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Word Search FUN! See Pages 12 & 13!

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PRE THANKSGIVING PARTY Wednesday, Nov 23 LIVE MUSIC • 9pm - 1am by BYRON JAMES GANG

The Woodbine Twiner

Drink Specials & Games in the Shed!

712-644-3942

The Official Newspaper of Woodbine, Harrison County, Iowa

www.woodbinetwiner.com

2849 335th Street Beebeetown, IA

November 23, 2011

Volume 133, Issue 47

$1.00

Giving Thanks: Bunkhouse Cafe gives to the community, twice NIKKI DAVIS Editor Bunkhouse Café Coowners Deb McClain and Jackie Nixon are firm believers in giving back to the community. They also believe no one should be alone on Thanksgiving. When they combined those two, simple beliefs, they created a seven year tradition involving family,

friends, Harrison County community members, Thanksgiving dinner and a donation to a local cause. The tradition includes Thanksgiving dinner and all the fixings, such as turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, dressing, sweet potatoes and more. Homemade, of course. In fact, some of it is literally homemade by

McClain’s and Nixon’s relatives. Those same relatives can sometimes be found helping out around the restaurant that day as well, serving coffee and keeping the food bountiful. “Our families come up to celebrate Thanksgiving with us here at the restaurant. They did in Logan, too, before we relocated here,” McClain said.

“And they bring their own side dishes to share. The menu includes the whole nine yards, even pumpkin pie.” That actually translates into eight to 12 pies. And around 60 pounds of turkey, 20 pounds of sweet potatoes, 20-30 pounds of mashed potatoes all prepared in eight to 12 hours. “You have to keep in See GIVING Page 6

Time to take out the trash ... or not National Adoption Month: Reason to celebrate NIKKI DAVIS Editor

Sustainable Coordinator for Americorp Alana Smith spent some time with Woodbine Community School District fifth grade students explaining what and how to use a garden composter. After showing the students what one was, Smith presented the students with example trash bags (items in the bag were clean) and worked with them on what they could recycle, compost and what had to be thrown away. Pictured here are Kerragen Hamblen, Woodbine Community School Sophomore Helper Shawna Vogel, Hailey Ryerson and Abby Goodrich deciding what category to place the items found in their example trash bag. See page 10 for more photos. Photo: Kevin Brown

Stepping into the cage: Grossman wins second match

Dillon Grossman waits for the word “go” to begin his second career cage fight Nov. 4 at the Tip Top Ballroom in Omaha, Neb. Photo: Nikki Davis NIKKI DAVIS Editor

TAKES

SHORT

Woodbine High School 2009 graduate

Dillon Grossman is beginning a new, athletic career. He graduated with a 131-52 wrestling win-loss record, includPEO CHAPTER FB TO MEET NOV. 28 Chapter FB of the PEO Sisterhood will meet at 7 p.m. Mon., Nov. 28 at the home of Dorothy Warner. The program will be “Spiritual Growth” by Vickie Argotsinger.

ing 84 pins and two trips to State. But his athletic drive didn’t end when he graduated from high school. Hence his entrance into Mixed Martial Arts fighting through Disorderly Conduct. His first MMA cage fight win came on May 21 at the Tip Top Ball Room in Omaha, Neb. He had watched his opponent, Ben Clough’s, one fight on YouTube multiple times. All Grossman new is that Clough was 0-1. “He lost by a guillotine choke, so there wasn’t much to go off of,” Grossman admitted. “But I had it in my mind that I was going to destroy him.” And he did. After 34 seconds the referee called the match because LIBRARY THANKSGIVING HOURS The Woodbine Public Library will be closed for Thanksgiving, Nov. 2426. KNIT-WITS NEW HOURS Knit-Wits will be moving to a new time: 3:30-4:30 p.m. (after

Randy Pryor REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE & Auction Co..

712-647-2741 • Woodbine, Iowa Randy Pryor, Broker 644-7610 • Leroy Burbridge, Asso. Broker 592-0085 Cindy Pryor 647-2741 • Bill Hutcheson 592-2330 Jerry Baldwin 269-2336 • Tony Smith 592-9817 • Denise Baldwin • 269-2337

Clough was in a position where he was unable to defend himself properly and at risk to serious injury. “I had his head pinned against the ground with one hand and was repeatedly punching it with the other,” Grossman recalled. “For a ref to stop a fight, he has to feel he has given the disadvantaged fighter the opportunity to improve the position that he has failed to do so and now risks serious injury.” That was just the beginning, though. Grossman found himself, now 1-0 in the Disorderly Conduct circuit of MMA Cage Fighting, facing Erik Smith on Nov. 4 at the Tip Top. The difference? See CAGE Page 6 school) on Fridays at the Woodbine Public Library. Knit-Wits is for third through sixth grade students with an interest in learning how to knit or want to further their knitting skills. HAT, GLOVES AND SNOW BOOTS DRIVE

The Nelson family stood with their attorney by their side, facing senior judge of the Fourth District of Iowa Gordon C. Abel at the Council Bluffs Courthouse on Nov. 3. Amber Nelson couldn’t hold in her tears …. Neither could her husband, Scott, their attorney, Kim Murphy, or even the court reporter. Seven-year-old Bernie was called to the Judge Abel’s desk. He took the pen, and signed his name. It was over. After living in seven different foster homes in his short, seven years of life, Bernie was now, officially a Nelson. The trip to the courthouse was just the final step in the process. “In our eyes, adoption day was just a formality. Bernie was as much our child as our other three children. We just didn’t have the paperwork signed yet,” Amber said. “With that

said, it was still emotional.” Bernie was in the Nelson’s son’s preschool class at Woodbine Community School. That’s when he first caught Amber’s eye – and her heart. “The moment I saw him in Mrs. Glackin’s preschool class, I immediately felt a tug at my heart,” Amber admitted. “Little did I know that God chose me, at that very moment, to be his mom.” Bernie moved in with the Nelsons on Oct. 8, 2010, and there was no looking back … especially after Judge Abel asked Bernie, and his brothers and sisters, to stand beside him at the bench so he could sign the adoption decree. It wasn’t the Nelson’s first experience with adoption. Max, the Nelson’s son that was in preschool with Bernie, is also adopted – from Korea. The Nelsons were blessed with that experience in 2004 when they See ADOPT Page 6

Making it official: In front, Bernie (now) Nelson, left, watches Fourth District of Iowa Judge Gordon C. Abel make his adoption papers official. Behind him, his new siblings watch with joy, left to right, Abby, Max (also adopted) and Jack. Photo: Submitted The Woodbine Junior Optimist Club is hosting a New or Used Hat, Gloves and Snow Boots Drive through Dec. 14. Items may be dropped off at Community of Christ Church, United Methodist Church, Believers Training

Center, Sacred Heart Church, Everything Ellen, Farmers Trust and Saving Bank and NuStyle Development Office. Donations will be distributed to Harrison County residents in See SHORT TAKES Page 6

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2

The Woodbine Twiner

November 23, 2011

Editorial

CHAMBER CONNECTION NOEL SHERER BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE

Here’s to continued change Alana Smith is an AmeriCorps volunteer, working with the Iowa Energy Corps and NCAT (the National Center for Appropriate Technology). She has been working with the City of Woodbine and Main Street since January of 2011 as the Sustainability Coordinator. She will finish her term in Woodbine in early December 2011 and will be returning to North Carolina.

B

efore this year, I had never really seen much of America. I had traveled throughout the world, but never through my own country. I had never been anywhere as rural as parts of the Midwest can be. I had considered the area where I grew up to be quite small and rural with my graduating class to be 250 and my high school located about 15 miles from a small city. Then I came to Woodbine: A tiny town with big ideas in the heart of America. Besides how rural the area is (and that it’s not flat), what really surprised me was how much is going on in this small town. The people here are genuinely friendly, welcoming and full of community pride. They enthusiastically do all they can to make this town a great place. I was very excited to jump right in and get involved with the progress. I arrived here not knowing what to expect, only hoping to make some sort of a difference while promoting environmental sustainability. With a degree in Environmental Studies, I came here passionate about recycling, reducing waste, and reducing one’s carbon footprint and man’s affect on nature. I became involved with several committees, working to bring recycling bins downtown as part of the future streetscapes project and to create green spaces in the Main Street District. I also worked with committed community members (such as Zell Millard and Tammy Barrett) to preserve Woodbine’s history. I learned much about Woodbine’s past while working with Main Street in the grant writing process. This may not sound “green” at first glance, but a strong sense of history and place ensures strong progression forward. Like any place, there is always room for improvement. If I could encourage any more positive change for this town, I would hope to see more recycling, fewer cars idling and fewer plastic bags used amongst Twiners - the simplest and most typical ideas promoted for a green community. I have been working all year to try and implement a curbside recycling program. Even if this program does not turn out to be successful (though I hope this is not the case), anyone can still reduce their impact on the environment by buying local, biodegradable, reusable or organic products. You could even start your own compost. Another important thing to do is turn off your car if you are stopping somewhere in town. Allowing a car to idle for more than 30 seconds wastes fuel and emits unnecessary, harmful fumes. And finally, bring your own reusable bag to the grocery store! I have spent not quite a year in this town and I have witnessed so many positive changes occur in Woodbine. Though I was not born and raised here, as so many I have met, the feeling of community pride has been contagious. I have come to truly appreciate small-town life and I feel that wherever I may go from here I will brag about the amazing things that Woodbine has already and will continue to accomplish.

A road rage attitude I NIK’S KNACKS think it would be a fair assessment to make that with as short as my temper is, I might, maybe, perhaps, a little bit, sometimes experience road rage. Nothing crazy, mind you. Generally, when frustrated, such as being stuck behind a combine on U.S. Highway 30 around 4 p.m., I mutter a few things under my breath. I would like to stress the fact that I am also not one of those nutty people that will fly around a car, tractor or bicycle, screaming forbidden words out the window while making obscene gestures. However, I had a slight reality check the other day. It really made me think twice about my mutterings and anger … as they dissipated into laughter. I was on my way to Omaha, Neb., to meet my mother and my sister for the annual Holiday Craft Show. This is an annual family tradition for us girls in the family. Well, as always, I was in a hurry. I spaced off a picture I had promised to take, so after the babysitter arrived at the house, I hurried to the Woodbine Library to snap a few pictures before I hit the road. Inevitably, I wound up chatting for a while. (I know. I talk too much.) So, then, of course, I was running late. Also inevitable, when you’re in a hurry, the traffic is never clear. Especially around 3:30-4 p.m. on 30. I found myself behind a tractor. Then a gigantic rig loaded to the top (and then some) with hay. Then just a slow, old truck. It seemed like it took forever to get to the Valley. Of course, I hit every red light on their Main Street. By the time I hit Casey’s, I kept staring at the clock in my car. By this time I was already muttering things under my breath. So … when 30 branched into two lanes and I could finally hit the actually speed limit … it didn’t happen. Of course. I was stuck behind a minivan and a car. I made it around the car, but got stuck behind the minivan. Why I didn’t recognize it sooner, I will never know. I guess I had my thoughts elsewhere. What I can tell you is that I saw the passenger animatedly talking to the driver. The passenger was “hand talking,” and it was clear as day, even as dusk was settling on the road. And, as I began to boil, uttering a few phrases, “Come on, now!” and “Really? Speed limit! Hello???” The turn about entrance ramp was the worst as we took a leisurly pace to enter onto I-29. Which frustrated me as I looked at the string of traffic travelling southbound as we all tried to join them. By this time, there were cars behind me. I was still watching the passenger talking, talking, talking with those arms. But the minivan didn’t merge. Instead, it kept traversing closer to the shoulder. I jabbed at my breaks, unable to go around it due to the string of traffic getting into the left lane to let us all on, and to let the minivan onto the interstate without an accident. Yup. I was uttering at that point. But I think I’ll keep what I said to myself. It was only about a mile or two before I had the

The Woodbine Twiner Published in Woodbine, Iowa. A Western Iowa Newspaper Group Publication of Midlands Newspapers, Inc. Kevin Brown – General Manager kevin.brown@woodbinetwiner.com Nikki Davis – Editor ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com Daryn Morriss – Account Representative daryn.morriss@woodbinetwiner.com Mary Lou Noneman – Production Supervisor marylou.noneman@woodbinetwiner.com P.O. Box 16 • Woodbine, Iowa 51579 Phone – 712-647-2821 Fax – 712-647-3081 E-mail – news@woodbinetwiner.com Official Newspaper for the City of Woodbine and the Woodbine Community School District. Periodical Class Postage Paid at Woodbine, IA 51579 USPS 690-340

SUBSCRIPTION RATES College/Academic (9 Months) – $24.00 Senior Citizen (62 or older) in Harrison County – $33.00 Harrison County, Panama, Portsmouth & Moorhead – $40.00 Rest of Iowa and Nebraska – $43.00 U.S. Outside of Iowa and Nebraska – $47.00 All items, including ads and news articles, intended for publication in this newspaper must be received AT the Woodbine Twiner office by NOON the preceding Friday. LETTERS POLICY: The Woodbine Twiner welcomes signed letters to the editor. Letters must include the writer’s telephone number for verification purposes and should contain fewer than 300 words. The Woodbine Twiner reserves the right to edit all letters. Send letters to P.O. Box 16, Woodbine, IA 51579, fax to 712647-3081, or e-mail to news@woodbinetwiner.com. The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright. Other than non-commercial, personal use of a limited nature, no part of this publication may be copied and reproduced in any way without the prior written consent of the editor.

