for a rest and a recuperative cup of tea, a piece of cake, or a scone with jam and cream after they have wandered through historical rooms that showcase precious furnishings, porcelains, silver wares, books, and paintings and teach us so much about our past.


©National Trust Images/John Hammond

HAM HOUSE

©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Ham St. • Richmond-upon-Thames • Surrey TW10 7RS +44 2089 401950 nationaltrust.org.uk/ham-house-and-garden

(Above) The portrait of Elizabeth Murray, later known as Duchess of Lauderdale, and a servant by Sir Peter Lely, circa 1651, is on display in the Long Gallery at Ham House.

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Ham House was built in 1610, almost 50 years before tea first arrived in London. In 1626, Charles I gifted it to William Murray, and when Murray died, it passed to his eldest daughter, Elizabeth. Smart, beautiful, greedy, and cunningly ruthless, she first married Sir Lionel Tollemarche (presumably for his money and status) and then John Maitland, 1st Duke of Lauderdale, making her Duchess of Lauderdale. Elizabeth’s family were staunch monarchists and maintained their support for the royal family during the 1649 to 1660 republican Interregnum after Charles I had been executed and his son Charles Stuart had fled to Europe. Elizabeth cleverly managed to maintain a friendship with republican leader Oliver Cromwell while plotting at Ham House for the return of King Charles II. In 1660, Charles was


restored to the throne and in 1662 married Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza, who introduced tea to the English aristocracy. Of course, Elizabeth became close friends with Catherine, and the Queen often visited Ham House. A suite of rooms on the first floor was furnished for Catherine’s visit in 1673, but the real jewel in the Ham House crown is the Duchess’s Private Closet, a small room near the Duchess’s bed chamber on the ground floor where Elizabeth and Catherine took tea together. On the lacquered Javanese tea table sit small porcelain tea bowls and Elizabeth’s rare Chinese porcelain teapot that was produced at the Zhangzhou kilns of Fujian province in the 17th century. Such pots were not normally imported into England, and a European merchant probably acquired this fine example privately. Visitors may walk through this little treasure of a room and imagine the Queen and the Duchess quietly sipping tea together and perhaps sharing the latest court gossip. Today, visitors take tea in the oldest orangery in Britain, built in the 1670s, that overlooks the walled kitchen garden.

©National Trust Images/Rosie Barnett

©National Trust Images/John Hammond

©National Trust Images

(Left and right) The 17th-century diarist John Evelyn described the Duchess of Lauderdale’s home as “furnished like a great Prince’s with tapestries, damask, velvet, mohair on walls, bedsteads, chairs upholstered in luxurious fabrics.” Her tea equipage, too, was the very finest. (Above left and below right) Visitors to Ham House can have tea in its orangery.

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©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

POLESDEN LACEY

©National Trust Images/Nick Meers

Great Bookham • Dorking • Surrey RH5 6BB +44 1372 452048 nationaltrust.org.uk/polesden-lacey

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Polesden Lacey nestles amongst the Surrey hills, an elegant Regency mansion that was remodeled for Margaret and Ronnie Greville in 1906 by architects Mewès and Davis, designers of the Ritz in London. Margaret was the illegitimate daughter of a millionaire Scottish brewer and a servant girl, and she inherited her father’s wealth. Despite her background, she was a frightful snob and social climber, and once she had acquired a suitably aristocratic husband, she launched herself as a society hostess, entertaining royalty, prime ministers, maharajas, ambassadors, actors, and wealthy industrialists at Polesden. Royal visitors included Kings Edward VII,


©National Trust Images/Nick Meers

©National Trust Images/Nick Meers

©National Trust Images

At Polesden Lacey, Mrs. Margaret Greville (right) lavishly entertained members of the highest social circles. King Edward VII described her gift for entertaining as “genius,” but although kind and thoughtful, she had a very sharp tongue and her wit was described by some as “honeyed poison.” (Below) Tea fare is available in the Granary Café.

©National Trust Images/Megan Taylor

George V, and George VI and Queen Elizabeth (mother of our present queen), who honeymooned here in 1923 before George became king. Margaret and Ronnie were so dedicated to surrounding themselves with famous, rich, and influential people that some rather unkindly referred to them as the “Grovels” rather than the Grevilles. The house was designed for entertaining, and tea was served every afternoon. In his 1974 book, Down the Kitchen Sink, Beverley Nichols describes how “tea is at 5 o’clock, and at Polesden, 5 o’clock means 5 o’clock and not 5 minutes past. Which in turn means that the Spanish ambassador, who has gone for a walk down the yew avenue, hastily retraces his steps, and that the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whoever he may be, hurries down the great staircase, followed by several members of the House of Lords, and that various ladies belonging to these gentlemen rise from their chaises longues on which they have been resting in their bedrooms, removing the perfumed anti-wrinkle pads which they have been balancing on their foreheads, and join the procession to the tea table which is set out in one of the smaller drawing-rooms.” Queen Mary, wife of King George V, often telephoned to say that she would be arriving for tea that afternoon. The tearoom, laid out today as it would have been then—with elegant Edwardian sofas and armchairs, dainty tea tables, and fine porcelain tea wares—has wonderful views out over the lawn and rose garden. Afternoon tea for 21stcentury visitors is served in the Granary Café, housed in the old stable yard.

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©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

SALTRAM HOUSE

©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Plympton • Plymouth • Devon PL7 1UH • +44 1752 333500 nationaltrust.org.uk/saltram

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Developed from a smaller Tudor building in the mid18th century, Saltram is a fine example of a wealthy Georgian home. It also contains records, wall coverings, and porcelains that add colorful detail to the history of tea drinking in Britain. As typical wealthy Georgians, Sir John and Lady Catherine Parker, and later their son John, gradually turned the house into a model of Georgian good taste. They hired Robert Adam to create neoclassical rooms and Joshua Reynolds to paint portraits of family members and to advise on purchases of art. During the 1740s, the Parkers introduced a variety of Chinese wallpapers—for example, the Chinese Chippendale bedroom is decorated with silk wallpaper that shows the processing and shipping of tea in China. In the 1760s, the younger John Parker, who had interests in maritime commerce, acquired many beautiful items from China. Cabinets around the house display porcelain tea jars, lidded tea bowls decorated with butterflies and flowers, Chinese porcelain teapots, and Meissen and Royal Worcester British teawares that echo the Chinese style. The family employed a large number of household servants, and ledgers from the 1780s show that staff wages often included an allowance of tea at a time when it was still far too expensive for working people to afford. The famous British tea break perhaps has its roots in this 18th-century provision of tea for servants who were developing a taste for what had previously been an upper-class luxury.


©National Trust Images/John Hammond

(Above and opposite page) The influence of Chinese style is apparent everywhere at Saltram—silk wallpapers, paintings on glass, fretwork, and porcelains that include tea jars, covered cups, teapots, and pieces of export Chinese tea porcelain decorated with the family crest. (Left) Visitors can have tea in Saltram’s restored chapel.

A small octagonal castle in the garden was designed in Gothic style in the 1770s by Theresa Parker, the younger John’s second wife. These were the days when tea was still taken as a digestif after a midday or early afternoon dinner, and guests often retired to a folly or teahouse in the grounds of stately homes to relax and sip tea together. Theresa intended her castle to create a convenient place for visitors to take tea or to rest during their walks around the parkland and gardens that surround the house. Today tea is served in the restored 19th-century chapel.

©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

©National Trust Images/Megan Taylor

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©National Trust Images

©National Trust Images/James Mortimer

CASTLE DROGO

Julius Drewe (top left) built his castle between 1910 and 1930, and despite his determination to create a medieval-style stronghold, the rooms were warm and comfortable. Drewe planned a home fit for a wealthy country gentleman and installed central heating, electricity, and a lift.

