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Course Title: Poetry Course Code & NO.: LANE 447 Course Credit Hrs.: 3 weekly Level: 7th Level Students

Romanticism Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” Lord Byron’s “She Walks in Beauty” Shelly’s “To a Skylark” Keats’ “Ode to Autumn” Instructor: Dr. Noora Al-Malki Credits of images and online content are to their original owners.


This Presentation • Discusses the emergence of Romanticism as a significant literary movement. • Presents a survey of the poetry written by some of the major Romantic poets of the 19th C. • Focuses on the presentation of themes related to the expression of heightened emotions and the portrayal of natural elements. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Romanticism (1770s- 1870) (1998-1832) Romanticism has very little to do with things popularly thought of as "romantic," although love may occasionally be the subject of Romantic art. Rather, it is an international artistic and philosophical movement that redefined the fundamental ways in which people in Western cultures thought about themselves and about their world. The early Romantic period thus coincides with what is often called the "age of revolutions"--including, of course, the American (1776) and the French (1789) revolutions--an age of upheavals in political, economic, and social traditions, the age which witnessed the initial transformations of the Industrial Revolution.

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Romanticism Major Elements •Emotion vs. Reason •Nature (leads to truth) •Imagination •Symbolism & Myth •Individualism: The Romantic Hero (genius) •the Exotic Adapted from Guide to the Study of Literature: A Companion Text for Core Studies 6, Landmarks of Literature, ©English Department,

.Brooklyn College

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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English Romanticism

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English Romanticism

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Coleridge

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Coleridge Kubla khan

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan First stanza In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round: And here were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Second stanza

Coleridge Kubla khan

But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover! A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover! ,And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing, A mighty fountain momently was forced: Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail: And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reached the caverns measureless to man, And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far Ancestral voices prophesying war!

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan The shadow of the dome of pleasure Floated midway on the waves; Where was heard the mingled measure From the fountain and the caves. It was a miracle of rare device, A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice!

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan A damsel with a dulcimer In a vision once I saw: It was an Abyssinian maid, And on her dulcimer she played, Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me, That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice!

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan ,And all who heard should see them there And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan

• The poem evokes romanticized Oriental landscapes (13th C China) • the setting contains contrasted images of wild nature and man-made dome. • It is a verse representation of Coleridge's theories of the imagination •“Kubla Khan” as a poem that relates the account of its own creation, thus stressing its tendency to foreground itself as a work of Romantic art.

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Coleridge Kubla khan -What predominant images we find in “Kubla Khan”? Comment on a few of them. - Coleridge depicted nature in a peculiar way in “Kubla Khan”. Discuss with sufficient illustration from the poem. -Critics point out that “Kubla Khan”, although a fragment, is a masterpiece representation of the elements of Romantic poetry. Justify this statement with adequate illustration from the poem -The symbolic dimension of “Kubla Khan” has been discussed by many critics. Present a symbolic reading of the poem.

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow'd to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o'er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o'er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all below, A heart whose love is innocent!

Lord Byron

She Walks in Beauty Hebrew Melodies

"mad, bad, and dangerous to know.“ •a lady in mourning wearing a black dress •Meeting of opposites •Not an expression of love

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow'd to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o'er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o'er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all below, A heart whose love is innocent!

Lord Byron

She Walks in Beauty Hebrew Melodies

"mad, bad, and dangerous to know.“ •a lady in mourning wearing a black dress •Meeting of opposites •Not an expression of love

Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 eaglenoora@yahoo.com

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Romantic Poetry  

Romantic Poetry

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