NIKKI DAVIS EDITOR

nikki.davis@woodbinetwiner.com

opportunity to pass. As I did, I peered over my right shoulder to look at the current source of my aggravation. As I did … my road rage disappeared. Completely. I was thrown into a fit of giggles, instead. I knew that minivan. And I definitely knew the driver. And the passenger. It happened to be a Woodbine student and her mother, on their way to Omaha. I had actually chatted with their father that morning about how they were going to go to Omaha … and he was going to stay behind in Woodbine. And it made sense all of a sudden. The exact speed limit. The slower pace up the entrance ramp to I-29. The animated arms. (I think we can all imagine the words being exchanged there … we all learned how to drive at one point. Some of us have even taught someone else how to drive.) I can actually hear the conversation between the young driver and her mother. And that made me giggle more. And then I felt guilty. And a little ashamed at my road rage. This was something I hadn’t ever taken into consideration, I suppose. When you first learn how to drive, most people aren’t Mario Andretti or, my dad’s favorite, Terry Labonte. You’re nervous. You’re scared. You’re new. When I got stopped, I grabbed my cell. I sent a simple text: “Just breathe. Driving on the interstate is not that scary. :o)” And the reply came about half an hour later. “Yes it is!!” So that was my lesson learned … as well as food for thought. I remember why I used to love those audio books so much when I was driving over from Modale … they occupied my mind so when I was going a little slower, it was OK. Because I was reading a book. Now, next time I get stuck going a little slower in traffic, I’m going to have visions of a pre-16 year old learning how to drive. The imagery alone is still making me smirk … even all these days later. I hope all of you can keep that same thought and image in mind (or whatever it takes to keep yourselves calm) when you’re behind the wheel. After all, road rage really doesn’t accomplish anything.

One word: Thanks

L

ast summer during the midst of the stress anticipating potential flooding, the comment was made that major events of this kind bring out the worst in some people, but thankfully, the best in many others. At the time, I recall thinking that we need to remember the little things that good people did that don’t look like much in the big picture, but were really hallmarks of the human spirit. And if you step back, that is true even in normal times. With that in mind now at Thanksgiving season, I invite you to try something simple that I will be doing prior to turkey consumption. With a pencil and paper, each of us will write down two or three things that we remember from this past year that are memorably good. Then, either as part of or in place of the blessing, each person chooses one to read as a remembrance. Maybe if

you say it, you will remember it. So here is a start on my list of “good things” from 2011: • High school rivalries are ingrained in our culture, yet early in June, the West Harrison School needed to be sandbagged. On a nearly 100 degree day, the evening double header between Lo-Ma and WH started hours early with athletes from both schools – girls and boys – pitching in to fill, lift, place bags to protect the school. Come evening, they put on uniforms and took the fields to play the games. Not a huge deal, but it was a special moment for all. Thank you! • At that same event, a recent graduate from across the county couldn’t help with the sandbagging herself, but took her graduation money and on her own bought watermelon for the students working. Again, not a huge deal ... but it is something I won’t forget. Thank you! • The Levee coalition!

EXTENSION OFFICE RICHARD POPE Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator ropope@iastate.edu Need I say more. These private citizens banded together and monitored problem spots and issues with the private levee system in Harrison and northern Pottawattamie Counties, and arguably kept Missouri Valley, Modale and loads of rural homes and fields dry throughout the summer. Thank you! • The friends of mine in Sloan and Salix who lent their trailer to the extension office for evacuation and transport of Fair things. Also, Mike in Salix who lent his generator to a Modale family for the summer as a back-up. Thank you! • The Iowa DOT and associated contractors. Who would have thought that the major highways in western

Iowa would be open well before Thanksgiving. Thank you! • Crops. Considering the challenges, the 2011 crop was pretty good (where you weren’t flooded out that is), and we had a great fall all in all for harvest and field work. And pretty safely done as well. Thank you! • The people I get to work with both here in Harrison County and across the state. You were there when you needed to be. Thank you! Well, there is my starter list. Happy Thanksgiving! For additional information, contact Rich Pope at the Harrison County Extension office at ropope@iastate.edu or (712) 644-2105.


November 23, 2011

3

The Woodbine Twiner

Community All Iowa Honor Band Golden Age Center meal menu Morgan Trierweiler, Woodbine, was selected to represent Southwest Iowa on trumpet in the All Iowa Eighth Grade Honor Band. This will be at the Iowa Bandmasters Convention held in Des Moines. She will rehearse with the top eighth grade musicians from across the state of Iowa May 10, 2012, and perform a concert that day with a guest conductor. Photo: Submitted

Wed., Nov. 23: Turkey roast in gravy, mashed potatoes/stuffing, green bean casserole, sweet potatoes, cranberry relish, butter flake roll/margarine, pumpkin pie with whip cream. Thurs., Nov. 24: Happy Thanksgiving! (Closed for the holiday.) Fri., Nov. 25: SW8 Sites closed. Mon., Nov. 28: Beef macaroni casserole, peas and carrots, apple juice cup, cinnamon raisin bread/margarine, emerald pears.

Tues., Nov. 29: Swiss steak in tomato vegetable gravy, baked potato/sour cream, PC, green and gold beans, Oroweat fiber bread/margarine, banana pudding or sugar free vanilla pudding. Wed., Nov. 30: Hearty ham shanks in northern beans, cinnamon apples, corn bread muffin/margarine, sliced peaches in cherry Jell-o or SF fruited Jell-o. All meals served with choice of 2 percent or skim skim, and/or coffee.

United in Marriage Aug. 20

Municipal Light & Power offering Lighting Contest The Woodbine Municipal Light & Power will be awarding prizes for the most attractive and imaginative outdoor lighting displays in the city limits of Woodbine. To enter, you must be an electric customer of Woodbine Municipal Light & Power. Entry sign-up sheets are available at The Woodbine Twiner and The Woodbine Municipal Light & Power offices. Deadline for sign-up is 8 a.m., Dec. 9, with judging to be the evening of Dec. 14, weather permitting. Woodbine Municipal Light & Power donated $500 in Woodbine Dollars last year.

Winners in 2010 included: First place, Jeromie and Staci Meyer, $250; second place, Les and Jamie Olsen, $150; and third place, Jim and Marcia Ricciardi, $100.

Foutch Golden Anniversary Please join their children and grandchildren in celebrating this momentous occasion.

The Foutches have struck gold: Happy 50th Anniversary to Nancy and Vern Foutch!

Open House: Sat., Dec. 3, 2011 Woodbine United Methodist Church 2-4p.m.

Andrea Liston and Bryce Benson were united in marriage Aug. 20 by Pastor Ron Riley at the Glass Chapel in Shelby.The bride is the daughter of Mike and Theresa Liston of Woodbine and the groom the son of Phil and Erika Benson of Logan. Grandparents of the bride are Barry and Phyllis Frum, Crescent and Jim and Betty Liston, Council Bluffs. Grandparents of the groom are Gene and Janice Benson, Logan and Lyal and Penny Sagendorf, Spokane, Wash. Andrea is currently attending Aveda Institute in Des Moines for cosmetology. Bryce is a fourth year electrical engineering student at Iowa State University in Ames. The couple resides in Ames.

Community Memorial Hospital FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor Rev. J. Samuel Subramanian, Ph.D. 647-2304 647-2347 Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and Sunday School 8:45 a.m. Confirmation Tues., Thrift Shop 9 - 2, and 6 p.m.- 7:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m. UM Service on Access Channel Wed., 6:00 p.m. Prayer Group; 6:30 p.m. Youth Group: 6:45 p.m. Choir Practice. Ushers: Rayner von Hohenstein & Dwight Mills FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH Disciples of Christ Pastor Mike Brown 647-3078 647-2761 9:30 a.m. Sunday School, 10:45 a.m.Worship Service Worship leader: Lloyd DeForest Elders: Don Lantz and Jenny Hall Deacons:Jamie and Lynee Metzger, Kim and Ronda Schramm, Brent and Michele Watkins. Deaconess: Gwen Wolkins Song Leader: Jenny Hall Greeters: Brent & Michele Watkins FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Pastor Steve Wiemeyer 46 Fifth St. Woodbine, IA Sun.: 10:30 a.m.,Worship. FOLLOWERS OF CHRIST 77 Fifth Street Woodbine, IA Church - 647-2006

Woodbine Farm Supply Seed - Chemicals -Feed Steel Buildings

647-2220

Triple C Roofing Commercial Roofing 800-234-5546 Woodbine • 647-2303

Richard Tiffey, Jr. 644-3297 Sun., Early Worship 9:15 a.m. 9:30 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service 6:30 class. Wed. 7:00 p.m. prayer service SACRED HEART PARISH CATHOLIC CHURCH Felix Onuora, CSSP 647-2931 643-5808 Masses: Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Woodbine. Saturday 4 p.m. at Holy Family in Mondamin. Saturday 5:45 p.m.,Sundays 8:45 a.m. at St. Patrick, Dunlap COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Noel Sherer, Pastor 647-2014 647-2695 Wed.: Zion’s League. Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:15 a.m., worship; 10:30 a.m., worship. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH Logan, IA Jerry Firby, Pastor 644-2384 642-2842 Sun: Worship; 9 a.m. Fellowship; 10 - 10:15 a.m., Sunday School 10:15 - 11:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study - 10:15 - 11 a.m. LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Assoc. Pastor Hank Gruver 1207 Harrison St., Dunlap, IA - 643-5475 Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:30 a.m., Morning Worship; Thurs.: 7 p.m., Intercessory Prayer. THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY

Harrison County Rural Electric Cooperative Serving the rural Woodbine Community

Woodbine • 647-2727

Farmers Trust & Savings Bank

Woodbine • 647-3375 Earling • 747-2000 Member Harlan • 235-2000

SAINTS Logan, IA Vance Gardiner, Branch Pres. 644-3495 646-2310 Sun.: 10 a.m., Sacrament meeting; 11:15 a.m., Sunday School; 12:10 p.m., Priesthood and Relief Society. Wed.: 7:00 p.m., YM/YW Scouts ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH, E.L.C.A. Dunlap, IA Carla Johnsen, Pastor 643-5495 643-5575 8:45 a.m.Worship 9:45 a.m. Fellowship No Sunday School 5:30 p.m. Finger Food Potluck 6:30 p.m. Hanging of the Greens Service BETHESDA LUTHERAN CHURCH, E.L.C.A. Moorhead, IA Carla Johnsen, Pastor 1st Sun. in Advent 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Worship 11:30 a.m. Fellowship/ Coffee Hour REMNANT CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS Missouri Valley, IA Terry Patience, Pastor Sun.: 9 a.m., Church School; 10 a.m.,Worship Service. THE BELIEVERS TRAINING CENTER Carmen Goodrich, Pastor 647-3233 647-2223 Wed.: 7:30 p.m., Bible Study and Youth. Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Worship; 7 p.m., Evening Service.