©National Trust Images/James Mortimer

Perched at the rugged northern edge of Dartmoor, Castle Drogo has the appearance of a medieval castle that might have featured in the tales of King Arthur and his knights. The house was in fact built between 1911 and 1930 for Julius Drewe, founder in 1883 of the Home and Colonial Stores, a chain of grocery shops that sold mainly tea. At the age of 17, Julius started work as a tea buyer in China for his uncle’s tea-importing business and then opened his own shop, the Willow Pattern Tea Store, in Liverpool, in 1878 when he was 21. Home and Colonial developed out of his success, and by 1889, he had made so much money from the enterprise that he was able to retire at the age of 32 and decided to employ architect Edwin Lutyens to build him a castle. At the time Drewe was working for his uncle in the 1870s, the price of tea had come down, and everyone in Britain could comfortably afford to drink it. After the East India Company lost its tea monopoly in 1834, new tea-importing companies were established all around the coast of Britain. Brooke Bond began trading in Manchester, Lipton in Glasgow, the Cooperative Society in Lancashire, and Drewe in Liverpool. In 1865, the government had helped make tea more affordable by reducing the tea tax to just sixpence per pound, and by the 1870s, cheaper British-grown teas from India and Ceylon were replacing China tea. Tea traders were busier than ever, selling a product that the British found they simply could not do without. Drewe seized the opportunity to sell tea direct from origin to the tea-drinking public, and by 1890, from his humble beginnings in Liverpool, he had opened 106 Home and Colonial Stores—first in London and then all over the country. Some of his wealth bought him this unusual and eccentric castle, named for the 12th-century Drogo family from which Drewe is believed to descend.

©National Trust Images/Robert Morris

Castle Drogo Dr. • Drewsteignton • Exeter• Devon EX6 6PB +44 1647 433306 • nationaltrust.org.uk/castle-drogo

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©National Trust Images/Ian Ward ©National Trust Images

WADDESDON MANOR Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP18 0JH • +44 1296 653226 nationaltrust.org.uk/waddesdon-manor

©National Trust Images

Waddesdon Manor, a vast mansion built in the style of a French Renaissance château, crowns a steep hill in the Buckinghamshire countryside. It was built for Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild to house his collection of art treasures and to entertain his friends, including Queen Victoria and her son The Prince of Wales, later Edward VII. Afternoon tea of course played an important role, and midafternoon, a footman would arrive in the drawing room with a trolley and enquire politely of guests, “Tea, coffee, or a peach off the wall, sir?” and the conversation would proceed: “Tea, please.” “China tea, Indian tea, or Ceylon tea, sir?” “China, if you please.” “Lemon, milk, or cream, sir?” “Milk, please.” “Jersey, Hereford, or Shorthorn, sir?” If tea was taken outdoors, as Dorothy de Rothschild explained: “A long line of open landaus would draw up outside the front door; Baron Ferdinand’s guests would get in and, in a flurry of parasols and panama hats, would go clip-clopping through the park, over the road, and down through Miss Alice’s long avenue of chestnuts. [Miss Alice was the Baron’s sister.] If it was overcast they would drive straight to the Pavilion, but if the sun shone, they would transfer themselves into a large electric

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©National Trust Images/Barry Keen

launch, manned by boatmen in straw hats ... They would then glide up the Thame to an enchanting tea-house Miss Alice had built on the river at the farthest point of her property. … The delectable tea … would be set out in the dining-room of the Pavilion. Then, just as the landaus were arriving, the weather might change, the sun would shine, and it was realised that the guests might prefer to go up river. Happily the Thame does not pursue a straight course through the meadows, but winds its way. This made it possible for the big iced cakes, the gingersnaps and wafer-thin sandwiches to be whipped off the table and packed into a pony-trap. This would be driven by a colleague straight across the fields to the teahouse at a speed which would enable the tea to beat the approaching launch by a short head.” Today, there is no launch or pony trap, but traditional afternoon tea is served in the Manor Restaurant, fashioned from rooms that were once the old kitchen and servants’ hall.

©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

The 45 rooms on view at Waddesdon Manor contain magnificent French furniture and decorative arts from the 18th century. There is also an impressive Victorian garden. (Opposite page middle) Waddesdon’s pastry chef and his staff in 1910. (Opposite page bottom) A picnic for the Prince and Princess of Wales at Waddesdon Manor, circa 1880.

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Wedgwood Tea Room


Taking Tea with

WEDGWOOD A very British story of a 260-year-old company’s teawares, tea, and tearooms Text by Jane Pettigrew Photography Courtesy of Wedgwood

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or as long as any of us can remember, the name Wedgwood has conjured images of beautiful teacups and saucers, stylish porcelain teapots, and a sense of history linking to a past when princesses and duchesses in elegant palaces and royal castles consumed tea in tiny quantities. Josiah Wedgwood’s designs were as popular and successful then as they are today, and his teawares found their way at an astonishingly fast pace into homes all around Britain and abroad. But this was, after all, a time when the acquisition of expensive tea bowls and pots was closely linked to social status, and the possession of pieces by the successful young Wedgwood brought prestige and provoked the envy of friends. Josiah, born in Staffordshire on 12th July 1730, began experimenting with clay while still very young, and by the age of 9, showed great skill as a potter. However, a cruel childhood attack of smallpox took away the use of one leg. Finding himself unable to work the potter’s wheel, he spent much of his time designing while also making pieces with help from others. In 1759, he founded his own company in Burslem, Staffordshire, and was quickly recognised as a brilliantly creative and inspired designer, an astute businessman, and an

important innovator of new manufacturing techniques. In 1765, England’s Queen Charlotte ordered a tea and coffee set in his famous creamware, which he immediately renamed Queen’s Ware when she appointed him “Potter to Her Majesty.” His new factory, called Etruria for the ancient Italian classic style that inspired his work, manufactured both useful household wares and exquisite ornamental pieces. His fame spread far and wide. In 1773, Empress Catherine The Great of Russia commissioned a Queen’s Ware dinner and dessert service for 50 for use at her gothic summer palace near Saint Petersburg. Since those early days, Wedgwood has been famous around the world for its strikingly beautiful teawares. Today, the company continues to sell stunning tablewares and has designed an impressive range of ceramics and teas Josiah Wedgwood called The Wonderlust The V&A Museum Collection at Collection, inspired by World of Wedgwood teatimemagazine.com

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(Below) The flagship store at World of Wedgwood is the brand’s largest retail space anywhere. (Right and below right) The eclectic Wonderlust collection of ceramics is used in the Tea Conservatory. (Bottom and opposite page top) Wedgwood’s Parkland is the porcelain of choice for the Tea Room at World of Wedgwood.

the fascinating sights and wonderful natural beauty discovered during the historic Grand Tour, a fashionable adventure for wealthy Europeans travelling through Europe and beyond during the 17th and 18th centuries. The six Wonderlust tea blends mingle teas from different world regions with unusual flower blossoms, tropical herbs, and exotic spices. Wonderlust Camellia adds rose petals, dried tea flowers, and aloe vera to green tea; Blue Pagoda blends oolong tea with jasmine blossoms, lotus flowers, and ripe mango; Rococco Flowers balances the delicate flavor of white tea against the gentle taste and aroma of bamboo leaves, orange blossoms, fragrant ylang ylang, and just a hint of sweet Asian galangal; Oriental Jewel is an unusual mix of black sencha tea and pine needles; herbal Yellow Tonquin blends basil, citrus peel, and chrysanthemum flowers with a dash of Echinacea; while fruit infusion Crimson Jewel is a mix of invigorating red fruits harvested from England and the South Seas. The tea packaging and the eclectic Wonderlust collection of ceramics (mugs, teacups, saucers, trays, bowls, and picture frames) reflects the same colourful connections 101

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to foreign lands, with their design including such evocative images as exotic flowers, palm trees, tropical islands, and pagodas. Lauched in 2018, Wedgwood’s Signature Teas line includes eight classics, such as Jasmine Mao Feng, Ceylon Uva, and Maharajah Darjeeling, among others. All these teas and ceramics are available at the World of Wedgwood at Barlaston, Staffordshire, the company’s home since 1938, when it moved its pottery manufacturing business there from the original Etruria factory. In July 2015, after months of rebuilding and refurbishment, Wedgwood unveiled its new museum with an award-winning collection of more than 80,000 ceramics and artifacts accumulated over the company’s history, with 3,000 of those objects on display in the galleries; a flagship store, which sells an extensive range of Wedgwood products and is the largest Wedgwood retail space in the world; the Dining Hall, a contemporary re-creation of the original Barlaston workers’ canteen, providing visitors with a relaxed family restaurant serving locally sourced foods; and, of course, the Wedgwood Tea Room, where the luxury and quintessential Englishness of the unique experience will thrill tea lovers. After a walk through the estate’s landscaped grounds and shady woodlands, a tour of the factory to watch Wedgwood’s artists at work, or a visit to the Master Craft Studio to try working the potter’s wheel, the Tea Room offers the ideal place to rest, reflect, and drink some excellent tea poured from fine Wedgwood teapots

and sipped from gorgeous Wedgwood cups. Any of the teas can be tasted in the Tea Conservatory—where you can also enjoy brunch, lunch, and afternoon tea—before deciding which one (or two or three) to purchase, and Wedgwood’s dedicated tea sommeliers are on hand to offer advice and information. The Tea Room décor celebrates the company’s heritage, blending Wedgwood classic colors and timeless elegance with contemporary chic to create a peaceful, calm haven that appeals to all—the secret of a successful tearoom. Afternoon tea here, with all its connections to times gone by, is an unforgettable indulgent experience and a perfect tribute to Josiah, to Wedgwood, and to tea. ......................................................................................................

