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For rich and poor Indians alike, diabetes epidemic shows no sign of abating Noor Arora

India’s economic development has brought higher incomes–and a large helping of diabetes. As salaries have increased, and all socio-economic groups have experienced a rise in living standards, diabetes–a condition caused by the body’s inability to regulate insulinlevels, which can lead to tissue damage and organ failure–became the country’s fastest growing disease burden over 16 years to 2016. India currently represents 49% of the world’s diabetes burden, with an estimated 72 million cases in 2017, a figure expected to almost double to 134 million by 2025. This presents a serious public health challenge to a country facing a future of high population growth and a government attempting to provide free health insurance to half a billion people. More money, more problems Diabetes prevalence has increased by 64% across India over the past quarter century, according to a November 2017 report by the Indian Council for Medical Research, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, both research institutes, and the Public Health Foundation of India, an advocacy.

ARTICLE SOURCE – BUSINESS STANDARD

For rich and poor indians alike, diabetes epidemic shows no sign of abating  
For rich and poor indians alike, diabetes epidemic shows no sign of abating  

For rich and poor Indians alike, diabetes epidemic shows no sign of abating

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