Stephany - Coe “Insurance “Insuranceofofall allkinds kindssince since 1900” 1900”

Woodbine Woodbine 647-2641 647-2641

Eby’s Drug Store Three Generations of Pharmacists Woodbine • 647-2840

631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley, IA MISSOURI VALLEY SUNRISE COMMUNITY Rev. David McGaffey Church of the Nazarene 2225 Hwy. 30, Missouri Valley, IA 712-642-3708 0Sunday School; 10:50 a.m.noon, 6-7 p.m., Celebration Service. Wednesday: 7 p.m. - ?, Prayer Service. MOORHEAD CHRISTIAN CHURCH Pastor Mike Brown Sun., Worship 9 a.m., Coffee Hour 8 a.m. Sunday school 10:00 Elders: Anita Moorhead, Joyce Queen Terri Savery, John Moorhead Deacons:Lois Hoffman, volunteer, Brandon Shearer, Dennie Archer Deaconess: Carolyn Archer Greeters: Trustees; Frank Archer, Jerry Moore, Phil Meadows MONDAMIN BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Harley Johnson Mondamin, IA Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.; Sunday - Youth Group ‘Magnolia Fire Escape’ 7:30 p.m. at Magnolia Fire Hall Wednesday Family Nights 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. (during school year.

712-642-2784

DECEMBER OUTPATIENT SPECIALTY CLINICS For Scheduling Appointments Call 712-642-9347

AUDIOLOGY Rhonda Ward, M.S., CCC-A............................,Dec. 5 & 19 CARDIAC Heart Consultants..........Every Wed. all day & Friday PM Heart & Vascular Services..Mon. & Wed. P.M. & Fri. A.M. CARDIAC/PULMONARY REHABILITATION Cindy Sproul, R.N.......Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday CARDIOVASCULAR NON-INVASIVE STUDIES..................................................Every Mon AM EAR, NOSE, THROAT Iris Moore, M.D..............................................Dec. 5 & 19 GENERAL SURGERY Roalene J. Redland, M.D.................Dec. 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 Andrew Y. Reynolds, M.D....Every Thurs. A.M. and Wed. OB-GYN Sami Zeineddine M.D.....................................Dec. 6 & 20 ONCOLOGY Heartland Oncology & Hematology..Dec. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael Feilmeier, M.D........................................Dec. 20 ORTHOPEDICS Thomas Atteberry, M.D...............1st, 3rd, 5th Thurs A.M, 2nd & 4th Thurs. all day PADnet ...........................................1st Tues of ea month

FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Missouri Valley, IA Rev. Barbara Todd Sun.: 9:00 a.m.Adult Sunday 10:00 a.m.,Worship

Midwest Quality Water Woodbine 1-866-558 (PURE) 7873

Rose Vista Home “Special Care for Special People” Woodbine - 647-2010

PODIATRY John Weremy, DPM........................................Dec. 8 & 22 Indergit Panesar, M.D.....................................Dec. 1 & 15 UROLOGY Larry Siref, M.D..................................................Dec. 12 MAMMOGRAPHY..............................Monday thru Friday EVENING HOURS NOW AVAILABLE......Mon., thru Friday MOBILE NUC MED................................................Dec. 12 PT/OT......................................Mon.-Fri........642-2179 BEHAVIORAL HEALTH.............................642-2045 Judith Benson, Psych ARNP Nancy Cyr LISW, Rod Black, LISW Cindy Duggin LISW


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1301 Normal St • Woodbine, IA • 712-647-2627

SHERIFF

By Sheriff Pat Sears Nov. 10 • Deputy Knickman took a report of threats being made over the nonpayment for a vehicle that was purchased privately in Mondamin. Charges are pending on the subject that made the threats. • Deputy Heffernan attempted to resolve an ongoing property dispute south of Pisgah. Both parties involved advised the other was at fault. Nov. 11 • Deputies Denton, Klutts and Killpack assisted Missouri Valley Police with a situation. The area was patrolled but nothing was found. • Deputy Sieck took a call from a subject from Persia reporting her 8 year old was “out of control” when told to share a toy. The caller wanted the child committed for evaluation. The caller was advised to make some arrangements for the child on their own. • Deputy Clemens is investigating the theft of a survey pin off Malden Trail. • Deputy Sieck investigated a report of reckless driving on Irwin Avenue. A vehicle description was given but was not located. • Deputy Doiel is investigating suspicious activity on 335th Street. The area will be patrolled. • Deputy Denton is investigating a theft of property off 119th Lane. • Deputy Knickman assisted with a child custody dispute that was ongoing. Both parties were advised to contact an attorney. Nov. 12 • Deputy Doiel stopped a vehicle in Persia for a traffic violation. It was discovered that the driver had been drinking. Cory Ring of Minden was arrested and transported to jail. Ring was charged with OWI and speeding. • Deputy Denton checked on a suspicious vehicle on 192nd Street. Stacy Frisk and Earl Risk of Bellevue, Neb., were arrested for outstanding Nebraska warrants. They were transported to jail and will be held until they waive extradition back to Nebraska. • Deputy Sieck stopped a vehicle in Logan for a traffic violation. The driver was found to be drinking. William Klein of Dunlap was arrested and transported to jail. Klein was

charged with OWI first offense. • Deputy Denton is investigating a vehicle that was found wrecked on Melody Oaks Trail. Deputy Sieck responded to a farm field off 270th Street to check on a suspicious vehicle in the area. A vehicle description was given but was not located. We will patrol the area. • Deputy Doiel responded to a residence on Merrick Place for a juvenile runaway that was at that residence. The child was interviewed then returned home where the parents said that they had ongoing issues with the child. There was more to the story when the child’s mother was interviewed. Counseling was suggested. Nov. 13 • Deputy Cohrs is investigating the theft of items stolen from a trailer in Deer Island. Also reported stolen was an aluminum boat. • Deputy Killpack is investigating an alleged child abuse. The child was taken to the hospital to be checked out. The case is pending and has been referred to the Department of Human Services for follow up. • Deputy Doiel stopped a vehicle west of Missouri Valley on U.S. Highway 30 for a traffic violation. A search of the driver’s person was done and drug paraphernalia was found. Andrew Cox, Missouri Valley, was arrested and transported to jail. Cox was charged with speeding, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. • Deputy Cohrs did a welfare check on a subject who lives on Overton Avenue. The subject was found to have a medical condition that needed attention. Rescue was called and the subject was transported to the hospital for treatment. Nov. 14 • Deputy Cohrs took an assault report that had occurred in Mondamin. All parties involved knew each other so the complainant did not want to file charges at this time but wanted the incident reported. • Deputy Klutts responded to a motherdaughter dispute on Yates Avenue. The dispute was talked over and resolved for the night. Nov. 15

November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

COURTHOUSE • Deputy Clemens took a harassment complaint in Mondamin. This person has a history of harassment. Charges are pending. • Charlotte Hoss of Mondamin was arrested on an outstanding harassment arrest warrant. Hoss was transported to jail. • Deputy Cohrs is investigating a reported burglary from a residence in Ryan’s Landing. Nov. 16 • Deputy Clemens talked to a subject reporting ongoing harassing phone calls on Monroe Avenue. The caller has a foreign sounding voice that is hard to understand and is trying to sell a credit card. The caller has been told not to call. The caller was referred to the phone company. • Deputy Klutts responded to Little Sioux for a dog complaint. It was reported the neighbor’s dog runs loose and has been chewing on her grill. Deputy Klutts talked to the neighbor who said the dog is going to a friend due to his control problem. • Deputy Clemens went to Magnolia for a driving complaint follow up. The young man was advised of the driving complaint. Nov. 17 • Deputy Clemens responded to a residence on 335th Street who had reported dogs on his property running his cattle. The dogs belonged to a neighbor and had been returned home. Deputy Clemens went to the neighbor and advised him that his dogs could not run at large. The dogs will be secured. • Deputy Knickman is investigating criminal mischief to a vehicle while parked in Mondamin. • Deputy Cohrs is investigating a burglary to a residence in Ryan’s Landing. • To report Crime Stopper information call (800) 247-0592. • To report littering call (888) 665-4887. Any criminal charge is merely an accusation and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

SMALL CLAIMS • Harold Yutesler vs Randall Moore, Amanda Messerschmidt, Modale • Hauge Associates vs Daniel Hendon, Jeanneane Hendon, Dunlap • Seeley Auto Service vs Opal Adams, Logan SPEEDING • Jodi Henderson, Charter Oak • Steven Hinkel, Mondamin • Terry Soll, Dow City • Cole Davis, Missouri Valley • Mark Quick, Logan • Jason Winchester, Logan • Attalee Brix, Logan • Courtney Palensky, Woodbine • Jennifer Kelly, Missouri Valley VIOLATIONS • Kristofer Erlbacher, Woodbine, possess/purchase alcohol by person under 21 • Michael Nichael Nicholson, Little Sioux, operation without registration; failure to have valid license/permit; open container, driver • Christina Martin, Missouri Valley, improper use of registration • Aaron Mauseth, Missouri Valley, dark window/windshield • Andrea Evans, Missouri Valley, minor using tobacco, first offense • Clinton Fitchhorn, Woodbine, operating non-registered vehicle • Alex Meyer, Modale, dark window/windshield • Harold Norris, Woodbine, no valid driver’s license

• Fred Radloff, Pisgah, failure to secure child • Andrea Evans, Missouri Valley, violate condition of restricted license; operation without registration • Heather Bumgardener, Missouri Valley, permit unauthorized person to drive • Triston Chambers, Missouri Valley, no driver’s license • Sharon Thompson, Missouri Valley, failure to yield DISTRICT COURT • State of Iowa vs Duane Alan Dryden, probation violation. Deferred sentence revoked on OWI first offense. Fined $625; 90 in jail, credit for time served; all but 10 days suspended; unsupervised probation for one year. • State of Iowa vs Kendra Joan Richards, OWI, second offense. Sixty days in jail with all but seven suspended; unsupervised probation for one year; ordered to complete drinking driver’s course and substance abuse evaluation; $1,250 fine plus surcharges and fees. • State of Iowa vs Walter A. Boysen, possession of controlled substance. Fined $315; 60 days in jail, suspended; supervised probation for six months; substance abuse evaluation; driving privileges revoked for 180 days. • State of Iowa vs Edward Michael James Neff, probation violation. Deferred judgment revoked; $750 fine; ordered to jail for a term not to exceed five years, credit for time served.

Women, Land & Legacy Fall Meeting Local women farmers and landowners are invited to join women from Shelby, Audubon, Cass, East and West Pottawattamie and Harrison Counties for a Level II meeting of Women, Land, and Legacy, a program for those with a connection to the land and its use now and into the future. WLL is a “focused conversation” allowing local women to listen to each other in small groups and then bring their ideas together to provide guidelines for local action to support women land proprietors. Topics for this meeting include: “Energy Savings for Farm Enterprises” and “Don’t Just Landscape… Rainscape!” Guest speakers are Dana Petersen from the ISU Farm Energy Center and Rich Maaske, Urban Conservationist with IDALS. The event is free and open to the public. Registration and a light meal will begin at 6 p.m. with the program starting at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will take place on Monday, Nov. 28, at the McKee Community Room at Elm Crest Retirement Community, 2104 12th St., Harlan. Reservations are

requested to ensure available seating. Please call the Harlan NRCS office at (712) 755-2417 (ext. 3) by Nov. 23 to register, or with questions. Email reservations will also be accepted and can be sent to joann.schulte@ia.nacdnet.net. If you need transportation to the meeting, let the staff know at the time you register. Sponsored by ISU Extension and Outreach, USDA Farm Service Agency, USDA Natural Resources Conservation

Service, the Audubon, Harrison, Shelby, Cass, East Pottawattamie and West Pottawattamie Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Golden Hills Resource Conservation and Development and Farm Bureau, the Women, Land, and Legacy project works from a grassroots approach, enabling women to network with other women in agriculture. Please join us on Nov. 28 and bring along any friends you feel would be interested in this program.