For more information, please visit worldofwedgwood.com. To book a table for afternoon tea in the Wedgwood Tea Room or Tea Conservatory, ring +44 1782 282986. teatimemagazine.com

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A Taste of

Yorkshire Afternoon Teas and Yorkshire Specials

Text by Jane Pettigrew Photograph Courtesy of West Winds Tearooms

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orkshire is England’s largest county and fills her vast space with an astonishingly varied landscape of wild moorland; deep, craggy valleys with tumbling waterfalls and dramatic outcrops of granite-grey rock; gentle dales; rugged coastal cliffs; elegant Victorian cities; sprawling industrial towns; and neat, picture-postcard villages. An inspiration to the Brontës and a tempestuous backdrop to the passions of Wuthering Heights’ Cathy and Heathcliff and to Jane Eyre’s harsh and lonely early years, Yorkshire fascinates and overwhelms with its mercurial temperament—one moment calm, benign, and bathed in sunlight and the next, sulking beneath glowering skies, battered by rough winds and thrashing rainstorms. Perhaps this is what makes it one of the best regions in the country for wonderful afternoon teas and traditional local teatime treats. There are so many excellent tearooms and hotel lounges to choose from in every corner of the county that each year, the Welcome to Yorkshire Tourist Office publishes Yorkshire’s Delicious Tea Trail, which includes between 40 and 50 venues. At teatime, Yorkshire weather calls for a Fat Rascal (a plump, fruity cross between a scone and a rock cake) or freshly baked Stottie Cake (a soft, flat round bread that is split and filled with bacon and egg or for high tea eaten with Yorkshire cheese and pickles). And tea tables are often laden with the sizzling larded dough of Singin’ Hinnies (flat, golden, and hot from the griddle, rich with currants and sugar); Yorkshire Parkin (a moist, sticky gingerbread made with oatmeal and treacle); and little Yorkshire Curd Tarts filled with a lemony curd cheese scattered with currants. All very traditional, satisfying, and filling—and all delicious!


WEST WINDS TEAROOMS WITH WALKER’S LODGE Behind the Buck Inn Buckden • Upper Wharfedale Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 5JA +44 1756 760883 westwindsinyorkshire.co.uk

With the surrounding historic village of Buckden—trees and gardens in blossom, green dales rolling away into the distance, and a tidy patchwork of farmers’ fields all around—the views from West Winds’ garden enchant the eyes and capture the heart. This is a haven for walkers who hike the trails here, local families whose children can romp while their parents chat quietly over a cup of tea, and tourists from all over the world who love this charming stone cottage, its pretty garden in summer, and the crackling log fire in the hearth on chillier, blustery days. This has been a tearoom on and off since the 1920s and is today owned and run by Lynn Thornborrow and Stephen Hounsham. Stephen grows the herbs that flavor the sandwich fillings; Lynn bakes all the cakes to favorite Yorkshire recipes; and together they serve wonderful lunches, afternoon teas, and cream teas, using local eggs, ham, beef, cheeses, and chutneys. The tea list includes powerful East African black supplied by Birchalls and other specialty teas such as Assam, Darjeeling, smoky Lapsang, various green teas, and herbal and fruit infusions. West Winds Tearooms is open from just before Easter each year until the end of October.

Photography Courtesy of West Winds Teaooms

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Photography Courtesy of Bettys Café Tea Rooms

BETTYS CAFÉ TEA ROOMS Locations in Harrogate, +44 1423 814070; RHS Gardens at Harlow Carr, +44 1423 505604; York, +44 1904 659142; Stonegate York, +44 1904 622865; Ilkley, +44 1943 608029; and Northallerton, +44 1609 775154 • bettysandtaylors.co.uk

Mention tea and Yorkshire in the same sentence, and someone will inevitably ask, “Have you been to Bettys?” Bettys has been a much-loved part of Yorkshire life since 1919. The company is famous not just for its tearooms, but also for its specialty teas; home-baked breads, biscuits, and cakes; fine chocolates; and cookery school that teaches an impressive annual program of bakery, pâtisserie, chocolate making, and “Teatime Temptations”! Bettys was founded in Harrogate by Fritz Bützer, a young Swiss orphan and qualified baker who left the Emmental Valley for the northern English city of Bradford in 1907 and found work with a Swiss confectioner there. He renamed himself Frederick Belmont (more sophisticated, he thought), and in 1912 was hired by Farrah’s—famous Harrogate toffee manufacturers since 1840—to teach them how to make continental chocolates. On July 17, 1919, he opened his first tearoom in Harrogate and wrote to his sister in Switzerland, “Here I now had a shop exquisitely fitted out, the showcases in precious wood, mirrors and glass on the walls, the café furnished in grey, with muted pink panels with 105

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old-silver borders, with silver electric candleholders in the centres. . . . Harrogate is a spa of the first order, and during the summer we had many well-known visitors as customers . . .” In 1936, Belmont and his wife, Claire, took a luxury cruise on Cunard’s ocean liner, the Queen Mary. He was so taken with the style of the décor that in March 1937, he acquired premises in York and hired Cunard’s interior designers and fitters to create a similarly opulent Art Deco interior at his second tearoom. In 1922, he opened a bakery; in 1924, a third tearoom in Bradford; and then a fourth in Leeds in 1930. But World War II brought bombs, as well as food and staff shortages, and by 1945, Bettys’ financial situation was so bad that Belmont was forced to sell the York tearoom. In 1948, Belmont’s Swiss nephew Victor Wild came to live in the UK, persuaded Frederick to buy back the York tearoom, and then joined the company as trainee manager of the York store. Bettys continued to thrive. In 1952, Frederick died, and Victor took control. Ten years later, Bettys acquired a rival teashop company, C E Taylor & Co., which also owned a small tea- and coffee-import business, and the now-famous company, Bettys & Taylors of Harrogate, was born. Over the years, some tearooms closed and new ones opened. Today, the six Bettys Café Tea Rooms in Harrogate, York, Ilkley, and Northallerton impress with their clever fusion of comfortable English tearoom, fine Swiss chocolates, traditional Yorkshire bakery, and hearty regional lunchtime specialties. And Champagne Afternoon Tea in the Imperial Suite in Harrogate or the Belmont Room in York is a wonderfully luxurious indulgence in rooms that evoke the streamlined elegance of the 1930s. The food is sensational, and all the teas are from Taylors. Expect to be tempted by the array of luxury fruit cakes, fondant fancies, brightly colored macarons, teas, and coffees at the front counter—many are available by mail order. But who was Betty? Actually, no one knows, and this unsolved mystery inspired the publication of a little book entitled Who Was Betty?, which is full of enchanting, whimsical suggestions from famous authors as to her true identity.


THE DRAWING ROOM AT OULTON HALL Rothwell Lane • Oulton, Leeds LS26 8HN +44 1132 821000 • oultonhallhotel.co.uk

Oulton Hall was once a simple 18th-century farmhouse but was extended in the 1790s to become a grand house with beautiful landscaped gardens and a lake. Rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1850, it served as a convalescent home for wounded officers during World War I. In 1925, it was sold to the local council, who turned it into a hospital for the mentally ill. But it then stood empty, vandalized, and with no roof until 1991, when De Vere Hotels purchased it and spent £20 million on its restoration. Today, QHotels owns the hall and its 27-hole golf course, and the house is a popular venue for afternoon tea, weddings, and other celebratory and corporate events. Head Butler Peter MacMahon is a member of the Guild of Butlers and brings Old-World gentility and effortless charm to the service of afternoon tea in the Drawing Room, where he has worked for more than 26 years. Behind the scenes, the hotel’s chef has drawn on Yorkshire’s traditions to create a menu of local specials. Sandwiches are filled with Yorkshire ham; warm scones are served with Stamfrey’s clotted cream; Yorkshire Tea Loaf is paired with crumbly mild Wensleydale cheese (a northern tradition); and rhubarb also features here in scones, desserts, and pastries. Singleorigin teas and a special Oulton Hall blend are all from Taylors of Harrogate, and a range of herbals includes one with dried rhubarb!

