Issuu on Google+


Welcome to Future Leaders School Magazine, 1st issue. We would like to offer you the best resources to practice your English. We believe that it is really important to have regular contact with the language and to be doing things in the language! The different resources are organized into sections, you’ll find a bit of everything: Fun stuff, serious articles, and much more! Some competitions will take place randomly so don’t miss them! We’ll have fun! We hope you enjoy this school Magazine and find it useful for your learning. If you’d like to make any suggestions about the magazine we’d really appreciate it. Your input is very useful! Please feel free to contact us at any time. Thanks for reading us!


A Cat and a Dog The cat licks its paws. The cat licks its belly. The dog licks its paws. The dog licks its belly. The cat lies in the grass. The dog lies in the grass. The cat rolls onto its back. The dog rolls onto its back. The cat and dog do things together.


Learn Grammar with us Few and little

We use a few with plural, countable nouns. For example, "A few people came to the party." We use a little with uncountable nouns. For example, "There's a little coffee left, if you would like some." We can also use few and little (without "a") to mean very few or very little (i.e. much less in quantity). For example, "There's little point in calling" (= there's not much point calling). "There were few people at the concert." "A few" is more in quantity than "few"; and "a little" is more in quantity than "little". "Few people understand" (not many people understand), compared to "a few people understand" (some people understand). In spoken English, we can also say not many, or only a few to mean "few" and only a little or not much to mean "little". "Not many people came to the party." Or "Only a few people came to the party." "There was only a little petrol left in the car." Or "There wasn't much petrol left in the car."


Crosswords


Fishy When the security guard saw a light in the store after closing hours, it seemed to him that there was something fishy going on. He called the central office and explained to his superior that he thought something strange and suspicious was occurring.

Leave Someone High and Dry Say, Jill. I thought that John was going to help you do the dishes tonight. So did I. But he left me high and dry. Where did he go ? Well, he got a call from some of his pals at work to go bowling, and he left me alone to do all this work without any help at all!



future leaders school magazine