Woodbine Business Directory Call 647-2821 to place your ad ! Jim Barnes, Owner

“Your Jewelers Since 1920!” Located at the Hartwig House Corner North Main and 4th Ave. North

712-263-2540

THE HOFFMAN AGENCY For all your Insurance Needs • Home • Auto • Commercial • Farm

Mike Hicks Home: (712) 647-3210 Cell: (402) 250-9617

• Health • Investments • Crop & More

Contact Mark Brasel or Craig Malone THE HOFFMAN AGENCY 617 Iowa Ave.-Dunlap-712-643-5322

Carpet, Upholstery & Wall Cleaning Tile and Grout Cleaning Certified Von Schrader Associates Alan G. & Terri L. Ronk - Owners www.angelhollow.biz Ph. 712-647-2272 Cell 712-592-1977 Residential - Commercial Free Estimates

KEEP US INFORMED news@woodbinetwiner.com

phone: 647-2821 Woodbine, IA


November 23, 2011

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The Woodbine Twiner

Community It’s here! It’s here! “Inheritance” BOOK BLURBS WENDY DOYEL WOODBINE YOUTH PUBLIC LIBRARIAN

I

t’s finally here! The long awaited final book of the Eragon series, Inheritance, is finally out … and the Woodbine Public Library has it! The series that started out as a Trilogy, but ended up being so big it was split into four books (the Inheritance Cycle), has come to an end, with an astonishing conclusion! This book is not going to stay here much so make sure to come in and let me know you want to read it and I’ll make sure to put your

name on the waiting list so you can find out what happens to Eragon, his dragon, Saphira and the evil king Galbatorix. Also, I know there are a lot of “House of Night” fans out there, myself included, and the new book “Destined” just came out and is here at the Woodbine Public Library. I just finished rereading the entire series (all eight books!) so I’d be ready for this new installment of Zoey Redbird and all her vampire, both Blue and Red,

friends, but I’m sure I’ll have to wait to read it as it’s going to go out fast too! Those are just two of the many teen/young Adult books we have in the teen section of the Youth Library. There are way too many to list just come and check out what we have. You might be surprised. I know a lot of people have read “Heaven Is For Real” and have really liked it, I am not one of those people. I just didn’t think it’d be something I could get into … my mind has been changed. I just read through “Heaven is for Real for Kids,” the kids picture book version of the adult book told by Colton Burpo to his parents when he was 3 years old, and it is amazing. Make sure to come in and read this book with

your children. We have the new Poison Apple Book, “At First Bite.” I don’t know what it is about these books but boy do they go out like crazy! The ever popular Hank the Cowdog has a new one, “The Case of the Mysterious Voice.” These are great for middle readers who love animal books and mysteries. And I’ve been seeing a lot of kids come in and play a computer game called Poptropica. It must be an awesome game because it’s played a lot! So when I saw the “Poptropica: The Official Guide book,” I knew I had to get it, I’m sure it’ll make someone’s day to find out all kinds of gaming secrets! I have to admit, even though I’m not a kid anymore, I love the look and find books. “Can You See What I See?” are a great series of look and finds and the new one just got here, “Toyland Express!” These are just a few of the books that just came in to the Woodbine Public Youth Library, there are many more! For a complete list of the books, you can visit our Facebook page, just click the Like button and you’ll not only see book lists but also updates on other things going on here. And don’t forget about our website http://www.woodbine.l ib.ia.us and the blog Stacks, Racks & B o o k p a c k s , http://woodbinelibrary.blogspot.com.

Holiday cheer being delivered to senior care centers: Volunteers needed

Woodbine dignitaries, entertainers, athletes, singers and musicians of all ages and talent levels are invited to participate in a series of holiday caroling festivities celebrated at local senior centers across the Heartland as part of a nationwide initiative to promote the overall theme of bringing happiness and/or enlightenment to the elderly, care-givers and participants during the holiday season. “We want to bring happiness and joy to the elderly residents, and at the same time to instill a heightened awareness in the carolers of what they may be taking for granted in their own lives,” event founder, co-organizer and Knights of Columbus member Vincent J. Leinen said. “Many of the residents in these homes don’t have their health or their families. We all need to be reminded that it’s important to feel blessed and happy with what we already have in life, and less concerned with what we don’t have. The Holiday Caroling Festivities event is a very fulfilling opportunity to share joy, happiness and holiday spirit with the elderly residents and their caregivers, while enhancing one’s own perspective or appreciation of life, health, and family.” Hosted by a team of volunteers, these enjoyable and rewarding community service events are free and open to the public: • 6:15-6:45 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, Denison Care Center, 1202 Ridge Rd., Denison. • 7-7:30 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, Eventide Lutheran Home, 114 S. 20th St., Denison. • 7:45-8:15 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, Silveridge, 222 S. 20th St., Denison • 8:30-9 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, Reed House, 2506 Third Ave. N., Denison For more information on the Fourth Annual Denison Christmas Caroling, contact Mark Gray at (712) 2636722. • 6:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15, Dunlap Nursing & Rehabilitation Center For more information, contact Marilyn Grote at (712) 643-5108 or Vincent J. Leinen at (818) 342-9336.

HCHPH stresses the importance of HPV vaccine for youth and young adults Harrison County Home and Public Health Department would like Woodbine residents to be ware. Human Papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. Another 6 million people become newly infected each year. HPV is so common that at least 50 percent of sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. Most people with HPV do not develop symptoms or health problems from it. In many cases, the body’s immune system clears HPV naturally within two years. But, sometimes HPV infections are not cleared and can cause genital warts and cervical cancer. HPV can also cause other less common but serious cancers, including cancer of the vulva, penis, anus and

throat. HPV is passed through direct contact, most often during sex. It can be passed between straight and same-sex partners, even when the infected partner has no signs or symptoms. A person can have HPV, even if years have passed since contact with the infected person. It is also possible to get more than one type of HPV. Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or group of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat or shaped like cauliflower. Health care providers can diagnose warts by looking at the area during an office visit. Warts can appear within weeks or months after contact with an infected partner. They can even appear if the infected partner has no signs of genital warts. About 1 percent of sexually active adults in the U.S. have genital warts at any one time.

Cervical cancer usually does not have symptoms until it is quite advanced. For this reason, it’s important for women to get regular screening for cervical cancer. Screening tests can find early signs of disease so problems can be treated early, before they even turn into cancer. Each year, about 12,000 women get cervical cancer in the U.S. Almost all of these cancers are HPV-associated. There are several ways people can reduce their chances of getting HPV. Vaccines can protect males and females against some of the most common types of HPV that can lead to disease and cancer. These vaccines are given in three shots and are most effective when started at 11 or 12 years of age, but the vaccine is approved to be given from 9 to 21 years of age. It’s important to get all three doses to get the best protection. For those who choose

to be sexually active, condoms may lower the risk of HPV. To be most effective, they should be used with every sex act, from start to finish. Condoms may also lower the risk of developing HPV-related diseases, such as genital warts and cervical cancer. But HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom, so condoms may not fully protect against HPV. People can also lower their chances of getting HPV by being in a faithful relationship with one partner; limiting their number of sexual partners; and choosing a partner who has had no or few prior sex partners. The Harrison County Home & Public Health Department offers STI testing and treatment, cervical cancer screening, education and immunizations (including the vaccine to prevent HPV. For more information, please call Harrison County Home and Publis Heath.(712) 644-2220.

Answers to holiday food, stain removal and more Fumigation Course Nov. 29 If Woodbine residents are seeking answers to holiday food questions, there’s a simple solution: Call Iowa State University Extension and Outreach’s Answer Line, (800) 262-3804. “We can answer your holiday meal preparation questions, as well as the stain removal questions resulting from those holiday meals,” Answer Line Coordinator Liz Meimann said. Professional family and consumer scientists at the toll-free hotline can explain everything from how long to cook the turkey, to how far ahead to make the pumpkin pie (or any other holiday dish,

)Meimann said. Generally, the hotline answers calls 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. Monday through Friday. “However, we will be available 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. We plan to work through the lunch hour for people who need to call at that time,” Meimann said. In addition, Iowans can get answers to frequently asked questions on the Answer Line website, www.extension.iastate.edu/answer line/, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Consumers can search by keyword, browse the keyword index or select a topic area to find

answers to their questions, Mei-mann said. A Relay Iowa line (phone linkage for deaf and hard-of-hearing

individuals) is available at 711. Questions also can be sent by email to answer@iastate.edu.

Harrison County will host a Fumigation Continuing Instructional Course for commercial pesticide applicators on Tuesday, Nov. 29. The program will be shown at locations across Iowa through the Iowa State University Extension Pest Management and the Environment program. The local site for the Nov. 29 CIC is the Harrison County Extension Office, 304 E. Seventh St., Logan. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. followed by the session from 9-11 a.m. The registration fee is $35 on or before Nov. 22 and $45 after Nov. 22. To register or to obtain additional information about the CIC, contact the Harrison County Extension office by phon-

ing (712) 644-2105. The 2011 course will provide continuing instructional credit for commercial pesticide applicators certified in categories 7C (Fumigation) and 10 (Demonstration and Research). The course will cover topics including bin and railcar fumigation; milling and food processing plant fumigation; grain insect biology; hazards of phosphide fumigants; emergency incidents involving fumigants; and an update on sulfuryl fluoride. Additional information and registration forms for this and other courses offered through the PME Program can be accessed at www.extension.iastate. edu/PME.


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Giving Thanks: Bunkhouse Cafe gives to the community, twice From GIVING Page 1 mind I’ve been preparing this meal for years now,” McClain said. “The time just depends on how long everything needs to cook.” And McClain and Nixon foot the bill for everything else not brought in by their families. In turn, they are able to offer a Thanksgiving feast for those with no where to go, or no one to share with, for nothing

but a free-will offering. “Everyone needs a place to go to share a Thanksgiving meal,” McClain said. “You need to share it with someone.” In turn, they pass the sharing on. Any funds collected from the free-will dinner are then donated to a local cause. In years past, the proceeds have found their way to helping elderly residents keep their homes heated, a young

boy in Logan fighting cancer, West Harrison D e v e l o p m e n t Corporation, Harrison County’s Adopt-A-Family Program and more. The decision on where, or to whom, to donate to comes after cleaning the last Thanksgiving dish. “We don’t keep any of the money from that day,” McClain said. “We, Jackie and I, pay for the food. We just firmly believe everyone needs to have some-

where to go on Thanksgiving.” McClain even mentioned others that have joined in the tradition. Not because they have no where to go, but more for the cause and the atmosphere. “There are families that do have somewhere to go and other people to be with, but they stop in here anyway,” she said. “They’ve made their own tradition out of it.”

They Bunkhouse dynamic duo doesn’t stop there, though. To make sure everyone has the opportunity to enjoy a Thanksgiving dinner, they offer local deliveries to residents unable to traverse. “We will deliver it to them. They just need to call us,” McClain said. Thanksgiving dinner will be served from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day,

Thursday, Nov. 24, and deliveries are available by calling 647-2711. And the turnout is … “To me, a good turnout is anybody that doesn’t have somewhere to go that can come join us for Thanksgiving dinner. Whether that’s one or 30,” McClain said. “Whether they come to enjoy dinner, just break bread with us or support the community – no one has to be alone on Thanksgiving day.”