Photography Courtesy of Oulton Hall

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THE DEVONSHIRE ARMS HOTEL & SPA Bolton Abbey Estate • Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 6AJ +44 1756 718111 • thedevonshirearms.co.uk

The Devonshire Arms Hotel was built in the early 17th century as a coaching inn and place of welcome for visitors to this very beautiful part of the Yorkshire Dales. It is part of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s estate, which includes nearby Bolton Abbey, a 12thcentury monastery and abbey abandoned when Henry VIII ordered the closure of monasteries, abbeys, priories, and convents. The imposing ruins stand beside the River Wharfe, and the tracks and public footpaths through the wide valley and surrounding parkland are well used throughout the year. After a bracing walk, tea at The Devonshire Arms beside a blazing fire in the lounge rounds the day off perfectly. The hotel is an inviting warren of a large drawing room, smaller intimate lounges, quiet corners, dining rooms, and a conservatory, so guests can choose an area that suits best. Afternoon tea brings a selection of super-fresh, tasty sandwiches, scones with Stamfrey clotted cream and homemade Yorkshire strawberry preserve, and tiny French pastries. The hotel garden grows herbs, vegetables, salad leaves, and fruits. Menus include these and other local produce—fresh-caught trout, east coast fish, cheeses, hams, and vivid pink rhubarb, grown here in the Rhubarb Triangle, a 9-squaremile area of West Yorkshire famous for its early forced rhubarb. The tea list offers a great selection from Taylors of Harrogate and Jing Tea. Photography Courtesy of The Devonshire Arms Hotel & Spa

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A SECRET TEA AT CHEZ SHAMWARI Saltaire • chezshamwari.com

Shirley Quarmby bakes the most amazing cakes. Her creations are works of art that look as if they were made in a professional pâtisserie. And yet, her love of preparing cakes, chocolates, and delicious savories for afternoon tea is just a hobby—from Monday to Friday she works as an IT business analyst. Once a month, however, on a Saturday or a Sunday, she hosts tea parties for up to six people in a cosy corner of her kitchen in Saltaire, a fascinating Yorkshire town built by Titus Salt in the 19th century for the people who worked at his textile mill. Shirley is from Zimbabwe; Chez Shamwari means “at my friend’s house” in Shona (the language of the indigenous Mashona people), and her tea occasions are truly gatherings of friends. She advertises as a “clandestine bistro and tea room” and keeps her address completely secret, only revealing it to guests just before the appointed day. But of course, the tea parties are so special and fun that it is only the location that is still a secret, and she has a long waiting list of would-be customers. The aim of these happy occasions is not to make a profit but to practice her cookery skills, serve excellent tea, and make sure that everyone has a really wonderful time. Faces light up, and eyes pop when she brings to the table her mini beef wellingtons, beetroot and goat cheese macarons, gift-wrap carrot cake tied with sugar-glazed carrot ribbons (so clever and inventive!), and stunningly theatrical strawberry gâteau. If there are ever any leftovers, they are given away or sold to raise funds for Shirley’s favorite local charity.

Photography Courtesy of Chez Shamwari

Stamfrey Farm Clotted Cream STAMFREY FARM ORGANICS West Rounton • Northallerton, North Yorkshire +44 1609 88229 • stamfrey.com

When clotted cream became the essential accompaniment to warm, freshly baked scones, it was available only from dairies in the southwest of England. Today, Yorkshire afternoon-tea aficionados can buy theirs from Stamfrey Farm in West Rounton, a small village in the north of the county. Sue and Angus Gaudie have been making clotted cream since 2002 using milk from their organically fed herd of 110 cows. Sue explains, “Originally, clotted cream was made when people didn’t have fridges, because cooking cream increased the shelf life. We take the cream off and cook it over water in a bain-marie. The evaporation causes the sweetness in the cream, and you get the crust on the top and that lovely smooth, velvety texture.” Although Stamfrey Farm clotted cream is not available by mail order, it can be enjoyed at many Yorkshire tearooms and hotels, and it is every bit as delicious as any from the West Country. Photography Courtesy of Stamfrey Farm Organics

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Howick Hall The Home of the Real Earl Grey Text by Jane Pettigrew Photography Courtesy of Howick Hall Gardens

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(Above) Portrait of Charles, the 2nd Earl Grey. (Right and above right) The East Quadrant of Howick Hall houses the Earl Grey Tea House where visitors can have tea and a variety of freshly baked goods following a tour of the estate.

W

hen you sip a cup of Earl Grey tea, have you ever wondered about the origin of the name? A real Earl Grey was indeed associated with this highly favored blend. He was Charles, 2nd Earl Grey, and British prime minister from 1830 to 1834. Few tea lovers have heard of him, though, and probably fewer still have visited Howick Hall in Northumberland in the north of England, the residence of the Grey family since the early 14th century. Charles Grey grew up here and then lived here with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Ponsonby, and their 15 children when he was not caught up with his political duties in London. Howick (pronounced HOE-ick rather than HOW-ick) Hall and the title of earl were handed down to subsequent generations until the 5th Earl died in 1963 without a male heir. The title then passed to Richard Grey, a distant cousin and the current 6th Earl, while the residence was left to the 5th Earl’s daughter Mary. When she died in 2001 at the age of 94, it passed to her son Charles, 2nd Lord Howick of Glendale, who lives there with his wife, Clare, and manages the estate that is today less famous for its connection to the tea blend than for its impressive gardens and arboretum, its visitor center, and the very welcoming and popular Earl Grey Tea House. The story of Earl Grey tea is full of inconsistencies, mysteries, and unanswered questions. Some claim that the world-famous recipe for the black tea flavored with bergamot was given in gratitude by a Chinese mandarin to a British diplomat who is said to have saved the

mandarin’s (or perhaps his son’s) life during an official visit to China. Then upon the diplomat’s return to Britain, the recipe was passed to Earl Grey. Bergamot is not a native Chinese plant, but it has been suggested that it was used in the blend to replicate the aromatic citrus character of some other Chinese citrus plant— perhaps neroli (bitter orange) or Citrus sinensis (orange blossom). The story from Howick Hall claims that the blend was created by a Chinese mandarin who used bergamot to offset the high lime-scale content of the local Northumberland water. Lady Grey is said to have served the tea also when entertaining in London, and so its popularity grew. teatimemagazine.com

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But Stephen Twining, whose family claims to have been the first to blend the tea for the Grey family, says, “I assumed that we were asked to reproduce the blend due to the earl being prime minister and thus based in London. There is no doubt in my mind that Twinings was requested by the prime minister to make more of this very special tea for him, and we are proud to continue this classic tea today.” Jacksons of Piccadilly also claims to have owned the original recipe. In a 1928 advert for “Earl Grey Mixture,” Jacksons calls the tea “The World’s Most Fashionable Tea” and claims, “Introduced in 1836 to meet the wishes of the former Earl Grey, this fine blend of China tea quickly found favour with other connoisseurs who appreciate the delicate aroma and distinctive flavour.” Lord Howick agrees that family stories have always linked the first blend with Jacksons, but the truth will almost certainly never be discovered, since no one has ever managed to produce any reliable documentary evidence that might settle questions about where the recipe came from, who first blended it, why bergamot, and whether it was blended for Northumberland or London water. Meanwhile, quite separate from the tea story, Howick Hall has become famous for its stunning gardens and parkland, which attract thousands of visitors every year. The estate covers 2,700 acres and includes the Home Farm, three other tenanted farms, 250 acres of woodland, the hall itself (the main part of which for the moment stands empty), the famous gardens and arboretum, a whinstone quarry, coastal cliffs, and a little 111

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parish church where the 2nd Earl is buried. Charles, 2nd Earl Grey, carried out important work to the grounds in the early 19th century. The 3rd Earl developed formal Victorian gardens, but the 5th Earl chose a more informal, natural style of planting which endures today. And since 1985, the grassy tracks and sweeping slopes of the new arboretum tempt yet more gardeners and plant lovers to Howick. With head gardener Robert Jamieson and other plant specialists, Lord Howick has journeyed all over the world in search of seed from rare wild trees and shrubs. After a stroll around the estate and a browse though the Visitors’ Centre (staffed by very knowledgeable and friendly volunteers), the Earl Grey Tea House in the old ballroom in the East Quadrant provides a haven for a recuperative pot of tea (Earl Grey, of course!), savoury lunchtime salad or sandwich, or a generous teatime slice of one of the irresistibly delicious homemade cakes.