National Adoption Month: Nelsons have reason to celebrate From ADOPT Page 1 made the decision to adopt from Holt International Adoption Agency in Omaha, Neb. This decision came after the delivery of the Nelson’s two, biological children, Abby, now 12, and Jack, now 9. The adoption process, through the Foster System with Bernie, and through an international, private agency with Max, had similarities and differences. “The hardest part of international adoption is the waiting,” Amber said. Scott and Amber received Max’s photo when they heard he was born. In the months to follow, they were given reports on Max’s doctor’s appointments. It was six months before the Nelson family was able to hold baby Max. “You can’t kiss, hug, hold or be with your baby and you feel like you are missing all of these moments,” Amber said. “Which, in reality, isn’t a long span of time, but when you are here and your baby is half way around the world, it is a very huge lesson in patience and trust. Patience, because once we knew Max had been born, we wanted him home. Trust in God that Max was in a home where he was being well-

taken care of and loved.” Aside from the long process, the paperwork was mountainous. “International adoption is a long process with lots of paperwork. There were times I didn’t know which was worse – paperwork or labor,” Amber joked. Bernie’s adoption through Foster Care was different. “There’s not quite as much paperwork and not near the expense,” Amber said. “But we still had to go through another home study, be fingerprinted and have background checks.” Regardless of what the Nelson’s endured to secure their sons into their place in their family, there’s a reason. Amber is passionate about adoption. Why? She is passionate about children and being a mother. And … she is adopted. “Every child deserves a home. A place where they feel loved and safe,” Amber said. “I am an adoptee and I know the impact that it has had on my life. Scott and I have adopted and, as much as we are told that we are a blessing to our children, we believe that our children are a bigger blessing to us.” Amber herself was found in a ditch outside of Seoul, South Korea, by

a man riding his bicycle on his way to work. She was dropped at a local hospital where they simply guessed at her birthday and gave her a name. She wound up at the Holt Orphanage until she was adopted at the age of three months by her parents in America. To this day, she still does not have a birth certificate. “Without a birth certificate, getting things like a Social Security number, a passport and even going through the adoption processes here, required some extra steps.” Amber wouldn’t have had it any other way – extra steps or not. And she’s not alone in those feelings, which is why November has been named National Adoption Month by the National Council for Adoption. Bernie used to be one of several statistics: According to the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System’s fiscal year 2010 data, on Sept. 30, 2010 there were 408,425 children in foster care. These children, ranging from the ages of less than a year through 20 years of age, spend an average of 14 months per home. Only 4 percent of them are placed in preadoptive homes.

The happy and recently grown Nelson sibling include, left to right, Bernie, 7, Jack, 9, Max, 7, and Abby, 12. Photo: Submitted Now, though, thanks to Amber and Scott, Bernie belongs to a different statistic: one of the 11,058 children adopted by U.S. families in the past year. Something the Nelsons will never regret. “To anyone considering adoption, I would tell them that adoption is a wonderful way to add to your family,” Amber said. “Choosing to adopt internationally or through the Foster Care System are two, very different experiences. And, adopting a baby is also a whole different experience from adopting an older child.” According to Nelson, adoption opens up preconceived boundaries, not only for the families, but for those around

them. “The term, ‘blood is thicker than water,’ loses its meaning very quickly. From the outside, our family looks very different. I grew up in a family that, from the outside, looked very different. You will get asked questions. You will get stares. And some people will just not understand. But the beauty of the situation is, for every ‘not-so-good’ experience, there are 100, beautiful, wonderful ones,” Nelson said. “When you give a child their ‘forever home,’ how he/she got there just becomes part of their life story. You love the child because he/she is your child and the labels of ‘adoption’ and ‘biologi-

cal’ are simply lost.” With a variety of adoption types, including domestic adoption through Foster Care and private organizations, international adoption and transracial adoptions, the National Council for Adoption encourages families to look into the adoption method that fits them. The Nelsons found more than one. More information regarding adoption is available on the National Council for Adoption’s website at www.adoptioncouncil.org. Or you can catch the Nelson family often at the school, Monday through Friday, dropping off or picking up their four children.

Stepping into the cage: Grossman wins second match in first round

Grossman works on securing a choke hold minutes before his opponent, Erik Smith, tapped out, ending the match. Being a good sport: Grossman and Smith exchange smiles and congratulations after Grossman was declared the winner. The entire match lasted under three minutes. Photos: Nikki Davis

SHORT TAKES From SHORT TAKES Page 1 need. Call 647-2866 with

questions. RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE Harrison County Red Cross Blood Drives will be held: 7 a.m. to noon, Dec. 2, at Alegent Health Community Memorial Hospital, Missouri Valley; and 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Dec. 13, at Sacred Heart Catholic

Church, Woodbine. CUBS HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES CUBS members will be reading books to children (and adults) from 5-8 p.m., Friday, Dec. 2, at Hometown Hardware. Goody bags available until gone. DVD DRIVE

From CAGE Page 1 Both fighters, Grossman and Smith, were entering with a 1-0 record. “I wasn’t scared at all during the fight, but before the fight, I get competitive anxiety and I might get a little freaked out in back,” Grossman admitted. “I mean they are locking you in a cage to fight another person that you have never met before except for weighins. Cage fighting is the closest thing we have modern day to compare to the gladiators.” Fortunately for Grossman, he has a system in place that helps calm him down and puts him “in the zone.” The match up between Grossman and Smith proved exciting with both wrestlers using an array of fighting styles from wrestling to boxing to Jiu-Jitsu and taking turns dominating the fight. However exciting it was – it was still another short fight. Grossman managed to land Smith on the floor in a rear choke hold before the bell sounded at the end of the first period. Smith tapped out, leaving Grossman at 2-0 as an amateur MMA fighter. And he’s already contemplating how to make

improvements. “I haven’t watched the video yet, and it all happens so fast. I know I could have thrown the flying side kick that I did right away better,” he contemplated. “I also would have liked to have striked more than I did and I shouldn’t’ have hunted for the arm so fast when I pulled guard. I should have seen what he was giving me and what was open, instead of going for the Kimura right away. I went for it so fast because it’s my favorite move. But there’s always things to fix. I’ll go back and watch the video and see how I can improve.” Grossman’s improvements will come from an array of arenas. He currently lives in Omaha, Neb. and attends college, so his focus is on school. However, he visits Woodbine to practice Tae Kwon Do and Jiu-Jitsu with Scott Thompson. Thompson’s training partner, Greg James, and James’ student, Sean Westbrook, also work with Grossman, showing him the “ropes” of cage fighting, including techniques and drills. He also lifts weights four days a week and runs a cardio/conditioning regiment about three days a

week. “I train for so many different things to happen that I really don’t think about what my opponent is going to do to me. When I’m out there, I know that I’m the one that’s going to dictate the pace and what happens. We do things to simulate taking a beating and getting your bell rung, or how you’re going to feel throwing punches when your legs are wobbly,” Grossman said. All of his training might lead him to another a fight at the St. Patrick’s Day event in March, held by Disorderly Conduct. This time, he’ll be entering the cage at 2-0. “I would love to become a pro and do have dreams of fighting in the UFC someday, but I also have to remind myself that this is just a hobby right now. I need to stay focused on school,” Grossman said. “And I wouldn’t be able to do it without my sponsors, Gary’s Ag, Meeker Well and Moore’s Electric.” While he’s a little farther behind on his 131-52 high school record, it looks as though Grossman is determined to match his pin record of 84, now standing at 2.

The Woodbine Key Club will be setting up boxes at Bank of hte West, Farmers Trust and Savings bank, Everything Ellen and Eby’s Drug Store for new or slightly used movies on DVD for patients at Children’s Hospital as part of their

Christmas project. Donations will be accepted from Nov. 28 to Dec. 9. NO FAREWAY FOOD STORE INSERT IN NOV. 30 TWINER To our loyal insert readers: There will be no Fareway Food Store insert in the Nov. 30 edi-

tion of the Woodbine "Twiner" as Fareway's corporate office does an annual targeted promotion. We thank you for your interest in reading about Fareway Food Store specials in your community newspaper and Fareway will be back in December.


November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Community

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Gift Guide THANKSGIVING WEEK SPECIALS at T he

D E T S I W T

TAIL

712-644-3942

ALEGENT HEALTH GIFT STORE

2849 335th Street Beebeetown, IA

Find us on facebook!

W EDNESDAY,, NOVEMBER 23 PRE THANKSGIVING PARTY! LIVE MUSIC from 9pm - 1am from BYRON JAMES GANG Drink Specials & Games in the Shed! Beebeetown is the place to be the night before Thanksgiving!

THANKSGIVING NIGHT - BAR OPENSS ATT 5pm

FRIDAY,, NOVEMBER 25 OPEN AT 8:00 A.M. FOR BREAKFAST!

The Gift Shop is open various hours Monday Friday

Stop In and Visit Our Gift Store Large Selection of Gifts for Everyone Volunteers needed to staff the hospital gift shop Call 712-642-9213

Holiday Items of all types. Cutlery sold single and by sets, candy - great for stocking stuffers, Jewelry, cards and ornaments Proceeds fund yearly scholarship opportunities for area graduates and post graduate students.

Serving Breakfast from 8am to 11am BLOODY MARY SPECIALS • $2 BUD FAMILY BEERS DURING THE

NEBRASKA vs. IOWA GAME! Immediately following the game, followed by LIVE ENTERTAINMENT AND BEER PONG & BAGS TOURNAMENT

Alegent Health Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley

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9

The Woodbine Twiner

November 23, 2011

Sports

s t n a p i c i t r a P s t r o p S l l Fa

Season Awards and Honors Football All District First team: Matt Monahan, Sam Powers, Cory Caddell Second team: Mason Mentink, Josh Matusik

Football Academic All District Matt Monahan, Mason Mentink

Volleyball Western Valley All Conference First team: Justina Royer and Shelby Vandemark Second team: Samijo Klaahsen and Kaitlyn Pulscher Honorable: Taylor Barry, Tiffany Vasquez and Cydney Meeker

Volleyball Team Awards (As voted on by teammates) MVP: Justina Royer Hussle Award: Bailee Meyer Most Improved: Lauren Dubas, Brittany Nelson Spirit Award: Brittany Nelson

Woodbine Farm Supply Congratulations, athletes, we hope you excel in all life’s ventures.

712-647-2220 • Woodbine, IA Missouri Valley California Junction Modale Mondamin Little Sioux Dunlap Woodbine

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10

November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Community Sustainable Coordinator for Americorp works with Woodbine Community School District students

From TRASH Page 1: Sustainable Coordinator for Americorp Alana Smith, standing in center, spent some time with Woodbine Community School District, fifth grade students explaining what and how to use a garden composter. Photos: Kevin Brown

Cameryn Schafer, Geana Davis, Katie Barnum and Brian Bak sort through example trash bags (items in the bag were clean) and worked with them on what they could recycle, compost and what had to be thrown away.

Kaitlyn Malone and Kyle Johnson observe the garden compost barrel Smith brought with her. TM

Gene’s Toys & Collectibles Black Friday Sale!

• Die Cast • Farm Toys • Nascar • Model Kits • Memorabilia • Restorations

Check our BUY ONE GET ONE SPECIALS

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Antiques 13,000 Square Feet of Quality Antiques Furniture, Glassware, Stoneware, Etc.

GRAND RE-OPENING & CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE Stop in! Free Refreshments! Gift Corner in Antique Mall November 25th thru December 4th Hours: 9:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

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Possum Lodge Christmas Trees

Open weekends 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. beginning Fri., Nov. 25. Located 1 1/2 miles east of Woodbine on Airport Road (F32), then 1 1/2 miles south on Sawyer Trail Cut your own tree • Fresh wreaths Denny Stoner ~ 647-2459

Kaelin Armstrong, Cuy Meeker, Alyssa Jensen and Jared Newton look through their “garbage bag.” Smith explained to the students what they could recycle, compost and what had to be thrown away.

Announce, Sell, Advertise, Recruit 24/7 Can’t Wait!! To Spread the News or Sell Your Goods in our classifed section just visit us at www.woodbinetwiner.com

Woodbine Twiner • 712-647-2821


November 23, 2011

11

The Woodbine Twiner

Community Vanessa Boe wins Loess Hills tour end of the year drawing “It was wonderful for us to see. We didn’t know that some of this was even here. Hidden treasures.” ~Vanessa Boe Mike Brownlee For The Twiner The season is barely over, but the people of the Living Loess Tour are looking forward to next year. “I thought it went really well. I’m excited about next season,” said Barb Gallaher, owner of Gallaher Designs.

Sawmill Hollow aronia berry farm, Honey Creek Creamery, the Loess Hills Lavender Farm, Hitchcock Nature Center, Gallaher Designs, Harvest Studio, Loess Hills Woodworks, Garden Grove Deli and the Harrison County Historical Village and Welcome Center make up stops on the journey

through the Loess Hills, with each location welcoming guests on the third Saturday of the month from May through October. The first year of the tour featured some obstacles, Gallaher said, including the closing of Interstates 29 and 680 because of flooding, rain on a few Saturdays and

confusion on how to get to Sawmill Hollow. (She said there will be fixes made to the map.) “We learned a lot,” Gallaher said. “All in all, it was great.” The first season helped get the word out about the tour, she said, and turnout was good, especially in the mornings. The tour was born of the artisans’ mutual friendships and encounters. “We just kept getting together, meeting each other at farmers markets, craft fairs and other events,” said Mary Hamer, owner of the lavender farm. “We

talked about how many great artisans there are in the hills and always supported each other, telling people about each other. We talked about how we could combine to make our efforts stronger. “You turn around, and pretty soon you’ve got a group going.” Tourgoers received a “passport,” and if they stopped at each spot during the summer — they weren’t required to go to all nine in one day — they were entered in an end-of-the-year drawing. Vanessa Boe of Woodbine, Iowa, won. Her prizes were a wood chest made by Shawn

Shea of Loess Hills Woodworks, along with a gift basket with products from each location. Unlike many, Boe and friends took the whole tour in one day. “What an experience it is to see what this area has to offer,” said Boe, who recently moved to southwest Iowa. “It was wonderful for us to see. We didn’t know that some of this was even here. Hidden treasures.” Gallaher said a kickoff festival might be held next spring. “People are looking for cool things to do close to home,” she said. “We’ll continue providing those opportunities.”

Cattlemen’s Association First flu case confirmed in Iowa Convention and Annual Meeting

Iowa cattle producers will have several opportunities for Harrison County cattlemen experiencing and learning practical information that can be used immediately on their farms at the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association Convention and Annual Meeting Dec. 12-14 at The Meadows Event & Conference Center in Altoona. “The theme of our meeting is ‘What’s in Your Cards?,’ and ICA is offering many options to draw a winning hand,” ICA convention organizer Trent Wellman said. On Dec. 12, cattle producers can attend a Cattlemen’s College in the morning. The Pfizersponsored event features Dr. D. Dee Griffin, Feedlot Production Management Veterinarian at the University of Nebraska’s Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center. Griffin will do an economic review of a cost-

effective health program, as well as analyze the cost of mistakes. In the afternoon, three cattle facilities in Story County will be part of a bus tour. Each farmer’s facility shows a different approach that today’s feeders can consider. The facilities include a hoop building; a modified hoop, which is an open lot combined with a hoop; and a monoslope building combined with an alternative technology system. In the evening, building designers will make brief comments before a panel presentation about using crop residues as feed stock. This program has been under development through a collaboration of John Deere, ADM, and Monsanto. Dan Loy, Interim Director of the Iowa Beef Center at Iowa State University will pull together the key issues from the afternoon and evening events.

On Tuesday, Dec. 13, there will be six different Info-Expo sessions held throughout the day. Topics include: Also on Dec. 13, the Beef Product, Business Issues, and Cattle Production policy committees will meet to discuss new proposed resolutions, as well as review expiring policies in each of the areas. Other activities that day are a trade show, awards luncheon, trade show reception and dinner followed by the Iowa Cattlemen’s Foundation Annual Fundraising Auction. The trade show will continue on Dec. 14, and the annual business meetings of the Iowa Beef Industry Council (which is responsible for the use of check-off dollars) and the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association will be held. Early registration for the ICA Convention and Annual Meeting will save attendees $35 per person. If registered by Nov. 28, registration will be $115; after that, the price increases to $150. The registration price includes four meals, the trade show and all educational sessions. The pre-convention event on Dec. 12 is free of charge, but registration is required so meal accomodations can be properly planned. Get more information or register for the meeting at the ICA website, www.iacattlemen.org.

The Iowa Department of Public Health has received its first confirmed seasonal influenza report for the 20112012 season. The State Hygienic Laboratory confirmed the positive test result in a Polk County child (0 to 17 years of age), with no reported medical conditions. “Right now is a good time to get your flu vaccine,” IDPH Medical Director Dr. Patricia Quinlisk said. “It’s not too late to be vaccinated for seasonal influenza, and it’s especially important for those with risk factors including heart diseases, lung diseases, diabetes, women who are pregnant and the very young and very old.” The influenza vaccine is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. While the flu vaccine is the best defense against getting influenza, it’s also important to take personal actions to help prevent the spread of illness.

Remember the 3Cs: Cover your coughs and sneezes; clean your hands frequently; and contain germs by staying home when ill. The flu is a respiratory illness caused by viruses. It spreads easily from person to person and can cause mild to severe illness. The flu comes on suddenly and symptoms may include fever, headache, tiredness, cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, and body aches. Illness typically lasts two to seven days. Influenza may cause severe illness or complications in people such as the very young or very old, or those who have underlying health conditions. Contact your health care provider or local health department to find out where the vaccine is available in your community. More information about influenza can be found at www.idph.state.ia.us/Cade/Influenza. aspx.

Automatical mailing of Iowa income Protect program eligibility before tax booklets eliminated for 2011 working wet areas of the farm If you are a Woodbine resident expecting a paper income tax form and instruction booklet in the mail this year, you may be surprised. With the continued growth of electronic filing, the Iowa Department of Revenue will no longer automatically mail paper income tax forms and instruction booklets to individual taxpayers beginning with tax year 2011. This change is part of IDR’s focus on creating efficiencies through the increased use of technology. The Internal Revenue Service and many other states have already taken this step. Tax payers are being encouraged to file returns electronically. If you are a Woodbine resident and would still like to file via paper, your options include: • Forms and instructions available online at www.iowa.gov/tax. The online form is fillable. • Call the forms order line at (800) 532-1531 • Request a form by

email at IowaTaxForms@Iowa.go v • Request a form by mail: Iowa Department of Revenue; P.O. Box 10460 Des Moines IA 50306-0460. • Pick up a booklet at the IDR office on the fourth floor of the Hoover State Office Building, located at 1305 E. Walnut, Des Moines. Due to limited availability, only one booklet

will be provided to each request. In addition, IDR is pleased to announce it is implementing a barcoding program for tax year 2011. Returns filed on paper that are created using participating computer software vendors or printed from the IDR website will contain a barcode to assist in processing those returns. Barcodes will appear in the upper right and

lower left on page one of the IA1040, as well as in the lower left on many other Iowa individual income tax forms and schedules. Barcoding will be offered in addition to electronic filing. While barcoding may speed the processing of a paper return slightly, filing returns electronically remains the best option for processing returns more quickly and accurately.

According to USDA, net farm income in 2011 is forecasted to be the highest recorded (adjusted for inflation) since 1974. Fueled by several years of higher grain prices, farmers have been reinvesting some of this increased income into their operations. As seen in fields this fall, many producers are choosing to spend this money on installing tile drainage systems. Higher land prices have also caused many landowners to squeeze more production out of the acres they currently farm by removing fence rows, filling low areas and clearing trees. Conservationists with the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service warn producers to be cautious about wetland provisions when installing tile, clearing trees or completing other land altering measures. “Farmers and land managers need to protect their farm program benefits by first checking with their local office for a wetland determination prior to working in wet portions of their farms,” State Conservationist for Iowa NRCS Richard Sims said. To maintain eligibility, USDA participants must certify they have not produced crops on wetlands converted after Dec. 23, 1985, and they did not convert a wetland to make agricultural production possible after Nov. 28, 1990. Any activity that alters natural wetlands, making the production of an agricultural commodity or forage crop more possible is prohibited. These conversion activities may include:Filling; draining (surface ditching or subsurface tiling); land leveling; clearing woody vegetation where stumps are removed; diverting run-off water from a wetland (i.e. building a diversion) If found in violation, farmers would lose eligibility for USDA programs, Sims said. For more information or to request a wetland determination, please visit your local USDA Service Center.


12

November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Community Licenses on sale for anterless deer Christmas Adoption Program Licenses are on sale for Iowa’s three day, November, antlerless deer season Nov. 25-27. November antlerless season licenses are valid only on private land in the 42 counties where the antlerless quota has not filled. Party hunting is allowed and all hunters must wear blaze orange. Hunting hours are one half hour before sunrise to one half hour after sunset.

For a listing of counties with antlerless licenses available, go to http://www.iowadnr.g ov/Hunting/DeerHunt ing/DeerInformation.a spx and click on quota numbers. All deer taken must be reported using the harvest reporting system by midnight the day after the deer is recovered. Accurately reporting the harvest is an important part of Iowa’s deer manage-

ment program and plays a vital role in managing deer populations and future hunting opportunities. For hunters with Internet access, the online harvest reporting is the easiest way to register the deer. Hunters can report their deer online at www.iowadnr.gov, by calling the toll free reporting number (800) 771-4692, or at any license vendor.

Farm Bureau - Chad Soma D

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{ Here is where you let out a sigh of relief. } Chad L. Soma FARM BUREAU AGENT

West Central Community Action and the Logan VFW Ladies Auxiliary 6256 are asking public assistance with the 2011 Christmas Adoption Program for Harrison County. Families who are not adopted will receive gift certificates from the monetary donations received. Please contact Amy at (712) 644-3388 to adopt a family or make a donation. Make checks payable to: Harrison Co. Christmas Adoption Fund, and mail to: West Central Community Action., Attn: Amy, 107 N. Fourth Ave., Ste 7, Logan, IA 51546. Families needing assistance can call for more information. Deadline to sign up is Dec. 9. Families available for adoption include: 2. Single dad; three girls, 12, 16 and 18 years; one boy, 24 years 3. Elderly woman 9. One boy, 12 years 10. Elderly man 12. Elderly single mom; two adult disabled children, one boy and one girl. 13. Elderly man 21. Elderly woman; single mom; three adult children (one disabled) ages 22, 23 and 24. 23. Elderly woman 25. Couple; three girls, 12, 13 and 15 years 26. Elderly woman 32. Single mom; one girl, 18 years 35. Couple; two boys, 11 years and 11 years; one girl, 19 years 36. Couple; one boy, 7 years 37. Couple; three boys, 14, 15 and 20 years 38. Single mom; one boy, 17 years 46. Couple; three boys, 12, 14 and 16 years; one girl, 10 years 50. Single mom; three boys, 2, 13 and 19 years; one girl, 16 years 52. Couple; two boys, 1 and 2 years 53. Single mom; one boy, 16 years 54. Elderly woman 55. Single mom; one girl, 16 years 56. Couple; one girl, 15 years 57. One boy, 9 years 58. Four boys, 6, 13, 15 and 18 years 60. Two girls, 14 and 17 years; one boy, 13 years 61. Couple; one boy, 7 years; one girl, 21 years 62. Disabled woman 63. Elderly couple; disabled adult son 65. Elderly couple; couple; two girls, 5 and 11 years 66. Single mom; three girls, 21 months, 14 and 16 years 70. Elderly couple 72. Single mom; one girl, 2 years; two

boys, 8 and 12 years 73. Single mom; one girl, 14 years 74. Single mom; two boys, 18 and 19 years; one girl, 19 years 75. One boy, 13 years; one girl, 9 years 76. Three girls, 10, 12 and 17 years 77. Three girls, 2, 4 and 13 years; one boy, 9 years 78. One boy, 9 years

503 Walker St, Suite 5 Woodbine, IA 51579 (712) 647-2647

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

H142IA (11-10) FB-19-P-10

Talk to Your Children (and Parents) about Shared Financial Picture It’s Thanksgiving week. And if you’re fortunate, you can look around your Thanksgiving table and see several generations of your family. Of course, as you know, many types of cohesiveness are involved in knitting a family together. But one connection that frequently gets ignored, at least in terms of family dialogue, is the financial linkage between parents and their children on one hand, and these same parents and their parents on the other. So if you find yourself in this “sandwich” group, it may be worth considering your financial position. If your children are very young, you might want to start by emphasizing the importance of three separate concepts: saving, spending and sharing. If you give them an allowance, or if you pay them to do some minor tasks around the household, you can encourage them to put the money in three separate containers. The “spending” jar is for them to use as they choose, the “saving” jar is to be put in some type of savings or investment account and the “sharing” jar is to be used for contributions to charitable causes. You can extend the spending, saving and sharing themes by encouraging your kids to spend wisely, watch how their savings grow

and feel pride in the work done by the charitable groups their dollars support. Later, when your kids are older, and can earn money by babysitting, mowing lawns or working parttime, you can further encourage good financial habits by offering to match their contributions to a Roth IRA. And be sure to discuss the different types of investments available; they may enjoy learning about the ways in which they can participate in the financial markets. Above all else, talk to them about the importance of developing good financial skills and how these skills will play a part in your family’s overall well being. Now, let’s turn to your parents. If they’re elderly, you may find that talking to them about financial issues may be considerably more challenging than talking about these issues with your children. It’s unfortunate, but true: People are sensitive about money and often don’t want to talk about it. You may find that you need to be persistent, especially if your parents are getting on in years. Perhaps you encourage them to consider their current position, and what planning might need to