Mary and Karen Jamieson serve an excellent range of green and black loose-leaf teas from northern tea company Pumphreys, and magic an amazing range of cakes out of their busy kitchen through the day—rhubarb and lemon, Earl Grey fruit loaf, Victoria sponge, chocolate and beetroot cake, gingerbread, sherry fruit cake, coffee and walnut, and, needless to say, a generous supply of scones. The portrait of Charles, 2nd Earl Grey, hangs on one wall to remind all tea lovers of the important link between him, Howick Hall, and Earl Grey tea. ............................................................................................. Howick Hall Gardens are open from noon to 6 p.m., from early February to mid November. The Earl Grey Tea House is open whenever the gardens are open but exclusively for visitors to the gardens. For more information, visit howickhallgardens.org. teatimemagazine.com

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Teatime in

Ireland Intriguing and tempting twists on tradition

Photography by Alison Crummy; Courtesy of Fáite Ireland

Text by Jane Pettigrew

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ea found its way into Ireland in the 17th century. Yet because of the exorbitant cost, it was considered to be a luxury beverage and was drunk only in upper-class homes. By the second half of the 19th century, as Britishgrown tea from the colonies became more available and prices gradually reached a level that made it affordable to the entire population, sturdy black tea taken with creamy milk became the standard daily refreshment. Today, favourite blends balance rich robust Assams with powerful Ceylon and punchy Kenyan black teas. The Irish drink between four and six cups of tea a day—more per capita than anywhere else in the world. Cups of tea punctuate the social round—tea at breakfast, tea midmorning, afternoon tea between 3:00 and 5:00, high tea as an evening meal for some families at around 6:00, and more tea before bedtime. During the first half of the 20th century, tea, along with sandwiches, scones, and cakes, was served in smart hotels. And on market days in the main towns, wealthy folk would spend the day shopping and then treat themselves to the luxury of afternoon tea before travelling home in time for dinner. The tradition of afternoon tea in hotel lounges and conservatories in both Northern Ireland and Éire continues today, and the same irresistible selections of savouries, warm scones, and artistic displays of little pastries attract as much excited attention as elsewhere around the globe. Most hotels and tearooms focus on the time-honoured classic menu, often using local Irish ingredients, but a few have tweaked the tradition by theming the food or by adding a little extra treat such as a tea cocktail or a mini feast of special desserts—just enough to intrigue and tempt.

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THE WESTIN DUBLIN

The Westin Dublin serves a traditional afternoon tea with all the anticipated treats—sandwiches of dill cream cheese and cucumber, roast Irish beef with horseradish and tomato, Irish oak-smoked salmon, buttermilk fruit scones with clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam—all delicious! But to make things a little more exciting for anyone who wants a change, the hotel’s team of mixologists has created an innovative, pioneering cocktail tea called Time for Gin Afternoon Tea. When the teapot arrives at the table, there’s nothing as predictable as brewed tea inside. Instead, it contains a tipsy blend of gin, lime, mint, and freshly pressed churned apple juice—the Hendrick’s Victoria Mojito! The Westin stands very close to Dublin’s Trinity College, which features in James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. To complement the tongue-tingling inebriant beverage, the cake stand brings seasonal teatime tidbits inspired by Joyce’s writings, such as confit of pork cheek with Stilton and honey aïoli; a tall cone filled with prawn cocktail; rolled spiced roast beef with spinach, red onion, and horseradish; and little blinis with smoked salmon. On the middle tier of the stand, there might be slices of freshly baked banana and walnut bread with cinnamon and honey butter. And the lowest layer might hold popping vanilla marshmallows, popcorn panna cotta, almond and red currant frangipani tart, and a chocolate and caramel sea-salted brownie! Served in the Atrium Lounge, a sort of outside-in covered courtyard space at the heart of the hotel, and quirkily offering a cocktail in a teacup, this is indeed a peculiar but deliciously stylish and seductive afternoon tea.

Photography Courtesy of The Westin Dublin

35-39 Westmoreland Street • Dublin +353 1 645 1000 • thewestindublin.com

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THE MERRION HOTEL Upper Merrion Street • Dublin +353 1 603 0600 • merrionhotel.com

Photography Courtesy of The Merrion Hotel

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Located in the historic Georgian center of Dublin and close to the National Museum and the National Gallery, The Merrion Hotel is naturally a popular and busy location for tea. The hotel was created from four grand townhouses built in the 1760s. The high ceilings, generous windows, and harmonious proportions of the drawing rooms make this a very appropriate and gracious setting for traditional afternoon tea. On fine days, perhaps choose a table on the Garden Terrace where fountains flow, foliage cascades from stone planters, and birdsong fills the air. The Merrion has devised Art Tea, a witty interpretation of the hotel’s important collection of fine contemporary Irish art. Executive Chef Ed Cooney and Master Pastry Chef Paul Kelly have created nine pastries, each inspired by a piece of this art. Three are served at a time, and the collection is rotated constantly. So, when you’ve enjoyed the sandwiches and bridge rolls, warm scones and tea breads, you may find yourself nibbling on the Tahitian landscape of Path Moorea by Pauline Bewick (a dark chocolate cream, milky vanilla cream with zingy lime and white chocolate, tiny chocolate palm trees catching the breeze) or Roses and Temple by Patrick Hennessy (a rosewater and orange mousse on a crispy white chocolate praline biscuit). Each guest receives a copy of The Merrion’s art collection catalogue to browse through whilst indulging in art that is good enough to eat!


THE G HOTEL Wellpark, Dublin Road • Galway, County Galway +353 91 865200 • theghotel.ie

The zingy, glitzy g Hotel sits in central Galway overlooking the glistening waters of Lough Atalia. Outside, the natural colors are rippling shades of aqua blues and greens; inside, the palate mixes black and white, dazzling pink, electric blue, and passionate purples and magentas. The interiors, by internationally famous Irish milliner Philip Treacy, are dramatic, glamorous, eccentric, and plush. And even when angry storms blow in off the Atlantic and darken the outside world to a glowering grey, the bewitching intensity of the hotel décor creates a razzle-dazzle world of imagined film sets, fashion catwalks, royal palaces, and movie stars. Afternoon Tea is served in the three Signature Lounges. The Ladies Lounge is very, very pink and very stylish in a Marilyn Monroe way; the Blue Gentleman’s Lounge has rich, deep-blue walls and crimson and gentian armchairs; the Grand Salon glows with its golden fabrics and twinkling mirror balls. Choose where to settle, then relax, and enjoy a glass of pink Champagne, a selection of open finger sandwiches and canapés, freshly baked scones, and lovely little sweet treats. Loose-leaf teas include malty Assams, a Second Flush Darjeeling, an Earl Grey, a China green tea, as well as a few flavoured ones, and several herbal infusions. The hotel’s use of colors is audacious; the mood is pure glamour; the afternoon tea is impressive and reassuringly traditional. Photography by Martina Regan; Courtesy of The g Hotel

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Photography Courtesy of Lough Erne Resort

LOUGH ERNE RESORT Belleek Road • Enniskillen, County Fermanagh +44 28 6632 3230 • lougherneresort.com

Lough Erne Resort, the venue in County Fermanagh that hosted the G8 Summit in June 2013, sits on its own 600-acre peninsula overlooking Castle Hume Lough and Lower Lough Erne. The views in all directions—over the lakes, little wooded islands, and gently rolling hills in the distance—are amazing. The hotel has two championship golf courses, a Thai spa, 120 luxury rooms, 25 individual lodges, and 5 helipads! And Afternoon Tea, served in the Garden Hall or on the Terrace, is as grand and lavish as everything else here and is served against the backdrop of the Fermanagh Lakelands and Castle Hume Loch (Lough in Irish). Executive Chef Noel McMeel has created a luxuriously delicious Afternoon Tea that showcases both Irish cuisine and local ingredients. The traditional Afternoon Tea savoury stand includes smoked Glenarm salmon, as well as County Fermanagh chicken that is partnered with white peach and Dijon mustard. Other savouries include a ham-hock fritter with apple butter, and a duck egg and onion brioche. The scones are served with Lough Erne 117

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raspberry and strawberry jam and Irish clotted cream, and the sweet stand is arranged with tantalisingly gorgeous pastries—Caramel Zephyr Banoffee; Tanzanian Chocolate Tarte; Raspberry, Vanilla, and White Chocolate Éclair; and a Noisette and Caramel Chocolate Brownie. How can anyone resist? The Cygnets Afternoon Tea for younger visitors (so named for the swans that glide across Castle Hume Lough) spoils children with finger sandwiches filled with peanut butter and jelly; toast with rich, creamy Nutella; and a chocolate or strawberry milkshake. The loose-leaf teas served to accompany such indulgence include a powerful Irish Breakfast; Japanese Sencha; Irish Whisky Cream blended with malty Assam, Irish whisky flavouring, and a hint of cocoa; Peach Oolong; Moroccan Mint; Ginger and Orange Chai; a creamy rhubarb infusion; and rooibos flavoured with strawberries and cream. Champagne or Prosecco are offered for special celebrations, but Lough Erne suggests something different—Gin & Bitter Orange Tonic made with Irish Boatyard Gin, or Boatyard Bramble, a cocktail of Boatyard Gin Chambord (black raspberry liqueur) and a dash of lemon juice. No wonder the hotel was awarded Luxury Resort of the Year in the Luxury Travel Guide Awards, 2017.


Traditional Irish Baking

Irish Clotted Cream? Until Valerie Kingston made clotted cream “by mistake” in the dairy at the family’s organic Glenilen Farm in West Cork, there was no such thing as Irish clotted cream. Clotted cream has always been a product of the lush grass and the Jersey cows that munch it in Cornwall and Devon, in the southwest of England. But as Valerie explained, “The truth is I didn’t know what clotted cream actually was—I’d only heard of it—as it’s not a part of our traditional food culture here. But having a food science and technology degree, I began experimenting in the farmhouse kitchen and sold my results at the local Bantry Country Market. One day, the cream turned out ‘wrong’ and was very thick, but I took it to the market anyway. A lady from Devon happened to see it and said, ‘Oh, what delightful clotted cream!’ I remembered what I’d done ‘wrong’ and was able to repeat it. We still produce clotted cream by this method. We take the cream from the fresh milk using a separator and gently heat it to give us our clotted cream. It’s very rich at 60% fat and doesn’t have the crust that traditional Devon and Cornish clotted cream has, but it’s very delicious and there’s a steady market for it in Ireland.”

The Irish are famed around the world for their spontaneous hospitality. Visitors to the house have always been warmly welcomed, offered a “cupán tae” and griddle cake hot from the pan, a thick slice of warm soda bread spread liberally with local butter and homemade jam, a slice of “barm brack” filled with spices and plump fruit soaked in cold tea, or a generous portion of homemade porter cake (a rich fruitcake made with a Guinness-like dark beer). In the past, huge rounds of plum cake packed full of dried fruits were baked and stored in the larder ready for the arrival of unexpected guests. And whenever there was a knock at the door, thick wedges were arranged on a large platter, potato cakes or soda scones would quickly be set to brown on the hot griddle, and the kettle would be brought to the boil. Oats and potatoes have long been staple ingredients in Irish baking. Favorite teatime fare still includes warm oatcakes, buttermilk oaten bread, potato cakes, “boxty” bread made with mashed and grated potatoes, and griddle cakes flavored with local fresh fruit or sultanas and raisins. Baking and the production of these traditional foods have always been such an important part of Irish life that in the seventh century, a law proclaimed that foster parents were obliged to teach the skills of flour sieving, kneading, and baking to all young girls. The law also stated that anyone who damaged or misappropriated the griddle, the kneading trough, the sieve, or the wooden measuring vessels would be subject to legal proceedings! Perhaps the most famous Irish teatime treat is soda bread. Soda was introduced as a raising agent in the early 1800s and was immediately welcomed, as it allowed housewives to put a delicious loaf of warm bread on the family tea table in less time and with less hard work. Instead of waiting for a yeasted dough to prove, a soda loaf of flour, salt, bicarbonate of soda, and buttermilk could be mixed, lightly kneaded, and baked in less than an hour.

Photography Courtesy of Glenilen Farm

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Afternoon Tea on the Move

All aboard for uniquely British teatimes!

Photograph by Ian Coles

Text by Jane Pettigrew

E Photography Courtesy of Brigit’s Bakery

ver since its heyday in the frothy, high-fashion days of the Edwardian period at the beginning of the 20th century, British afternoon tea was served not just home and in elegant hotel lounges, but also on steam trains, oceangoing liners, and aeroplanes. That continues today, of course, on luxury modes of transport such as The Orient Express, the Queen Mary II, and upper-class cabins on long-haul flights. But now, to add to the fun and sense of celebration, a trend to serve tea in more quirky situations is growing. My favorites in Britain today are some of the vintage steam trains operated privately by volunteer railway workers up and down the land; boats on the Thames; and London’s vintage, bright red Routemaster double-decker buses. The crockery and food may not be quite as gracious and refined as that at Claridge’s or The Langham, but to sit sipping tea and nibbling sandwiches while the cityscape or countryside moves gently past on either side is delicious. The regular, nostalgic clicketyclack of the train wheels on the track, the slight rolling of the steamer in the wake of a speeding launch, and the sway of the bus as it rounds the corner at a major junction in central London are all part of the excitement.

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AFTERNOON TEA ABOARD THE BLUEBELL RAILWAY Since steam locomotives reached the end of the line on our national railways in the middle of the 20th century, groups of passionate devotees up and down the country have acquired old sections of track, scoured sidings and old stations for vintage steam engines, fenders and carriages, and worked long hours to get them running again. Today, these private railways carry passengers on journeys of pure nostalgia through quiet British countryside. In the early days of celebration of the lost days of steam, the ride itself was enough, but now most of the lines serve lunches, dinners, suppers, and afternoon teas. These smaller railways have a simple charm and remind us of the everyday journeys we loved as children—the thick smoke billowing from the engine’s funnel and wafting over neighboring fields, the piercing whistle heralding the train’s arrival into the next station, and the thrilling sense of adventure. Afternoon tea in one of those old Pullman carriages or restaurant cars makes us smile and slip happily back into those childhood memories. Expeditions on The Bluebell Railway start at Sheffield Park, close to the National Trust property of the same name where visitors can wander through acres of landscape garden and historic parkland. When you arrive for your trip on the Wealden Rambler Afternoon Tea Train, it’s great fun to stand on the platform and watch the engine being shunted into place at the front of the four carriages. When the Bluebell started serving tea, only one restaurant car was needed. Now four wagons, holding a total of 120 people, are required each day. Once the staff have loaded all the food, impatient passengers climb aboard and settle at their tables. Then, as the engine huffs and puffs and the train gently slips away from the platform, the staff get to work. A twotier cake stand arrives at each table bearing a selection of sandwiches (smoked salmon, roast beef, egg

Photography by Ian Coles

+44 1825 720800 • bluebell-railway.com

mayonnaise) and lots of cakes (meringues, shortbread, little tartlets, éclairs). Scones are served warm, when required, with jam and clotted cream. The tea—English Breakfast, Earl Grey, Lapsang Souchong, and fruit infusions—is served in pots and replenished to order. For birthday celebrations, the carriage is bright with balloons, the table is decorated with sparkly stars and smiley faces, and a birthday card sits ready for the lucky girl or boy. For a dash of extra fizz, passengers can order a bottle or a glass of English Hindleap sparkling wine from the nearby Bluebell Vineyard Estates. teatimemagazine.com

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CREAM TEAS ON THE KENT AND EAST SUSSEX RAILWAY

Photography by Ian Coles

+44 1580 765155 • kesr.org.uk

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For a full afternoon tea before you ride this vintage railway, book a table in the Art Deco Refreshment Rooms on the platform at Tenterden Station in Kent and tuck into all the sandwiches, scones, and cakes. Seats outside afford an excellent view of all the activity on the tracks—engines being shunted and trains arriving and departing, leaving puffs of smoke and hissing steam in their wake. Or instead, climb on board for a yummy cream tea on the comfortable old Wealdon Pullman train that winds its way from Tenterden Station to Bodiam, just over the county border in Sussex. As the train chugs past fields of sheep and across the Kent marshes, happy customers sip the welcome cups of tea and dollop thick clotted cream and Tiptree jam onto their scones. And just before the train arrives at Bodiam, as they lick the last crumbs from their lips and enjoy the last few drops of tea, they turn to peruse the 14th century medieval walls of Bodiam’s moated castle, where knights in armor once tried to knock each other off their horses on the jousting green.