Scott Thompson 115 N. Ave., Suite 200 Logan, IA 51546 (712) 644-3692 www.edwardjones.com Toll Free: 866-644-3692 Member SIPC

be considered. Do they have accounts in a local bank? Where are their investments held? Do they have a financial advisor? Have they worked with legal professionals on any arrangements? If your parents have expressed interest in leaving a legacy or passing assets to family members, you might consider encouraging them to seek assistance from the appropriate professionals. After all, if something were to happen to your parents without them having made the proper arrangements, their wishes may not be carried out. So this Thanksgiving, as you think about the value of your family, you might take some time to consider issues that need to be addressed. . It may take time and diligence — but when it comes to your loved one's wishes and wellbeing, it’s probably worth the effort. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

To learn more, call 647-2340 or get a rebate application from your retailer, from Woodbine Mun. Lt. & Power, or at:

Woodbine

517 Walker St. Woodbine, IA 51579 Ph. 712-647-2340

Municipal Light & Power


November 23, 2011

13

The Woodbine Twiner

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14

November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Legals/Community Wetlands Reserve Program Nov. 17 fire in Logan destroys Woodbine landowners interested in restoring agricultural land to natural wetlands through the USDA’s Wetlands Reserve Program should apply by Dec. 1 at their local USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service office. WRP is a voluntary program that provides technical and financial assistance to eligible private landowners to restore, protect and enhance wetlands in exchange for retiring eligible land from agriculture. WRP is a continuous signup program, although NRCS periodically makes funding selections as program funding allows. Dec. 1 is the first cutoff date for this fiscal year’s funding. During fiscal year 2011, NRCS enrolled easements on more than 4,000 acres across Iowa at a value exceeding $15 million. Over the past 20 years, more than 156,000 acres have been restored or are in the process of being restored to wetlands in Iowa through WRP and similar federal programs. Wetlands provide habitat for wildlife, including threatened and endangered species; improve water quality by filtering sediments and chemicals; reduce flooding; recharge groundwater; protect biological diversity; and provide opportunities for educational, scientific and limited recreational activities. To apply or to find out more about WRP eligibility and enrollment options, visit your local USDA Service Center, the nearest being located at the Logan Service Center, 2710 Hwy. 127, Logan, call (712) 2432107 or visit the website at www.ia.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/WRP.html.

garage, spreads to house The Logan Fire Department was called to a garage fire at 1:30 p.m., Nov. 17, at the Doug Johnsen residence in Logan. The fire completely destroyed the garage, including a pickup and motorcycle parked inside. Some siding on the Johnsen’s house was charred, but there was minor damage. The siding on the neighbor’s house melted from the heat. Fire department officials suspected the cause of the fire was electrical and resulted in approximately $30,000 in damage. Woodbine was called for mutual aid in the blaze which was under control in approximately two hours. Photo: Mary Darling

LEGALS PUBLIC NOTICE WOODBINE CITY COUNCIL November 7, 2011 Minutes Mayor William H. Hutcheson called the Woodbine City Council into session Monday, November 7, 2011, at 5:00 p.m. in the City conference room. Councilmembers Brenda Loftus, Jim Andersen, Bob Stephany, and Noel Sherer answered roll call. Councilmember Nancy Yarbrough arrived at 5:15 p.m. Others in attendance included Deb Sprecker, Jim and Patty Reisz, Kassey Bartels, Courtney Harter, Kevin Brown, Darin Smith, Cathy Searcy, Donald (DJ) Belcastro, Alana Smith, Zell Millard, Paul Marshall, Alan Ronk, Joe Gaa. Moved by Stephany, seconded by Andersen, to approve the consent agenda which included October 17 minutes, October 24 Special and November 1 Special Minutes and continued October Bills. 4 ayes. The Mayor opened the Façade Master Plan Public Hearing at 5:03 p.m. Courtney Harter, of Southweset Iowa Planning Council and Project Manager Darin Smith gave an update on the properties involved and the overall budget. Harter reported the City received $500,000 in CDBG funding and $380,000 has been spent to date. The projected completion date for the project is Decembet 32, 2011. Mayor Hutcheson closed the meeting at 5:05 p.m. Kassey Bartels gave a presentation on Blue Zones Healthiest Communities Initiative. Through a competitive application process, ten communities that demonstrate the greatest passion, interest and abili-

ty to bring their community together will receive direct access to national experts in transforming into a Blue Zones Community. Kassey has been organizing the event in woodbine. Woodbine has submitted a statement of interest. If accepted, a full application will be due January 4, 2012, with selection completed by March. Updates were given on two properties with reported nuisance abatement issues: 608 Normal – Jim and Betty Bennett- property was inspected October 12, 2011. Owners were not present at meeting, and no public comment received. The inspection report was reviewed with the Council. Recommended action was to give 30 days to abate the yard debris. If issue is not resolved by December 7, 2011, the city will abate the nuisance and assess the costs to the property owner. Moved by Loftus, seconded by Andersen, to approve the recommendation. 40 (Yarbrough arrived shortly after this vote). 23-7th Street – Cathy Searcy and Donald Belcastro – property was inspected October 12, 2011. Owners were present at the meeting and addressed the Council, no additional public comment received. This case has been on-going for several months. A court order to abate was issued in April. Little compliance has been made and the City has received numerous citizen complaints on the condition of the property. Two recommended options were presented to the Council. 1. Option 1 Part A-#1-4- on the Cost Estimate Report should be completed within 30 days. These

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items mirror the requirements of the court order. If the items are not resolved by December 7, the City will abate the nuisance and assess the costs to the property owner. Option 1 Part B – The property owner should submit a plan to satisfy the requirements of #5-10 on the Cost Estimate Report in a timely manner. The plan should be submitted to the City office by November 30 for review by the Council at the December 5 meeting. OR 2. Option 2 – The Council can offer the owner a cash settlement to deed the property over to the City of Woodbine. The recom-mended buyout amount is $5,000. The property would then be leveled and the lot re-sold for new residential development. The sale of the land would likely repay the funds used for the initial purchase and demolition costs. The property owners requested the Council allow them to pursue Option #1. The property owners had different opinions as to what vehicles on their property are classified as “junk vehicles” and greatly disputed the inspector recommendations for improve-ments to the dwelling. Moved by Stephany, seconded by Yarbrough, to extend Option #1. The Mayor and Councilmembers Yarbrough and Loftus, each addressed the property owners stating that progress must start immediately and be noticeable and tha the end goal is absolute compliance. The property owners agreed to the Council comments and stated they would have Part A completed within 30 days, weather permitting, and that a written plan would be presented for Council consideration and approval on December 5th. The Mayor put

the issue to vote – passed 5-0. City Administrator Gaa updated the council on the potential residential energy efficiency partnership proposed by Energy Pioneer Solutions (EPS). There have been conflicting legal opinions. Iowa Association Municipal Utility (IAMU) has evaluated the opinions and provided their opinion on the program. IAMU’s opinion stated the program is legal under Iowa law and could be pursued by Iowa communities. While this mostly is a Utility Board issue, City support and involvement would be needed. Moved by Sherer, seconded by Andersen, to support the EPA program. 5 ayes. (Sherer left after this vote). Jim and Patty Reisz addressed the Council to express their interest in purchasing the lot that includes the police station and metal storage building. The Reiszes have purchased the former bakery building and would like to utilize the police station for additional retail space. The metal Building would be removed to provide green space and parking. This would allow the addition of windows to the north side, and also help in resolving a water issue in their building. The City Administrator stated the Council would have to determine their desire to sell the property, then publically advertise and accept proposals for purchase. Councilmember Stephany felt that additional study needed to be conducted and to consult with the Utility Board for support as the property is shared. Patty Reisz advised they understood there were many issues to resolve and that it would take time to reach a final solution. Moved by Loftus, seconded by Andersen, to table this matter for further review

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and to present the offer to the Utility Board in December. 4 ayes. The Mayor re-appointed Shirley Wakehouse to a five-year term on the Board of Adjustment. Moved by Andersen, seconded by Loftus, to approve the mayoral appointment. 4 ayes. Regular monthly reports were presented by the City Administrator, Interim Police Chief, Public Works Director and Electric/Water Superintendent. Meeting adjourned at 6:42 p.m. William H. Hutcheson, Mayor ATTEST: Lois Surber, City Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICE WOODBINE CITY COUNCIL October 2011 Bills Agriland FS, Inc. Fertilize/ball fields ........249.20 Bankers Trust Company GO interest & fee....17,197.50 Bedrock Gravel Incorp. 54.58 T rock/shop/8th St...........805.06 Counsel Office & Document Copier/copies...............103.99 Mary Jane Foutch Clerical...........................63.00 Gall’s An Aramark Co. Police uniforms ............213.29 Harr. Co. Landfill Assessment ..............3,040.00 Holiday Inn Airport, IAMU IMFOA training ............380.80 IIMC, membership fee ......135.00 Echo Group Inc., Lincoln Way bulbs ....................281.96 IA Dept. of Commerce IUB assessment ..........348.00 Windstream, phone Service ........................457.26 Iowa Treasury, October sales tax .....1,521.00 Bank of the West (Visa) Postage, budget class, Halloween/police .........119.54 Mangold Environmental Wastewater testing 11th & L. way.................74.00 Paul Marshall, cell phone Allowance/meal .............55.02 The Office Stop, pocket And file folders...............41.58 Pryor’s K & L Parts Battery/explorer ...........114.00 Southwest Planning Council Admin. I-jobs/ Master Façade......................2,721.00 Swift Small Engine Repair Privacy locks Public

Works Bldg. .................285.00 United Western Coop Fuel..............................214.51 Verizon Wireless Police cell ......................83.41 Horizon Equipment, mower Repairs, supp ..............321.09 W. Central Community Act ILEAO refund...............368.80 Antia Whitmore, Cleaning ......................375.00 Winnelson Company, ball Valves water truck .........96.24 Woodbine Mun. Utilities Service .....................1,463.21 Casey’s General Store Fuel..............................976.63 Eby Drug Store Batteries/gloves .............11.46 David Esser, paint south Woodbine sign...............75.00 Gall’s An Aramark Co. 2 long sleeve shirts......106.64 Groebner & Associates, Inc. Riser box .....................185.34 Harlan Municipal Utilities Spam filter .....................50.00 Heartland Technology Solutions Computer remote Labor .............................28.75 Echo Group, Inc., well generator Startup service .......15,695.00 IA. Assoc. Mun. Utilities Storm water workshop...90.00 IA Good Roads Assoc. FY 2012 dues ................95.00 IA State University Streets seminar .............65.00 Sargent Drilling, Well 1 & 3 pump tests .........500.00 Smith Project Management Façade master plan/reimb. Recordings ..................859.00 R. S. Stover Company 2 regulators .................263.90 Triple T Enterprises, Inc. Vehicle/criminal Law book .....................135.75 Walker Service, diesel......208.80 Warner Welding, weld Service line..................212.00 Barbara Wimer Floral garden ...............355.00 Woodhouse, repair brake Switch ’01 F250...........146.80 Balance .......................51,188.53 General Fund ..............12,748.46 Debt Service................17,197.50 Water ...........................18,496.01 Sewer ...............................602.58 Gas................................2,143.98 TOTAL .........................51.188.53 47-1


November 23, 2011

15

The Woodbine Twiner

Classifieds Ultra Chic Prom Boutique to celebrate fifth year Any Woodbine graduate understands prom dress styles have changed over the past five years. With those changing styles, the Ultra Chic Prom Boutique has grown. From its inaugural year in 2008 with 300 dresses collected and $2,000 raised for the Lydia House, the

Ultra Chic Prom Boutique has grown to nearly five times that. In 2011, the event collected 1,500 dresses, each dress was cleaned, pressed and mended by Max I. Walker’s dedicated and hard working employees, raising over $9,400 for the Lydia House. The Ultra Chic

Prom Boutique’s fifth year, including a fundraising event, will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012, at the at the Ramada Plaza Hotel & Convention Center on 72nd and Grover Streets in Omaha, Neb. With a goal to make the fifth year bigger and better than

ever before, Max I. Walker is seeking dress donations. Max I. Walker will clean and press the gowns, making them as good as new, and will sell them for just $25 at the event. Dresses can be dropped off at any of the 25 Max I. Walker locations. A list of this can be found at

MaxIWalker.com to find a complete list of locations. Every dress donated will allow entry to win a grand prize which includes a year’s worth of free tanning from Ashley Lynn’s and a party catered by Qdoba (grand prize value of about $500). Participants can enter to win the grand

prize by completing an entry form at any Max I. Walker location. Please see www.maxiwalker.co m for official rules. All proceeds from the Ultra Chic Prom Boutique benefit the Omaha Lydia House, a branch of the Open Door Mission. The Lydia House provides the Open Door

Mission’s services such as food, shelter and other basic needs, as well as individualized case management to map out the steps back to independence for single women and families. The Ultra Chic Prom Boutique has raised more than $28,000 for the Lydia House over the past four years.

CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED Service Manager room HELP WANTED: Servers and Cashiers: Apply in person after 4 p.m. G u r n e y ’ s Restaurant & Lounge, Missouri Valley. HELP WANTED: Halladay Motors Subaru of Cheyenne is expanding its Service Center and needs an experienced Import Auto Technician. Must be able to perform diagnostics & repairs on import vehicles as well as maintenance. Dealership experience preferred, not required. Benefits include 401 K, paid vacations, medical and dental insurance and profit sharing. Position requires 40+ hours/week including some Saturdays, must pass pre-employment drug screen and have acceptable driving record. Must possess own tools and have a positive attitude. Flat rate pay based on experience. No phone calls please. Apply in person @ Halladay Subaru of Cheyenne, 1615 Westland Rd, Cheyenne, WY or e-mail resume to Michelle Dixon,

NOTICE Gas leaks, Day: 647-2550 Evening & wkends 647-2345 Lo-Ma Community School

house in at: mdixon@halla- Logan, 2 car daymotors.com garage, all appliances included. HELP WANTED: $750 a month plus E x p e r i e n c e d deposit. No smokC o n s t r u c t i o n ers - no petsM e c h a n i c s References Needed. Paul Reed required. If interestConstruction, 2970 ed call Jess or Tedd N. 10th Street, at 402-290-3255 or Gering NE 69341. 402-510-4105 (308) 635-2213. MCAN FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. in Logan. HELP WANTED: References and E x p e r i e n c e d deposit required. Concrete Foreman. 712-420-2252 or Apply at Paul Reed 712-642-2007 Construction, 2970 N. 10th St., Gering FOR RENT: 3 bedNE 69341 MCAN room house, Woodbine, gas HELP WANTED: heat/central A-C, Work for Dept. of no pets. 712-647Health & Human 3044. Services. View current job openings at FOR RENT: Three www.dhhs.ne.gov bedroom home, MCAN three miles south and four miles east FOR SALE of Woodbine. Yellow house. Call FOR SALE” Used 7 1 2 - 7 3 3 - 2 6 7 3 , almond refrigerator, Chris Blum. good condition, $150. 712-647- LOST & FOUND 2741 FOUND: Lost bicyFOR RENT cle. Call 647-2381. Ask for Don to FOR RENT: 2 bed- identify. room house for rent in Woodbine IA, CARD OFTHANKS HUD approved, s t o v e / r e f r i d g e CARD OF included. No pets, THANKS: Thanks deposit required. If to all for rememberinterested call 402- ing me with 871-4385. prayers, cards, flowers, visits and FOR RENT: In phone calls for my Logan, 2 bedroom, birthday and hip energy efficient operation. Kathleen house, large yard, Burress. off street parking. Renter pays utiliSTATEWIDE ties. Deposit required. 402-6804908. ADOPTION

and adventure await! Financially secure, happily married artists wish to share extended family, home, and joy with baby. Expenses/support. www.EandTadopt.c om. 1(800)9592103. (INCN)

FOR RENT: 3 bed- ADOPT -Art, love,

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PREGNANT? Considering Adoption? Call us First! Living expenses, housing, medical and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866743-9212 (INCN) A G R I C U LT U R AL/FARMINGSERVICES Adams Mudjacking & Foundation Piers located in Lincoln NE. Concrete Raising, void filling and foundation piers/ Using limestone grout and polyurethane/Mem ber BBB 402 770 2566 (INCN) AUCTION 70 years Collection Estate of High Quality/Rare A n t i q u e s . November 18-20. Friday @ 4PM, Saturday @ 10AM, Sunday @ 11AM. Held inside Community Center in Alta, IA. Kevin Cone auctioneer 712-284-2726 w w w. i o w a a u c tionguide.com/con e (INCN)

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“You got the career trainingdrive, We have the Attend college Direction” OTR 100% online. Job Drivers APU placement assisEquipped Pre-Pass tance. Computer EZ-pass Pets/pas- available. Financial senger policy. Aid if qualified. Newer equipment. SCHEV certified. 100% NO touch. 1- Call 800-481-9409 8 0 0 - 5 2 8 - 7 8 2 5 www.CenturaOnlin A t t e n t i o n : (INCN) e.com (INCN) OWNER OPERAFlatbed M I S C E L L A TORS! New Pay Exp. Increase. No Drivers: Regional NEOUS Upfront Costs, opportunities now Industries Best open with plenty of Place a 25 word Fuel Discounts, freight & great pay! classified ad in Bonus Programs 800-277-0212 or over 250 newspaand Home Weekly. www.primeinc.com pers in Iowa for 25+, 2yrs OTR, (INCN) only $300. Find CDL-A Call 866out more by calling STABLE 800-227-7636 or 946-4322 www.fcc- DriverCAREER, NO this newspaper. inc.com (INCN) E X P E R I E N C E www.cnaads.com Driver- Build Your NEEDED! Sign On (INCN) Own Hometime! Bonuses Available! Part-time, Full- Top Industry pay & 500$ Loan service. training. No credit refused. time, Express & quality Casual lanes! Daily 100% Paid CDL Fast and secure. or Weekly Pay. Training 800-326- Easy on the budg7 7 8 et. Modern equipment! 2 Payments CDL-A, 3 months www.JoinCRST.co spread out over recent experience m (INCN) three months. Toll required. 800-414free: 1-855-6269569. www.dri- I N S T R U C T I O N , 4 3 7 3 . v e k n i g h t . c o m SCHOOLS LoanHere.com (INCN) (INCN) ALLIED HEALTH Drivers– Midwest regional, IA, NE, SD, MN, WI, IL. THANK YOU Great home time, Harrison County Humane Society practical mile pay. would like to give a big Thank you to 99¢ fuel for lease Christy Mentink, Mason Mentink, ops. 2011 & 2012 Malachi Mentink, Matt Monahan, trucks. 888-514- Victoria Thompson, Nate Thompson, Krysta Jensen and Kaylyn Jensen of 6005 (INCN) Fairgrounds Des Moines, Iowa Over 300 Talented Exhibitors Fri. 5-9, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4, Adm. $6, with this ad $5 Fantastic Holiday Shopping. (INCN)

the Woodbine 4H club for helping us remove donated fencing from the donors property last Saturday. We couldn’t have done it without you.

Chadron State College CSC is accepting applications for the following positions to be located in Chadron: • Information Technology Suppport Specialist • Network Administrator. For a complete listing of job requirements and application procedures, visit our website at www.cssc.edu/hr/jobs or email hr@cac.edu. CSC is an EOE. Applicants who need a reasonable accomodation during the selection process may contact HR at (308) 4326224 for assistance

Now Accepting Applications For: 1 bedroom apartment at Boyer View Apts., Logan, IA. Quiet complex, stove & refrigerator furnished. Rent based on income. 62 years or older or persons with disabilities of any age. Call 1-712-647-2113 or 1-800-762-7209. Boyer View is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

IOWA

BLACK FRIDAY TAILGATE PARTY @ Bunk House Cafe 501 Walker St • Woodbine, IA 712-647-2711 November 25 • Kickoff @ 11:00 am Beer • Wine • Food Thanksgiving Day Dinner November 24 Free Will Offering Proceeds go to help those in need.

NEBRASKA Boustead Real Estate Services APPRAISALS, CONSULTING, MANAGEMENT & SALES

www.Bousteadrealestateservices.com 1221 Imperial Place, Pisgah - 28 acres w/3 bed, 2 ba. home, 1200 s.f., 3 car gar. restored barn! Beautiful views!................$198,900 NEW LISTING: 35-11th St.....a beautifully maintained true ranch with 2-3 bedrooms, main floor laundry, open kitchen/dining/living room, laminate flooring. Come and see the updates 3229 210th Street, Woodbine 8.86 acres, with 2 bedroom home, horse barn, numerous updates! .....................................$105,999

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16

November 23, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Physical Therapy Center at Woodbine Clinic To Open November 28, 2011 Physical Therapists will begin seeing patients at our new Alegent Woodbine Clinic location on Monday, November 28, 2011 Our therapists are licensed professionals who are experts in musculoskeletal dysfunctions. They are trained to analyze movement and identify abnormal mechanics. From this assessment they will treat a dysfunction with manual skills that will accelerate the recovery process. To enhance this treatment, the therapist will design a specific exercise program that the patient may execute independently. We treat a wide range of dysfunctions from neurological injuries to sports injuries and wound care.

Susie Kenealy Mo. Valley Wellness Center PT Secretary. Born and raised in Missouri Valley, Susie has been employed at Alegent 5 years. She has a BA in Accounting and is an active member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Mo. valley. She enjoys sports,reading and spending time with family. Married to Mike, daughter Julia. She is always ready to help admit patients.

Mark Sherer PT, DPT Doctorate of Physical Therapy from UNMC, BS degree in Exercise Science from Wayne State College. With Alegent 4 months. Mark is married and enjoys helping his patients reach their functional goals. Physical Therapy Staff. Left to right are Mark Shearer, PT, Deb Garrett PTA; Heather Fogelman PT and Susie Kenealy, Dept. Secretary Debbie Garrett, PTA Associate Degree from WITCC, Sioux City, Iowa 1966. Debbie has been iwht Alegent for 5 years. She loves travel and SHOPING and enjoys making friends with the patients she treats.

Heather Fogelman, PT, Graduate from the College of Scholastica in duluth, MN. Heather has over 10 years of being a PT, and has worked for Alegent for 6 years. She loves spending time with her family, camping, traveling, shopping and reading. “I love being a PT because I get to work one on one with patients to increase their function and improve their quality of life.”

Woodbine Alegent Health personnel include back row, left to right: Rachel Davis, B. J. Oster, Aileen Heffernan and Michelle Brunow Front row: Christy Jackson and Dr. Enrique Cohen

CLINIC INFORMATION The Alegent Health Rural Clinics are devoted to providing exceptional care to Harrison County and surrounding communities. Our physicians include family practice, internal medicine and obstetrics/gynecology. Each Clinic has a team including a physician, and physician assistant or nurse practitioner, all having the expertise to prevent, diagnose and treat a wide variety of conditions. Patients of all ages may see one of our providers for services that include preventative care, health screenings, x-ray, laboratory and minor surgical procedures.

This Is Your Healthcare Missouri Valley Clinic Located in Hospital (712) 642-2794 Logan Clinic 122 West 8th Street (712) 644-3288

Alegent Health Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th Street (712) 642-2784

Woodbine Clinic 518 Lincolnway St. (712) 647-2566 Dunlap Clinic 707 Iowa Avenue (712) 643-2298

Woodbine Twiner 11-23-11  

Woodbine Twiner 11-23-11

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