B BAKERY THAMES CRUISE AFTERNOON TEA BOAT TOUR

Departing from Butlers Wharf, where the nowrefurbished warehouses used to store tons and tons of bulk tea, B Bakery’s two Afternoon Tea Boats (The Edwardian carries up to 50 people, and the Elizabethan has places for 120) are always fully booked for the twoand-a-half–hour trips up the river past Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Tate Modern, Parliament, and Tate Britain, as far as the new American Embassy at Battersea, and back down under Tower Bridge, past Canary Wharf, the Cutty Sark, and beyond. I sailed on the Elizabethan and had the most wonderful time. As we arrived and climbed the elegant staircase, with its polished brass rails and shiny wood banister, to the wooden dance floor (what a perfect venue this would be for a tea dance!), we were served a glass of sparkling wine, then mingled and chatted with other excited passengers. Also onboard this and every Afternoon Tea Boat tour were B Bakery’s owners, Brigit and Philippe Bloch. They are always there to ensure that every journey is perfect, and they move around the tables, chatting to passengers, answering questions, and making everyone feel special. Their French staff, all dressed engagingly as cheeky French sailors in stripy blue-and-white shirts and a range of nautical hats, were all friendly, smiley, and helpful. For the first half hour of the voyage, we stood on deck in the sunshine with our glasses of wine, enjoying the famous riverscape. As the boat slowly turned around close to the vast new development at Battersea, we were invited to take our seats for tea in the saloon downstairs, where everything looked delightfully elegant and charming. Just as in the Covent Garden shop, the tables are set with vintage mix-and-match china, three-tier cake stands, and generous portions of B Bakery’s lovely food. The tea is served in colourful floral pots that are refilled as often as required. The afternoon passed much too quickly as we watched London go by and conversed with the friendly, interesting people sharing our table. When our voyage was over and we found ourselves back at Butlers Wharf, I think everyone was silently promising themselves to do it all again very soon.

Photography Courtesy of Brigit’s Bakery

+44 20 3026 1188 b-bakery.com/afternoon-tea/afternoon-tea-boat-tour/

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Photography Courtesy of Brigit’s Bakery

B BAKERY AFTERNOON TEA BUS TOUR +44 20 3026 1188 b-bakery.com/afternoon-tea/afternoon-tea-bus-tour/

Opened in 2011 by French entrepreneurs Brigit and Philippe Bloch, B Bakery is a very pretty, hugely popular tea salon and patisserie in London’s Covent Garden. The brand, home of L’Afternoon Tea, is feminine, whimsical, and light-hearted, and it cleverly blends traditional British style with French chic. A “petite makeover” in 2016 added all the afternoon-tea experiences you could ever dream of—the B Bus Afternoon Tea Tour, the B Afternoon Tea Boat Tour, and the B Picnic. The company now has eight vintage London buses (each has its name painted just inside the door—Delboy, Rodney, Trigger, Marlene, Bisous, for example), and five trips a day take passengers on a gentle meander through London’s most fashionable neighborhoods and past the London Eye, Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace, Royal Albert Hall, Harrods, Piccadilly Circus, Trafalgar

Square, and many more famous landmarks. Book ahead to sit on the upper deck, or choose a table downstairs. When you climb onboard the big red bus, you will find your table set with bright pink napkins, pretty vintage china plates, and a colorful array of tea treats (neat finger sandwiches, quiches, smoked salmon blinis, scones, cupcakes, macarons, and other cute pastries) served on a two-tier cake stand. The tea menu offers Earl Grey, English Breakfast, green, jasmine, Darjeeling, Moroccan mint, or rooibos. Once you have chosen, your tea is quickly delivered in a tall, covered plastic cup decorated with images of red buses and other London scenes in whimsical B Bakery style, which you are allowed to take away with you when you leave. During afternoon tea, the cup sits in a neat little well in the table to keep it safe. The waiters and waitresses are charmingly French, give a gentle commentary during the trip so that you know where you are on the route, and make sure you have everything you need to make your tour joyful and jolly and unlike any other tea experience you’ve ever enjoyed.

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B BAKERY’S OTHER MOVEABLE TEA FEASTS +44 20 3026 1188 • b-bakery.com/afternoon-tea/afternoon-tea-picnic/

Photography Courtesy of Brigit’s Bakery

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For those who prefer to use their own wheels, the B Picnic Afternoon Tea comes in a bright pink box that contains all the usual B Bakery treats and cups of tea, plus it fits perfectly into the panier of London’s Boris Bikes (the pay-and-ride bicycles introduced to central London by Boris Johnson when he was London’s mayor), so cyclists can choose a nearby park, a riverside bench, or their own back garden for a leisurely picnic tea. B Bakery also has plans to acquire a coach and horses to drive teatime customers around London’s quieter green spaces so they can pretend they are back in Victorian times when Queen Victoria sometimes sipped her afternoon cup of tea in her carriage. A wonderfully eccentric way to enjoy afternoon tea!


Photography Courtesy of Good & Proper Tea Company

GOOD & PROPER TEA ON WHEELS +44 7780 684 786 • goodandpropertea.com

When Emilie Holmes decided to set up her Good & Proper Tea Company, her plan was to start by serving tea from a van that could be driven to places where people needed a really good cup of tea. Much better to take tea to the people than wait for the people to find the tea! So, she bought a 1974 Citroën H van, raised over £14,000 on Kickstarter in one week, and converted the van into a travelling tea shop. After spending hours tasting teas, she chose ten high-quality varieties and headed off to her first allocated parking spot at London’s Kings Cross Station, an area popular with upmarket street vendors. The van’s current home is Brockley Market in South East London one Saturday per month, usually from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. On other days, the Citroën takes up residence at different street markets, fashion events, rock concerts, classic car boot sales, and food festivals. (To find out where the van will appear next, Emilie recommends following Good & Proper on social media.) Regardless of the location, Emilie serves her usual offering of beautifully brewed teas and hot toasted organic crumpets with organic butter and jam or melting cheese and delicious onion chutney. The teas are brewed in glass pots using timers and water at the correct temperature delivered from a Marco Uber boiler. When leaf and liquor have been separated once the brew has reached the perfect flavour, the pots are placed on little hot plates to keep warm. The selection usually includes Ceylon or Assam, Darjeeling, Jade Tips (Mao Jian), Yellow Gold Oolong, or fresh mint. The pairing of tea and crumpets is so perfectly English that it is really hard to resist, and the steady queue of eager customers is testimony to its timeless appeal. Emilie’s van has been such a success that she now also has a tea bar in central London.

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A Purr-fect L Teatime

What to look for when selecting a tearoom in London: imported tea, creamy cakes, fresh pastries, and, of course, cats Text and Photography by Cindy-Lou Dale

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ady Dinah’s is an archetypal English tearoom in London’s East End, serving afternoon tea, sandwiches, cake, and scones, but with a difference—it’s full of cats. Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium (named after Alice’s cat in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland), London’s first cat café—yes, a cat café—is found in the uber trendy art district of Shoreditch. It’s modelled on the cat cafés that first took off in Japan 14 years ago (Tokyo alone has approximately 100 such businesses) and have since been established in cities around the world. The idea of Lady Dinah’s is to give hipsters and stressed-out feline-loving Londoners, most of whom live in cramped high-rise apartment blocks, a bit of cat therapy. The £10 surcharge is a small extravagance offering a place to reflect and unwind; to come in from


the cold to a comfortable wingback chair, a hot cup of tea, a book, a board game, Wi-Fi, and a bundle of purring joy. It’s something like a supervised indoor petrental scheme with a good brew, and sweet treats can be ordered from the menu for an additional charge. Although space is dominated by a Victorian café setting spread over two floors, a great deal of room is also used purely for people to play with the obliging 15 in-house cats, as well as space for the cats to play with their toys. But it’s not just about a lot (or a little) interaction with the cats; it’s the whole anxiety-buster experience of petting some ridiculously cute kitties and forgetting about your troubles—this is purr therapy. Lady Dinah’s is not a café for cats; it’s a café for humans who are cat lovers. Stop by for a brew, and cuddle with any of the felines, so long as they’re willing. Book a table in advance, and enjoy High Tea (£25, cover

charge included), which features a three-tiered cake stand filled with a selection of savoury options, scones with jam and clotted cream, and an assortment of delectable cakes and bakes. The seasonally changing menu caters to omniovres as well as to those with dietary restrictions, such as gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, vegetarian, and pescetarian. And, of course, a choice of excellent teas is part of the High Tea experience, including their own bespoke blend of Earl Grey infused with rosebuds. So you can take a little of Lady Dinah’s home with you, all teas are available for purchase by the bag in the café. ............................................................................................. Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium is at 152-154 Bethnal Green Road, Shoreditch, London E2 6DG. For more information or for reservations, ring +44 207 7290953, or go to ladydinahs.com. teatimemagazine.com

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recipe index BEEF & PORK

FISH

TEA SANDWICHES & CANAPÉS

Ham and Spinach on Rye Tea Sandwiches 17

Dilled Salmon Mousse Canapés 63

Apple, Cheddar, and Chutney Tea Sandwiches 17

Scotch Egg Canapés 51 Steak & Onion Bridies 51

Salmon Mousse Tea Sandwiches 41

Coronation Chicken Salad Sandwiches 63

Smoked Trout Tea Sandwiches 51

Cucumber–Blue Cheese Canapés 30

CAKES

Chocolate Biscuit Cake 44 Chocolate-Iced Loaf Cake with

Cucumber Tea Sandwiches 41

FRUIT

Dilled Salmon Mousse Canapés 63

Apple, Cheddar, and Chutney Tea Sandwiches 17

Ham and Spinach on Rye Tea Sandwiches 17

Lemon-Thyme Curd Cakes 35 Strawberry-Lemon Battenberg Cake 67

Currant Scones 42 Dundee Cake 57

Salmon Mousse Tea Sandwiches 41

Victoria Sponge Cake 45

Golden Raisin and Orange Scones 20

Scotch Egg Canapés 51 Smoked Trout Tea Sandwiches 51

Irish Soda Scones 31 Lemon-Curd Whipped Topping 35

Tarragon Butter and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches 17

Chocolate Biscuit Cake 44

Lemon Linzer Cookies with

Watercress and Egg Salad

Chocolate-Iced Loaf Cake with Raspberry Filling 23

Ginger Preserves 67 Lemon Madeleines 43

Milk Chocolate Ganache 44 Semisweet Chocolate Glaze 23

Lemon-Thyme Curd Cakes 35 Lemon-Vanilla Shortbread 55 Strawberry-Lemon Battenberg Cake 67 Victoria Sponge Cake 45

Raspberry Filling 23 Dundee Cake 57

CHOCOLATE

COOKIES Lemon Linzer Cookies with Ginger Preserves 67 Lemon Madeleines 43 Lemon-Vanilla Shortbread 55 Peppermint-Filled Shortbread Shamrocks 34 Toffee-Walnut Cookies 22

EGGS & POULTRY

Buttermilk Tartlets 35 Coronation Chicken Salad Sandwiches 63 Egg Custard Tartlets 21 Scotch Egg Canapés 51 Watercress and Egg Salad Tea Sandwiches 63

FILLINGS, GLAZES, ICINGS & TOPPINGS Honey Cream 31 Lemon-Curd Whipped Topping 35 Milk Chocolate Ganache 44 Semisweet Chocolate Glaze 23

PASTRIES & TARTLETS

Buttermilk Tartlets 35 Egg Custard Tartlets 21 Mini Cherry Bakewell Tartlets 67 Raspberry-Oat Tartlets with Whiskey-Honey Cream 55

SAVOURIES

Luck o’ the Irish Pea Soup 30 Potato-Leek Quiches 29 Steak & Onion Bridies 51

Tea Sandwiches 63

VEGETARIAN Apple, Cheddar, and Chutney Tea Sandwiches 17 Cucumber–Blue Cheese Canapés 30 Cucumber Tea Sandwiches 41 Luck o’ the Irish Pea Soup 30 Potato-Leek Quiches 29 Tarragon Butter and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches 17

EDITOR’S NOTE: Recipe titles shown in gold are gluten-free, provided gluten-free versions of garnishes and processed ingredients (such as flours, prepared meats, sauces, extracts, and stocks) are used.

SCONES

Cream Scones 65 Currant Scones 42 Golden Raisin and Orange Scones 20 Irish Soda Scones 31 Oat & Wheat Scones 54

teatimemagazine.com

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resources COVER

Photography by Marcy Black Simpson; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Royal Crown Derby Pemberley accent plate; Royal Crown Derby Ashbourne teacup and saucer from DeVine Corp., 732-751-0500, devinecorp.net. Godinger Symphony 3-tier server, 718-418-1000, godinger.com.

T IT L E PAG E

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Page 2: Royal Crown Derby Old Imari teapot and Àat cup and saucer sets from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Silver-plated tipping teapot with stand from private collection.

CO N TR I B UTI N G W RI T E R S

Photography by William Dickey; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Page 7: Spode Camilla Blue cup and saucer set, square handled cake plate, and teapot; Spode Blue Italian creamer from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com.

T EA- ST EE P ING GU I DE

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Page 9: Royal Albert Brigadoon dinner plate, salad plate, footed cup and saucer, and teapot from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com.

ENGLISH COTTAGE TEA

Photography by William Dickey; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Pages 13–24: Spode Camilla Blue 5-piece place setting, mu̇n dish, square handled cake plate, teapot, round compote, and 12-inch oval platter; Spode Blue Italian creamer, sugar, and pitcher from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Linens and Àatware from private collection.

L UC K O’ T HE I RI S H A FT E R N O ON T E A

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Pages 25–36: Belleek Pottery Shamrock 5-piece place setting, teapot, creamer, and sugar bowl from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Wheaton Stripe table runner in Cactus Green, Wheaton Stripe napkin in Cactus Green, PB Classic Belgian Flax Hemstitch napkin in Green, and Tava napkin ring in Honey Stain from Pottery Barn, 888-779-5176, potterybarn.com. Floral arrangements by FlowerBuds, 205-970-3223, ÀowerbudsÀoristbirmingham.com.

129

British Tea

D O WN TON ABBE Y T EATIM E

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Pages 37–46: Royal Crown Derby Old Imari teapot and tea strainer and bowl; Reed & Barton Windsor sterlingsilver small rectangular tray; Wallace Grande Baroque 3-light candelabra and round serving tray from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Tipping teapot, Àoral design cream and sugar set, sugar tongs, Wedgwood Duchesse footed cake plate, table linens, Àatware, and round silver serving dish from private collection.

A BO N NIE S C OTT IS H T EA

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Pages 47–58: Royal Albert Brigadoon dinner plate, salad plate, footed cup and saucer, teapot, creamer, sugar bowl, and oval platter from Replacements, Ltd., 800-7375223, replacements.com. Mikasa Regent Bead Àatware, 866-645-2721, mikasa.com. Flower arrangement from FlowerBuds, 205-970-3223, ÀowerbudsÀoristbirmingham.com. Page 57: Rosanna Le Gateau pedestal, 877-343-3779, rosannainc.com.

A ROYAL C ELE BRATI ON

Photography by Marcy Black Simpson; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Pages 59–68: Royal Crown Derby Pemberley accent plate; Royal Crown Derby Ashbourne teacup, and saucer from DeVine Corp., 732-751-0500, devinecorp.net. Royal Crown Derby Heraldic Gold teapot from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Godinger Symphony 3-tier server, 718-418-1000, godinger.com. Mini creamer and sugar set and tea strainer from private collection.

R EC IP E I ND EX

Photography by John O’Hagan; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Page 127: Belleek Pottery Shamrock 5-piece place setting from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Wheaton Stripe table runner in Cactus Green from Pottery Barn, 888-779-5176, potterybarn.com.

BACK COVER

Photography by William Dickey; Recipe Development and Food Styling by Janet Lambert; Styling by Lucy W. Herndon Spode Camilla Blue 5-piece place setting, mu̇n dish; Spode Blue Italian pitcher from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com.


NEW BOOK! While the custom of afternoon tea originated in Europe, the beverage itself has ties around the world. Tea Parties Around the World, a 136-page hardback book by the editors of award-winning TeaTime magazine, celebrates tea’s global roots with ten menus inspired by different countries and cultures. Expert tea pairings, along with a tea-steeping primer, make it simple to choose and prepare the perfect pot of tea to accompany any of the delicacies in this book. With 97 recipes, Tea Parties Around the World presents a collection of scones, savories, and sweets perfect for treating teatime guests to an international culinary tour without the need for a passport.

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3 EASY WAYS TO ORDER Hoffman Media Store P.O. Box 8510 • Big Sandy, TX 75755

800-361-8059

HOFFMANMEDIASTORE.COM/TEAPARTIES


Profile for Noor Ashikin Saerah

TeaTime (Special Collector's Issue): British Tea  

TeaTime (Special Collector's Issue): British Tea  

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